Hanad's Legacy Lives On in Davenport Breeding
by Robert J. Cadranell II
Used by Permission of RJCadranell II
all rights reserved
           Among the most widely known of all Davenport stallions was Hanad, AHC #489. One of the highlights of the famous Sunday shows at the Kellogg Ranch, Hanad also appeared in motion pictures, merited awards in horse shows, and established himself as one of the more important early American sires.

          Hanad, like so many other early Davenports, was bred at the renowned Hingham Stock Farm of Peter B. Bradley in Hingham, Mass. Bradley, owner of a profitable fertilizer firm, was able to afford whatever he wanted in horses.

          His facilities were vast and housed trotters, polo ponies, Thoroughbreds, and mustangs, in addition to his Arabian collection.

          Hanad's sire, *Deyr, was Bradley's favorite from among the imported Davenport Arabians and enjoyed the heaviest use at Hingham of any Arabian stallion save *Hamrah, also represented in Hanad's pedigree. Hanad traced in tail-female to *Wadduda, favorite war mare of the supreme Sheikh of the 'Anazah tribes, Hakim Bey Ibn Mhayd.

          This eminent Bedouin no doubt had many mares from which to choose, and his selection of *Wadduda is a testament to the mare's agility, endurance, intelligence, soundness, and tractability. This latter quality helped to make Hanad famous, and it may well be that he inherited part of it from *Wadduda, along with some of her beauty.

          *Wadduda is the victim of several unfortunate photographs, making her appear somewhat plain. Cameras more often than not distort their subjects, and modern breeders would do well to recall the number of attempts required to obtain even one representive photograph of their own horses. They also ought to recall how many photographs of themselves they either throw out or refuse to show.

          Archie Geer, first cousin to Homer Davenport and a guest at the Davenport farm, knew *Wadduda and rode her there. He always spoke of her to his family as the most beautiful of all Davenport's horses.

          Modern writers who rave about the beauty of the Davenport mares *Urfah and *Abeyah while ignoring *Wadduda ought to take Geer's statement into account. Stallions as stunningly magnificent as Antez, Hamwad, and Hanad do not stem from plain mares.

          Although the Hingham Stock Farm bred Hanad, he was foaled elsewhere. His dam Sankirah went with a large consignment of Hingham Arabians to John G. Winant of Concord, N.H., in 1921.

          This gentleman was U.S. ambassador to Great Britain during World War II, following a stint as the governor of New Hampshire. Mrs Winant retained a few of the Arabians for a number of years, but the bulk of the horses went in 1922 to Morton S. Hawkins of Portland, Ind., and it was in that state that Hanad was foaled.

          Unfortunately for the horses, Hawkins soon went to federal prison. The animals were neglected and scattered, sold to those willing to pay their outstanding feed bills.

          That winter Dr. Charles D. Pettigrew of Muncie bought Sankirah and her foal Hanad, debilitated to the point where he could not stand. He was strapped to a drag and pulled from the pasture.

          Pedigrew owned Hanad for four years. Under his ownership Hanad had his start as a breeding stallion. Herbert V. Tormohlen of the respected Ben Hur farm brought him his first mares, and Pettigrew also used him at home.

          Pettigrew sold Hanad in 1927 to Charles W. Jewett, a mayor of Indianapolis. At Jewett's Arlington Farm, Hanad was ridden some and continued his career at stud, siring foals for Jewett, Tormohlen, and the early Midwestern breeder John A. George.

          Hanad was not to remain long with Jewett, however. Arlington Farm was becoming surrounded with newly built houses, and Jewett decided to sell his Arabians in 1929. In July of that year W.K. Kellogg and his manager Herbert H. Reese inspected the Jewett Arabians.

          They obviously liked what they saw, for Kellogg bought the entire lot of 11 head, four of which were 100 percent Davenport in pedigree. The balance were of mainly Davenport breeding.

          Hanad arrived in Pomona on Aug. 19, having been shipped by rail. It was at the Kellogg Ranch that Hanad made his fame.

          Manager Reese was quite complimentry, writing of him years later that

              "his best points were a good shoulder and exceptionally beautiful, high carriage of tail, and his disposition was all that was ever claimed for the breed by its most enthusiastic admirers...Hanad proved to be adaptable to any sort of training of an unusual sort, such as "jumping rope' under saddle, doing the Spainish walk, standing on a pedestal, and so on.

              "His calm disposition was never flustered by noise, crowds or strange surroundings, yet he was always spirited and full of "go," making him ideal as an exhibition horse.

              "He took part in practically all the shows, parades and motion picture work away from the ranch as well as doing his specialties in the Sunday exhibitions...Hanad played a noteworthy part in acquainting the public with the virtues of the Arabian breed, and he also contributed as a sire."

          Hanad also was trained as a five-gaited horse and for driving.

          Hanad was judged champion stallion at the Los Angeles County Fair in 1929, 1930 and 1932. In 1930 his daughter Valencia received the champion mare award.

          Hanad also appeared in numerous fairs as part of a traveling Kellogg show. These animals did not compete in the regular classes, but delighted audiences with their specialty acts. Hanad and the Kellogg string journeyed as far from their home base in Pomona as Tennessee and Washington state.

          Hanad posed in publicity photographs with the 1930 Rose Queen and actress Laura LaPlante. In 1931 actress Marguerite Churchill presented him in a Sunday show. She later reminisced:

              "I wanted to show horses and, eventually, I managed to get to the class where Kellogg Ranch invited me to ride Hanad. It was probably the greatest joy of my life (even now) to be mounted on that lovely stallion...He, unlike many Arabians, had been trained to the five gaits, and I was also able to do that.

              "I went many times to the stables, training with a fine man, I believe called Smith, to show me the fine points of Hanad. It was not a small triumph to make the show on two Sundays showing Hanad. I hope well, and myself as well as I could... I recall the terrible heat there when coming out for my lessons, but, of course, when the "show" was on, I thought of how I was doing, well or poorly, and wanting so much to let everyone see that I was able to show Hanad at his best.

              "I believe at that time he was valued at $25,000, and not just for that, but because he was so beautiful, I tried to be worthy of him."

          Actor John Davis Lodge appeared in "The Scarlet Empress" with Marlene Dietrich and Hanad. He also left notes attesting to Hanad's qualities.

              "It was my good fortune to ride Hanad in several of the scenes of the picture. It was my first experience riding an Arabian stallion.

              "Having ridden a good deal and loving horses, I was greatly impressed by the beauty, strength, and agility of this stallion. He was well-trained and handled easily. I have never encountered a horse with his beautiful, restrained gallop.

              "One day, when we were filming the scene in which I escort Marlene Dietrich to Moscow, the ground was heavily covered with cornflakes, simulating snow. The scene called for a fast gallop around the bend of the castle.

              "It was wet and slippery underfoot. Hanad's legs skidded right from under him and he landed on one side, pinning my legs to the ground; yet he sprang up so quickly that we we off again - in full gallop. I do believe that, with most horse, it might have been a dangerous accident."

          Hanad sired 23 Arabian foals during his time at Kelloggs, though one of these, Sanad, came from Arlington Farm in-utero. An article in the Journal of the Arab Horse Society, apparently written during his years as a sire at Kelloggs, stated that "Hanad is siring well-proportioned colts with a maximum of quality and natural style."

          The widely known author and artist Gladys Brown Edwards first became involved with Arabians through Hanad. In 1932 she bred her part-Thoroughbred mare to Hanad, and kept the foal at the Kellogg Ranch after it was born.

          That she chose Hanad over the famous stallions *Raseyn, *Ferdin and *Nasik is a testament to Hanad's type, quality, and the brillant beauty that he possessed.

          She described him as "a stylish horse, and very trainable." while crediting him with 73 champions descending in the tail-male line.

          Late in 1935 Kelloggs was requested to provide two horses to lead the procession into the Rose Bowl game on New Year's Day. The ranch sent Hanad and *King John.

          One of the spectators, W.C.Stroube, saw Hanad there and felt he must own him. Stoube, a Texas oil man, appeared at Kelloggs the next day, insistent on the purchase of Hanad. After some deliberation, Kelloggs decided that they had enough of his get and could train a young horse to replace him as a performer.

          One wonders what Stroube paid to wrest Hanad from the Kellogg Ranch. A week after his visit he owned the stallion.

          Stroube kept Hanad for seven years, during which time he got only four foals, all from mares that Stroube had purchased as yearlings from Kelloggs with Hanad. In 1943 William States Jacobs bought Hanad, retaining him until 1946. Hanad sired no foals under the ownership of Jacobs.

          In 1946 Hanad, at the age of 24, found his last owner. John and Alice Payne drove to Texas to buy Hanad and bring him to their ranch in Whittier, Calif. They found that he had sustained a broken front leg at some point during his Texas sojourn. To buy him Alice Payne had to exercise her full powers of persuasion, but in the end she was successful.

          Hanad was quite old by this time, having very few stud seasons left to him. Despite the handicap of age, he managed to sire as many foals during his second stay in California as he had during his first.

          Hanad and *Nuri Pasha are the oldest animals with progeny in Volume VII of the studbook, yet *Nuri Pasha has only one foal to Hanad's 13.

          Hanad was not immune to time, but he still managed to impress those who saw him. Following is Mrs. Milton V. Thompson's account of Hanad in old age:

              "We traveled 5,000 miles to see old Hanad, *Raseyn and *Aziza at Payne's...It was worth it.

              "Hanad is a terrific, bombastic horse, 27 years old, who snorts fire and brimstone with every breath out of those beautiful "picture" nostrils of his. When Alice Payne brought this proud beauty out of the barn he was prancing high, wide and handsome, with that broken right front leg going just as high as the good legs. He is 14.2 - a rich, dark chestnut.

              "One morning I got up at the crack of dawn to see Hanad. I looked at him for two-and-a-half hours straight, made some sketches of that wonderful head of his. He rolled over nine times.

              "Where he broke his leg nobody seems to know. He was once one of the famous trick horses at Kelloggs, as the picture in the studbook shows him jumping rope.

              "He was once sold for $10,000, years ago, and his history has been vague since. right now Hanad is enjoying a wave of popularity in the West, rivaling anything he knew at his peak as a dressage horse. And no wonder.

              "He is a very prepotent old guy- I picked out unknown colts as Hanad colts when they were his grandchildren. The Hanad colts are at a premium.

              "In fact, we saw none for sale. Everyone wants one, including Milton and Virginia T., and his colts are spoken for when the mare is bred. People just seem to be waking up to what a great horse he is."

          Hanad died on Nov. 6, 1949, at the Payne Ranch. He was 27. He got a lifetime total of 57 foals, a respectable figure in a time when Arabians were something of a rarity.

          Many of the Hanad sons became honored sires in their own right. Ameer Ali stood with Dr. Glass in Oklahoma.

          Mahomet grew into a key sire for his breeder, J.A.George, while Aabab filled the same position for the Tormohlens. Sanad headed the small but influential program of Mr. and Mrs J.N.Clapp.

          Cliff and Mollie Latimer of British Columbia, Canada, adored their Adounad, writing that it was "interesting to correspond with owners of other sons of Hanad and to find they were as pleased with their results as we have been."

          Hasab stood for years with Mrs. Beverly Young. Ibn Hanad created a veritable dynasty of champions for Margaret Shuey's Sunny Acres program., and Hanrah's son Ibn Hanrah did the same for Gerald Donoghue's program. Tripoli headed the Craver breeding project until his death at 29, and all but a handful of the living 100 percent Davenport horses trace to him, and thus to Hanad.

          The Hanad daughters were notable good producers. Show winnings are only one of many methods used to eveluate Arabian horses, yet they seem to be the method of choice for a great portion of today's breeders.

          For some years running, The Arabian Horse World has printed lists of mares who have produced four or more champions. Our current Class "A" show system is a relatively recent creation, and Hanad was rather an early sire to be expected to have daughters on this list.

          His last three foal crops contained a combined total of but 10 fillies, yet two of them (20 percent) appear on this list of top-producing mares. Three Hanad granddaughters appear, again from Hanad progeny produced during his later years after he left the Kellogg Ranch.

          To name a few individual daughters, Valencia, Rokhalda, Nadda, and Rifnada were all Kellogg broodmares. Raadah went to the W.R. Hearst stables.

          John A. George had Dowhana and Chrallah, with Chrallah later going to Roger Selby. The Tormhhlens retained Aabann. Schiba became a significant foundation mare for Dr. Krausnick, while Charles Craver was able to secure Dhanad and Hantarah for his Davenport program after they had spent many years producing at the Sullivan Ranch in California.

          The 75 percent Davenport Ganada, Hanad's last foal, was a show horse and broodmare for John Rogers. Her full sister Hanida did the same for the Mekeels.

          She was the first Reserve Pacific Coast Champion mare. Hanida produced five champions, while Ganada had six.

          From the above, it will be seen that Hanad was most admired for his beauty, his ability under saddle, his amenable disposition, and the quality of his get, both as individuals and as breeding stock. This is especially noteworthy since Hanad was extremely close to desert horses in terms of generations of removal.

          One often reads, and more often hears, that strictly desert-bred stock does not appeal to American tastes, and is not as attractive as the "big, bold, and beautiful" Arabian show horse of today. Hanad's record, and the records of many other animals close to their Bedouin-bred origins, make such claims appear uninformed, if not ludicrous.

Back to: Articles of History
Back to: Craver Chronicles

The Kellogg Davenports

Peter Bradley:The Forgotten Man

Pat Payne & Tripoli

Those Davenport X's

Arabian Visions






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