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A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY.

407
the night in Marion and went over the next day and joined his wife. I will leave the reader to imagine whether there was intense disappointment or not, and whether there was any cursing done by the groom. The bridal party went to Mississippi and settled there--I think, in Smith County. John B. was a very energetic and persevering man, a farmer he went into the war, and in 1863, he died of disease, and left his wife and four sons, Augustus B., William, Sumter and John--the latter born after his father's death, all then small. After John B.'s death, Captain Elisha C. went out to Mississippi and brought the widow and her children to this county. The widow settled on a place given her by her father, and went to work to raise and educate her sons; in this she succeeded well. She was no ordinary woman; well educated herself and of fine literary taste, and to this added her fine business qualifications and her success, placed her in the front rank among women. Much more might be said to her credit, but space will not permit a further extended notice. Her sons grew up and one by one they went to Birmingham, Ala., and she finally followed and, I think, yet lives. The second daughter of Captain Elisha C., Wilmina Rachel, has never married, and is now in the sixtieth year of her age. The third daughter, Augusta B., married A. E. Gilchrist, of Mullins, and has already been noticed herein among the Gilchrist family. Alice, the fourth and youngest daughter of Captain Elisha C., married D. Asbury Smith, who has already been noticed among the Lane family. She, too, has gone to Birmingham, Ala., where three of her four sons reside. According to the chart of the Bethea family in all its branches including the Nansemond County, Va., Betheas, the Cape Fear, N.C. Betheas, the "Buck Swamp set," and the "Sweat Swamp set," Captain EIisha C. Bethea "takes the cake" for having and raising the greatest number of sons; eleven; while Dr. J. F. Bethea stands next, with eight. Not much danger of extinction. Colonel James R. Bethea, the second and youngest son of old man Philip Bethea, who has been mentioned in several places herein before in connection with other matters, married, rather late in life (thirty-four or thirty-five years old), to Miss Mary McLeod, of Marlborough, one of the best and most devotedly pious women I ever met; and should
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A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY.

any of her children turn out badly in the future, it cannot be charged to any fault in the mother's training, either by precept or example; they had and raised (Jessie, the oldest, was near grown when he died) six sons and three daughters; the sons were Jessie, James D., Philip Y., Elisha, D. McLeod and Robert Lucien; the daughters were Kate, Clara and M. Isabella. Of the sons, Jessie died when about grown. James D., the second son, married Miss Flora Fore, daughter of the late Stephen Fore; he is dead. Of James D.'s family, mention has already been made in or among the Fore family. Philip Y., the third son, now in Marion, a first class business man; has been County Auditor, and is now and has been for ten or more years cashier of the Bank of Marion; married Miss Florence Johnson, of Charleston, a distant relative of his--his father and Florence's grand-mother, Sallie Strobel, were first cousins; they have had six sons (one, Philip Y., dead), Eugene, Arthur, Johnson, Stewart, Philip Y. and Markley, and three daughters, Eloise, Edith and Mary McLeod--none of whom are married. Eugene, the eldest, is in the Philippines or China, in the United States army, an officer, a promising young man, and may rise to greater distinction. The other children are all at home--Eloise and Arthur are grown. Philip Y. has a very interesting family; his wife is a superior woman, and well fitted by education and early training to raise a family. EIisha, the fourth son of Colonel J. R. Bethea, was quite a promising young man, but the fates decreed that he should not live, and he died when twenty-five or six years of age, unmarried. D. McLeod Bethea, the fifth son of Colonel J. R. Bethea, a first class man, an excellent and successful farmer, married Miss Florence Fore, daughter of the late Stephen Fore, and who, with his family, have already been mentioned (herein in or among the Fore family. Robert Lucien, the sixth son of Colonel Bethea, has married twice; first, a Miss Shaw, of Bishopville; by her he had one child, a daughter, Leona, who is now nearly grown. The first wife died, and he married a second time, to Miss Rosa Carnes, of Bishopville, and by her has some three or four children; names and sex unknown; they are yet children. Robert Lucien, lives in Bishopville, and runs

A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY

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a hotel.* Of the daughters of Colonel J. R. Bethea, the eldest, Kate, married Gibson G. Crawford; both of whom and their family have already been noticed herein among the Betheas above. The second daughter of Colonel Bethea, Clara, married Holland Manning, who lives on her patrimony, and are doing well--in fact, Clara is an extra smart and sensible woman; they have two children, daughters, both children, Mary Belle and Hope. Holland Manning was a widower with five children, three,of whom are married; he has a place of his own in extreme upper Marion, which he rents. Colonel James R. Bethea died in 1878, at sixty-nine years of age, and his widow, Mary, some years afterward. The youngest daughter, Isabella, or Belle, has never married; she has a good farm, which she rents; she also teaches school, and when not thus engaged she stays with her sister, Clara Manning. Colonel James R. Bethea, when young, imbibed a military spirit, and manifested a strong ambition to attain to high honors in the militia of the State. Starting as a private in his local beat company (Cross Roads), he soon obtained a Lieutenancy; and from that to the Captaincy of the company; and from that to Major of the upper battalion; and iby seniority soon became Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment; and from that by election to the Colonelcy of the Thirty-second Regiment, which position he held at the time of his marriage, in March, 1844, and continued to hold that position for three or four years --afterward and in the meantime declined to be a candidate for Brigadier General, to which place he could have been elected, perhaps, without opposition. He was an efficient officer, and was popular as such. It was very expensive, and as he had a growing family he wisely chose to abandon the further pursuit of military honors (empty as they were), and devote his means to the support and education of his fast-growing family. He resigned his commission as Colonel and Elly Godbold or John J. George was elected in his place. They both were successive Colonels, but do not remember which of the two were first elected. Afterwards Colonel Bethea was elected as a Representative from the district in the State Legislature (1848 to 1850). ________________________________________________________________ *He is now at Dillon in the same business.
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A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY

Of the daughters of Philip Bethea, a son of old "Buck Swamp John," Clarissa, the eldest, never married, and died in 1861, at the age of fifty-eight. The second daughter, Margaret, married Willis Finklea, called Arter Willis; in a short while Finklea moved to Alabama; there they had several children, five of whom were raised. Willis Finklea was a drinking man and treated his wife badly, so much so that she could not stand it; they separated, and her father, in 1841, went to Alabama, Monroe County, in a wagon, and brought her and her five children back to Marion County; Finklea soon after died; her children were raised mainly by her father; there were two sons, James C. and William; the daughters were Lucinda, Sallie and Margaret Agnes. James C. Finklea is now one of our fellow citizens, known as Captain Finklea, inWahee Township, and, in fact, all over the county. Captain Finklea volunteered in Captain C. J. Fladger's Company E, 23d South Carolina Regiment, in the Confederate War; went off as a Sergeant in that company. Captain Fladger in a few months resigned, and Harris Covington, First Lieutenant, became,Captain, the other Lieutenants went up, and Captain Finklea was elected Third Lieutenant, made vacant. Some time after Covington resigned, and the company was reorganized by orders from the proper authorities, and Captain Finklea was elected Captain of the company, and served gallantly until the latter part of 1864--having fought through all the campaigns from Virginia to Mississippi. At that time Captain Finklea was the senior Captain in the regiment, when,by the casualties of war the Major's office became vacant, and according to rules of promotion, Captain Finklea was entitled to the place; but a junior Captain was promoted, by appointment, not by election, to the Majoralty over him; when Captain Finklea resigned and came home, and did not return to the service. It was said he was a good and brave Captain; that his men all loved and respected him, but he was not popular with the higher officers, because he always associated with his men and not with them. Captain Finklea is known as a modest, retiring man; not self-asserting. Had the vacancy for Major been left to his company, he would have gotten the vote of every man; he sympathized with his men, fared as they fared, and assumed no superiority over them on

A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY.

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account of his position. As an evidence of Captain Finklea's popularity, when he was first elected County Commissioner, a few years ago (he was twice elected), he received every vote at Berry's Cross Roads, something over 200. He is a man of good sense, a good and safe manager of his farm and home affairs, unostentatious,and unassuming, rather avoids company --unfortunately, of late years, his habits are not good. After the war he went, first, to Alabama and then to Texas, where he married a Miss Kyle; she had one child for him, a son, who died in infancy, and the mother died; he then came back to South Carolina, and married the widow of Dr. William H. Godbold, a most excellent and cultured woman; by her he had one son, named for his first wife, a very promising boy, but he died at the age of four or five years. William Finklea, the youngest brother, died when about grown. Lucinda, the oldest daughter, married John T. Kinney, of Marlborough, and emigrated to Texas, where they raised a family; both are dead, and nothing is known further of them. Sallie, the second daughter, married Cyrus B. Haselden; they had and raised five children, two sons, John and Frank, and three daughters, Lucy, Maggie and Fannie. Cyrus B. Haselden and wife, Sallie, and family, have already been noticed in or among the Haseldens. Margaret Agnes, the youngest daughter of Willis Finklea and wife, Margaret, never married, and died of cancer on the breast, at the age of forty, in March, 1882. A noble girl she was. Martha Ann Bethea, the third and youngest daughter of old man Philip Bethea, married W. W. Sellers, the writer, 10th January, 1847, and died 2d February,1893; they had seven children, four sons, John C., William W., Benjamin Morgan and Philip B.; of these, Benjamin Morgan died a little under two years of age; three daughters, Anna Jane, Rachel C. and Mary 0. Of the sons, John C. is a graduate of the South Carolina College, studied law, was admitted to the bar in1870, was elected to the Legislature in 1870, practiced law only one year, and retired on the farm where he now lives; his first wife was Miss Maggie E. Mace, daughter of the late John Mace; she had seven children, three sons, Benjamin B., John M. and Wallace Duncan; of these, John M. died under one year old; there were four daughters, Lucy B., Annie R., Maggie Leila,
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A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY

and Maggie EIlen (called Pearl). Benjamin B. Sellers is a graduate of Wofford College; married Miss Norma Watson, youngest daughter of the late William Watson; they have two children, Harry and Margaret Ellen; he is farming. Wallace Duncan's education is not completed. Of the daughters, Lucy B. is a graduate of the Columbia Female College; she married D. Maxcy Watson; they have no children. Annie R. went to the Female College for more than a year, but did not graduate; is unmarried. Maggie Leila is near grown, is going to school. Maggie E.., called Pearl, was only three days old when her mother died , her Aunt Rachel Norton took her and has so far raised her; she is near thirteen years of age. W. W. Sellers, Jr., married Miss Harriet J. McPherson, daughter of C. Ervin McPherson, of West Marion; they have had seven or eight children, only three of whom are living--two daughters, Rachel Elise and Etta; the son is Marvin McSwain--none of them grown. W. W. Sellers, Jr., is one of the Chiefs in the present State Constabulary, and has been for several years; he resides at Latta. Philip B. Sellers is a graduate of Wofford College; studied law and was admitted to, the bar in I884 (May) ; he married Miss M. Sue DuBois, daughter of J. T. DuBois, of Marion, in December, 1886; they have five children, three sons, John DuBois, Philip Bruce and William Maynard, and two daughters, Agnes Leona and Mildred Eugenia--all children, none grown; he resides at Dillon, and is actively engaged in the practice of his chosen profession, with apparent success. Of the daughters of the writer and his wife, Anna Jane, the eldest daughter married her cousin, D. N. Bethea; he and Anna Jane and their family have been already noticed in the same connection, Betheas. The second daughter of W. W. Sellers and wife married Hon. James Norton, of Mullins; they had but two children, sons, Evan Lewis and William Fitzroy. Evan Lewis, the eldest, died when four or five years of age. William Fitzroy grew up to manhood; first Went to Wofford College, and after two years spent there, he went to the law department of the South Carolina College for two years, graduated in law, and ipso facto became a lawyer--he does not practice, however; he married Miss Florence Smith, daughter of B. Gause Smith, at Mullins; they reside at Mullins, and have no

A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY

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children. Mary 0. Sellers, youngest daughter of W. W. Sellers, married Thomas N. Godbold, a son of Dr. W. H. Godbold; they have only three children living, Thomas Carroll, Anna and Bessie. Thomas N. Godbold is in the railroad service, on the "Plant System" between Charleston and Savannah. This family has already been noticed in or among the Godbold family. Recurring back a few lines: John C. Sellers, after living about ten years a widower, married, a second time, to Miss Jaquiline Oliver, of North Carolina, 2d February, 1898 --a most excellent woman; they have had two children, boys, who are both dead. Elisha Bethea, fourth son of old "Buck Swamp John," known as old Colonel Elisha, never married. It is said of him that he,was a very handsome man in his young days; he was born in 1787, and was Captain of a company in the war of 1812; he was better educated than any of his brothers--in fact, better than most men,of his day. His father left him a fine property, his homestead and a large number of negroes; few men of that time had such a prospect. He was very popular and had more natural politeness than any Bethea I ever saw. But, alas! the demon of intemperance ruined him; he died poor in 1854, at the age of sixty-seven years. After the war of 1812, he became Colonel of the militia. He was true to his friends and true to his country. It seemed to be his delight to make others pleasant, happy and comfortable even at the expense of his own convenience. This was the man after he became poor, which proved it to be natural with him. His bearing and appearance in poverty and old age,was that of a nobleman, of a cavalier. Parker Bethea, the youngest son of old "Buck Swamp John," was born in 1790 and was given his mother's maiden name, Parker; he settled opposite the head of Catfish, at the Cross Roads on the Marlborough line, twenty two miles above Marion, and died there, St. John the Evangelist Day, 27th December, 1867; he married Elizabeth Harllee, daughter of old Thomas Harllee; they raised two sons, Harllee and Benjamin Parker, and four or five daughters. Harllee had one son, Reddin, and Benj. P. had one named Charles. Harllee moved to Florida many years ago; his wife was a Miss Roberts--Benj. P.'s wife was a Miss Woolvin; he moved just after the war to Pender or Onslow County, N. C., thirty miles
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A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY.

on the coast above Wilmington. These families have already been noticed in or among the Roberts family and the Harllee family. One more remark about these old Betheas, sons of "Buck Swamp John." They all loved liquor and except old Philip, drank it to excess, till after middle life when they tapered off, and by the time of old age became perfectly abstemious, and this was specially the case with William, James and Parker. They were all good men and excellent citizens, and did much in starting the development of the resources of the county. The first gin house built in the county was built by old "Buck Swamp John;" it stood on,what has ever since been called the "Gin House Branch," near the Cross Roads, at John C. Bethea's plantation; a good part of that gin house is still in use. After the death Of old "Buck Swamp John," in 1821, the plantation fell to old Colonel Elisha, and he in his financial extremities years afterwards sold the gin house to Cross Roads Henry Berry; he pulled it down and hauled it to Berry's Cross Roads, and it stands there now, the property of James Berry, between his (James Berry's) dwelling and the storehouse. It has been there, to the writer's knowledge, more than sixty years. Of the grand-sons of old "English John," John settled on Buck Swamp, as already stated, and William settled on Sweat Swamp; he married, and had four sons, John, Goodman, Philip and Jessie. Of these, John, the man who, after the Revolution, hung the Tory, Snowden, married, and he had and raised four sons, William, Tristram, John and Cade--the latter, no doubt, is remembered by many now living in upper Marion and elsewhere in the county. Goodman Bethea married and had two sons, Philip and Jessie. Philip, the brother of Goodman, never married, or if he did, he had no children. Jessie, the fourth son of old "Sweat Swamp William," had Hugh, Goodman, William, Henry and Tristram. According to the Bethea chart none of these latter five had any posterity. Supposed they emigrated to parts unknown or died in youth. William, the grandson of "Sweat Swamp William," had seven sons, John, Tristram, Philip, Jessie, William, Thomas C. and Cade. Of these latter, John, William, Thomas C. and Cade had no offspring.

A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY.

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Cade is in upper Marion now an old man.* Of the other three, Tristram had one son, named William; Philip had four sons, Jessie, William, Tristram and Philip--these last four seem to have had no offspring. Jessie, the great-grand-son of old "Sweat Swamp William," had five sons, John, William, Charles, Farquehard and Holden; their mother was a Miss Bethune; she had some daughters, one the wife (now dead) of Patrick Finagan. By the Bethea chart now lying before me, none of these five latter Betheas have any offspring, but the writer knows to the contrary. John has twelve or thirteen children, boys and girls. Holden married Miss Alice Rogers, daughter of Jessie Rogers, and has some children. The Bethune wife Of Jessie Bethea had a daughter other than Mrs. Finagan, who was the wife of the late Edward C. Shrewsberry. Tristram, the grand-son of old "Sweat Swamp William," married and had one son, Philip, who was a lawyer, but did not practice much here, and soon went to Alabama, and his father soon after moved himself there; father and son have been lost sight of--suppose both are long since dead. John, another grandson of "Sweat Swamp William," married Miss Hannah Walker; by the marriage four sons, William W., Alfred W., David W. and John B., were had and raised, and five daughters, Sophia, Mary Ann, Charlotte, Sallie and Hannah. Of the sons, William W. married, first, Mary Bethea, a granddaughter of "Buck Swamp John"; they had three sons, John F., Dallas and William; don't know of any daughters by William W.'s first marriage; he married, a second time, Miss Mary Platt, a daughter of old Daniel Platt; by his (Platt's) second marriage with Polly Lane, a daughter of old James C. Lane, who was a son of old Osborne Lane, I know of but two children; by William W. Bethea's second marriage, two daughters--Hettie, the wife of John C. Bethea, of Dillon, who has already been mentioned; the other daughter married a Mr. Floyd, a son of judge Floyd, of Alabama or Mississippi. J. F. Bethea (our Dr. Frank Bethea) married his first cousin, Hannah Jane, daughter and only child of Dr. Alfred W. Bethea; by this marriage eight sons, Alfred, Preston L., Tristram, William, Frank, Charles Archie and Victor, and I think, three _________________________________________________________ *Died recently.
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A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY.

daughters, Flora and two others whose names are not known, have been born. Alfred (I think) died about the time of his majority. Preston L. married a Miss Weatherby, daughter of Colon W. Weatherby, of Bennettsville, and resides at Dillon. Tristram married a Miss McRae, daughter of Hon. James McRae, of Albriton, in extreme upper Marion; he resides at Dillon. Frank married a Miss Smith, of Alabama or Georgia, and is now a resident of one of those States. William recently married a Miss McLeod, of Robeson County, N. C. The other three sons are yet with their father, Dr. Frank, I suppose, not grown. Of the daughters of Dr. J. F. Bethea, the eldest, Flora, married Tristram Thompson; she was a most excellent lady, loved and respected by all who knew her. The Doctor's two other daughters are minors and still with him. Dr. J. F. Bethea is a successful man every way; as a farmer, he is a man of affairs, a turpentine and saw mill man, is merchandising at Dillon, he and his sons (don't know how many or which), under the firm name of J.F. Bethea & Co.; he has once represented the county in the State Legislature. Dallas Bethea, brother of Dr. J. F. Bethea, is in Mississippi; he has three sons, William, Preston and Franklin. Alfred W., another great-grandson of "Sweat Swamp William," married Flora Bethea, a daughter of Tristram Bethea, of Floral College, who was one of the "Cape Fear set," and by her had only one child, a daughter, Hannah Jane, who married Dr. J. F. Bethea, with the results above stated. Dr. Alfred W. Bethea was no ordinary man; he was eminent as a physician, a good farmer, a well-informed man and of sound practical sense and judgment; he was a member of the Secession Convention of 1860; he was waylaid, shot and killed by the deserters in the last months of the war, much regretted by all who knew him; he lived where Dr. J. F. Bethea now lives; the widow, who survived him, is now dead. David W. Bethea, another great-grandson of "Sweat Swamp William," married, first, Miss Sarah Tane Manning, daughter of Mealy Manning, of Marlborough; by her he had two sons, LeRoy and David W., they are both married. LeRoy has two sons, Henry and Leon--these have already been mentioned in or among the Mannings and Easterlings, to which reference is made. David W., Jr., has lately married, I think, a Miss

A HISTORY OF MARION COUNTY

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Townsend, of North Carolina; gives promise of becoming a useful man--is already so; if like his mother he cannot be otherwise, as she was one of the best of women. D. W. Bethea, Sr., represented the county one time in the Legislature, 1860-1862; he was a good citizen; he married, a second time, a Miss Brunson, of Darlington, who yet survives; no offspring. John B. Bethea (the youngest), another great-grandson of "Sweat Swamp William," married Elizabeth A. Bethea, a daughter of Captain Elisha C., of the "Buck Swamp set;" they had four sons, as already mentioned among the "Buck Swamp set," to which reference is made. Of the daughters of John Bethea, the grandson of "Sweat Swamp William," as given herein above, Sophia, the eldest, married Robert B. Platt, and in a few weeks or months after her marriage she was accidentally burned to death, and, of course, died childless. Mary Ann, the second daughter, married Levi Bethea, of the "Buck Swamp set" and has already been herein noticed in the "Buck Swamp set," to which reference is made. Charlotte and Sallie, the third and fourth daughters, both married the same evening--Charlotte to Zack Fulmore and Sallie to Dr. John K. Alford, both of North Carolina, Where they thereafter lived and died; know but little of the family of either. Hannah, the fifth and youngest daughter, married Alexander Fulmore, of North Carolina; they moved to Alabama; know nothing of them. Cade Bethea, the youngest grandson of old "William of Sweat Swamp," through his son, John, married Kittie Bethea, a sister of "Floral College Tristram," and a great-granddaughter of Tristram, the son of "English John," who settled on Cape Fear River, N. C.--her father being Jessee and her grand-father was Jessee, whose father was Tristram, the settler on Cape Fear, whose father was old "English John." This I get from the chart now lying before me. Cade Bethea and Kittie had and raised five sons and three daughters; the sons were John W., Evander R., William C., Calvin and Henry; the daughters were Caroline, Harriet and Mary Ann. Cade Bethea settled on Sweat Swamp, north side, just opposite the mouth of Beaver Dam, on the south side, where he lived and died; I think the place now belongs to Hon. D. W. McLaurin. There was but one Cade Bethea in regard to character; he was

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