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Gee... it's the Mighty GSX "G"

This page has been read times since its creation on 31 Dec 2002
This page was last updated on 12 Jan 2004


RALLY LATEST

The rally schedules for the USA and Germany are now available. You can also read about earlier G Rallies.


My Baby G... ain't she pretty
David Goh, the Singapore Where is Singapore??? G-Man

While I very much prefer to have a Honda tourer, I love riding this unique motorcycle.  Using a chassis of the standard "naked" bike, slap on the robust and powerful engine from the Suzuki R1100 racing series, tuned it for strong low and midrange power, jam on a shaft drive instead of a chain drive, and voila, you have the GSX1100G. 

My "G" sports a 1127cc four-stroke four-cylinder 16-valve, oil-/air-cooled dual-overhead-cam (DOHC) engine with twin-swirl combustion chambers (TSCC).  It is said to be put out a maximum power output of about 112 HP... I won't know how to measure that, but this bike climbs hills effortlessly, and I have personally pushed it past the 200 km/h mark before.  The fuel consumption is comparable to a small (litre-class) car: with good premium gasoline, the 18-litre tank will go about 200+ kilometres in the city before needing a top up (less if regular petrol is used); less if riding long-haul on the highways.






top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories


















top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories

  About the GSX1100G

sugsx110.jpeg (12788 bytes)Unfortunately, this bike was born at a time when this sort of bike was going out of favour.   Though Suzuki tried to offer the add-on options like luggage bags and full fairing.   The range of accessories wasn't bad: one could fit up the GSX1100G like a fully packed up "land yacht", to a back-and-forth commuter, to a wide-band sport-tourer, making the bike pretty versatile.  However, against the onslaught of fully fitted full-fairing fully-dressed tourers that had had come into vogue (e.g. Goldwing, ST1100) or the "crotch rockets" sport motorcycles (e.g. ZX, GSX-R, CBR), and being a basic no-frills motorcycle, it obviously had a very small and limited market, never was a big seller, and was consequently left out.  The model existed for a very short duration from 1991 to 1993 in the USA, or till 1994 outside USA. 

There again, one wonders how it could have gone out of fashion, given that such naked bikes like the Suzuki Bandits (GSXs) and the Honda Super Fours (and CB's) remain fairly popular... and in recent years, there has been a renaissance of naked bikes!  See the current crop of such bikes:

Suzuki GSX1400 Suzuki Bandit 1200 Honda CB1300 Honda CB400 Super Four Hyper-VTEC Honda Hornet CB900F Honda Hornet CB250 Honda CB750 (not NightHawk variant)

My suggestion to the Suzuki Motor Corporation

If you damned people are reading, please this bike is a great bike. I'm sure you could do is come up with a worthy successor to the mighty GSX1100G... or at the very least, come up with a shaft drive option for the GSX1400!



top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories
























top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories

The Story of "Standard" Motorcycles

In term of appearance, the "street standard" were pretty basic bikes, designed back when function dictated form. The gas tank sat above the engine to allow the gas to run down into the carburetors. The way the human body bends pretty much dictated the placement of the rest of the parts. As motorcycles became more specialized in the 1980s, the look of motorcycles changed. Motorcyclists were so excited by new developments that we didn't realize we were losing something in the process. Then one day in the late 1980s, we realized that the basic bike no longer existed. Motorcyclists began complaining about this situation, and soon the Japanese designed bikes that embodied the virtues of those older models.

Suzuki, in an attempt to recapture the sales success it had enjoyed with its big GS series of the 1970s and 1980s, brought out the GSX1100G, a big, 1980s-style standard with a modern, single-shock rear suspension. On paper, the Suzuki fulfilled every requirement those clamoring for standard bikes claimed to need from a bike.

But the GSX was even less successful than the VX. The reason probably involved the bike's appearance. At the risk of offending loyal GSX riders, many people considered the bike to be goofy-looking. One magazine wag even suggested they take the coloring crayon away from the designer who conceived the machine.

Honda was the first Japanese manufacturer to find relative success in the standard bike market, with its Nighthawk CB750. Here was a bike that offered the versatility UJMs (universal japanese motorcycle) were known for and looked good doing it. Perhaps the factor that contributed most to the bike's success was its low price. In this case, you really did get your money's worth.

These were, and still are, great value for the money.

While the Nighthawk was the first modern Japanese standard to hold its own in the marketplace, it never set any kind of sales records. It seemed the standard might once again disappear from the market, had a couple of manufacturers not rethought the concept.

First Yamaha introduced the Seca II 600. At first glance, this nimble, fun bike might not be considered a standard, since it included a small, frame-mounted fairing (a device that protects riders from the elements).

Fairings: The devices mounted at the front of a motorcycle to protect the rider from the elements. These range from simple, Plexiglas shields mounted to the handlebars to complex, encompassing body panels that shroud the entire front half of the bike. Bikes without any type of fairing are known as "naked" bikes.

But riders didn't care; the fairing just added to the bike's practicality. It seemed that being naked (without fairing) was not a prerequisite for a standard. Suzuki also realized this and brought out its Bandit series. These bikes are comfortable motorcycles that incorporate the best technology available, a useful fairing, and a reasonable price. So far, they have been sales successes.

The latest in the line of naked bikes is the GSX1400. Apparently this is not available in USA, though the boys in Europe are apparently very happy with it!




top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories














top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories

Back to the G - big bad naked bike with a shaft drive

However for those who have used bikes shaft drives, they love and appreciate its maintenance free nature.  Think of it this way: no messy oily chain to lubricate, and no grease/oil being flung off the chains and soiling the bike and/or rider(s), and only periodic replacement of the shaft oil.  Then there's the massive 100+ horses generated by this litre-class engine, combined with the shaft drive gives tremendous torque and sheer power and enough speed to make your head spin!  The G has got breath-taking acceleration and it's rock steady, thanks to the rake of the fork.

Like any bike, there are always weaknesses.  The G is long and heavy.  The G has weak original fork springs, combined with the heavy weight (230+ kilogrammes or 500+ pounds!).  While the fork rake angle gives steady straight-line riding, taking it around the twisty roads takes strength and good handling techniques, though changing the fork oil to a heavier one (7 to 10 SAE) or replacing the fork with stiffer aftermarket ones will improve steering handling.  The long rake also means that the turning radius is pretty long.  Try manouvering the G into confined parking spaces and you'll know what I mean.  Also when taking corners, it is highly advisable not to tip this bike too low or go too fast as the clearance is not that high.   I've already scraped my centrestand, the bolts holding the exhaust pipe, and my footpegs from going in too low.  The G was not designed as a racing machine, it would be dangerous if one tried to use it as one.

Overall, this is a good bike to ride and commute with.   Comfortable, powerful, steady.  Most of all, on the practical side, it is all paid up and its all mine, and its relatively easy to maintain.





Historic Suzuki Motorcycles

Predecessors and successors in the GS/GSX range





top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories




























top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories




























top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories





























top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories






























top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories




























top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories

























top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories




















top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories

My Fittings and Modifications

Parts, parts, parts...

Given the rarity of the model, especially in Singapore, some resourcefulness is needed when it comes to replacement components.  Go to the Singapore agent for Suzuki bikes and parts and ask for GSX1100G parts and he will laugh in your face... and say "is there such a bike?!"

Some components of the GSX1100G are still used in other Suzuki bike models (brake cylinders and seals, fork springs and seals, carburettor components, engine valve rocker assemblies), so having the part number helps.   Other parts need to be adapted from other Suzuki bikes (handlebar controls, rear suspension, speedometer cable), so it is very much a case of stripping off the part, going to the agent, and asking if he has "anything like that, or something similar".   Then one might even have to sometimes adapt from other makes and models of bikes, or try alternative aftermarket sources.

I'm no expert, so if you need help, check with your mechanics, or if you want, visit mine at Belwin Motors, 1 Syed Alwi Road, #01-04 Song Lin Building, Singapore 207628 (speak to David Mah).

There are also the valuable on-line resources (see below).  It is possible to purchase the Service Manual and the microfiche of the Parts List and Diagrams through the Internet.

Long road to recovery

This bike came as scrap, or at least on the verge of being turned into a little cube of scrap metal.   The previous owner did not take good care of the bike, due to corrosion, the tank rusted through, and after a half-hearted attempt to patch that, simply left the bike to stand for years.  With a haul-to-scrap-or-salvage deal, the junk came for free.   But to resuscitate and restore it took time and some money.

gsxg-crap1.jpg (10692 bytes) gsxg-crap3.jpg (9448 bytes)
the junk heap when I first received it; the deboned G half-way through restoration
gsxg-crap2.jpg (4804 bytes) gsxg-fixed5.jpg (7766 bytes)
rusted through tank and warped side panel before (left) and after repairs beautifully restored (right)

To took months of work...

  • Hauling the scrap heap to the workshop
  • Testing to see whether the engine was salvageable (fortunately yes, otherwise it was straight to the scrap metal dealer and yet another haulage fee...)
  • Finding a source for the GSX1100G service manual and parts microfiche (then another hunt find someone who print out the microfiche to normal paper)
  • Welding work for the tank and and remoulding and repainting work on plastic parts damaged by gasoline
  • Finding a source for the parts and components that needed to be replaced, both in Singapore and outside.
  • Solving a problem manifested itself as loss of power from engine imbalance, overheating or abnormally very high engine running temperatures, spark plug fouling and smoky exhaust.  After months of tracking down and eliminating problem by problem, the root cause was found to be due to air leaks around the carbuerettors, especially in the "pipes" (that what the parts manual calls it; actually the rubber parts that connect the carbuerettors to the engine block).  This was solved by applying industrial/automotive heat resistant glue, otherwise known as "engine block sealant".  After that to fine-tune the bike back to mint condition, it meant resetting all the jet settings to standard factory specification (the earlier owner/mechanics had been twiddling with this), replacing all the spark plugs with slightly hotter ones (see rated markings on the side of the plug), and then rebalancing of the carbuerettors. 

My Baby-G... ain't she pretty (oblique view) My Baby-G... ain't she pretty (side view)
and here is the beauty!

As you can see, the completed work was well worth the effort.  Today, the bike only means the usual maintenance.

For those who may be interested, here's a list of what was replaced, modified or added on:

Bike systems

  • Provided the original airbox is still present, replace original Suzuki air filter (Part No 13780-26D00) with the K&N washable reusable air filter, part number SU-1191 [old part number SU-0003]. This can be washed, dried, re-oiled... avoids having to continually look for replacement air filter elements which for this bike is somewhat difficult to find in Singapore)
    (K&N's tip to using their filters: Do not clean the K&N air filter too often.  In normal on-road applications, service your K&N Filter every 50,000 miles.  When a drop in performance is noticed, or the machine becomes hard to start, it is time to service the filter element. The dirt build-up actually helps stop more dirt and does not hinder the airflow.)
    Also
    see my comments having used this for a while now...
  • headlamp off switch (came from a Honda scrambler, needs some splicing of wires in the headlamp assembly) (in case battery is weak when starting engine)
  • two fuel filters, one before fuel pump, one after fuel pump (against particulate matter in fuel or tank or in the pump, to prevent carburettors from being jammed by particles)
  • original oil cooler hoses are only available in USA and had to be shipped in.  Note that there are two different lengths (corresponding to part numbers) depending on the year of production of the motorcycle.
  • spark plugs are hotter than the factory specified ones.   This is because the bike largely runs on short city trips, and it also speeds up the warming up of the engine.  If you tend to run long distances, then replace with cooler ones according to factory specifications.

Cosmetic/functionalgivsamp.jpeg (3151 bytes)

  • very large Givi windshield (less bugs and dirt in face, some wet weather protection)
  • Givi WingRack for hard case luggage on top and sides
  • Givi E21 hard saddlebags
  • Givi E50 top hard case (helmets, and when commuting to work, for my briefcase)
  • engine case guards custom made by Seng Kwang Metal (to protect engine against damage when it tips over) (as this is custom, you'll need to leave the bike there for a couple of days)
  • Fiamm CTE dual-tone electromagnetic horns - loud but harmonious sound; use the relay so as not to spoil the electrical contact in your handlebar controls.  Also don't remove your original horns, as these are required by LTA requirements. Afternote: I've replaced the Fiamms twice because they stopped working, probably due to internal corrosion. Since then, I've changed to the German-made Hella horns that are of better quality, last a lot longer in Singapore's humid conditions, and don't cost very much more. My favourite is the Twin-Tone Horn Kit ("Elektro-Zweiklang-Fanfaren Set", 12 volt).

Tyres

  • Fortunately, the GSX1100G has a similar wheel size to that of the Honda ST1100, making the tyres pretty common in Singapore, and are therefore easily sourced.
  • I've used the factory-specified tyres, but I didn't like them because their grip wasn't good.   The Dunlop K505 has since been succeeded by the D205:
    • Front Tire: Dunlop K505, 110/80 V18, inflation pressure 2.25 bar or 33psi
    • Rear Tire: Dunlop K505, 150/70 V17 (160/70 V17 can also be used),  recommended 2.5 bar or 37 psi, max 2.85 bar or 42psi
  • Metzeler tyres. I use the ME33/ME55 allround tyres. Good grip (confidence on the curves), excellent mileage, it is a reliable workshoe and really value for money.
    • front: ME 33 LASER 110/80 - 18 58V TL (tyre manufacturer recommended inflation pressure 2.25 bar or 33 psi)
    • rear: ME 55 A METRONIC 160/70 B 17 73V TL (tyre manufacturer recommended inflation pressure for dual riding 2.90 bar or 42 psi; riding solo, I use 2.5 bar)
  • other tyres available from Metzeler,
    • Z4 sports ("sport mileage") (approved by Metzeler)
      • Front: ME Z4 FRONT 110/80 ZR 18 (58W) TL 2.25 bar
      • Rear: ME Z4 160/70 ZR 17 73W TL 2.90 bar
    • Z2 sports (the tyre sizes have phased out)
      • Front: ME Z2 FRONT 110/80 ZR 18 (58W) TL 2.25 bar
      • Rear: ME Z2 160/70 ZR 17 73W TL 2.90 bar
    • Z6 sports (newly introduced, no certification. at the current time - Dec 2003 - there is still no rear tyre of the 160/70 size.).
      • Front: 110/80ZR18(58W)TL Roadtec Z6
      • Rear: not available
  • other tyres used by other G-men to date or recommended by tyre manufacturers:
    • Bridgestone BT45 or BT020
      • Front: BT020F 110/80ZR18 BW TL - 58W, max 42 psi
      • Rear: BT020R 160/70ZR17 BW TL - 73W, max 42 psi
    • Dunlop D205 (recommended by Dunlop)
      • Front:110/80ZR17 57W, loaded 36 psi (max 42)
      • Rear:160/70ZR17 73W, loaded/max 42psi
    • Michelin Macadam 50/50E (approved by Michelin or TÜV)
      • Front: 110/80 V 18 TL 110/80 - 18 58 V TL/TT MACADAM 50 E, 2.2 to 3.0 bar
      • Rear: 160/70 V 17 TL 160/70 - 17 73 V TL/TT MACADAM 50, 2.5 to 4.5 bar
    • Pirelli Dragon GTS (fitment recommended but not certified by Pirell)
      • Front 110/80ZR18TL 58W MTR23 - 2.25 BAR
      • Rear 160/70ZR17TL 73W MTR24 - 2.90 BAR
  • some other useful notes from Metzeler:
    • All Metzeler Tyre Fitments recommendations apply only to tyres which have been sold and fitted in Germany. 
    • If the intention is to switch over to tyres which have not been recorded in the vehicle documents then the original approval certificate must be requested from the manufacturer before switching over. Any restrictions or other requirements in respect of the switchover which may arise must be followed precisely. Where stated in the footnotes, the release certificates can be requested from METZELER. (meaning these recommendations have been certified in collaboration with the testing authorities and the manufacturer)
    • The "tyre fitment" only gives the information status at the time of the last database update. The definitive requirements for the switchover are the standards to be taken from the vehicle documents and release certificates at the time of the switchover. Technical advice must always be obtained if there is any doubt.
    • All pressure indications given in connection with specific bikes represent the values for dual riding.  Detailed information regarding pressure for riding solo and/or with luggage should be taken from the bike's manual. Many bikes have stickers on the rear swimng-arm or chainguard indicating the recommended pressures.
    • Check the inflation pressure once a week!
    • Always use a valve cap with rubber sealing!

Other street legal goodies you can add on!

  • K&N items (Singapore distributor: Sporting Motorcycles at 286 Lavender Street, Singapore 338803):
    • Air Filter: SU-1191
      • My experience: I am have been using the older model SU-0003 (now obsolete, replaced by SU-1191). The results have been excellent with some improvement over the stock filter with livlier response to the throttle. I have cleaned it several times (equivalent to replacing the original Suzuki paper filter at least twice!) with no adverse effects or degraded performance. Well worth the expense of getting one!!! Make sure your local mechanic is experienced in cleaning or recharging this air filter, otherwise you have to make sure that the local K&N filter supplier has the recharging kit. When recharging, go easy on the filter oil, otherwise you will foul your spark plugs!
    • Stage 1 Jet Kit: 81-9284
    • Stage 1 Jet Kit w/ Filter: 23-9284
    • Oil Filter: KN-138
      • My experience: this is crap!!! this can is made in Thailand and the quality is inferior to the original Suzuki filter which is made in Japan. after 5000 km, paint had flaked off or had been chipped off by debris thrown up by the front wheel, and the can was rusty (original Suzuki filter can has never ever rusted). the front nut which is supposed make it easy to remove without a special filter removal tool became stripped off the first time when trying to remove the filter! used a chain or belt wrench to loosen the filter (Suzuki original filter requires a tool to mate against the polygonal head). performance wise, it was not so good, with the engine sounding a little rougher after about 1000 km. Will never buy this again. I've since bought the original Suzuki filter tool (Suzuki part number 09915-40610, "oil filter wrench").
  • Xena Micro XM-1 alamed disc lock (available from Chong Aik) (tip: it is significantly cheaper to buy it in Singapore than to buy it from the US or Europe) (with the alarm, you won't forget to remove it before driving off!) (the alarm is triggered by an internal shock sensor, has a 1 second delay to allow installation and removal, and when triggered it will sound for 10-15 seconds and then re-set and re-arm)
    • My experience: somehow not so robust. try never to drop this, as it screws up the sensor and/or electronics...
  • A small sheet metal disc or plate, about 3 to 6 inches in diameter or size, obtainable as scrap from hardware stores specialising in metal rods and sheets.   This bike is awfully heavy and unless you are parked on a solid ground, you might come back and find your bike lying on its side, with the side stand buried in the ground... put this under your side stand when parking on relatiely soft ground.  Even on hard paved roads, over time parked over the same spot, my side stand has already made a deep impression in the bitumen... ha!






top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories

Maintenance

The most commonly maintained items are listed below (as listed in the service manual):

  • Engine oil - replace every 6000 km / 4000 miles or 12 months.
    • oil change only: 4.8 litres
    • oil filter change: 5.0 litres
  • Oil filter - replace every 12000 km / 7500 miles or 24 months. (memory tip: every 2 engine oil changes)
  • Air filter
    • if Suzuki original paper air filter (Part No 13780-26D00), inspect/clean every 6000 km / 4000 miles, or 12 months (memory tip: every engine oil change); replace every 18000 km / 11000 miles or 36 months (memory tip: every 3 engine oil changes).
    • if K&N air filter (SU-1191), inspect/clean every 6000 km / 4000 miles (memory tip: every engine oil change), full "recharge" if necessary (memory tip: usually every 3 engine oil changes).
  • Spark plugs - replace every 12000 km / 7500 miles or 24 months (memory tip: every 2 engine oil changes).

Not cleaning/changing the required items may lead to power loss.


Bibliography:

  • Suzuki Part No 99500-39103-03E, "Suzuki GSX1100G Service Manual"
  • Suzuki Part No 99520-01000-01E, "Suzuki Service Handbook: Motorcycle Troubleshooting - trouble diagnosis and emergency measures / trouble correction"






top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories






















top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories

Valuable "G" on-line Resouces

b1b7adeb.jpg (6775 bytes)You are entering the G zone...

Fresh off the presses in 2002, new owners of the GSX1100G should first check out our own domain at http://www.gsx1100g.com courtesy of Dave Hembroff (a.k.a. "DGmann").

It provide all you wanted to ever know abou the bike, as well as valuable information about service and maintenence tips and tricks gathered from many other owners of this bike.  You should register yourself and your bike in his owners' database... hey, be proud of your bike!

This site takes over from the original GSX1100G Worship Page (at http://www.reocities.com/MotorCity/7592 or http://www.reocities.com/mdgore.geo) established by a honourary G-man, Mike Gore. Sadly however, Mike has sold off his G and this website may eventually be taken down.

... where G-Men gather...

There is also the GSX1100G Yahoo! Group cum Bulletin Board
(at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/gsx1100g ), lovingly dubbed the
"G-Men's International GSX1100G Association".  Here, you can also meet the brotherhood of G-men - other owners of this machine. 

Also check out fellow G-Man Texmex's G Database (at http://www.csoft.net/~texmex), where useful information discussed at the Club has been collated and topped-off with a search engine.

Put it this way, putting my G into service has been one heck of a long adventure and getting to know the G-men and learn from them has been great!   It also helps if you have good mechanicsG RULES OK!

... and for the German speaking G-men...

Obviously, the German-speaking brothers will have a bit of a tough time communicating with the English-speaking brothers if their Englisch was rusty... and vice versa the Deutsch of the English.

So there is a home for them too. Visit the German G website at http://www.gsx1100g.de and the German G forum "Das Forum für die GSX-1100-G" (at http://www.byte-worker.de/gsxg/forum ) run by Norbert Gumbrecht and Uwe Balser.

As you can see, it is a truly dedicated group of G-men globally that contribute to keeping the G-dreams alive.






top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories
























top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories

Technical information

Dimensions and dry mass

Overall length 2280mm (89.8in) Overall width 840mm (33.1in)
Overall height 1140mm (44.9in) Wheel base 1585mm (62.4in)
Ground clearance 140mm (5.5in) Seat height 805mm (31.7in)
Weight (dry) 236kg (520lbs)    

Engine

Type 4-stroke, air-cooled with SACS, DOHC, TCSS Number of cylinders 4
Power/Torque 100 BHP/8000rpm, 98Nm/7000rpm Valves/cylinder 4
Bore 78.0mm (3.071in) Stroke 59.0mm (2.323in)
Piston displacement 1127ccm (68.8 cu. in) Compression ratio 10.0 : 1
Carburetors Mikuni BST36SS, four Air cleaner Polyester fiber element
Starter system Electric starter motor Lubrication Wet sump

Transmission

Clutch Wet multi-plate type Transmission 5-speed constant mesh
Gear shift pattern 1-down, 4-up Drive system Shaft drive

Chassis

Front suspension Telescopic, coil spring, oil damped Rear suspension Link type, coil spring, gas/oil damped, spring preload 7-way adjustable, rebound damping force 4-way and compression damping 20-way adjustable
Caster 58º Trail 156mm (6.1in)
Steering angle 33º (right & left) Turning radius 3.4m (11.2ft)
Front brake Twin disc brake, hydraulically operated Rear brake Disc brake, hydraulically operated
Front tire size 110/80V18 V240 Rear tire size 160/70VB17 V240

Electrical

Ignition Fully transistorised Battery 12V 43.2kC (12Ah)/ 10 HR
YTX14BS or FTX14-BS

Capacities

Fuel tank, including reserve 20.0 Litres
(5.2/4.4 US/Imp.gal)
Reserve 5.5 Litres (1.5/1.2 US/Imp. gal)
Engine oil (w/o filter change) 4800ml (5.1/4.2 US/Imp. qt) Engine oil w/ filter change 5000ml (5.3/4.4 US/Imp. qt)





top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories




































top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories




































top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories

1991 Brochure

gsx1100g_p-16-tn.jpg (7004 bytes) gsx1100g_p2-tn.jpg (6686 bytes) gsx1100g_p5-tn.jpg (5436 bytes)
(Thanks to Charlie Brown.  Links are to Mike Gore's GSX1100G worship page)
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According to its 1991 brochure, it headlined: 

"Classic form, modern function."

"Classic styling. Riding comfort. Low maintenance.  Awesome torque.  Excellent response.  State of the art technology.  Opposite ends of the motorcycling spectrum?  The description of two very different motorcycles?  Not any more."

"Introducing the 1991 Suzuki GSX1100G.   With smooth traditional lines.  All-day-long comfort.  Shaft drive.   And the performance that has to be experienced to be appreciated."

"The 1991 Suzuki GSX1100G blends the best of yesterday's standard styling and comfortable riding position with the latest big-bore performance technology of today.  And adds the convenience of shaft drive and the flexibility of exciting options like matched luggage, a full fairing."

"The new GSX1100G is classic form, modern function"

gsx1100g_p6-2.jpg (8529 bytes)
see below for original Suzuki accessories

The key features included:

  • More torque, less vibration, shaft drive.   The GSX-1100G's 1127cc four-cylinder is based on the GSX-R1100 power plant, an engine that completely dominates U.S. endurance racing and has earned a reputation for reliably delivering serious performance over the long haul.  With important differences: the 1100G is equipped with a gear-driving secondary balancer shaft to reduce vibration reaching the handlebars by an incredible 24 percent.  A link plate cam chain for quieter cruising.  And a low-maintenence clean and quiet shaft drive.
  • Suzuki Advanced Cooling System (SACSTM).  The Suzuki Advanced Cooling System (SACS) combines with air cooling to efficient keep the 1100G engine at optimal operating temperatures.  SACS is a separate high-volume oil flow system that carries engine heat to an efficient high-capacity cooler.  SACS results in engine temperatures much lower than those achieved with air cooling alone, and SACS is simpler and lighter than competing water cooling systems.  The 1100G's oil cooler has a wire mesh front screen and is equipped with vented end covers.
  • Slingshot CarburettorsThe 1991 1100G breathes through large 36mm Slingshot smooth-bore carbs featuring a unique slide design developed by Suzuki engineers working with Mikuni technicians.  The design combines the best performance features of a flat slide and a round slide, delivering quick response and reduced throttle movement resistance of a flat slide, and the less turbulent airflow and better sealing of a round slide.  A smooth-radius air intake bell, without ridges, increases intake efficiency.  Linking carburettor float chambers to a separate airbox compartment helps eliminate float chamber pressure variations caused by road speed and wind turbulence.  Slingshot design carburettors are also lighter than conventional carburettors.  The 1100G's high-flow air filter has large surface area.  An electric fuel pump stabilises fuel supply to the carburettors, and the reserve selection petcock has a large conventional knob.
  • Four-into-two Exhaust System.   The 1100G's bright chrome high-flow four-into-two exhaust system increases efficiency while maintaining quiet sound levels. 
  • Computerised Digital Ignition.   Suzuki's microcomputer-controlled digital ignition system provides ideal ignition timing at every engine RPM.  Timing is not affected by heat or humidity. 
  • Hydraulic Clutch with Diaphragm Springs.   Hydraulic actuation and diaphragm springs help give the 1100G positive clutch action with a relatively light lever feel.
  • Positive Transmission Shifting.   Precise, positive shifting without wasted movement, slack or hesitation is built into the GSX1100G's transmission.  The shift drum rotates on ball bearings and a bearing locator fitting reduces side-to-side drum movement.  The large diameter (14mm) shift shaft is supported by needle roller bearings.  It adds up to cleaner and smoother shifts.
  • A comfortable riding position.   Careful testing and ergonomic engineering gave the 1100G a very comfortable seating position both for the rider and the passenger.  The goal was just the right knee and back angle for all-day comfort, and the testing and engineering paid off with an ideal relationship between the tubular handlebars, rubber-padded footpegs and generous seat.   The seat itself is thickly padded with a full 90mm (3.5 inches) of selected density cushion foam for the rider.  Even the controls received careful engineering attention.  For example, the 1100G's adjustable front brake lever has a four-position eccentric cam pivot that helps put the brake lever at the position that is most comfortable for the rider.  The adjustment system is easy to use, with a large adjustment knob.  And the rear brake pedal tip has its own rubber pad to reduce vibration reaching the rider's boot.






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About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories

Other 1991 brochure

g91_1.jpg (10321 bytes) g91_4.jpg (8160 bytes)
(from Rod Lewis. links are to Mike Gore's GSX1100G worship page)
g91_2.jpg (12227 bytes) g91_3.jpg (9185 bytes)






top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories

1992 brochure

Brochure1992-1a.jpg (11425 bytes) Brochure1992-2a.jpg (10360 bytes)
(Thanks to Tom Frost. links are to Mike Gore's GSX1100G worship page)
Brochure1992-3a.jpg (12279 bytes) Brochure1992-4a.jpg (6862 bytes)






top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories

Original Suzuki accessories
source URL: http://people.ne.mediaone.net/cburian/mc/gsx1100g/gsxg-acc.html

Windshield/fairing

Brochure1992-7a.jpg (4483 bytes) Brochure1992-17a.jpg (2406 bytes)

Hard luggage options (Givi probably makes better stuff)

Brochure1992-8a.jpg (3058 bytes) Brochure1992-9a.jpg (2921 bytes)

Soft luggage (Givi sells this too)

Brochure1992-12a.jpg (4416 bytes) Brochure1992-15a.jpg (2660 bytes) Brochure1992-5a.jpg (2467 bytes)

Structural (back-rest for passenger, engine case guards)

Brochure1992-10a.jpg (2360 bytes) Brochure1992-11a.jpg (2687 bytes) Brochure1992-6a.jpg (3253 bytes)

Others (luxurious leather seat, tank bra)

Brochure1992-16a.jpg (3333 bytes) Brochure1992-14a.jpg (3238 bytes)






top

About the GSX1100G
My Mods
Maintenance
Links

Specifications
Original Fairing
Brochure 1991-A
Brochure 1991-B
Brochure 1992
Original accessories