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Bethea

--The Bethea family will next be noticed. This very large and extensive family,both in name and in its vast network of connections, all sprang from one common stock, John Bethea, who emigrated from England to Virginia, at what precise time is not known, but supposed to be in the latter part of the seventeenth or early part of the eighteenth century. The name was originally spelled Berthier, and is supposed to be of Freneh origin. The writer has been furnished by Philip Y. Bethea, of Marion, with a family tree, and chart of the family from old "English John" up to date--at least, so far as Marion County is concerned, and I suppose generally, so far as can be ascertained. This chart only gives the names of males, no females--for the reason that they generally lost their identity by marriage; yet the females transmit the blood just as much as the males do hence the writer will hereinafter notice the females as well as the males, in every instance where
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A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY.

they are known. Old "English John" had two sons, John and Tristram. John settled in Nansemond County, Virginia, and Tristram settled on Cape Fear River, in North Carolina, as is supposed, in the early part of the eighteenth century. John, the second, had two sons, John, third, and William. John, third, emigrated to South Carolina, about the middle of the eighteenth century, or a little later, and settled on Buck Swamp, about two miles above the present town of Latta. His brother, William, about the same time, came to South Carolina (or they may have come together), and settled on Sweat Swamp, three or four miles above Harlleesville. These were the progenitors of all the Betheas and their numerous connections in Marion County, and, I suppose, throughout the Western States. Hereinafter these two families will be referred to as the "Buck Swamp family or set." The wife of "Buck Swamp John" was Absala Parker, hence their youngest son was named "Parker." "Buck Swamp John" settled on the plantation now owned by one of his descendants, John C. Bethea, of Dillon; he was a prosperous man--took up and owned at the time of his death, in 1821, six or eight thousand acres of land around him and in near by parts, the most of which is now owned by some one or another of his descendants; he farmed and raised stock, drove it to Charleston; had and raised large orchards, raised fruit; made cider and brandy, and sold it, in his day, without let or hindrance; he accumulated a large estate for his day and time, which he gave almost entirely to his five sons, William, James, Philip, EIisha and Parker--giving nothing, comparatively, to his four,daughters, Sallie, Pattie, Mollie and Absala (I think, was the name of the latter). Sallie married Levi Odom, of Revolutionary fame; two of them, Absala and Mollie, married a Mr. Owens; and Pattie married another Mr. Owens. None of them except Pattie have descendants in this State--as Sallie and Absala died childless, and Mollie and her Mr. Owens emigrated to Natchez, Miss. The five sons all settled, lived and died in Marion County. William, the eldest, married, first, a Miss Crawford; had one child, a son, John C. Bethea; his second wife was Mary (Polly) Sheckelford; the fruits of the marriage were five sons, Levi, Willam S., Frank, George J.

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and Evander S. Bethea; the daughters were Rebecca, Absala, Mary, Catharine and Sarah Ann. Levi married Miss Mary Ann Bethea, a daughter of John Bethea, of the "Sweat Swamp set," and had two sons, Henry L. (who died in youth), and George, and four daughters, Sophia, Hannah Jane, Louisa and Charlotte. Of these, Sophia married William H. Smith, on Buck Swamp, and had and raised sons, Samuel 0. Smith, Wm. B., Henry E. K. and John B. Smith, and two daughters, the wife of B. S. Ellis (first cousins), and Hamilton Edwards' wife. Hannah Jane Bethea married John C. Bass, and died childless. Louisa Bethea married James F. Galloway, and has a family of two sons, Henry and James, and four daughters, Sallie, Rebecca, Mary and Rachel. Charlotte Bethea married John E. Henry, who lives on the old William Bethea homestead, and has already been noticed in or among the Henry family. George Bethea, son of Levi, married a Miss Campbell, daughter of the late Edward Campbell, and has five sons, Edwin, Henry, Gary, Robert and Chalmers. Think Edwin lately married a Miss Smith, daughter of Marcus L. Smith. William S. Bethea, second son of William Bethea by his Sheckelford wife, married, Miss Sarah Ann DeBerry, of Marlborough; by her he had two children, a daughter, Missouri, and a son, William Henry. Missouri became the first wife of John H. Hamer; she died, leaving one child, a son, Missouri Robert Hamer, who has already been noticed in or among the Hamer family. The son, William Henry Bethea, married, first, a Miss Wilson, of Wilmington, N. C., and by her he had two daughters, Adaline and Ella, both single, and two sons, Wilson and Henry (twins); Henry died in 1899; Wilson survives, and is unmarried. William Henry's first wife died, and he married, a second time, Miss Ellie Sherwood; she has one son, Evander S., a boy nearly grown. William Henry Bethea died in 1891 or 1892, a felo de se. Frank Bethea married, late in life, Miss Rebecca Manning, daughter of Woodward Manning; had one child, a son; father and son (an infant) both died the same year; the widow, Rebecca, married twice after that, and has already been mentioned among the Manning family. George J. Bethea married Miss Irena Page, daughter of Captain William Page; they had and raised two sons, William
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A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY.

A. and John D., and several daughters, Amanda, Ellen, Mary, Kittie and Belle. William A. married a. Miss Floyd and moved to North Carolina. John D. married Miss Sallie Manning, daughter of Woodward Manning. Of the daughters, Amanda married William B. Ellen; Kittie married Joseph Watson, her first cousin; don't know who the others married. William A. has a son, named Jasper, and John D. has a son, named Herbert. Evander S. Bethea, the youngest son of old Buck Swamp William never married. The oldest son of Buck Swamp William, by his Crawford wife, was named John C., bom in 1798 and died January, 1863; married, first,. a Widow Irby, whose maiden name was Allison; she had one child, a daughter, Elizabeth, when he married her, who grew upL up and married Henry Rogers, of Marlborough; they raised a large family of sons and daughters, and among the daughters is, Henrietta, who is now the widow of the late Govvmor W. H. Ellerbe; by his marriage with the Widow Irby, he had and raised one son, Edwin Allison, when she died ; and he afterwards married- Sarah Ann Davis, and by- her had and raised one son, John,C., now of Dillon. Edwin A. married Ann EIiza Godbold, youngest daughter of Asa Godbold, Sr.; they live at Latta, and have a family of several sons and daughters; the sons are Asa, John C., Edwin and Reed Walker, and several daughters. One daughter married to W. C. McMillan, and is in. Columbia, S. C. Asa has gone West; others all here. John C. Bethea, of Dillon, married Miss Hettie Bethea, daughter of W. W. Bethea, of Mississippi, and of the "Sweat Swamp family;" they have two sons, Horace and John C., and five daughters, all small. Of the sons of Buck Swamp William, there was one noticeable peculiarity--they all, except old John C, drank liquor excessively, and when intoxicated or drinking were Perfectly quiet and harmless--much more so than when sober, except, perhaps Evander S.; they were all capital men, energetic and progressive citizens. Of the daughters of old William Bethea (Buck Swamp), Rebecca married Colin McLellan, who has already been noticed in or among the MclLellans. Absala married William W. Bethea, of the "Sweat Swamp set," who will be noticed further on.

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Catharine married Averitt N. Nance, of North Carolina, and raised one son, Daniel, and several daughters. Sarah Ann married a Mr. Folk, of North Carolina, and raised a family of two sons and two daughters, names unknown. All the sons and daughters of Buck Swamp William are dead; he himself died I3th June, 1840. James Bethea, the second son of old "Buck Swamp John," married Miss Margaret Cockrane, a daughter of Thomas Cockrane, of Marlborough County, and settled in the fork of Big and Little Reedy Creeks; they had and raised to be grown twelve children, five sons and seven daughters; the sons were Thomas C., Samuel J., John R., David and Claudius; the daughters were Nancy, Deborah, Sallie, Rachel, Lucinda, Lucretia and Jane. Thomas -C. married Miss Miranza Rogers, a daughter of old Timothy Rogers, and emigrated to Mississippi. Samuel T. married Miss Mary Rogers, another daughter of old Timothy Rogers; he was a local Methodist preacher for more than forty years, a man of high character and a most excellent citizen; he died in 1877; he married, a second time, Miss Elizabeth Bass, daughter of old man Joseph R. Bass; by his first marriage they had and raised to be grown eleven children--sons, James, Andrew J. and David N.; daughters, Sarah, Margaret, Harriet, Flora J., Louisa, Lucinda, Charlotte and Cattie; and by his last wife, one son, Samuel J., Jr. Of the sons, James died unmarried, just on arriving at manhood. Andrew J.was a practicing physician, and married Anna Maria Allen, daughter of Rev. Joel Allen, settled in the "Free State" section, and died in 1881, leaving his widow and five children--all now grown--three sons, Herbert, Percey and Andrew, and two daughters, Mrs. Rev. Pearce Kilgo, who has five children, and Mrs. William T. Bethea, who has three children, sons, James Earle, William Thaddeus, Jr., and Philip Osborne. The next son of Rev. S. J. Bethea, David, N., who died last week, married, first, Anna J. Sellers, daughter of the writer, and settled in the "Free State" section; they had eight children, three of whom are dead, also the mother; of the eight, five were sons and three daughters; the sons were William T., Samuel, Stoll, David A., Swinton Legare and Andrew Pearce; the daughters were Cattie May, Lillian and Anna Laval. Of these, Samuel Stoll,
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A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY.

David A. and Cattie May are dead--died before majority. William Thaddeus married his cousin, Georgia Bethea, as above stated and children as above stated; he is railroad agent at Dillon and has been for more than ten years, and Mayor of the town for three years. By the second marriage of Rev. S. J. Bethea, he had one son, Samuel J., Jr., who is and has been for ten years or more a traveling Methodist preacher in the South Carolina Conference; he married Miss Nannie Bethea, of,the "Sweat Swamp" family, and have only one child-, a son, Samuel J., Jr. Of the daughters of Rev. S. J. Bethea, three, Lucinda, Cattie and Charlotte, all grown young ladies, died unmarried. Sarah married James Moore, of Marlborough County; they had only one child, a son, James B. Moore, of Latta; the father died when James B. was an infant; the widow never married again, and died a few years ago. The son, James B. Moore, married Miss Mollie Godbold, daughter of Asa Godbold, Jr.; they have three children living, two sons, Clancy and LaCoste, and a daughter, Lorena (small). Margaret, the next daughter of Rev. S. J. Bethea, married John W. Tart; they had and raised three sons, James, John and Andrew; the father and mother are both dead. James went to Savannah, married a Miss Fuller, of Way-cross, Ga., and when last heard of was said to be doing well. John married a Miss Bethea, daughter of Elisha Bethea, Jr., of Latta; they have some family, how many and of what sex is not known. Andrew Tart married a Miss Hays, daughter of Hamilton R. Hays, and lives near Kirby's Cross Roads; suppose they have some family, how many and of what sex is unknown. Of the daughters of John W. Tart and wife, two or three of them died unmarried, after maturity. One married Samuel 0. Smith, of Buck Swamp; they have a large family. Their oldest, a son, Stephen Lane Smith, lives at Latta, and lately married a Miss Edwards, a daughter of Austin Edwards. Another daughter married C. C. Gaillard, and has three children-a daughter, Maggie, and a son, Luther, and another name unknown; they now live at Dillon; their children are grown. Another daughter married James Johnson, a nephew of Chancellor W. D. Johnson, called "Black Jim," to distinguish him from J. W. Johnson, Esq., another nephew and son-in-law of the Chancellor.

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;they live at Fair Bluff, N. C.; they have some children, how many and of what sex is unknown. Another and youngest daughter of John W. Tart and his wife, Margaret, married Solon Lewis, of Latta; she died some months ago, and left two children, a daughter and a son, I think. The next daughter of Rev. S. J. Bethea, Harriet, and the only survivor of his eleven first children, has never married, and is sixty-one or two years old. Flora, the next daughter, married the late Stephen D. Lane; both are dead, and died childless. Louisa, the next daughter, married Newton Owens, of North Carolina; they moved to Texas several years ago; she is dead, leaving several children, sons and daughters-perhaps, all grown. John R. Bethea, the third son of old James Bethea, married Miss Harriet Bass, daughter of old Joseph R. Bass. I think this family has been already noticed in or among the Bass family. The fourth son of old James Bethea, David, died a young man, unmarried, in 1843. Claudius Bethea, the fifth and youngest son of old James Bethea, married, late in life, Miss Mary Ann Miles, daughter,of Charles Miles, of the "Free State" section; he and his wife are both dead, childless. Of the daughters of old James Bethea, the,eldest, Nancy, married Salathel Moody, an older brother of old Barfield Moody; they had several children, sons and daughters, some grown, when they broke up and moved West. Deborah, the second daughter, married James Spears, a very successful man in Marlborough; they had and raised a large family--two sons, Andrew J. and Edwin A., and six, or seven daughters; they have descendants, grandsons, in Marion County now, in the persons of Dr. J. H. David and Frank B. David,* enterprising, progressive men, with their families. They have many descendants in Marlborough County. The two sons, Andrew J. and Edwin A., died childless; Edwin married. Lucinda, the fifth daughter of old James Bethea, married Colonel Wilie Bridges, of Marlborough, and emigrated West. Sallie, the third daughter, married Willis Crawford, from whom sprang several sons and two daughters; the sons were James, Hardy, Thomas C., Willis, William and Gibson G. Crawford, now,of Latta; the daughters were Rhoda and Margaret. Of the sons, James died when about grown, *Frank B. David died recently.
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unmarried. Hardy married a Miss Platt, and went West. Thomas C. married twice, is well known in the county; married, the last time, a Miss McPherson, in West Marion, and has resided there for more than thirty years; his wife died a short time ago, childless; he is a most excellent man and a good citizen.* Willis Crawford was a physician; married a lady in Charleston, and was soon after accidentally killed in a fox drive by his own gun--verifying the adage, "That more people are killed or hurt at play than at work." William died, a single man, after having gone through the war and came out unhurt. G. G. Crawford married Miss Kate Bethea, daughter of Colonel James R. Bethea: they had and raised two sons, James C. and Samuel B., and two daughters, Jessie and Mary; his wife is dead; he has not remarried. James G. has lately married a Miss Evans, of Society Hill. Jessie married, two or three years ago, William EIlis Bethea; no offspring. Samuel B. and Mary are yet single. The oldest daughter of Willis and Sallie Crawford, Rhoda, married Henry Easterling, and has already been noticed among the Easterlings. Margaret, the youngest daughter, never married, and is dead. Rachel, the fourth daughter of old James Bethea, married Enoch Meekins, of Marlborough; he, however, settled and lived many years near Harlleesville, and raised a considerable family of sons and daughters, and finally moved, to North Carolina, where he and his wife both died; don't know enough about his children to trace them. He had one son, Philip B., who married a Miss Hays, daughter of John C. Hays; they also moved to North Carolina, and are lost sight of. One daughter married John R. Carmichael; he died, and left two sons, Alexander and McCoy, and one daughter, Johny; the mother still lives. Another daughter married James McGirt; they went to North Carolina. Lucretia, the sixth daughter, first married Aaron Meekins, of Marlborough, brother of Enoch, Who had married Rachel; Aaron Meekins lived but a short time, and died childless; the widow afterwards married Wesley Stackhouse, who has already been noticed among the Stackhouse family. Jane, the youngest daughter, married Tristram Easterling, who has already been noticed in or among the Easterling family. Philip Be- *Thomas C. Crawford has recently died.

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thea, the third son of old "Buck Swamp John," married, in 1801, Rachel Cochrane, daughter of old Thomas Cochrane, of Marlborough, and sister of his brother James' wife. (As to Thomas Cochrane--he was a Vermonter, ran away from his parents in Vermont when a mere lad, and married a Miss Council, and settled on Great Pee Dee, just above the mouth of Crooked Creek; raised a family; married three times; the two Bethea's wives above mentioned were daughters of the first wife, together with another daughter, Polly, who became the wife of old John Hamer, and the progenitress of the large family of that name in Marlborough and Marion, and a son, named Robert; he amassed a large property and lived to a great age.) Philip Bethea settled on Catfish,where he lived and died in 1865; they raised to be grown two sons, Elisha C. and James R., and ;three daughters, Clarissa, Margaret and Martha Ann. Of the sons, Elisha C. married Martha Ann Walters, daughter of Jeremiah Walters, of upper Marion; Captain Elisha C. was a very successful man as a farmer and well to do in life; they had eleven sons and four daughters; the sons were Philip W., John J., Robert C., James A., Elisha, Picket, Morgan, George, William W., Clarence and Julius N.; the daughters were Elizabeth Ann, Wilmina R., Augusta B. and Alice. Of the sons of Elisha C., Philip W. married Miss Anna Smith, a daughter of Rev. John L. Smith, of the "Fork" section, and settled Where he now lives; his family has been noted among the Lane family. The second son of Captain Elisha C. Bethea is Dr. John J. Bethea, at Mullins; has been practicing medicine since 1852; he married, first, Miss Mary Bethea, a daughter of Tristram Bethea, of Floral College, one of the "Cape Fear set;";she had one child, a daughter, Emma, who grew up and married Dr. William Harrel, who moved to Georgia some years ago, and had when they left six daughters and no son. Dr. John J. Bethea married, a second time, Miss Jane Smith, a daughter of Rev. John L. Smith, and sister of his Brother Philip's wife. Owing to some trouble growing out of the war, Dr. John had to leave the county and State for fear of the Federal garrison stationed at Marion in 1865 to 1868; he went to Mississippi, and his family soon followed after him, and he stayed in that State some fifteen or twenty years, when
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he came back, and has been in this county ever since. His family have been noticed in tracing the Lane family. Robert C. Bethea, the third son of Captain Elisha C., married, some time before the war, a Miss Legette, daughter of John C. Legette, of West Marion; before the war, he removed to Mississippi; they had some little family before leaving this county--know nothing more of them; he was also a physician, and in his adopted home he became a local Methodist preacher. James A. Bethea, the fourth son of Captain Elisha C., was a bright young man; volunteered in the early part of the war, was a Lieutenant or rose to a Lieutenancy in Co. E, Twenty-third Regiment, S. C. V., and remained in the war to the end, a gallant soldier. After the war he went to Mississippi; and from there went to a law school at Lebanon, Tenn.; returned to Mississippi, was admitted to the bar, but soon after took sick and died--a worthy and promising young man; he never married. Elisha Bethea, Jr., the fifth son of Captain Elisha C., married, on the 9th March, 1861--,the writer officiating at the nuptials--to Miss Sallie Ellis, daughter of the Widow Ginsy Ellis. He also volunteered and went into the army, and remained in it till he was disabled for field service, when he came home, and for some time his friends supposed he would not survive the wounds, but he did and has been going on crutches ever since-the wound being in his hip; he yet lives, and is near Latta, an energetic and successful man, a farmer. He had by his first wife several sons and daughters. His oldest living son, William Ellis, is now merchandising at Latta, and has been twice married--first, a Georgia lady, who had three sons, Charles, Robert and Dallas, and one daughter, Florence, and died; he married, a second time, Miss Jessie Crawford; she has no children. Arthur,his second son, has lately married a Miss Hays of Hillsboro Township, a daughter of William B. Hays; he teaches school. Morgan, his third son, is a young man, unmarried; he teaches school. Of his daughters by his first marriage, one, Mattie, married John J. George, who died childless. Another, Carrie, married John Tart; they have five children (small). Another, Augusta, is unmarried. Another, Nellie, married Tristram Hamilton; she has two children, Bertha and Sallie (small). Elisha Bethea, Jr., had another son, Benjamin, and

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one named Elisha; both died in youth. Elisha Bethea's first wife, Sallie, died; he married again, her sister, Mary Ann, who at the time of her marriage was the Widow Thomas; by this second marriage he has one son, named Power, who is now in Wofford College, and a daughter, named Eva, and perhaps others (small). Pickett Bethea, the sixth son of Captain Elisha C., married Miss Carrie Honour, daughter of Rev. John H. Honour, of Charleston, about the first of the war; by this marriage two sons were born, Walker and Pickett. Walker died when a child. Pickett K. grew up and became a doctor, and married a Miss Davis, of North Carolina, and has removed to Socastee, in Horry County, and is there practicing medicine, and is said to be doing well. His father, Pickett, volunteered early in the war, and was a Lieutenant in Captain McKerall's company, in 25th Regiment; he was killed in one of the battles in Virginia, in 1863. His widow married again to J. W. Saintclair, a school teacher; they removed West; she had several children for him, and died. Morgan, the seventh son of Captain Elisha C., volunteered early in the war; he sickened and died at home while on a furlough; he was unmarried. George, the eighth son, was killed, when about thirteen or fourteen years of age, by What was called a "flying mare"--another verification of the adage "that more people are killed or hurt at play than at work." William W. Bethea, the ninth son of Captain Elisha C., now living in West Marion, married Miss Sallie Morrison, a daughter of Rev. Mr. Morrison, a Presbyterian minister, of Anson County, N. C., a very estimable and accomplished lady; the fruits of this marriage are four sons, Morrison, Theodore, Oscar and James. Of these, Morrison is married to a lady of Clinton (name unknown), and has two sons, Curtis and Eugene; there may be a daughter or two (all small). William W. Bethea may have daughters, the writer does not know. One of the sons, Theodore (I believe) is a graduate of the Citadel Academy of Charleston--said to have graduated with distinction. Clarence, the tenth son of Captain Elisha C., died when a small boy. Julius N., the eleventh son of Captain Elisha C., married, first, Miss Anna Shrewsberry, daughter of the late Edward C. Shrewsberry, of the "Free State" section. An incident of their marriage,may be here related: They were
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married at a school house near by her father's, in the woods on a road not much frequented, by the Rev. Joel Allen, on Christmas day, in 1871 ; he gave them a certificate of their marriage Only one person was present at the nuptials besides themselves and the officiating clergyman; and at their special instance and request, the marriage was to be kept secret until the 19th day of April following, it being Julius' birthday and the day of his arrival at the age of twenty-one years. Julius carried his wife back to her home, half a mile away, and left her there; he went to his father's, and said nothing until the appointed time, 19th April, 1872, when he told his father and mother about it, and went to her father's, and their marriage was satisfactorily established to her parents, and he took her and carried her to his father's. A sufficient reason, satisfactory to them, may have existed for their marriage and subsequent secrecy, but it does not accord with the writer's views of propriety, nor with the conduct of 999 out of 1,000. His bride was a very intellectual and well cultivated lady--far more so than many in that region; the fruits of the marriage were three sons, Herbert, Ernest and Adger, and one or two daughters, one named Mattie May--suppose they are all grown. Anna, his first wife, died, and he married, a second time, Miss Carrie Sessions, daughter of John D. Sessions, of Marion; they reside now at Mullins; children of the last marriage, if any, are small--names, number and sex unknown. Of the daughters of Captain Elisha C. Bethea,the eldest, Elizabeth Ann, married John B. Bethea, of the "Sweat Swamp" family; her mother was a half Bethea of the same set; he had previously gone to Mississippi, and came back to her home in Marion County and married; the bridal trip was to be to Mississippi. She had some negroes, which her father had given her, and they with their little baggage were taken along for the trip. This was before the war, about 1856. When the bridal party arrived at Marion to take the train, the groom put the bride on board, and stepped back to see to getting on the negroes--a woman and some children, and whilst thus engaged the train pulled off and left him; of course, he ran after it and tried to stop it, but failed in his almost frantic efforts. His bride went on to Florence (then a small village) and stopped over for the night; the groom spent

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