TEACHING OUTLINE
TEACHING OUTLINE
TEACHING STRATEGIES
Set Induction:

In the last class we looked at how to evaluate different types of activities that you could use to develop an exercise program. Today instead of going outside we are going to get right into Chapter 14 which is designing your own program. I wanted to do this while the elements and concepts are still fresh in you head from the last class. Now who can remember some of the principles and activities that we discussed in class last time?

 

I. Develop a Total Fitness Program. 

You should consider four specific areas in designing your total personal

fitness program.

A. Health related fitness activities.

B. Sports skill you have or desire.

C. Stress diversion activities.

D. Good nutrition.

 

II. Starting Your Program.

Basic guidelines to follow when beginning a personal fitness program

include:

A. Determine the need for a medical examination.

B. Conduct a fitness evaluation.

C. Set realistic goals for yourself.

    1. You must decide if you want to improve each component of physical
    2. fitness, or

    3. Do you want to improve one or two components while maintaining the
rest.
  1. Select activities that will help you reach your goals. An exercise program
that will benefit you must follow the principles of: 1. Overload the body system that you want to improve.

2. Progressively demand more of the body system.

    1. It should only improve the specific part of the body that it was
designed to.

 

III. Designing Your Personal Fitness Program.
  1. Your current level of physical fitness should be the basis for designing
you future program. B. Remember to set realistic goals.

C. Steps in developing your personal fitness program are.

1. Evaluate your present level of fitness.

2. Set goals for yourself.

3. Select activities to improve your level of fitness.

4. Design your fitness program based on the training principles.

5. Plan periodic assessment of your progress.

 

IV. Keep It Going.

A. Fight boredom with variety.

1. Vary your activities.

2. Vary your workout partners.

3. Vary the places you choose to workout.

4. Exercise with a friend.

B. Record keeping.

    1. Keeping records will help you monitor your progress through your
program. 2. Can help motivate you even if you canít see results immediately.

 

V. Summary.

  1. A total fitness program should involve activities that meet personal
needs in four areas: 1. Health related.

2. Sports skills.

3. Nutrition.

4. Stress management.

B. Follow five basic steps before beginning your personal fitness program.

1. Evaluate your present level of fitness.

2. Set goals for yourself.

3. Select activities to improve your level of fitness.

4. Design your fitness program based on the training principles.

    1. Plan periodic assessment of your progress.
 

Closure:

Who can remember some of the fitness principles that I wanted you to put into and exercise program? Why is it important to include something from each principle into a workout program? Remember, on Tuesday we are dressing out and will meet outside. If anyone needs equipment for their portion of the class see me on the way out and I will have it for you.

  • State days objectives.
  • Ask students questions to involve them and to relate to their experiences.
  • Go into class discussion on the types and benefits of different activities.
  • Use transparencies on the overhead.
  • Break up into groups for activity.
  • Have activity expectations put up on overhead or on poster boards so they can see them.
  • Discuss the work that the groups have done in class.
  • Closure.
  • Review the days lesson.
  • Get the class involved.
  • Hand out the review sheet before the kids leave.
 
 
EVALUATION OF ACTIVITIES
CLASSROOM

 EQUIPMENT NEEDED:
For this class I will need an overhead projector, transparencies to use on the projector, and books for each student if they need them. The students will need a piece of paper and something to write with in each group.

OBJECTIVES:
MOTOR:
None.
COGNITIVE:
The student will be able to restate the concepts covered in the chapter verbally to the teacher in classroom discussion as well as be able to begin assessing their own fitness and workout regimens and putting them into a fitness program in the group activities.
AFFECTIVE:
The student will be able to listen in class and follow the teachers directions as well as cooperate in a group setting with their other classmates in completing the class assignment.

SOURCES USED:
Williams, Harageones, Johnson, and Smith. (1995) Personal Fitness: Looking Good, Feeling Good Dubuque, IA: Kendal/Hunt Publishing Company. Pp. 236-252

Seaton, Schmottlach, McManama, Clayton, Leibee, and Messersmith. (1992). Physical Education Handbook. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Zakrajsek, Carnes, Pettigrew. (1994). Quality Lesson Plans for Secondary Physical Education. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics. Pp. 233-258

PREREQUISITES:
The students should have the understanding of the previous chapters in the book, especially chapter 13, Evaluating Fitness Concepts, the skills of reading and writing, and basic communication skills such as the ability to speak in complete sentences and comprehend verbal cues and instruction given to them.
 
 

 DESIGNING YOU OWN PROGRAM
PROGRESSION OF TASKS AND METHODS
COGNITIVE CONCEPTS
QUESTIONS AND APPLICATIONS
SET INDUCTION:
  • See teaching outline.
  • Putting the fitness concepts into your own fitness program.
  • Who can remember some of the fitness principles that we discussed in the last class that are important in considering when designing you own program? 
 
OVERHEAD WORK:

 

 

 

 

 

  • Overview of lesson and concepts discussed in chapter 14 and the things to look for in designing your own program.
 
  • Why is it important to set realistic goals for your fitness program?
  • Why is it important to do periodic assessments of you progress?
  • What were the four areas that a total fitness program should look at?
  • Who can tell me some of the five steps that you should take before beginning your fitness program? 
 
GROUP WORK:
Activity one.
See sheet at end of lesson.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Designing a personal fitness program.
 
  1. Choose a goal for your personal fitness program. Ex. - To loose 10 pounds before spring break, or to prepare for a try-out for an athletic team.
  2. What activities are you going to do in this program (jogging, weight training, sport specific drills, stretching warm-ups and cool downs, etc.) and what areas do they fall under (cardiovascular fitness, strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, etc.)
  3. How long will this program last?
  4. How many days a week will you work out and how many days of rest will you get?
5. Chart out your program:
GROUP ACTIVITY.
Activity two.
See sheet at end of lesson.

 

 
 
 

  • Designing a presentation to display and present one aspect of the groups fitness program.
  1. Choose one area of your program to present in class on Tuesday. (A stretching routine, a specific drill, a cardiovascular exercise, a calisthenics routine, etc.)
  2. Be prepared to give a verbal explanation of your activity. What it is, what areas it works or concentrates on, etc.
  3. Be prepared to give a demonstration of your activity.
  4. You will then instruct the rest of the class as they participate and perform your activity. 
GROUP PRESENTATION OF ACTIVITY.

 

 
 
 

  • Students will show and discuss the work they have just done in their groups.
  • What is the goal of your fitness program?
  • What fitness concepts did you use in planning out your program?
  • What is the intensity and duration of your program?
  • What are you going to present on Tuesday for us to participate in?
LESSON CLOSURE.
  • See teaching outline.
  • Reviewing the chapter and setting up the next class.
  • See Teaching outline.
  •  

     

     

     

    ACTIVITY 1:
    1. Choose a goal for your personal fitness program. Ex. - To loose 10 pounds before spring break, or to prepare for a try-out for an athletic team.

    2. What activities are you going to do in this program (jogging, weight training, sport specific drills, stretching warm-ups and cool downs, etc.) and what areas do they fall under (cardiovascular fitness, strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, etc.)

    3. How long will this program last?

    4. How many days a week will you work out and how many days of rest will you get?

     Chart out your program:
    Example Chart:
    ACTIVITY
    M
    T
    W
    H
    F
    SA
    SU
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
                   
     
    ACTIVITY 2:
     1.  Choose one area of your program to present in class on Tuesday. (A stretching routine, a specific drill, a cardiovascular exercise, a calisthenics routine, etc.)
     2.  Be prepared to give a verbal explanation of your
          activity. What it is, what areas it works or concentrates
          on, etc.
     3.   Be prepared to give a demonstration of your activity.
     

    4.   You will then instruct the rest of the class as they
          participate and perform your activity.