Whats New: Recently released information for the Mortuary Affairs NCO

 UPDATED 17 FEB 99

The following Information was taken from the March 99 edition of the QM NCO Update.

 

From the Desk of the

92 M Career Manager

UNITED STATES ARMY
Office of The Quartermaster General
Fort Lee, Virginia 23801-1601

SGM Erskine Morris
92M/57E/43M Career Manager
QM Proponent Office

DSN: 687-3225
Comm: (804) 734-3225

Email: morrise@lee-dns1.army.mil

As one of the low density MOS in the Army, 92M Mortuary Affairs career field must have a good career model for progression. This means that the career manager must keep a very close watch on the MOS positions, promotion and career progression.

In CY 97, the 92M MOS did well at the senior level for promotions as depicted in the following chart.

CY 97 PROMOTIONS - MORTUARY AFFAIRS

92M

Army Average

SFC

15.70%

19.40%

MSG

14.30%

13.80%

SGM

66.70%

15.90%

92M MOS has recently undergone a restructuring effort due to the directive from the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army initiative to reduce the NCO content from 50% to 47%. Change in NCO Structure (CINCOS) has allowed us to upgrade and add some additional positions. One MSG position at the Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii has been upgraded to SGM. And three other positions were upgraded to Master Sergeant; one in the 19th TAACOM, one in the 9th TAACOM and the other in the 21st TAACOM. Thanks to SFC Albert Brown, the previous 92M Career Manager, for the outstanding job he has done in modeling the 92M career field.

Here at the Quartermaster Center and School, Enlisted Proponent office, our main objective is to provide, enhance, and maintain career progression. As the outgoing career manager, it has been a pleasure working with the soldiers in the field.

 

From the 92M Sergeant Major:

MORTUARY AFFAIRS CENTER

It is a pleasure to be back at Fort Lee and I am very pleased to be assigned as the Mortuary Affairs Sergeant Major. During the past nine years, the mortuary affairs infrastructure has undergone significant changes. The primary example is the reorganization of the only Mortuary Affairs Company in the active Army’s inventory-the 54th Quartermaster Company. This unique organization allows the active army to consolidate all the mortuary affairs personnel, Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) 92M, within the continental United States allowing for rapid deployment capability in the event of a major mass fatality. The 54th Quartermaster Company has also undergone a dramatic personnel and equipment increase, which maximizes mission support capabilities. 92M personnel constantly provide support to various organizations during deployments, field exercises and recovery missions. This intense training ensures tactical and technical proficiency as well as leadership competency and confidence. The mortuary affairs specialists have dedicated themselves to excellence and strive to continually hone their technical skills.

They support the Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii (CILHI) whose primary mission is search and recovery/repatriation of remains of deceased service members in Vietnam, the Philippines, Korea, and other locations within the pacific theater. CILHI continues to increase the strength of assigned mortuary affairs specialists, allowing a greater range of support to the Pacific Theater and the world. The knowledge that a 92M gains from this assignment has proven invaluable thus enabling them to pass their expertise along to subordinates. 92Ms are consummate professionals forever prepared to conduct their sensitive mission; anywhere, anytime.

Congratulations to the eleven Staff Sergeants selected for Sergeant First Class. This influx of senior NCOs, as well as the authorized increase of senior NCO slots, allows CILHI and the 54th Quartermaster Company to strengthen their organizations where previously critical shortages existed. Furthermore, congratulations are in order for Master Sergeant Morris and Master Sergeant Treon on their selection for Sergeant Major. As a final note, in Fiscal Year 1999 there will be one Drill Sergeant position available within the 92M career field.

SGM Al Grigler is currently serving as the Sergeant Major for the Mortuary Affairs Center, Fort Lee, VA

JOINT MORTUARY AFFAIRS SENIOR NCO COURSE, 492-F1.

The next class is scheduled for 14-25 Sep. For more information, contact Mrs. Calhoun at (804) 734-5312 or DSN 687-5312.

WHY DID WE SELECT SO FEW NCOS FOR PROMOTION IN MY MOS?

NCOs in all MOSs often have a difficult time understanding what causes their MOS to have lower senior NCO promotion selection rates than other MOSs even within the same career management field. The starting point to understand the differences in promotion select rates is to understand the Army bases promotion on the need for noncommissioned officers by rank and MOS.

Since the Army promotes by MOS to senior NCOs ranks, the most significant factor effecting the select rate of promotion is the total number of authorized positions, or spaces, at the promotion grade. If there are few jobs at the next higher rank, there will be few promotions. The second most significant factor effecting the select rate is the relationship between the total number of authorizations in the promotion grade versus the total number of authorizations at the current grade for the MOS.

As you compare these two MOS, you can see there is a higher percentage of opportunity for advancement to SFC in MOS 92A. You have a total of 862 SSGs competing for one of the 835 positions at the SFC level. The competition for promotion to SFC in MOS 92Y is much more difficult. In 92Y, you have 2359 SSGs trying to fill one of the 1416 SFC positions as they become vacant. Bottom line -- the NCO pyramid at the top of 92Y shrinks much quicker than MOS 92A; therefore promotion opportunities are available for only the best of the best in MOS 92Y.

You can do a similar analysis of promotion select rates for all NCO ranks. As another example, if you look at the promotion list to CSM/SGM released in Dec 97, you will see the following selection rates:

NUMBER IN

PERCENT

MOS

PRIMARY ZONE

SELECTED

SELECTED

77F

19

1

5%

92Y

63

7

11%

92A

66

13

20%

92G

19

14

74%

The reason for a 74% select rate for SGM in MOS 92G is there was more positions to fill in that MOS. While it is sometimes difficult, NCOs should refrain from comparing their careers, past performance, and future leadership capabilities with a NCO in a different MOS. The selection rates will almost always differ based on future requirements in the promotion grade. The selection rates in no way reflect upon the quality of the NCO’s file within each of the MOS or their qualifications for promotion. Ideally, the Army would promote all NCOs as soon as they could demonstrate their ability to perform the duties of the next higher grade. Unfortunately, there are not enough positions to permit everyone to advance all the way to SGM before their retirement. In the officer corps, not every officer will advance to General Officer or even Colonel. This same situation exists in most major corporations. In the civilian sector, not every employee will advance to assume the duties of CEO.

The third key factor effecting the select rate of senior NCO promotions is the soldiers or faces, actually serving at the promotable grade. As NCOs complete their military career and make the decision to leave the Army, they submit their retirement applications. The Army will back-fill the open positions, created through retirements, on a one-for-one basis through promotion of other junior NCOs. While the actual number of retirements will vary from year to year based on the personal decisions of the senior NCOs, the number of retirements for each grade and MOS remains relatively constant.

Lastly, the days of waiting two or three years to pin on your new rank after the release of the promotion list should be over. Considering programmed and anticipated retirements, we attempt to select just the exact number of NCOs we will need to sustain the Army for approximately 12 to 14 months following the release of the list. This is a good news story and should continue for Quartermaster NCOs for years to come; however, it does effect the total number of selections needed for the upcoming year.

There are very few MOS in the Army that have a perfect pyramid structure to offer the optimum progression from Private, through the NCO ranks, up to Sergeant Major. The structure of most of our Quartermaster MOSs may cause some time-in-grade and time-in-service peaks and valleys; however, when you reflect back on the entire career of the NCO, most times you find the promotion system tends to balance out the minor differences. Some NCOs advance very quickly to SSG based on that MOS having a larger number of authorized positions as found in MOS 92Y. These same NCOs may wait slightly longer for promotion up to MSG. Other NCOs take slightly longer to receive their promotion to SSG, as with 92A and the relatively small number of authorizations at the SSG level, and then later these same NCOs often times advance quicker to MSG.

The future looks bright for continued promotion selections to the senior NCO ranks. While it is a given we have different select rates for every MOS based on Army requirements, NCOs can look forward to relatively consistent selection rates in the primary zone from year to year and an equal opportunity, through time, to advance up to SGM with your peers.

Points of Contact

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT POINTS OF CONTACT

Cut along printed lines for wallet sized cards.

Pass cards to other Quartermaster soldiers.

"The Warfighters Logistician"

UNITED STATES ARMY
Office of The Quartermaster General
Fort Lee, Virginia 23801-1601

QUARTERMASTER INTERNET HOMEPAGE

http://www.lee.army.mil/quartermaster

DSN: 687-3248
Comm: (804) 734-3248

UNITED STATES ARMY
Office of The Quartermaster General
Fort Lee, Virginia 23801-1601

CSM LARRY W. GAMMON

Regimental Sergeant Major
Quartermaster Corps

DSN: 687-3248
Comm: (804) 734-3248

Email: gammonl@lee-dns1.army.mil

UNITED STATES ARMY
Office of The Quartermaster General
Fort Lee, Virginia 23801-1601

CSM LARRY W. GAMMON

Regimental Sergeant Major
Quartermaster Corps

DSN: 687-3248
Comm: (804) 734-3248

Email: gammonl@lee-dns1.army.mil

UNITED STATES ARMY
Office of The Quartermaster General
Fort Lee, Virginia 23801-1601

SGM Jeffrey L. Klaren
Chief, Enlisted Branch
QM Proponent Office

DSN: 687-4143
Comm: (804) 734-4143

Email: klarenj@lee-dns1.army.mil

UNITED STATES ARMY
Office of The Quartermaster General
Fort Lee, Virginia 23801-1601

SGM Erskine Morris
92M/57E/43M Career Manager
QM Proponent Office

DSN: 687-3225
Comm: (804) 734-3225

Email: morrise@lee-dns1.army.mil

UNITED STATES ARMY
Office of The Quartermaster General
Fort Lee, Virginia 23801-1601

SFC Joan P. Baker
CMF 77 Career Manager
QM Proponent Office

DSN: 687-4183
Comm: (804) 734-4183

Email: bakerja2@lee-dns1.army.mil

UNITED STATES ARMY
Office of The Quartermaster General
Fort Lee, Virginia 23801-1601

MSG Cynthia Pigram
MOS 92A Career Manager
QM Proponent Office

DSN: 687-4191
Comm: (804) 734-4191

Email: pigramc@lee-dns1.army.mil

UNITED STATES ARMY
Office of The Quartermaster General
Fort Lee, Virginia 23801-1601

SFC Michael Talley
92G/92R/92Z Career Manager
QM Proponent Office

DSN: 687-4189
Comm: (804) 734-4189

Email: talleym@lee-dns1.army.mil

UNITED STATES ARMY
Office of The Quartermaster General
Fort Lee, Virginia 23801-1601

SFC Lila Chambers
92Y Career Manager
QM Proponent Office

DSN: 687-4229
Comm: (804) 734-4229

Email: chamberl@lee-dns1.army.mil


Recommended Links


Standard Installation Topic Exchange Service (SITES)

Reclassification/Reenlistment IN/OUT Calls

Army Career and Alumni Program

Army Retirement Services Home Page

Defense Finance and Accounting Service

Quartermaster Corps Home Page (Fort Lee, Virginia)

Army Home Page


 

 

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