Notes

[NI0019] September 24, 1998 e-mail:
"I have a lot of information on the Oldfield's. My 4xgreat grandfather was William Oldfield, who is a son of Joseph and Martha. A lot of the information that I have is not first hand research, but I have aquired it
over the computer thru the Family Tree Maker and some other forums. There are a lot of Oldfields. I don't have all of them on the computer yet. But when I do I will gladly send it then if some one else hasn't already done it. (By the way I am also looking for more Oldfield connections).
Linette Batterman
tbatter@mato.com""
September 25, 1998 e-mail:
The first Oldfield in America was John Born About 1630 and died before May 24, 1691 he married Sarah (Post?) I'm not sure of the last name.
Their children:
Richard
John Jr
William
Daniel
Joseph born about 1670, died about May 14, 1741 Goshen, Orange County, New York.
Joseph married Martha Grassett Before May 28, 1699
Their children:
Joseph Jr
Augustus Grassett
Martha
Esther
Mary
Richard
Daniel
Elias, Sr...
Linette Batterman
tbatter@mato.com""

[NI0020] e-mail of September 25, 1998:
"Martha Grasset was born October 1, 1675, La Rochelle, France. Her Parents were Auguste Grassett and Marie Pele. Auguste Grassett was born January 18, 1644/45, La Rochelle, Aunis, France, Christening: Feb 5, 1645, Huguenot Temple, La Rochelle, Aunis, France. August Died April 7, 1712, New York, New York (He was murdered during the Negro insurrection in 1712).
Auguste' Parents were Pierre Grassett & Elizabeth Costrandeur. They were married Dec 7, 1642 in the Hueguenot Temple, LaRochelle, Aunis, France.
Marie Pele's parents were Pierre Pele and Marie Gautier...
I found some information on the Grassett's in a book about the French Hueguenot's in America that is in our public library.
Augustus and Mary Grassett, nautralized in England, March 8, 1682, came as early as 1689 to New York where Grassett became a leading merchant and government official, and one the "chefs de famille" of the French Church.
He was murdered in the Negro insurrection April 7, 1712.
Linette Batterman
tbatter@mato.com""

[NI0161] "NAME Anthony Swarthout
Birthdate 1735
Place Goshen, Orange Co., NY
Death Date 20 Nov 1815
Place Ovid, Seneca Co., NY...
From Swartwout Chronicles: On June 8, 1775, Anthony Swartwout, Sr., Anthony Swartwout, Jr. and Jacobus Swartwout were signers of the pledge of association at Goshen, Orange Co., NY." (2)
"Names of the signers of the above, from the present town of Deer Park (then a part of Town of Mamakating, Ulster Co.,) June 26,1775...
Philip Swartout, Esq....
Harmanus Van Inwegen...
Jacobus Swartout
Gerardus Swartout
Philip Swartout, Jr....
Daniel Van Fleet, Jr...
Isaac Roosa...
Names of the Signers from the old Town of Minisink (Now divided into Minisink, Mount Hope, Wawayanda and Greenville)
Wilhelmus Westfall...
Jacob Quick...
Aldert Osterhoudt...
Petrus Cuykendall
Isaac Davis...
Ephraim Middaugh...
Solomon Cuykendal...
Simon Westfall...
Jacobus Vanfliet, Jr.
Jacobus Vanfliet...
S. Cuykendal, Jr." (3)
"Among the persons named at that time as exempt from miltary service were Anthony, Sr. and Jacobus. Anthony Swartwout, Jr. was enrolled as living then in Blooming Grove District of Orange Co., NY (east of Goshen and north of Chester). After the war, in 1784, Anthony, Jr.'s father, Anthony, Sr. sold his land in Orange Co. and migrated to Pennsylvania. By 1788, Anthony, Jr. had moved to the town of Ovid...
Following typed from "New Genealogy" book purchased at Swarthout Reunion in Romulus in September, 1993: Anthony Swarthout, Sr. married Mary Armstrong. Their home was in Goshen, Orange Co., New York where their children Anthony, John, Ralph, Nathaniel, Bernardus and four daughters were born. One daughter married Abram Henries; another Mickens Boardman; another William Cury; and another James Cooley... On May 10, 1784, Anthony Swarthout, yeoman, and his wife, Mary, of the precinct of Goshen, conveyed to David Mapes for 122 pounds sterling; all that tract or parcel of land situated lying and being in the county of Orange, aforesaid and part and parcel of land situated lying and being in the county of Orange, aforesaid and part and parcel of a large tract of 1320 acres surveyed by Benjamin Stevens between the 18th and 30th days of October 1770, containing 200 acres...
11/20/1792: William Vredenburg sold to Anthony Swartwout, Sr. from Romulus land in lot 94, town of Romulus, for 300 pounds.
At the first town meeting on 4/1/1794, Anthony was elected one of the overseers of roads, and John Swarthout (probably his son) one of the fence layers. A memorial of inhabitants living between the Lakes Seneca and Cayuga (was) presented to the legislature of the state of NY on June 27, 1795. Among the 20 names subscribed are those of Nathaniel, Anthony and John Swartwout.
1800 Census, Cayuga Co., Romulus township
Anthony 00021 00003 11
From Dick Apolant letter, 2232 Hudson Avenue, Rochester, NY: Anthony Swartwout, Sr. was born in Goshen, Orange Co., NY; married Mary Armstrong about 1758. In 1788, he settled in Ovid, Seneca Co. where he died at the age of 102.
5/10/1784 - Anthony and Mary sold Orange County lands: 1788 Anthony moved to Ovid, then Montgomery Co., NY
6/10/1993 - Received post GENIE from Mary Jane Turner quoting 10,000 Vital Records of Western, NY 1809-1850: Swartout, Anthony died about 100; died 11/29/1815 in Ovid....
The "Indenture made 25th day of Sept 1815 between Anthony Swarthout of Ovid and Ralph Swarthout and Barna Swarthout for sum of $1000 for certain parcel of land lying and being in town of Romulus in the county of Seneca... situated and lying at or near the dwelling house of the said Anthony Swarthout. Deed signed with X, the mark of Anthony Swarthout, Sr.
From Supplement to the "Swarthouts of the Finger Lakes": Anthony Swarthout, Sr. is buried in a cemetary located by Riding Creek, formerly called Swarthout Creek, in Seneca Co. not far from the edge of the lake, about 400 feet east of the Lake Road...
Children
Anna
Catherine
Rachel b. ca. 1755
Anthony b. 4 Jul 1759 Chester, Orange Co., NY
John 1760 Goshen
Nathaniel b. 14 Oct 1762 Goshen d. 13 Oct 1803 Romulus
Ralph...
Barnardus b. 1 Sep 1771 Goshen d. 20 Oct 1838
Elizabeth b. 3 Jan 1771 Goshen d. 23 Apr 1859 Fayette, Seneca Co., NY
Hannah b. Jul 1773 d. 2 Oct 1844" (1)
This presumably means that he was illiterate.
"Anthony, son of Antoni Swartwout of the town of Goshen, Orange County, N.Y., province of New York, married Mary Armstrong.
Children:
Anthony
Ralph (Roeloff), born in the town of Goshen January 1, 1764
Barnardus, born in the town of Goshen September 1, 1771
Memoranda. On June 8, 1775, Anthony Swarthout, senior, Anthony Swarthout, junior, and Jacobus Swarthout were among the signers of the pledge of association, at Goshen, Orange County, N.Y. Anthony Swartwout, junior, was enrolled as living then in the Blooming Grove District. On May 10, 1784, Anthony Swarthout, yeoman, and Mary, his wife, of the precinct of Goshen, conveyed to David Mapes, for 1200 pounds... 200 acres." (4)
"Soon after the Wisners settled in the township of Romulus, Anthony Swarthout of the town of Goshen in Orange County, came to Romulus and November 20, 1792, Anthony Swarthout purchased 500 acres of land in lot 94 of the township, adjacent to the lot where the Wisners had made their home. This purchase encouraged other Swarthout families to come to Romulus or to the adjacent township of Ovid to the south. In fact, by the year 1801 the families of Anthony, Barnabus, John, Nathaniel, and Ralph Swarthout had become residents of the townships of Ovid or Romulus in what then became a part of a new county named Onondaga." (5)
"Anthony [Swarthout] married Mary Armstrong. Anthony, Sr., Jacob, and Anthony's son, Anthony, Jr., were signers of the pledge of association at Goshen, Orange County, NY on June 8, 1775. Anthony, Sr. and Jacobus were both exempt from military service at that time. At the same time Anthony, Jr., was enrolled as living in the Blooming Grove district. On May 10, 1784, Anthony Swartwout, yeoman, and Mary, his wife, of the precinct of Goshen, conveyed to David Mapes for £1200 "all that Tract or Parcel of Land, situate, lying, and being in the county of Orange... of thirteen hundred and twenty acres." (Book of Deeds, D., pages 82 & 83 at Goshen) On April 1, 1794, at the first town meeting, Anthony Swartwout, Senior, was elected as one of the overseers of roads. On June 27, 1795, a memorial of the inhabitants, living between Seneca Lake and Cayuga Lake, was presented to the New York State legislature. According to this memorial, the petitioners settled there in 1788. Among these petitioners were Nathaniel, Anthony, and John Swartwout. Anthony, Barnardus, John, and Nathaniel Swartwout's names appear on a list of electors in the town of Romulus in 1801. Anthony and Mary had three children:

I. Anthony had a child named George F. Swarthout.
II. Ralph was born at Goshen on January 1, 1764. He married on November 24, 1782 to Louis (Lois) Halstead (born in Orange County on October 1, 1767). Ralph was a resident of Goshen until about 1795 when he moved his family to a farm on the west branch of the Susquehannah River. He lived there only about a year. He then moved his family to the town of Ovid, then part of Onondaga County. They settled on lot 94 of the military tract near the site of the Willard Asylum. Ovid later became part of Cayuga County, and then, about 1803, became part of Seneca County. Ralph died in Ovid on December 11, 1843. Louis died at Ovid on December 28, 1848. Ralph and Louis had:

1. Mary was born at Goshen on December 27, 1783.
2. Benjamin was born at Goshen on April 8, 1786.
3. James was born at Goshen on August 31, 1788.
4. William was born at Goshen on February 15, 1792.
5. Elisabeth was born at Goshen on January 14, 1793.
6. Anthony was born at Ovid on September 28, 1796.
7. Martha was born at Ovid on May 28, 1799.
8. Lois was born at Ovid on February 5, 1802.
9. Sophia was born at Ovid on May 28, 1804.
10. Ralph was born at Ovid on January 4, 1807.
11. Sarah Ann was born at Ovid on April 23, 1811.

III. Barnadus was born at Goshen on September 1, 1771. " (6)

1) Ruth Thoden
2) Ibid.
3) History of Minisink, p. 74-7
4) The Swartwout Chronicles (see Tomys) p. 591
5) Harrold, p. 61-2
6) David R. Jansen's Northeast United States Genealogy Home Page

[NI0162] "Children:
Wilmot Halsted married Deborah lived in Minisink, Orange County
Dolly married Alexander Simpson
Mary married Barnardus Swartout
Sarah lived in Cayuga Co.
Unknown married Joseph Blain lived in Cayuga Co.
Cynthia married James Armstrong of Minisink
Lois married Ralph Swartout
Benjamin Halsted
Cynthia married Eli Patterson" (1)
(see Benjamin's will under Lois Halsted)
The Halsted's married two Swarthout brothers, so the families must have been close. For this reason I put Benjamin's place of death as Goshen.
"From Foley's History of Early Settlers of NYS, page 66: Benjamin Halsted died 5/10/1801, leaving no will. Later his farm was sold and following were included in names of his heirs: Lois, wife of Ralph Swarthout and Mary, wife of Barnardus Swarthout." (2)
In 1860 and 1861, John Halsted was Town Clerk of Minisink, Orange Co., New York. He is probably a descendant of Benjamin, who may have lived in Minisink township. (3)
"Benjamin (5) (1740-1801) [son of Richard Halsted and Esther Oldfield]" (4)
"Benjamin Halstead (ca 1740-1801), s of Richard and Sarah Halstead, m Ruth ---- (ca 1748-ca 1800). Residents of Orange county, New York.
[Children]
Lois...
Wilmot Halstead (1769-1831), m. 1792 Deborah Nealey (1771-1848), lived in Orange county, New York. Wilmot was appointed administrator of his father's estate in 1801.
Dolly Halstead b 1771, m ca 1789 Alexander Simpson, family migrated before 1801 from Orange county to what is now Seneca county, New York.
Mary Halstead (1772-1835), m ca 1789 Barnabus Swarthout (1771-1838) who after the death of Mary married 2nd Catherine ---------. Barnabus and Mary migrated before 1801 from Orange to what is now Seneca county, New York, and were prnt of 11 ch.
Benjamin Halstead (ca 1775-1834), m 1802 Anna Wisner (1784-1876), prnt of 11 ch., resided in Seneca and Niagara counties, New York, and Washtenaw county, Michigan.
Sarah Halstead b 1777, migrated before 1801 from Orange county to what is now Seneca county, New York, m before 1803 Joseph Blain.
Cynthia Halstead b ca 1779, m before 1810 Eli Patterson.
Martha Halstead b ca 1781, m ca James Armstrong, resided in Orange County, New York." (5)
"Benjamin Halstead, the son of Richard and Esther Halstead, is believed to have been born about 1740 in the town of Goshen, Orange county, New York. However, no vital record has been found by this author to verify this date...
About 1766, Benjamin Halstead married a woman whose first name was Ruth but whose maiden name is not presently known...
The Story of a Revolutionary War Soldier
Benjamin Halstead and his father were partisans to the cause of the American colonies during the struggle with Great Britain. Like his father, Benjamin was one of the men in Goshen who on June 8, 1775, signed the Revolutionary Pledge of loyalty to the colonies in opposition to the acts of Britain.
It is believed that after his marriage, Benjamin Halstead and his family lived in or near the village of Chester, about four miles southeast of Goshen. At the beginning of the hostilities in 1775, many residents of Chester made up a company of militia under Captain John Jackson, which company was a unit of the Third Regiment of Orange County, New York Militia, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel William Allison, who was also from the village of Chester. Benjamin Halstead was one of the men who enlisted in Captain Jackson's company.
In 1776, a number of officers and men were transferred from Colonel Allison's regiment to a unit known as the Minute Company under the command of Captain Moses Hatfield. As a result, Benjamin Halstead was made a second lieutenant in the Third Regiment of Orange County, New York Militia. This regiment was known as the Goshen Regiment.
In addition to serving in the militia himself, Benjamin Halstead recruited others to serve in the militia and for this he was given land bounty rights as provided by various Acts of New York State." (6)
In the fall of 1777, the Third Regiment of Orange County, under the command of Colonel William Allison, was one of the units of the New York State Militia called up and stationed at Fort Montgomery [near Popolopen Creek on the Hudson] to garrison the fort. Lieutenant Benjamin Halstead was one of the officers of that Goshen Regiment...
On October 3rd the first contingent of British forces left New York followed by others on the 4th. By October 5th the convoy of British ships carrying a total of 4,000 men arrived at a point south of Peekskill on the east bank of the Hudson...
under the cover of darkness and fog, [General Clinton] landed his main force at Stoney Point on the west bank of the Hudson early in the morning of October 6th. From here they moved west about two miles inland and then, following back country roads northward, came up to the back of Fort Clinton and Fort Montgomery, attacking them simultaneously from the west at about 4:30 in the afternoon of October 6, 1777...
Prior to this time, as many members of the local militia as possible had been summoned to aid the two forts but only about 600 men were available to hold the forts against a superior force of about 3,000 of the enemy.
The British sent a message to the forts demanding the surrender of the forts and the surrender of all personnel as prisoners of war. The Americans replied that they were determined to defend the forts to the end. The action then began with vigor and continued on into the early evening.
The Americans resolutely defended their positions but the British continued a vigorous and incessant attack upon the two forts. Many times the British were repulsed and beaten back from our breastworks with great casualties but they moved up fresh troops and pressed on. They overpowered the defenders of the forts with numbers and by evening had gained entrances to each of the forts at various places. Further resistance was impractical and the American defenders were forced either to throw down their arms and surrender or to fight their way out of the fort in order to escape the enemy. Both Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton were overwhelmed by the British at approximately the same time...
It was reported by the British that they captured 26 officers and 237 privates as prisoners and an unknown number of American men were killed in action. Two of the men who were unable to escape and were taken prisoner by the British were Lieutenant Colonel William Allison and Lieutenant Benjamin Halstead, both being of the Third Regiment of Orange County from the town of Goshen...
Prisoner of War...
After the fall of Fort Montgomery and Fort Clinton the prisoners were taken by ship to King's Bridge in the New York City area where the British were firmly in control. Later they were taken to Long Island which was held by the British troops and which was the major source of supplies of wool and food for the British in the New York area. The privates and the non-commissioned officers were kept in prison camps but it is understood that the officers were given greater freedom...
In spite of probable better treatment, the American officers, after nearly three years of captivity were unhappy and petitioned for relief as follows:
'To His Excellency the Governor and The Honourable Senate and General Assembly of the State of New York.
The Memorial of the officers prisoners of War of the said State Humbly shewth, That your memorialists have endured a long, tedius and irksom confinement, subject not only to those disagreeable and humiliating sensations inseperable from a state of captivity; but finally find ourselves unfortunately left to struggle with all calamities of indigency and want. A whole year has now elaps'd since we have received the smallest supply or our board paid; with the rest of our fellow prisoners in general, and the small sum then handed us was barely sufficient to pay our debts, and furnish us with the then necessary articles of Cloathing...
We trust we have hitherto supported ourselves with a patience and perseverance becoming to the soldier and Citizen, and that the same line of conduct will continue to mark our character...'
The above petition was dated at Long Island, May 24, 1780...
Passes were given by Governor Clinton to Mrs. Allison wife of Colonel Allison, Mrs. McClaghry wife of Colonel McClaghry, Mrs. Logan wife of Major Logan, Mrs. Halstead wife of Lieutenant Benjamin Halstead, and Mrs. Brewster wife of Lieutenant Brewster. The wives, together with others were sent in a sloop under a flag of truce to New York on May 16, 1779.
It appears that the British officer who was in charge did not honor the request of Governor Clinton because one of the other persons allowed on the sloop had not been properly granted a permit and the ladies returned to Poughkeepsie greatly distressed at their disappointment. On May 28, 1779, Governor Clinton wrote to the British commander in New York with explanations and apologies and eventually the wives were allowed to visit their prisoner husbands on Long Island.
Writing from Goshen on September 12, 1780, Mrs. Allison again asked Governor Clinton for a pass for herself and for Mrs. Halstead which would permit them to go to New York and visit their respective prisoner husbands on Long Island. It would appear that after minor delays, permission was granted for a visit also in 1780. Family records show that Benjamin and Ruth Halstead were parents of daughter Cynthia about 1780 and daughter Martha about 1781 while Benjamin was still a prisoner of war on Long Island...
An undated record states that the name of Benjamin Halstead, Lieutenant, appears on "a List of Officers whose exchanges have taken place at the last meeting of the American and British Commissaries of Prisoners at New York...
It is assumed that Benjamin Halstead was released as a prisoner of war by the British sometime in 1782...
Benjamin Halstead returned to his home and family in the town of Goshen after being released by the British. By then he was about 42 years old and wife Ruth was about 35 years old... The family lived in the village of Chester in the town of Goshen and Benjamin worked as carpenter.
The 1790 United States census for the town of Goshen, Orange County, New York, lists Benjamin Halstead as the head of a family consisting of one male over 16, one male under 16, and five females...
On June 11, 1790, Benjamin Halstead purchased 600 acres of land in the Wawayanda Patent, town[ship] of Minisink, Orange County, for a sum of 600 pounds current money of New York. It appears that the Halstead family then moved from the village Chester in the town[ship] of Goshen to the town[ship] of Minisink. Records show that Benjamin and Ruth Halstead were residents of the town[ship] of Minisink in 1791.
The next year, on September 1, 1791, Benjamin and Ruth Halstead sold 199 1/4 acres of their property in the town[ship] of Minisink for 220 pounds to their son-in-law, Ralph Swarthout of the town of Minisink, husband of Lois Halstead Swarthout. Also on that same date, Benjamin and Ruth Halstead sold to James Armstrong (Note: It has not been determined whether or not this James Armstrong is the same one who married Martha Halstead, the youngest daughter of Benjamin and Ruth Halstead, about 1800.) of the town of Minisink 196 3/4 acres of their property in Minisink for 180 pounds.
A record has not been found indicating the date when Ruth Halstead died. It is believed that she died before her husband and that Marthat Halstead and her husband James Armstrong, who were married in 1800, lived with Benjamin Halstead at the time of his death. Benjamin Halstead died on May 10, 1801, in the town[ship] of Minisink. It is not presently known where either Benjamin Halstead or his wife Ruth Halstead were buried but it is probable that both were buried in the Halstead cemetery north of "Old Rome" near the northern boundary of the town[ship] of Minisink, Orange County, New York." (7)
1) Ruth Thoden
2) Ruth Thoden
3) Stickney, Charles E., A History of the Minisink Region (Middletown 1867), p. 125
4) Halstead, William Leon; The Story of the Halsteads of the United States (Ann Arbor 1934) p. 61
5) Harrold, p. 34
6) Ibid., 33-6
7) Ibid., 38-53

[NI0216] "Thomas Kelsey, probably second son and third child of Mark Kelsey and his first wife, Rebecca Hoskins, born Oct. 16, 1663 at Wethersfield. He resided at Windsor where he died May 9, 1715. He married about 1686-88 Elizabeth _____, who died at Windsor Jan 31, 1725/6.
Children: 9 (Kelsey), two sons and seven daughters, the four eldest probably at Wethersfield, last five births recorded at Windsor.
Elizabeth, born about 1689, died after 1726
Mark, born 1692; living 1726
Abigail, born 1695
Rachel, born ______; died 1798 (Since the arranging of these children, we have received information that Rachel lived to be 107 years old.
Thomas, born July 10, 1701
Ruth, born Jan 10, 1704/5
Hannah, born June 6, 1707
Rebecca, born Jan 10, 1709
Mabel, born June 7, 1712
Thomas Kelsey was probably younger than his brother John, who died unmarried in 1685, and was therefore, in all probability, the third child of Mark and Rebecca Hoskins... We know that his wife was named Elizabeth from the records of settlement of his estate, no marriage record has been found." (1)
1) Kelsey Genealogy p. 59-60

[NI0246] "Benjamin Halstead... m Ruth ---------- (ca 1748-ca 1800)." (1)
1) Harrold

[NI0274] "Annis Bartoo b. 20 Nov 1829" (1)
"Annis Bartoo wife of Jacob Henry Whiteman
Annis daughter of Jesse L. and Caroline Barnes Bartoo
Born November 20, 1829 Greene, N.Y.
Married December 14, 1847 at Jasper, by Jack Townley, Esq.
died W. Clarksville, N.Y. April 17, 1903
buried W. Clarksville, N.Y...
VII-1. Annis Bartoo, oldest child of Jesse Luce and Caroline Barnes Bartoo, was born November 29, 1829. She married Dec. 14, 1847, Jacob H. Whiteman of Jasper, N.Y. They moved to West Clarksville, Allegany County, N.Y. in 1850." (2)
1) Luce Genealogy p. 629
2) Arlene Whiteman

[NI0280] "Henrich Weydman (Whiteman, Wightman)... married Martha Van Vleet (Van Fleet) about 1799. Martha, daughter of John and Sarah (Swart) Van Vleet. The 1850 Census gives wife of Henry as "Nancy" so it would seem that Martha had died." (1)
"Martha (Nancy) daughter of John and Sarah Swart Van Vleet
born 1779
married
died between 1850 and 1855" (1)
Buried in a rural cemetery 1 mile east of Jasper, Steuben County, New York. Death date from the tombstone. Age at death listed as 76 years, 8 months, 29 days. Not listed in the 1850 Census. Her husband, Henry Whiteman is listed as married to Nancy, probably a second marriage. Nancy was apparently dead in 1855 (County Census).
According to van Vliet Dunn, Allison; A Genealogy of the van Vliet Family in America (1973), this family descends from " Adrian Gerritsen van Vliet b. in the Province of Utrecht, Netherlands; mar. Agatha Jans Spruyt, doubtedless a descendant of the ancient family of Spruyt of Kriekenbeck and Utrecht" (p. 5)
His child Gerrit, or Gerard "b. about 1649 in Province of Utrecht, Netherlands; mar. Pieternelle, daughter of Teunis Coenelissen and Elizabeth van der Linde...
1) Arlene Whiteman

[NI0286] Ancestral Files Sarah Swart AFN:1CRF-D8N Bap 12 Aug 1746 in Wallkill, NY Sponsors:William Krans & Wife, Elsje Moller Father: Stephanus Swart AFN:GMV3-6W Mother: Zara Decker AFN:1CRF-D17 Another Sarah Swart with the same parents was baptised in 1742, but probably died young. Wallkill is south of New Paltz and Esopus near Newburgh.
"14 Oct 1784
Johannis van Vliet, junior, j.m., born in Dutches [Dutchess] Co., and resid. under the jurisdiction of Kingston, and Sarah Swart, j.d. born and resid. under the jurisdiction of Kingston. Banns published, but dates not given." (1)
PROBABLY NOT THE CORRECT MARRIAGE
This would make Martha, if she were their daughter no older than 15 at the time she married Henry Whiteman and only 16 when her first child was born. That is very unlikely. There may be another John Van Vliet and Sarah Swart who resided in Schenectady.
Notice in NYG&B Record (January 1996):
2701. Swart. Any information regarding Cornelis Jacobsz, son of Jacob Willemsz Hilkers alias Swart, and Aeltje Cornelis, baptized 26 February 1640 in the Oudekerk, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. He married perhaps about 1665, became a carpenter in the East Indies, and was living 1679. Did he have a son Johannes Cornelisz born about 1694 and inherited his father's share of his grandfather's New Utrecht lands, assuming his grandfather's name "Swart"? Gwenn F. Epperson, 282 East Three Fountains Drive, Provo, UT 84604
This may be a possible ancestor.
Potential Source: Bray-Swart and Allied Families by Viola E. Bray; Americana Magazine Vol. XXXV 1941 p.51ff
"On July 26, 1876, Mr. Sutcliffe was married to Miss Sarah E. Swart. Her father William Beekman Swart, was of Dutch descent, a descendant of Anneke Jans, and an old settler of Dutchess County, whose father, Maj. Thomas Swart, served in the Revolutionary War." (2)
Cornelis and Thomas Swart are listed as heads of household in the 1790 Census in Rhinebeck, Dutchess County.
"Upper Red Hook...
Red Hook, November 9, 1798. Were chosen members of the consistory the following persons, Elder, Peter Heermance, in place of Cornelius Swart, who goes out." (3)
"Swart, Abraham [buried] Old Dutch Cem, Kingston, Ulster Co NY 1985" (4)
1) Hoes, Roswell Randall; Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston p. 648
2) Commemorative Biographical Record of Dutchess County, New York (1897 New York) p. 314
3) Smith, James H., History of Dutchess County, (Syracuse, 1882) p. 184
4) Abstracts of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots found by DAR Vol. IV, p. 91

[NI0288] "History of Brisbin (sic)
Until 1836 where now is Brisben there was only a Wayside Tavern and a saw mill, both built by Selah Barnes, and a small still on the back part of his farm where home-made whiskey was made. His first wife Annice, daughter of Elder Nathaniel Kellogg, and their children were: Amelia, Caroline, Jerome, Nelson, and Nathaniel K." (3)
Arlene Jones says that she was born in Greene.
John Peck was the first settled Minister (relation to the Merrimans?). There is a Selah Barnes b. 4 Mar 1769 in Southington, CT, where some of the Merrimans moved from Wallingford.
Her mother-in-law's (Eunice Loomis) family settled first in Smithville Flats, so it seems likely that this branch of the Barnes family settled in Smithville Flats/Greene. In the 1840 N.Y. Census Index Reuben, Selah and Seth Barnes are listed in Smithville. Reuben is listed there in the 1830 N.Y. Census Index.
She was buried near Little Valley. The cemetary has been obliterated, but according to the Book of Cemetary Inscriptions of the Cattauragus Historical Society, her tombstone read "Caroline wife of Jesse died August 14, 1857 aged 45 years, 2 months and 10 days." Also buried there is Jesse Bartoo's second wife, Malenda Chase. The cemetary is shown on an 1870's map in the Historical Society. I visited the area. It is on County Route 15 where it makes a right angle turn to the east and forms a triangle with New York State Route 242 as the hypotenuse.
"I am a direct descendant of Thomas Barnes of New Haven, who immigrated from England and died June 10, 1691. My line includes his son Maybee (born 1663 in New Haven); Gershom (born 1705 in Middletown); Col. Asa Barnes (born 1736 in New Haven); Asa Jr. (born 1765, Lanesboro, MA)
Your wife's Asa Barnes doesn't appear to be the same as my ancestors. My Asa Barnes Sr. was born in New Haven in 1736 and died in Charlotte VT in 1802. His son was born in Lanesboro, MA in 1765 and died in Lansingburgh, NY in 1809." (1)
"This is for John Hope re: Asa Barnes of New Haven. I have records from a Barnes Family Bible that was featured in the March 1941 Natl Genealogical Soc Quarterly. The bible was printed in Edinburgh in 1723, and contains transcribed records going back to early 1600's. There was an Asa Barnes, b. Wednesday, May 25, 1768 to Enos Barnes and Abigail Luddington (Abigail died 6-8-1768). I have confirmed Enos and Abigail and they are both buried in Footville Cem. Enos (Sr.) is son of Thomas Barnes (1687-1726) and Johanna Farnham, Thomas was son of John Barnes (1648-ca 1692) and Mercy Betts (1648-1692) (dau of Roger Betts of Branford). John Barnes was son of Thomas Barnes b. (England 1621-d New Haven 1691). This Thomas Barnes fought in Pequot War, signed original constitution and resided in New Haven.
Although the month doesn't match your posting the day and year (Mar vs. May) seem very likely to be your Asa. (He was my uncle, as I am descended from his brother Enos Sr. If you are interested in contacting me you can reply here, via email or internet to cdb@bae.bellcore.com."(1))
"'major Barnes immigrants:
1) Thomas Barnes b. Engl; settled Hingham, MA about 1634; wife Anna; 7 kids.
2) Thomas Barnes "of Hartford" write Frederic W. Barnes, 794 Chestnut Dr., Fairfield, CA 94533-1465 who just wrote a book on this line...
3) Thomas Barnes "of New Haven" - subject of James and Dave Barnes' posting here.
4) Thomas Barnes, settled Marlborough, MA 1656; wife Abigail Goodnow. No more info.
5) William Barnes, b. Eastwich, England; settled first in MA, then Long Island, NY in 1644.
6) Charles Barnes - possible brother of William; also settled Long Island" (2)
1) Dave Barnes (KTXM67A-Prodigy)
2) Mary Beth Wheeler (GCRF69B-Prodigy) quoting The Barnes Family Yearbook, 1907, article by Trescott Barnes, Grafton Press, 70 Fifth Ave., NY, NY (not listed in Manhattan White Pages)
3) Cochrane, Echoes of the Past, c. 1971 p. 200
Other Barnes Researchers:
James Barnes (TPYH55D-Prodigy)
Mary Beth Wheeler (GCRF69B-Prodigy)
Lynn Sullivan (Walnut Creek) (BJMF07B-Prodigy)

[NI0289] Son of Luce & Swartout (INCORRECT)
Enlisted 7/24/1863 at Bolivar N.Y. as a private in Company E - 51st N.Y. Infantry at age 33(?). He was 5'6", had blue eyes and light hair. His service card states only "faithful--good soldier". Also served in Company F - 109th N.Y. Infantry. National Archives 38865-335715. Bolivar is very close to W. Clarksville, so it is likely that the was living in that area in 1863.
He was married in the First Methodist Episcopal Church in Auburn, N.Y. by Rev. D.W. Bristol.
Widow Almira was granted a pension. (1)
"Lewis Swarthout b. about 1822 in Yates Co., N.Y., living in Clarksville, Allegany Co. in 1880. His father was James A. Swarthout b. 21 Aug 1788. His mother was Betsey Ketchem b. about 1787, Ora, N.Y. His spouse was Almira (no Maiden Name) born Cayuga, N.Y. 1850 Census Barrington, Yates Co., N.Y. No. 250 shows: Lewis, 26 b. N.Y.; Almira, 25 b. N.Y.
J.S Minard's "History of Allegany Co. and It's People" lists on page 938 under history of Clarksville a Lewis Swarthout who served in the Civil War.
Also from Allegany Co. Land Records, Belmont, NY - 1866 - Lewis B. Swarthout bought land in Scio 73:608, lot 6
1870 Census, Amity, Allegany Co., NY
Lewis B. Swarthout, 46 farmer $900, $500, b. NY
Elvira, 44
Mary, 18
George, 15
Winnie (sic), 13
Charles, 11
Sylvia (sic), 7
Rosa, 4

1880 Census, Clarksville, Allegany Co., NY
Lewis Swarthout, 55
Almira, 54
Charles, 19 b. 1861 (sic)"(2)
"Lewis was born in 1824 married Almira Swarthout of Auburn and settled in Friendship, Allegany Co. Their children were Eunice, Mary J., Charley, Minnie, George and Sylvia. Confirms that he was the son of James A. and Betsey Ketchum" (6)
"Anthony Swarthout came from Seneca County and settled the Asa Swarthout Farm (in the township of Wayne, Steuben County), on the banks of Keuka Lake, near Keuka, about 1806. He made a clearing, and built a log house and log barn. Around him was a howling wilderness. He lost eighteen sheep in one night by the wolves.
A village of Indian wigwams stood on the beach of the lake, just below Mr. Swarthout's house. His relations with the Indians were always friendly. He often enjoyed with them their hunting and fishing sports. He was a successful farmer, and a member of the Baptist Church. He died on the farm he settled. His children were Ezekial, John, Henry, Caleb, George, Andrew, (who was elected three years supervisor without opposition), Asa, Catharine, Anna, Elizabeth, and Mary." (5)
The Henry mentioned here may be the Henry who settled in West Clarksville.
An 1869 map of Clarksville shows "L.B. Swarthout" living in Section 6 of Clarksville Town near the road that branches NE 1 1/2 miles east on the road going east of town. (3)
His oldest daughter, Eunice married Jesse Whiteman, son on Jacob H. Whiteman and Annis Bartoo and his second daughter, Mary Jane, married George Whiteman, also the son of Jacob and Annis and great-grandfather of Ann. (4)
"Swarthout, Lewis B. -- Age, 33 years. Enlisted at Bolivar, to serve three years, and mustered in as a private, Co. F, July 24, 1863; transferred to Co. F, Fifty-first Infantry, May 31, 1865." (7)
51st New York, aka "the Shepard Rifles"....fact...."This distinguished regiment is included as one of William F. Fox's (circa 1889) top 300 Union Fighting Regiments."
1)Arlene Whiteman
2)Marilyn Jordan (GTBF70B-Prodigy)
3) West Clarksville Sesquicentennial 1835-1985, p. 45
4) Ibid., p. 75
5) Historical Gazeteer of Steuben County, p. 55
6) History of Yates County quoted by Dick Apolant, 2232 Hudson Avenue, Rochester, NY 14617 (Ruth Thoden)
7) Report of the Adjutant-General of the State of New York for 1903 Vol. 34 (Albany, 1904) p. 481
Other Swarthout researchers:
Nancy Curran (MBFH73A-Prodigy)
Helen Graves (NCEB78A-Prodigy)
Ruth Thoden (HLRF71A-Prodigy or Ruththoden@Delphi.com))
possible source:
Swartwout Chronicles

[NI0290] "Almira daughter of James & Eunice Thorpe Osterhout
born 1827 in Fleming, Cayuga County, N.Y.
married January 11, 1848
died October 8, 1898
The Osterout name was spelled Oosterhoudt and Osterhoudt. Almira Osterout had two grandfathers in the Revolutionary War - Osterhout and Thorpe."(1)
Possible source:
Tucker, Sheila Saft; The Township of Fleming, Cayuga County, New York 1823-1873 (Auburn 1973) I looked at it, but did not have time to examine it thoroughly. It is in the NY G & B S library. It discusses a Sand Beach Church which was Dutch Reform and located at Brinkerhoff Point (north of Brookhollow). It was founded in 1796. The Congregation of the "Reformed Protestant Dutch Church in Aurelius" commonly called from the beginning "Sand Beach"... included the area of Southern Brutus (now Sennet and Throop), Aurelius (now City of Auburn, Fleming, Springport, Owasco) and portions of Scipio.
Other Osterhout Researchers:
Janet Brown (QPNW16A-Prodigy)
P.O. Box 1298
Truckee, CA 96160
1) Arlene Whiteman

[NI0311] "Birthdate 31 Aug 1788
Place Goshen, PA/NY
Deathdate 4 Dec 1871
Place Barrington, Yates Co., NY
Burial Place Baptist Church, Wayne, Steuben Co., NY...
Following received from Dick Apolant, 2232 Hudson Avenue, Rochester, NY 14617 on 4/19/1993:
James A. Swarthout was born in PA during his father's short stay among the Indians. He was about six years old when they finally settled in Seneca Co., NY. There in 1808, he married Betsey Ketchum of Romulus who had been born in Orange Co. In 1817 he took his family to (the) town of Barrington, now the far southwest corner of Yates Co. At that time only two log cabins existed between them and Penn Yan.
After the death of Betsey, who had given him nine children, he married Anna Russell and had three more children. He remained on the farm for the rest of his long life increasing the size to 473 acres. He was a leading citizen of the town, twice serving as supervisor. Prior to his death he had become the oldest living Swarthout in the area.
McMasters History of Steuben Co states James A. Swarthout was born 1787 in PA and moved on farm that he now lives on in the town Barrington, Yates Co., NY, one mile north of Wayne Hotel, 52 years ago when there was but two log houses between there and Penn Yan.
1850 Barrington, Yates Co. NY Census
James A. Swarthout, 60, b Tenn (sic)
Anna, 48, b NY
James, 15
Mary A., 8
Sally, 6
William Dunning, 23 b. Ireland, Laborer
1855 Barrington, Yates Co., NY Census Call 193
James A. Swarthout, 65, b. Orange Co; 38 year resident
Anne, 60, b Dutchess Co; 38 year resident
Mary A., 10, born Yates Co.
Catherine Delong, 22, servant; born Steuben Co.
William Denning, 27, servant; born Rockland Co.
James A., the second son, was born in PA and married Betsey Ketchum of Romulus, Seneca. in 1808. She was a native of Orange Co., born 1787.
In March (what year?) they purchased the farm on which he lives on lot 72 in Barrington. 180 acres of his land was bought from Judge James Dean of Oneida Co. and Judge Lush of Auburn. He added to this until his farm embraced 473 acres on the Bath road about 1/2 mile from the south wild state and none was more than partly cleared. His wife died Jan 10, 1832, leaving nine children: Louisa, Joanna, Ralph, Simpson, Charles, Lois, Lewis, Betsey, and Matilda. He married a second wife, Anna Russell from Tyrone in July 1832. The children of the second marriage were James A., Mary Ann and Sarah.
They still reside on the homestead, he is nearly 83 years old and she is 68 years old. He was a very industrious and successful farmer, in both grain and stock growing. His grains have been very large. For cattle and sheep of superior quality and for good horses he has been celebrated in his vicinity. He states that he has drawn hundres of (bushels?) of wheat to Bath, a distance of 18 miles, which was sold for 44 cents a bushel. He has sometimes raised 1400 bushels in one season, besides 1000 lbs. of wool and much other products. His wife relates that she has made upwards of 30 firkins of butter in a season which was sold at 10 to 12 cents a pound. Their toils have been patient and persistent and they have gained a fine competency for themselves and secured substantial aid to their children. Mr. Swarthout has been a leading man in this town and has twice been supervisor." (1)
"CCCXXV. James, son of Ralph and Lois Halstead Swarthout, born in the town of Goshen, Orange County, New York on August 31, 1788.
Children:
615. Charles
616. Sampson [sic]" (2)
1) Ruth Jordan Thoden, 402 Main Street, Boonville, New York, 13309 - ruththoden@delphi.comm
2) Weise, Arthur James; The Swarthout Chronicles 1388-1899 (Trow, New York 1899) p. 624

[NI0327] According to the Swarthout Chronicles, he was baptised 22 October 1699 at the Dutch Reformed Church at Kingston.
"on May 22 (1756), Anthony Swartwout, Philip's cousin, was attacked at his home (by Indians) in Walpack. His wife was shot dead on her way to the spring. Anthony and three of his children were herded into line and marched off toward the Delaware. The other children were killed before they left the house. Near Swartwout Pond, Anthony was tied to a tree, tortured and scalped before his children's eyes. A little further, the younger girl, unable to keep pace, was dispatched. The other children, a girl of twelve and a boy of nine, were ferried across the river on a raft of rails a mile or two below the Walpack church, and taken to the Susquehanna.
Later, it developed that a white man who had worked for Swartwout and who had a grudge against him, had set the Indians up to the massacre...
Later Swartwout's son made his escape and identified (Benjamin) Springer as the white man who had persuaded the Indians to torture and scalp his father. Springer was tried and hung by New Jersey for this crime.
Following the offer of a bounty for Indian scalps, men went after them in hunting parties. They tramped through the woods of Pennsylvania as far west as the Susquehanna, burning every Indian village they came to." (1)
Children:
Anthony
Jacobus (2)
"Antoni Swartwout
Antoni, the youngest child of Antoni Swartwout and Jannetje Coobes, was baptized at Kingston on October 22, 1699. The sponsors at his baptism were Jan Willemse Hoogteeling and Grietje de Hooges. The name of Antoni's wife is unknown, but it is known that he had at least two children. He lived at Goshen, Orange County, NY.
The children of Antoni Swartwout are:

1. Anthony ...
2. Jacobus, like his brother Anthony, was a resident of Goshen. He signed the pledge of association there on June 8, 1775. Jacobus Swartwout was a witness to an order on the state treasurer for services performed by Aaron Swartwout (his son), a fifer, in Captain John Minthorn's company of the Orange County militia on January 25, 1785 at Sugar Loaf, in the town of Warwick, Orange County. Jacobus' wife's name is unknown, but it is known that he had at least two sons.
The children of Jacobus Swartwout are:

I. Moses was serving as a private in May of 1781 in Captain Andrew Miller's company in Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Wisner's regiment of the Orange County militia. He was also a private in Captain Philip Shrawder's company attached to the First Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry commanded by Major James Morse. This company was sent there to help prevent riots in Wyoming which were originated by Pennsylvania and Connecticut settlers there after the Revolutionary War.
II. Aaron was a fifer in Captain John Minthorn's company under Colonel John Hathorn's regiment of the Orange County militia on October 30, 1784 and also on January 25, 1785. " (3)
1) Angell, Pauline Knickerbocker; Fifty years on the Frontier with the Dutch Congregation at Maghaghkamik (1937) p. 12-13
2) Swarthout Chronicles (see Tomys) p. 586
3) David R. Jansen's Northeast United States Genealogy Home Page

[NI0328] "Anthony, son of Roeloff and Eva Bratt de Hooges Swartwout, baptized in Wiltwyck, New Netherlands on May 11, 1664... Anthony married 8 May 1693 in Bergen, New Jersey Church; he was from Esopus (Kingston)... both living in Bergen at time of wedding; received certificate to Esopus 8 May 1693...
Anthony and brothers Thomas and Barnardus bought land north of the Delaware River and stretching along the west side of the Neversink River in 1696. After Anthony's death in 1700, his son, Bernardus, took charge of his land.
Grantee Records, Orange Co., NY - C:7 on 28 Oct 1741- Roeloff Swartwout of Orange Co sold to Jacobus Swartwout of Orange for 75 pounds 1/7 part of the 1200 acres purchased by his father Anthony Swartwout...
From speech given by Mrs. D. Nelson Raynor, wife of the Port Jervis historian:
"Among five men who received a patent for land at Peenpack were Thomas and Anthony Swartwout who built at the center of Huguenot and named their home Seneahaun which is Indian for 'home near stream.'
The Swartwout home is still occupied at this writing by the family of Howard Swartwout, some of whose ancestors lost their lives during the Brant raid of 1779 on the Minisink Valley section. This is one of the best known of the original settlers."...
Children
Roeloff bapt. 9 Jun 1695 Kingston
Jacobus bapt. 29 Mar 1696 Hurley, Ulster Co., NY d. ca. 1771
Swartwout Chronicles, page 150: Jacobus, second son of Antoni Swartwout, was distinguished for intrepidity and military ability. In 1738, he was captain of the 4th Company of Foot Militia in the Orange Co. regiment commanded by Colonel Vincent Mathews. The strong influence he wielded over the warriors of the Wolf and the Turkey (Clans) of the Cochecton Indians led shortly thereafter to his promotion to major of the regiment.
Minisink DRC Records, page 282 - 4/16/1747 - Jacobus Swartwout listed as a member of the church. 10/16/1748 - Antje Westbrook, widow of Jacobus listed as a member of church...
Bernardus Swarthout bapt. 31 Oct 1697 Kingston d. ca. 1773 Lehman, Northhampton Co., PA
Swartwout Chronicles - page 149 - Barnardus, son of Anthony Swartwout, having attained his majority, received his portion of his deceased father's land. As disclosed in Orange County Records, following persons were freeholders at Maghaghkemeck on July 7, 1728: Samuel Swartwout (s/o Thomas); Barnardus Swartwout (son of Anthony); Jan van Vliet, Jr. (married to daughter of Thomas Swartwout), Harmanus Barentsen van Inwegen (married to widow of Jacobus Swartwout), Pierre Guimar and Jacque Caudebecq.
Anthony bapt. 22 Oct 1699 Kingston" (1)
"Swartout. -- The ancestors of this family were of Dutch origin, and came to this town with Gumaer and Cuddeback in 1690. They were all three interested in the Peenpack Patent, but Eager says that but one of them kept his share. Whether it was Thomas, Anthony or Bernardus, that refused to sell, we are not informed. They were said to be all large, powerful men, and well fitted for the hardships of a pioneer's life in the wilderness. One of them (actually Jacobus the son of Anthony) in 1730 was major of the militia of Orange county. He resided on the disputed territory between New York and New Jersey, and was once dispossessed by the Jersey claimants; an affair that called out all his neighbors in order to reinstate him, as related in a previous chapter." (2)
"In the year 1690, as near as can be determined, Jacob Cuddeback, Thomas Swartwout, Anthony Swartwout, Bernardus Swartwout, Peter Gumaer, John Tyse and David Jamison, settled in the present town of Deerpark, in the County of Orange and State of New York, on and near a handsome knowll or hill contiguous to a spring brook and a spring of living water in the central part of Peenpack flats...
Peter Gumaer located himself at the southwest end of the hill... Jacob Cuddeback a few rods northeast of the northeast end of the hill... Anthony Swartwout, where the house formerly of Cornelius Van Inwegen stood, a few rods northeast of Cuddeback's place of residence...
The name of the father of the three Swartwouts is not known, but we have reason to believe it was Gerardus, as this is a name which has been given to at least one member of each Swartwout generation from the first in this neighborhood to the present; and also in the family of Harmanus Van Inwegen, whose wife was a Swartwout... In the early part of the settlement here, there were two Swartwouts who sometimes came over here from the east side of the Hudson river (probably from Dutchess or Westchester counties) to see their relatives here. The name of one of them was Jacobus (James), and he was generally called Dickke Jacobus, in consequence of his bodily thickness... It is probable that the Swartwouts in this place either came from the city of New York or from one of the counties on the east side of the Hudson River, and that their ancestry emigrated from Holland into this country at an early period of its settlement...
It is somewhat uncertain which of the three Swartwouts remained in this neighborhood, but as the seats of Bernardus and Thomas became vacated, and Anthony's continued to be occupied by Van Inwegen, after Samuel and James Swartwout removed more distantly from the neighborhood first settled, I will make use of his name as the father of the two latter." (3)
"Inasmuch as those bearing the name of Swartwout, residing at the present time in the town of Deerpark and vicinity, are the descendants of Anthony Swartwout and Jannetje Jacobus, the remainder of this article will be devoted and the date of their baptisms as found in the Kingston church records are as follows:
Roeloff, bap. June 9, 1695
Jacobus, bap. March 29, 1696, born at Hurley..." (4)

"The Descendants of Antoni Swartwout, the
son of Roeloff Swatwout and Eva Bradt
Antoni was baptized on May 11, 1664 at Wiltwyck (Kingston, NY). His sponsors were Evert Pels, Gysbert van Imbroeck, Gissel Alberts, and Maria De Hoges. He married Jannetje, a daughter of Jacobus Coobes, in 1695. Jannetje was born in Rensselaerswyck (Albany, NY). After Antoni's death in 1700 in Maghaghkemeck (now Port Jervis, Orange County), Jannetje remarried on January 19, 1701 to Hermanus Barentsen van Nijmegan (Inwegen), of Nijmegan, Gelderland, Holland.
The children of Antoni and Jannetje are:
I. Roeloff was baptized at Kingston, NY on June 9, 1695.
II. Jacobus was born at Hurley and baptized at Kingston on March 29, 1696.
III. Barnardus was baptized at Kingston on October 31, 1697.
IV. Antoni was baptized at Kingston on October 22, 1699." (5)
I NEED TO COPY THE REST OF THE ARTICLE.
1) Ruth Thoden
2) Stickney, A History of the Minisink Region p. 134-4
3) Gumaer, Peter E., A History of Deerpark in Orange County, N.Y. (Minisink Valley Historical Society 1890) p. 30, 31, 37, 38, 39
4) Deerpark Church Life p. 219
5) David R. Jansen's Northeast United States Genealogy Home Page

[NI0329] "V-5. Jesse Bartoo, fifth child of Silas and Ruth Luce Bartoo, was born December 25, 1775 presumably in Connecticut, (possibly on Long Island as his father lived there in 1783). He married Eunice Loomis who was born October 17, 1778. She was the sixth child of Abijab Loomis, born March 7, 1744, and Mary Loomis, born November 29, 1749. He died July 16, 1819; she died December 4, 1815. They came from Egremont, Mass., to Chenango County, N.Y., but at what date is not certainly known, probably about 1795-6, and it is not known where they first located, (supposed to have been at Smithville [Flats], N.Y.)
Later he procured a farm on the Chenango River six miles above Greene." (1)
He appears in the 1800 census and the 1820 census in Greene. (2)
1800 Census, town of Greene, Chenango Co., NY
Jesse Bartoo 10100 - 10100
1810 Census, town of Greene, Chenango Co., NY
Jesse Bartoo 120011 - 32111
Hiram Bartoo 100010 - 00100" (5)
"The first farm on the east side of the river in the town of Greene's northern limits was taken up in 1794 by Samuel Wheeler, a British soldier over here during the Revolution, who decided to remain... Joseph Gray was the next occupant of the farm, then Jesse Bartoo in 1835 who, with his wife, Eunice Loomis, came from Egremont, Mass. Their children were: Hiram, Abigail, Polly Ruth, (Elisha) Smith, Jesse L (uce), Louisa, Olive Urania, Lucretia, William and Charlotte. Hiram Bartoo married Laura Bates and succeeded his father on the farm." (4)
According to an 1869 directory, his son Hiram, who inherited his farm, was living at Lot 73, Township 3, East Greene (Brisben) (3).
"His father Silas Bartoo was living with him at the time of his death. He died suddenly on December 24, 1823 and is buried at the Tillotson Cemetary in Greene, N.Y. His tombstone reads:
Jesse Bartoo
d. Dec. 24, 1823
Age 48 yrs.
Friends nor physicians could not
Save mortl body from the grave,
Nor can the grave confine it here
When Christ commands it to appear." (1)
I visited the cemetery, which was in the process of being cleared and repaired (August 1995). His tombstone, which is the oldest in the cemetery, is in remarkably good condition. I did not find his wife's tombstone, which is reportedly in the same cemetery. The cemetery is primarily a family cemetery for the Tillotsons, whose property was adjacent. The cemetery lies on a small side road (which was the old NY 12) just west of the present NY 12 about half way between Greene and Brisben. It is on a small mound next to the old canal. If you look west from the highway over the marker, the mound directly behind the sign is the cemetery, though it is very hard to see.
His son Elisha Smith Bartoo and probably his son William emigrated to Clarksville, which is where Jesse Whiteman moved to and where George Whiteman was born.
"Bartoo children:
Hiram b. 10 Apr 1798 (Greene d. 25 Mar 1866)
Abigail b. 7 Apr 1800 (Greene d. 7 Mar 1875)
Polly b. 8 Dec 1801 (Greene d. 20 Feb 1869)
Ruth b. 12 Apr 1804 (Greene d. 4 Feb 1887)
Elisha Smith b. 24 Mar 1806 [d. Aug. 19, 1885 (1)]
Jesse Luce b. 28 May 1808 [d. July 9, 1897(1)]
Sally Louisa b. 1 May 1810 (Greene d. 10 Nov 1880)
Olive Matilda b. 26 Sep 1812 (Greene d. 17 Feb 1881)
Urania Vianna b. 21 Aug 1815 (Greene d. 24 May 1888)
Lucretia Cordelia b. 6 May 1817 (Greene d. 4 Sep 1875)
William b. 21 Apr 1819 (Greene d. 24 Dec 1896)
Mercy Charlotte b. 7 Mar 1821 (Greene d. 25 Dec 1912)" (6)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) History of Greene, p. 234
3) Cochrane, Echoes of the Past, p. 314
4) Ibid., p. 209
5) Ruth Thoden (ruththoden@delphi.com))
6) McCourt, Martha et al.; The American Descendants of Henry Luce of Martha's Vineyard (1994 Boston) p. 282

[NI0330] Egremont is in the Southwestern corner of Massachusetts.
Sixth child of Abijab and Mary. (1)
1855 Census Town of Greene First Election District
Hiram Bartoo 57 Farmer Laura Bartoo Wife Eunice Bartoo Mother age 76 born Massachusetts (2)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) Cochrane, Mildred English, From Raft to Railroad: A History of the Town of Greene, Chenango County, New York 1792-1867; c. 1967 p. 346

[NI0333] "Roeloff Swarthout b. 1 Jun 1634 Amsterdam, Holland, Netherlands d. before 15 May 1715 Hurley, Ulster Co., NY; Roeloff, son of Tomys and Hendrickjen Otsen Swartwout, born in Amsterdam, Holland and baptized there on 6/1/1634 married in Beverswyck, New Netherlands on 8/13/1657 to Eva, widow of Antoine de Hooges and daughter Albert Andriessen and Barentse van Rotmers Bratt. She died in Hurley, Ulster Co., province of New York about the year 1689. October 8, 1691, he married in the city of New York Francijntje Andries, widow of Abraham Lubbertszen. She died prior to her second husband's decea
se. On March 30, 1714, he made his will and died in Hurley in May, 1715.
Census of Bergen Co., New Jersey for 1691 lists Roelof Swartwout (Index) and residing in Jersey City.
... He came to America with his parents in March 1652. In 1656, Roeloff paid a visit to Severswijch, by which name the present city of Albany was legally known until 1664. On account of the crescent form of the bank of the river at this point this hamlet was called the Fuyck or Beversfuych, and it was Fuyck by the Dutch for many years after it had passed into the hands of the English." (1)
"Roeloff Swartwout, the grandfather of the above mentioned Jacobus, was the paternal ancestor of all the Swartwouts in this country. He was a prominent man in public affairs in the early history of Ulster County, having been chosen the first Sheriff of Esopus under the charter granted by the States General in 1661. He was a member of Gov. Leisler's Council in 1689, and Justice and Collector of Ulster County Dec. 24, 1689. He was born in Amsterdam, Holland, in 1634; came to this country in 1655, and first settled at Fort Orange (Albany), where he married Aug. 13, 1657, Eva Alberts.... Roeloff made a visit to Holland, returning in 1660 to Esopus (Kingston) where had settled with his family. The latter part of his life he lived on his farm at Hurley. His wife dying, he remarried in New York City, Oct. 8, 1691, Francyntje Andries, widow of Abraham Lubbertsen. The will of Roeloff Swartwout, made eightieth year, in 1714 is recorded in the Dutch language at Kingston.
The children of Roeloff Swartwout and Eva Alberts were:
Hendrickje, born at Niew Albanien (Albany)...
Thomas, born about 1660...
Thomas and his two brothers, Anthony and Barnardus, were part owners of a patent of twelve hundred acres of land in the present town of Deerpark, in company with Jacob Codebec and others." (2)
"The charter of Esopus or Wyltwick (now Kingston), was granted May 16, 1661 to Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentsen Sleight and Albert Heyman Roosa, Schepens, (Magistrate), who with Roeloff Swartwout, as Schout, formed the court of justice for the government of the new village." (3)
"In September, 1661 [Tjerck De Witt] appears as plaintiff in an action at law before the Schepens Court of Wiltwyck, and on October 11th the same court ordered the Sheriff (Roeloff Swartwout) to pay him three and a half schepels of wheat in eight days and seven more in one month...
[During the winter of 1664] Roeloff Swartwout sold a horse to Tjerck Claessen De Witt, which was taken to the latter's barn, but the ex-sheriff, becoming dissatisfied, took it away secretly. He was sued for the property." [From unpublished "History of Ulster County."]" (4)

"Roeloff Swartwout
Roeloff Swartwout was baptized at the Oude-Kerk (Old Church) in Amsterdam, Holland on June 1, 1634. He grew up on his father's bouwery at Midwout, Holland. In 1656, he decided to follow in his father's footsteps, and move to New Netherlands. In that year he visited Beverswyck (Beaver's District), a small independant colony near Fort Orange that was seperated from the colony of Rensselaerswyck in April of 1652. Twelve years later, the name Beverswyck was changed by the English to Albany, NY.

During his sojourn at Beverswyck, Roeloff met Eva Albertse Bratt. She was the daughter of Albert Andriessen Bradt and his wife, Annatie Barents van Rotmers(z). Albert, who was often called Albert the Noorman or Albert Andriess Noorman, was born about 1607 at Frederikstad, at the mouth of the Glommern River, in Norway. He was the son of Andries Arentse Bradt who was born about 1578 in Frederikstad. Annatie was the daughter of Geesie Barents and her husband Barent (who died prior to his daughter Eva's marriage). Geesie Barents later married Pieter Jacobsen van Rendsburgh. In June of 1642, Peter Jacobsen and his wife "Gysje Pieters" (formerly known as Geesie Barents, Pieters simply means that she was the wife of Pieter) made a joint will in which real and personal property was left to her daughter "Annetje Alberts" (Alberts here is referring to the fact that she was the wife of Albert). Geesie Barents was a sponsor for her great-granddaughter Cornelia at Kingston in 1667.

Albert Andriessen, who was known for his occasional violent temper, had many legal problems, but he was also known for his many enterprises. He came to Beverwyck (Albany) on April 7, 1637 under a special contract signed in Amsterdam in 1636 when he was 29 years old. This contract was with Kiliaen van Rensselaer, the wealthy diamond merchant of Amsterdam. Kiliaen van Rensselear, the Patroon of Rensselaerswyck (near Beverwyck), had secured many miles of land in what is now Rensselaer County, NY. Albert and two other partners were to build a mill in Rensselaerswyck. Not long after his arrival, however, Albert dissolved his partnership, and left the Patroon's service.

Albert Andriessen established himself as a tabacco planter and a fur trader in Beverwyck. Albert also owned a house in New Amsterdam (Manhattan), conveniently located by the produce exchange, where he established a trading post. This house had a large warehouse in the back of it. Albert's wife Annetje inherited this property from her step-father, Pieter Jacobsen van Rendsburgh (Rynsburg). On June 3, 1662, Albert made an agreement with the children of his late wife, Annetje, concerning this property. In this agreement, Albert mentions "Mr. Roeloff Swartwout, husband and gaurdian of Eva Albertsz, daughter of Albert Andriesz, Barent and Storm Albertsz, sons if said Albert Andriesz, Theunis Slingerlant, husband and guardian of Engeltie Albertssz, and Jan van Eckelen, husband and gaurdian of Gisseltie Albertsz, as well for themselves as in these presents filling the place of and undertaking for Andries, Jan and Dirck Albertsz, minor children, sons and daughters of said Albert Andriesz, their father, and Annetie Barentse, their mother, deceased, and therefore heirs ab intestato to all the property left by their late mother.... Albert Andriese promises hereby to convey to the said children and heirs in free ownership, on the 5th day of this month of June, the house and lot standing and lying within the city of Amsterdam in New Netherland, bounded westerly and southerly by the streets, easterly by Claes van Elslant and northerly by the aforesaid Slingerlant, which house is at present occupied by the honorable Burgomaster Allert Anthony... the said children and heirs... shall receive each an equal portion."

Albert operated two large mills in Albany run by a powerful waterfall. He also maintained a farm on a stream in Albany which would later be named the Norman's Kill after him. Albert lived by the Norman's Kill until his death on June 7, 1686. Albert's first wife, Annetje, died prior to June 3, 1662. Albert married (2nd) Pieterje Jans, the widow of Claes Jansen de Ruyter from Naerden. Peiterje died before January 29, 1667. Albert married (3rd) Geertruy Pieterse Coeymans, the widow of Abraham Pietersen Vosburgh. This marriage was annulled by the Governor on October 24, 1670.

Eva Albertse Bradt was baptized on January 9, 1633 at the Lutheran Church in Amsterdam, in the Netherlands. She married (1st) Antoine de Hooges in October of 1647. Antoine arrived at New Netherlands in 1641, and almost immediately succeeded Arendt van Corlear as the Secretary, Bookkeeper, Vorleser, and Superintendent of the colony of Rensselaerswyck on November 29, 1641. Antoine died in 1655. Eva and Antoine had five children.

The children of Eva Albertse Bradt
with her first husband, Antoine de Hooges
1. Johannes de Hooges who married Margarita Post on December 4, 1675.
2. Eleonora de Hooges who married William Menjeur de la Montagne in May of 1673.
3. Maria de Hooges who married (1st) Hendrick Bries and (2nd) Jacob Lookermans on August 21, 1696.
4. Antje de Hooges who married Emanual Van Etten on May 10, 1702.
5. Catrina de Hooges who married Wynant Van Der Poel on August 17, 1706.

In 1656, Eva Bradt de Hooges was residing on the northwest corner of Bever and Handelaars (Broadway) streets, south of the blockhouse church. After asking for her hand in marriage and publishing their banns, Roeloff married Eva on August 13, 1657. Roeloff's father, Tomys, and Eva's father, Albert, were present. Their marriage contract reads (translated from Dutch):

"In the name of the Lord... in the year sixteen hundred and fifty seven on the thirteenth day of the month of August, appeared before me, Johannes La Montagne,... deputy at Fort Orange..., Roeloff Swartwout, in the presence of his father, Thomas Swartwout, on the one side, and Eva Albertse, widow of the late Antoine de Hooges, in the presence of Albert Andriessen (Bradt / Bratt) her father, on the other side, who, in the following manner, have covenanted this marriage contract... in the presence of the orphan-masters, recently chosen here, to wit(ness): Honorable Jan Verbeeck and Evert Wendel, reserves for her and Antoine de Hooges' children, for each of them, one hundred guilders, to wit, for Maricken, Anneken, Catrina, Johannes, and Elconora de Hooges... Barent Albertse (Bradt / Bratt) and Teunis Slingerland, brother and brother-in-law of the said Eva Albertse and uncles of the said children, should be guardians of said children... Done in Fort Orange..." signed by:
Roeloff Swartwout
the mark of "+" Eva Albertse (Bradt / Bratt)
Thomas (Tomys) Swartwout
Albert Andriessen (Bradt / Bratt)
Jan Verbeeck
Evert Wendel
Teunis Cornelissen
witnessed by Johannes Provoost and (mark of "+") Pieter Jacobsen

Four years prior to Roeloff and Eva's marriage, a number of colonists of Rensselaerswyck, led by Thomas Chambers, bought several tracts of land off of some Indians along the Esopus Creek (now Kingston, NY). Their hopes were to establish and cultivate manor-free land so that they could advance their own interests. In 1659, Roeloff decided to move to Esopus also. In order to start an independent farm, however, he needed money, so he sold his garden in Beverswyck on August 15, 1659 to Philip Pieterse Schuyler. This garden was originally granted to Anthony de Hooges, Eva's first husband. He also mortgaged his home. In doing so, he was able to pay off a debt that he had promised to pay off by July 1, 1660. He then sailed to Holland to obtain the necessary tools and some farm hands.

While he was in Holland the lords-directors of the West India Company asked him numerous questions about this independent settlement. Upon learning that it was their intention to establish a local court there, Roeloff asked to be appointed as a schout (sheriff) of the settlement. Realizing that he was qualified, "the directors of the Incorporated West India Company, department of Amsterdam, ...placing confidence in the capability... of... Roeloff Swartwout, we have have provisionally appointed and commissioned him sheriff... giving him full power, order, and authority to occupy this position" on April 14, 1660. As the provisional sheriff, Roeloff took the "rank of the burgemeesters and schepens," and was to sit in on judicial meetings as the president. Roeloff left Amsterdam for New Netherlands on April 15, 1660 on board of de Bonte Koe (the Spotted Cow). He took with him agricultural implements and three farm laborers.

Director-General Petrus Stuyvesant and the provincial authorities of New Netherlands felt slighted that one of them was not chosen as the sheriff, and set out to debase the character of Roeloff Swartwout. They lied when they claimed that the 26 year old was still a minor, and therefore unfit to run the place. The authorities in Amsterdam argued that they had sufficient judgement and possessed the authority to have their orders obeyed. Upon returning to Esopus, Roeloff rented a bowery from the widow of Jacob Jansen Stol, who had been killed by Indians in October of 1659.

On April 26, 1661, Director-General Petrus Stuyvesant was asked to allot parcels of ground to different persons desiring to settle in Esopus. Stuyvesant renamed the settlement Wiltwyck (Wild District), following some trouble with the local Indians. On May 5 he appointed Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentsen Sleight, and Albert Heymansen Roose (Roosa) as schepens. Following their appointment, Roeloff formally petitioned the provincial authorities to invest him with the office of provisional schout. Although Stuyvesant had his doubts about Roeloff, he was forced to comply with the orders of the Governor-General and the High Council in Amsterdam. Stuyvesant wrote to the High Council saying that "in pursuance of your Honor's special request he (Roeloff) is now appointed, and we leave the result to his behavior and suitableness."

Desiring to build a home for his family in Wiltwyck, Roeloff obtained a deed to a lot which measured 170 feet (Holland measure). This lot was to the south of the lot of Louis Du Bios, a French Walloon, and north of the lot of Thomas Harmansen. A new village was being laid on the right bank of the Esopus Kill (Rondout Creek). Roeloff also received a lot here of 24 acres of land "lying neare unto ye New Durp" (lying in the New Village, later named Hurley) on April 25, 1662. This lot was "to ye West of Evert Pell's, to ye East of ye Minister's Lott." His two parcels of land were confirmed by the English Governor Richard Nicolls on July 16, 1668. Roeloff also purchased 16 acres of land previously owned by Hendrick Cornelissen van Holstein. This lot was confirmed to him on July 23, 1667 by Governor Nicolls.

A militia company was organized in Wiltwyck on May 30, 1662. Thomas Chambers was made captain, Hendrick Jochemsen (Schoonmaker) was made lieutenant, and Pieter Jacobsen, the miller, was made sergeant. Roeloff Swartwout, Cornelis Barentsen Sleight and others were given subordinated positions, and helped the other inhabitants of Wiltwyck feel less concerned about a possible Indian attack. Roeloff was concerned with their safety, and took steps to remove any evidences of danger. He outlawed the selling of liquor to the natives, and wrote to the provincial authorities on September 5, 1662 regarding his fears of the frequent infringements on his law. Roeloff noticed that the greatest threat was from rebellous traders who continued to sell liquor and firearms to the natives, and that "if no precautions are taken we are in great danger of drawing upon us a new war." In 1663, he was suspended from office on account of the "insolent letter," but he apologized and had his privileges restored.

Nine months after Roeloff wrote that letter, his fears were realized. On June 10, 1663 between 11 and 12 o'clock, the savages entered the village "in a friendly manner." A short time later some horseback riders came into town crying out that "the Indians have destroyed the new village!" The Indians attacked from the rear, plundering houses and firing rifles from the corner houses. They set the village on fire, burning twelve homes. Fortunately the wind changed, saving several homes from destruction. Most of the settlers were unarmed, for they had been out in the fields before the attack. The Indians were "put flight on the alarm being given by the sheriff (Roeloff)." Hendrick Jochemsen (Schoonmaker) had been "very severely wounded in his house by two shots at an early hour," but, with the help of Jacob the brewer, managed to get to gate toward the river. "Captain Thomas Chambers, who was wounded on coming in from" the fields, "issued immediate orders to secure the gates, to clear the gun and drive out the savages."

More people would have died had it not been for the chief men of Wiltwyck. "The intrepid schout's conduct in hastening from his partly built dwelling and venturing through the corpse-strewn streets to alarm and collect a small body of armed men and with them dauntlessly searching through the smoky and cinder-littered surroundings of the burning dwellings for the murdering invaders and driving them from the scene of their blood shedding, incendiarism, and plunder, must ever be regarded as memorable evidence of his fitness for the responsible office then held by him." Domine Blom related on September 18, 1663 that 24 had been murdered and 45 were taken hostage.

On July 12, 1667, Roeloff conveyed one forth of his land to William Beekman, the attorney for Petrus Stuyvesant. At the time, Roeloff was the guardian of the minor children of the late Matthys Janse Van Keulen. That same day Thomas Chambers, who married the widow of the late Matthys Janse Van Keulen, also conveyed one forth of his land to William Beekman. On September 6, 1667, William Beekman requested that Roeloff keep his fence in Proper condition. On September 24, 1667, William Beekman accused Roeloff of selling "strong drinks to the savages." In June of 1670 Roeloff finally got rid of his land in Albany by conveying it to Ryckie Dareth, the widow of Jan Dareth of Albany, a lot east of the house of Volkert Janse (Douw). On February 1, 1671, Matthys Blanshan made a complaint against Roeloff's dog. On June 13, 1671, Roeloff was told by the court to make the necessary repairs to his fence.

On May 28, 1686, a survey of was taken of Hurley (the New Village). According to this survey, Roeloff owned 47 acres of land on the north side of the Esopus Kill (Rondout Creek), a house lot in Hurley, and two lots (11 and 13) on the "Hurley Fly" (meadow ground). On November 12, 1697, Roeloff petitioned for 200 acres of land in Ulster County. This land was called "Waghgashkenck" or "Machackemeck" (which is now the village of Port Jervis in the town of Deerpark, Orange County, NY)

In January of 1690, a troop of French soldiers and Indians, commanded by Sieur Le Moyne de Sainte Helene, attacked the colony of Schenectady, NY. This alerted the inhabitants of Albany, who bolstered their forces greatly. A need for corn for these forces caused the commissioners to authorize Roeloff Swartwout as the collector of the king's revenue in Ulster County. As such, he was to obtain as much corn from the farmers in his district as they could spare, and ship it to Albany as soon as possible. With the shipment of corn, Roeloff took the opportunity to send a letter to the authorities of Albany advising them that the upcoming "election of two delegates" which would be held the following May at New York City "ought to be a free election for all classes" rather than an election of those who considered "themselves favorites of royalty."

Roeloff was not afraid of losing his preferred position when he became a partisan of Jacob Leisler, who commended him to the Committee of Safety. This commencement gave him the power and authority of a commander-in-chief. He was given the title Justice and Collector of the Grand Excise of Ulster County.

After Eva's death about 1689, Roeloff remarried on November 22, 1691 (banns published on October 8, 1691) to Francijntje Andries, the widow of Abraham Lubbertszen. Francijntje died prior to Roeloff's death.

The children of Roeloff Swartwout and Eva Bradt are:
1. Thomas
2. Antoni was baptized at Wiltwyck (Kingston, NY) on January 8, 1662. The sponsors of his baptism were his grandfather Toomes (Tomys) Swartwout, Aart Martensen Doorn, Tryntje Tyssen, and Jacoomyntje Slecht. He probably died young.
3. Antoni
4. Hendrickje* married Huybert Lambertsen (Brink) on March 16, 1679. Huybert was the son of Lambert Huybertse who came to this country with his wife, Hendrickje Cornelis (Lamberts), and two children from Wageningen, in the Province of Gelderland, in the Netherlands in December of 1659. A third child was born on the passage. Hendrickje and Huybert's marriage was recorded at the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, NY. Their marriage banns were first published on February 21, 1679. Huybert was born at Wageningen. According to their marriage record, Hendrickje was "from Nieu Albanien" (New Albany or Albany, NY). They both resided in Hurley, and their marriage took place there. Their children are: (all baptized at the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, NY)

1. Lambert Brink was baptized in early 1680.
2. Roelof Brink was baptized on April 27, 1684.
3. Thomas Brink was baptized on December 6, 1685.
4. Hendrick Brink was baptized on November 6, 1687.
5. Eva Brink was baptized on May 25, 1690.
6. Hendricus Brink was baptized on November 18, 1694. He probably died young.
7. Hendricus Brink was baptized on January 10, 1697.
8. Johannes Brink was baptized on May 28, 1699.

5. Cornelia was baptized at the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, NY on March 13, 1667 (the witnesses to her her baptism were Cornelis Slecht, Jannetje Pels, Willempje Jacobs, Thomes Loodewycksen, and Geesje Barents). She married prior to April 28, 1689 to Hendrick Klaesen Schoonhoven. Cornelia was mentioned in her father's will, dated March 30, 1714, as deceased.
6. Rachel was born on April 10, 1669 (her baptism was not recorded at Kingston). She married Jacob Kip prior to February 9, 1696.
7. Barnardus was baptized at Kingston on April 26, 1673 (Rudolfus Swartwout and Jacomeyna Swartwout were witnesses). Barnardus resided in Hurley. He married on May 19, 1700 to Rachel Schepmoes, and had at least two children who were baptized at Albany, NY:

1. Eva, baptized on February 18, 1705
2. Jacob, baptized on February 1, 1708

8. Eva**

* - "Ulster County, NY Probate Records" lists Hendricke as the second child.
** - "Ulster County, NY Probate Records" lists Eva as the seventh child.

Roeloff Swartwout's will
The will of Roeloff Swartwout was recorded in the Ulster County Book of Deeds, Liber II on March 30, 1714. This will was probated on May 14, 1715. Following the long religious preamble, it reads (translated from Dutch):

"To my oldest son Thomas £25, his right as being the first born. Also to Thomas and my son Barnardus my entire estate in the County of Ulster... £1500 to my other heirs - To my daughter, Hendricke, wife of Huybert Lambertsen £65. To the children of my son Anthony £65. To the children of my daughter Cornelia, deceased, £65. To my daughter Ragel (Rachel), wife of Jacob Kip £65. To my daughter Eva, wife of Jacob Dingman £65. All my clothing to my sons Thomas and Barnardus."

Resources

"The Swartwout Chronicles 1338 - 1899 and the Ketelhuyn Chronicles 1451 - 1899" by Arthur James Weise, M. A.
"Descent From Seventy-Nine Early Immigrant Heads of Families, vol. 1" by James S. Elston
"Early Records of Albany" by Prof. Jonathan Pearson
"Contributions for the Genealogies of the Ancient County of Albany from 1630 to 1800" by Prof. Jonathan Pearson
"Pioneer Families of Orange County, NY" by Martha and Bill Reamy
"Ulster County, NY Probate Records" by Gustave Anjou, Ph. D.
"Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, NY, 1660-1809" by Roswell R. Hoes " (5)
1) Ruth Thoden (?)
2) Church Life of Deerpark p. 219
3) January 1894 Old Deerpark Days p. 235
4) The De Witt Family (see Lucas De Witt) p. 3
5) David R. Jansen's Northeast United States Genealogy Home Page

[NI0343] "Silas Bartoo (the first and only one I find with the "oo" termination) was the second son of Francis and Mary Ketcham, born 31 May 1742 (presumably) at Hempstead, Long Island where his father had settled and lived.
As a young man he was engaged in the whale fishery. He married Ruth Luce of Martha's Vineyard, born January 20, 1745.
Silas Bartoo was in the Patriot Army of the American Revolution. At one time his family, wife and several small children had to seek protection in the fort, sinking their pewter ware in a pond nearby, and putting their clothes and bedding in a dry well and covering them with boards. Their house was burned as well as the clothing concealed in the well.
Silas Bartoo lived in Redding, Connecticut in 1783; in 1791 he moved to Catskill, New York where he lived until 1799, at least. Next he is found living in Greene with his son Jesse. About 1830, he went to live with his eldest son, Jonathan Luce Bartoo in Eden, Erie County, New York, where he died November 17, 1831.(2) His grave is at Eden Valley beside that of his wife, Ruth. Their graves have recently (1930's) been marked by the Buffalo Chapter of the D.A.R.
Silas and Ruth Luce Bartoo had ten children as follows in the fifth generation:
1. Jonathan Luce Bartoo 1769 (July 1) - 1852 (Jan. 16)
2. Polly Bartoo 1770 (Sept. 13) - 1790 (June 19)
3. Urania Bartoo 1772 (Mar. 2) - 1815 (Feb. 15)
4. Anna Bartoo 1774 (Jan. 15) - 1790 (June 15)
5. Jesse Bartoo 1775 (Dec. 25) - 1823 (Dec. 24)
6. Morris Bartoo 1778 (Apr. 12) - 1779 (June 9)
7. Ruth Bartoo 1782 (July 16) - 1837 (Jan. 29)
8. Alice Bartoo 1783 (Dec. 14) - 1884 (Oct. 28)
9. Nancy Bartoo 1785 (Apr. 14)
10. Silas Bartoo, Jr. 1788 (Jan. 13) - 1814 (Dec. 6)
[It appears that Polly and Anna died in the same epidemic, such as measles. It may be that Silas Bartoo, Jr. died in the War of 1812. I have only included the children likely to have had issue in the data base.]
Note: The records to follow are those of Jonathan Luce and Jesse Bartoo, the only two sons of Silas who left children. The genealogical records of Alice Bartoo are being compiled by Mrs. Cecile Kellogg Bidwell and will be published soon [1940's?]." (1)
"Silas, son of Francis and Mary Ketchum, married Ruth Luce of Martha's Vineyard who died Jan. 24, 1837. As a young man he was engaged in the whale fishery. He was in the Patriot army in the Revolutionary War and a pensioner. At one time, his family had to seek protection in the fort. Sinking their pewter in a pond near by, and putting clothes and bedding in a dry well, they covered it with boards. Their house was burned, and their bedding and clothes also.
In 1783 Silas lived in Connecticut, and in 1791 moved to Catskill, N.Y. He lived in Chenango county with his son Jesse for some time, and in 1830 lived with his son Jonathan in Erie county where he died Nov. 7, 1831." (5)
"Barto, Reuben, S44594, NY Line, appl 3 Jun 1828 Delaware Cty NY... in 1829 a Silas Barto a res of Greene in Chenango Cty NY stated he srv with sol but relationship not stated" (3)
"Bartoo, Silas [buried] Eden NY 1933" (4)
I visited his grave at the Eden Valley Cemetery, which is about two miles north of Eden on the North Boston Road, just past the Eden Valley Bridge. His wife and his son, Jonathan and son-in-law are buried in the same place. Unfortunately, I did not write down the dates of death of Silas and his wife. There is a conflict between Arlene's book, the contents of which she obviously took form Early Settlers and the Early Settlers article itself.
1) Arlene Whiteman Jones
2) See also History of Eden, Vol. I, by Doris Anderson, c. 1974 p. 13
3) Abstracts of Rev. Pen. File p. 177
4) Abstracts of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots found by DAR Vol. I, p. 58
5) "The Bartoo Family" Foley, Janet Wethy; Early Settlers of New York State: Their Ancestors and Descendants Vol. I (Genealogical Publishing Co., 1993) p. 7

[NI0344] I consulted two sources in the New York Public Library. They are:
Geneaological Notes Re Herbert Pratt Luce: Long Island Branch of the Luce Family, 1950 (Cat. No. APB p.v. 55)
Glazier, Prentiss Cummings Van Kleeck, Luce Family Index. An index of the Luce family sketch contained in the "History of Martha's Vineyard" in pages 248 to 265 of the third volume, Brooklyn, N.Y. 1933
There is only one Ruth in this index. From this index, we were able to work out her ancestry. It lists her birth as 1748, but this may be an error. Her older sister was born 1744 and her next sibling 1752, so the date listed in Arlene Jones' book may be correct.
"Ruth, b. (1748?); m. Silas Barstow (sic) 21 Oct 1768" (1)
"(Marriages)
Ruth and Silas Barstow (sic), Oct. 21, 1768 (Note: Intention to marry not recorded.)" (2)
1) Banks, Charles Edward; History of Martha's Vineyard 1925 Edgartown) Vol. 3 p. 257.
2) Vital Records of Tisbury, Massachusetts to the Year 1850; New England Historical and Genealogical Society 1910 Boston p. 158

[NI0345] "Jonathan Luce... m. ca. 1743 to Urania ---, she b. 1723; she d. 31 Jul 1808, age 85." (1)
"Jonathan Luce... m. Urana ________ about 1743, who was b. 1723 and d. 31 July 1808." (2)
1) Luce Genealogy p. 51
2) Banks History of Martha's Vineyard (see Ruth Luce) Vol. 3 p. 257

[NI0352] "Thomas Whitmore was born in England in 1615... came to America, as before stated, in 1635; tradition says that he embarked from Bristol. The first mention that we find of his name in the Colonial records, is in the Wethersfield Town records, in 1639-40, as owner of certain lands; where it appears he first settled on coming on to the Connecticut river.
He subsequently removed to Hartford, at what time we have no data for determining, unless it was, at, or about, the time the difficulty arose among the colonists at Wethersfield in 1640-41, which caused many of them to disperse; a large number of whom removed with their pastor, Richard Denton, to Stamford.
He married first Sarah, daughter of John and Ann (Willocke) Hall, of Hartford, Dec. 11, 1645; had issue John, Elizabeth, Mary, Sarah, Thomas, Hannah, Samuel, Izrahiah, Beriah, Nathaniel, Joseph, Sarah 2nd, and Josiah: he married 2d, Mary, daughter of Richard Platt, of Milford, and widow of Luke Atconson (Atkinson?) Jan. 3 1667; had Mahitable: he married, 3d, Katharine Leet, widow of Mr. Robards,
Oct. 8, 1673; had Benjamin, Abigail and Hannah 2d.
He, with his father-in-law John Hall, William Smith, Samuel Stocking, and Robert Webster, were the first to settle the plantation of Mattabesek; the exact time it is difficult to determine, for the reason that a few of the first pages in the Town records of Middletown are lost, and others illegible...
The proprietors of the place changed its name to Middletown, which was confirmed by the General Court as follows: "Nov. 23, 1653. This Courte approues that ye name of ye Plantatyon commonly called Mattabesick shall for time to come bee Middletowne."
The most of the very early inhabitants of Middletown lived in, or near the town; the largest collection being about the Meeting house yard. At the north end of Main Street there were Thomas Allen, William Markham, Nathaniel Brown, Rev. Samuel Stow, George Hubbard, John Hall and Thomas Whitmore. The homestead of the latter was situated upon the north end of Main street, east side, being the square, now bounded north by Green street, east a river, south on Ferry street, west on Main street; one of the most desirable locations upon the town plot, part of which is still known by the name of the Wetmore Property.
May 20th, 1652, Thomas Whitmore was made a freeman by the General Court...
He, together with Robert Webster, represented Middletown in the General Court in 1654, and 1655...
The amount of property assessed in the town of Middletown, March 22, 1670, was 4322 pounds 10 shillings...
Thomas Whitmore 125 pounds 10 shillings (the tenth largest)...
He died, December 11, 1681, aged 66 years, and the subjoined is a copy of his will taken from a record in the Probate Court's office in the city of Hartford:...
I give to my Daughter Sarah Whitmore & my son Josia Whitmore & my daughter Mehetable, my great lott at the Straits Hills to be equally divided among them three, Sarah first, and Josia next, and Mehetable last from ye homeward side...
Thomas Witmore's second wife, Mary Attconson, died June 1, 1669, after giving birth to her daughter Mahitable." (1)
1) Wetmore Family pp. 11-26 (see Mehatable)

[NI0353] "Thomas Whitmore... married 2d, Mary, daughter of Ricard Platt, of Milford, and widow of Luke Atconson (Atkinson?) Jan 3, 1667" (1)
"Thomas Whitmore's second wife, Mary Attconson, died June 1, 1669, after giving birth to her daughter Mehetable." (2)
"Mary b. in England (by conjecture ca. 1630 or earlier)...
Savage says: "Atkinson (Adkinson or Atkison) Luke, New Haven, of the earliest settlers, signed the compact 1639, before 1643 is counted with family of four, m. 1 May 1651... probably as second wife,
Mary daughter of Richard Platt of Milford, had Mary, born 1652, Hannah 1653, and Sarah 1655, removed next year, whither is unknown, perhaps to Middletown, for there his widow married 3 Jan 1667, Thom
as Whitmore or Wetmore and bore his two children named in his will by their grandfather Platt in 1683."(3)
1) Wetmore Family p. 11
2) Wetmore Family p. 26 (see Mehatable)
3) Man, Alrick H.; The Descendants of Richard Platt (NYG&BS library) p. 6-7

[NI0354] " Hertfordshire
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Platt, Richard Aldenham New Haven Tradition Par.
Aldenham" (2)
"Richard Platt. He is allocated as the son of John Platt (called "of Rickmansworth" and "of Bovingdon", Hertfordshire, England, son and heir of Sir Hugh Platt, baptized at Bovingdon Sept. 28, 1603, an alleged record now lost.
He was without doubt one of the party led by Rev. John Davenport, Theophilus Eaton and Rev. Peter Prudden, who sailed from London in the ship Hector, arriving in Boston June 26, 1637, and who settled in Quinnipiac, the site of New Haven in April 1638.
He was alloted lands in the First Division, twenty acres, and his house plot was on the southwest side of what is now Chapel Street, New Haven, facing the present grounds of Yale College and extending in the rear to land allotted to Rev. Peter Prudden. On this plot he had erected a home before removing to Milford. He also had "four acres in the Neck, twelve acres of meadow: and " in the Second Division 48 acres"...
He continued therefore to hold lands in New Haven for some years after his removal to Milford.
He was one of the 66 founders of Milford who before leaving New Haven formed themselves into a church society under the leadership of Peter Prudden on Aug 22, 1639. He enrolled in the church in Milford Jan 29, 1639/40 and his wife Mary on Aug 15, 1641. He was at all times an active and zealous churchman. In 1669 he was chosen as deacon...
he was admitted as a freeman of Connecticut in 1646...
Children
Mary b. ca. 1630 in England
John b. ca. 1632 in England
Isaac b. ca. 1634 in England
Sarah b. ca. 1636 in England
Epenetus b. 1640, bapt. at Milford First Congregational Church July 2, 1640
Hannah bapt. Oct. 1, 1643
Josiah bapt. October 1645
Joseph bapt. April 1, 1649" (1)
1) Platt Genealogy p. 1-3 (see Mary Platt)
2) Topo. Dict. p. 66

[NI0356] Information on her birth, marriage and death comes from Arlene Whiteman. Her surname was provided by Jean McGowan (BFKJ13A-Prodigy). She may be a sister to Elder Nathaniel Kellog, the father of Selah Barnes' wife. Eunice Loomis was her sixth child per Arlene Whiteman.
Her name may have been Mindwell Belden, not Mary Kellogg. See Abijah Loomis.

[NI0361] "The "Trouw" sailed again on her return to New Amsterdam, March 21, 1662... and arrived on June 13... Among the passengers on this voyage were Adrian Gerritsen... with his wife and five children...
The wife of Adrian was Agatha Jans Spruyt, doubtless a descendant of the ancient family of Spruyt, of Kriekenbeck and Utrecht. She was frequently a witness at baptisms in Kingston." (1)
1) Commemorative Bio (see Adrian) p. 409

[NI0365] "1 SIL CORNELISDR (Coely) d: Bef May 01, 1650 in Minnertsga?, Holland
..+EPKE LUUVESC b: Abt 1569 d: 1630 in between 1621-1630 Father: LIEUWE TE (BONTA) BANTA
2 Fookel Epkesdr b: in Minnertsga, Friesland,
Netherlands
...+Tialle Sybrensz m: Bef May 01, 1650
2 Anna Epkesdr b: in Minnertsga, Friesland, Netherlands

...+Teeke Idsen m: Bef May 01, 1650
2 Cornelis Epckesz b: in Minnertsga, Friesland,
Netherlands d: Aft 1650 in before 1653
...+Antie Jonsdr m: Bef May 01, 1650
2 Jacob Epkesdr b: in Minnertsga, Friesland,
Netherlands
2 Lyuwe Epkesz b: Bef 1590 in Minnertsga, Friesland,
Netherlands
...+Hin Jarichadr m: September 09, 1618 in
Barradeel, Friesland
2 JACOB EPCKES b: Abt 1590 in ?Minnertsga, Friesland,
Netherlands d: Aft February 1655/56 in Minnertsga,
Friesland, Netherlands
...+REYTSKE SICKEDR m: Bef February 24, 1635/36
d: Bef May 04, 1652 Father: SICKE?
3 EPKE JACOBS(e) b: Abt 1619 in Oosterbierum?,
Friesland, Netherlands d: 1686 in Bergen, Co, NJ
....+TYEETS(?) DIRKSDR b: in Minnertsga, Friesland,
Netherlands m: 1651 in before 1652 d: Bef 1675
Father: DIRCKS(?)" (1)
1) Thomas McPartlin RRYW67A@prodigy.comm


PRODIGY(R) interactive personal service - Date: 10/27 Time: 6:52 PM

[NI0368] II-2. John Barto, second son of Francis and Mary Barteau, was at Harlem with his parents and was named in the census of Flushing in 1698, where he seems afterwards to have lived. His wife Elizabeth, was baptized together with her six children, at Grace Church, Jamaica, Long Island, March 2, 1714. Amy, the youngest child, was baptized at Jamaica, June 10, 1716.
1. Elizabeth Barto 1703
2. Hannah Barto 1705
3. Sarah Barto 1707
4. John Barto 1709-1795 (Aug. 12)
5. Francis Barto 1711-1786
6. Mary Barto 1713
7. Amy Barto 1715"(1)
He was apparently not baptised with his wife and children in 1714. As a Huguenot, he would have been a strict Lutheran. He may not have converted with his wife. At the time many Huguenots were entering the Anglican Church. Grace Church of Jamaica, Long Island, N.Y. may be an Anglican Church.
"John Barteau, brother of the first mentioned Francis (#297), had two sons, who Anglicized the name to Barto:
ii Francis Barto b. 12 Aug 1711 settled at Hempstead, and d. at Westhills, L. I. March 26, 1786. By his wife Mary, who d. in 1790, he had nine children: 1. Obadiah b. 16 Oct 1740 d. 19 Mar 1803...
2. Silas Barto b. 31 May 1742 went to Ohio. 3. Servia Barto b. 10 Aug 1744... 4. John Barto b. 7 Nov 1746... 5. Ada 6. Anna Barto, b. 3 Apr 1751; d. 15 Dec 1838 7. Reuben Barto, b. 30 Jul 1755... 8. Morris Barto b. 18 Aug 1758, of whom presently. 9. Jonah Barto, b. 15 Dec 1760, went to Ohio." (2)
Comment: I believe there are two mistakes here. One, John Barto (Barteau) was the son of Francis, not the brother. Two, Silas did not go to Ohio.
(1) Arlene Whiteman
(2) Bartow Genealogy, p. 204-205

[NI0384] "Elisabeth Ann was a very remarkable woman, very much a housewife, although she had taught school before she was married. She was the mother of ten children, five boys and five girls, five had blue eyes and five had brown eyes. Her aim in life was to educate these children and each evening we had a session with our school books before she read to us until bed time. She was interested in dramatics and often produced little plays, the characters being members of our own family. She went through the difficult years of pioneering in Kansas with great fortitude and never tired of helping everyone in the family as well as the community.
The last years of her life were spent in Olive's home in Claremont, California. During these years she was blind and paralyzed, however she learned to read Braille and was always cheerful and helpful with the grandchildren's homework. (1)
She may have been related to T.M. Bennett, whose daughter Joanna married Levi Wheeler, her husband's uncle.
Possible source on the Bennett's: History of Lower Sciota Valley
"Wheeler, George W. & Elizabeth A. Bennet. 25 Mar. 1860. M[arriage] A[ffidavit], R[eturn], D-118." (2)
1) Arlene Whiteman quoting Olive Wheeler Whiteman (her daughter) June 1968
2) Scioto County Marriages p. 144

[NI0405] "Born (twin of Isaac) March 29, 1783 Married Luther Wheeler, 1805 Grafton Died 1857 in Ohio" (1)
The marriage may have been in Grafton, Massachusetts, where her father probably married Sarah Whipple at about the same time, although Arlene Whiteman placed it in Grafton County, New Hampshire. It is hard to imagine how Rebecca could have gotten to Grafton County on her own. She may have died before 28 Jul 1857 when a power of attorney was executed by her husband.
1) Arlene Whiteman


[NI0410] "(Births)
Jonnathan (ch. of Hennery and Hannah), June 15, 1722" (3)
"Jonathan Luce b. 15 Jun 1722 Martha's Vineyard, MA.; residence Tisbury, MA.; weaver; d. 12 Jul 1791, age 69; his will: 5/8 Mar 1790; prov. 25 Oct 1791; he m. ca. 1743 to Urania ---, she b. 1723;...
Luce Children:
Joanna b. ca. 1744
Ruth b. 20 Jan 1745
Samuel b. ca. 1752
Malachi b. 26 Aug 1755
Shubael b. ca. 1757
Uran(i?)a b. 21 Mar 1760
Solomon b. 4 Aug 1762
Damaris b. 30 Oct 1764
Nancy b. ca. 1766
Ruhama b. ca. 1768...
Sources: H.M. Pease Collection at D.C.H.S., Edgartown, Vol. 12, p. 430. Banks' "History of Martha's Vineyard," Vol. III, p. 257
Vital Records sent by June Pierson of Littleton, MA.(1)
"(Deaths)
Luce, Jonathan July 12, 1791 in 69th year (Source: Church record)" (2)
1) Luce Genealogy p. 51
2) Vital Records of Tisbury, Massachusetts to the Year 1850; New England Historical and Genealogical Society 1910 Boston p. 224
3) Vital Records of Chilmark, Mass. to the year 1850; New England Genealogical Society (Boston 1904) p. 20
Note in GenForum
Posted by Jim Miller on July 26, 1998 at 12:11:19:

Martha McCourt has published through the New England Historic Genealogical Society a large 4 volume History "The American Descendants of Henry Luce of Martha's Vineyard." As to my knowledge, NEHGS only printed 50 sets to sell and have sold them all, but a number of copies were made and given away to state historical & genealogical libraries. Check your local state historical & Genealogical libraries, you can't miss them... they take up 14" of shelf space.

[NI0419] According to Topo. Dict. (p. 147), the Shattucks came from Somerset.
"William Shattuck... was born in England in 1621 or 2, and died in Watertown, Massachusetts, August 14, 1672, aged 50 years...
Mr. Shattuck's name appears in an old list of the proprietors of Watertown made about 1642...
We have found it difficult to ascertain the exact place where Mr. Shattuck resided. It was, however, undoubtedly on Common Hill, near "King's Common"...
Mr. Shattuck is sometimes denominated a weaver; an humble but honorable handicraft of considerable importance in his day...
(his estate) amounted at his death to 434 pounds... of which 200 pounds was in real estate... and... 103 pounds in money...
He was interred in the ancient burying ground situated on the old road leading from Cambridge to Watertown, a short distance westerly of Mount Auburn. A... tablet... has recently been erected near the northwesterly corner of this ground...
William Shattuck was married about 1642... The christian name of his wife was Susanna...
His children, by Susanna, born in Watertown.
Susanna b. 1643
Mary b. Aug 25, 1645
John b. Feb 11, 1647
Philip b. 1648
Joanna, b. d. April 4, 1673
William b. 1653
Rebecca, b. 1655
Abigail b. 1657
Benjamin
Samuel b. Feb 28, 1666" (1)
1) Shattuck Genealogy p. 57-61 (see Mary Shattuck)

[NI0420] "William Shattuck was married about 1642... The christian name of his wife was Susanna; but neither her surname, nor her parentage, nor the exact date or place of her birth or marriage, has been asce
rtained. She remained a widow about 15 months after his death, and married Nov. 18, 1673, Mr. Richard Norcross, who survived her. She died in Watertown, Dec. 11, 1686" (1)
1) Shattuck Genealogy p. 60-61 (see Mary Shattuck)

[NI0421] "Jonnathan (ch. of Hennery and Hannah), June 15, 1722 Adonijah (ch. of Hennery and Hannah), Aug 15, 1717
Eleazor (ch. of Hennery and Hannah), Jan 1, 1712
Johannah (ch. of Hennery and Hannah), Jun 13, 1714
Robert (ch. of Hennery and Hannah), Dec 1, 1715" (3)
Children:
Eleazer Luce
Joanna Luce
Adonijah Luce
Jonathan Luce
Abraham Luce b. 1723 Martha's Vineyard
Isaac Luce b. 1726 Martha's Vineyard
Peter Luce b. 1730 Martha's Vineyard
Jacob Luce b. 1734 Martha's Vineyard (1)
"Henry Luce... b. 28 Mar 1690/1; res. Chilmark & Tisbury, MA.; d. 4 Apr 1769; will: 12 Dec 1768; prov. 4 May 1769. He m. 11 Feb 1710, Hannah Merry... Henry m. (2) 11 Feb 1747/8, Mrs. Mary (Clifford) Hatch, she was b. ca. 1703; she m. (1) 1 Dec 1724, Samuel Hatch; she was daughter of Jacob Clifford & Elizabeth Mayhew. Banks' data on each wife's family, here.
Luce children:
Eleazer/Eleazor b. 1 Jan 1711/2
Joanna/Johannah b. 13 Jun 1714
Robert b. 1 Dec 1715
Adonijah b. 15 Aug 1717
Jonathan/Jonnathan b. 15 Jun 1722
Abraham b. ca. 1723; d. 31 Aug 1797; age 74
...
Isaac b. ca. 1726; d. 3 Aug 1780
Peter b. ca. 1730
Jacob b. ca. Aug 1734
Sources: Banks' "History of Martha's Vineyard"' Vol. III, p. 93, 252, 331.
L.D.S. Archive Rec.: Marietta D.J. Walker of San Bernardino, CA.
West Tisbury Church Marriage Recs.: "Margaret Hatch" -- copy -- D.C.H.S. Edgartown." (2)
1) Luce document in NYPL
2) Luce Genealogy p. 25
3) Vital Records of Chilmark, Mass. to the year 1850; New England Genealogical Society (Boston 1904) p. 20

[NI0423] "Remember Luce... m.ca. 1688, Samuel Merry, b. 16 Nov 1669. They resided at Chilmark, Chickemoo, MA; he was a farmer; he d. 6 Oct 1727 age 58. Samuel Merry's will prov. 5 Mar 1728; served as Constable; Selectman; and Surveyor. Son of Joseph Merry & 2nd wife: Elizabeth (Parkhurst) Hilliard...
Merry children:
John b. 17 Sep 1689
Hannah b. 10 Jun 1692; m. Henry Luce
Mary b. 23 Dec 1694
Elizabeth b. 15 May 1697; d. 28 Jan 1732; unm.
Abigail b. 14 Jun 1700
Samuel b. 18 Dec 1702
Miriam b. 8 Apr 1705
Joseph b. 17 Jan 1711
Source: Banks' "Hist. of Martha's Vineyard"' Vol. III, p. 331" (1)

1) Luce Genealogy p. 17

[NI0428] "394. Moses, 6 son of Stephen 5 (117), b. 1 Apr 1720; m. 30 Apr 1740, Mary Sheldon,
[NOTE: THIS APPEARS TO BE AN ERROR. SEE WESTFIELD RECORD BELOW.]
"both of Northfield...
He lived for a time between Sheffield (very near Southwest corner of Massachusetts) and New Marlboro, near the line. His farm, at the time of the revolutionary war, was in Alford, but was finally set off to Hillsdale, N.Y. (just over the New York state line) Later he removed to Egremont. In the latter part of his life he resided in Geneva County, New York. (probably means Geneva, Yates Co.)
Children, first ten born in Westfield (near Springfield, MA).
1188 Abigail, 7 b. 3 Sept 1740;
1189 Lucy, 7 b. 13 Apr 1742
1190 Thankful, 7 b. 24 Jan 1744
1191 Moses, 7 b. 21 Feb 1746
1192 Abner, 7 b. 9 Nov 1747
1193 Mary, 7 b. 29 Nov., 1749
1194 Pliny, 7 b. 10 Nov., 1751; d. 17 Oct. 1752
1195 Eunice, 7 b. 25 Sep 1753
1196 Anna, 7 b. 2 Dec 1755
1197 Nathaniel, 7 b. 24 Feb 1758
1198 Pliny, 7 b. 7 Nov 1759
1199 Dolly, 7 b. 6 Jan 1762
1200 Titus, 7 b. 4 Jun 1765
1201 Elijah, b. _______" (1)
"Moses and Mary Bellden, both of Northfield A-158a
Married by Joseph Kellogg, Jus., Apr. 30, 1740
Abigal Born, Sept. 30, 1740
Lucy Apr. 13, 1742
Thankful Jan. 24, 1744
Moses Feb. 21, 1746
Abner Nov. 9, 1747
Mary Nov. 29, 1749
Pliny Nov. 10, 1751; died Oct. 17, 1752
Eunis Sept. 25, 1753
Anna Dec. 2, 1755
Nathanel Feb. 24, 1758" (3)
"The Diary of Elizabeth (Porter) Phelps [of Hadley, Massachusetts)...
November 6, 1768... Moses Kellog had a Daughter born the week past -- baptized Abigail Shelding...
April 7, 1769... Moses Kelloggs wife... taken into the church
July 23, 1769... This day Mother and Mrs. Phelps... attended the funeral of old Mrs. Kellogg" (2)
This Moses is probably 1191 Moses listed above.
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 122
2) NEGHR p. 118/24ff.
3) Westfield Family Histories as obtained from the files at City Hall, Westfield, 1945 Family History 41

[NI0429] "Died 14 Dec 1766 aged 44; headstone in the cemetery on the line between Egremont and Sheffield." (1)
She probably died during the birth of her last child, Elijah.
Posted by Richard Belding Gilbert on September 21, 1998 at 20:48:08:
In Reply to: Mary Belden (1722-1766), w. of M. Kellog posted by John Hope on September 14, 1998 at 14:15:58:
I have a Mary Belding/Belden b. 1722, the daugher of Stephen Belding/Belden (February 22, 1688/89 - February 09, 1735/36) and Mindwell Wright (October 1694 - ). Stephen was the son of Stephen, son of Samuel, son of Richard. Stephen died in Northfield.
My source is "Concerning Some of the Ancestors and Descendants of Royal Dennison Belden and Olive Cadwell Belden" by Jessie Perry Van Zile Belden, printed for private circulation by J.B. Lippincott Company, Philadelphia MDCCCXCVIII (reproduced (badly) by Higginson Book Company) pp. 173-175.
Also, "History of Whately, Mass." by James M. Crafts.
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 122

[NI0432] "117. Stephen, 5 son of Ensign Stephen 4 (31), b. in Hadley, 3 Feb 1695; m. (1) May 1719, Abigail Loomis...
he m. (2) 18 Jun 1734, Mary Cook, b. 20 May 1700, daughter of Capt. Moses Cook...
He was and innkeeper and trader in Hadley.
He served 7 weeks, 5 days in Capt. Dewey's Troopers, 1723.
Children.
394 Moses, 6 b. 1 Apr 1720; m. Mary Sheldon
395 Stephen, 6 b.12 Oct 1721; m. Mindwell Beldon (later wife of Abijah Loomis)
396 Josiah, 6 b. 15 Jun 1723; d Oct. 1749
397 William, 6 b. 22 Feb 1724
398 Thankful, 6 b. 26 Dec 1726
399 Ephraim, 6 b. 11 Oct 1728; d. 23 Jun 1731
400 Nathaniel Loomis, 6 b 15 Jun 1730
401 Mary, 6 b. 3 Jul 1736
402 Abigail, 6 b. 10 Aug 1738" (1)
"Stephen and Abigail Lumis; marriage intentions A-152
published May 9, 1719; married by Capt. John Ashley May 25, 1719
Moses Born, Apr. 1, 1720
Stephen Oct. 12, 1721
Josiah June 15, 1723
William Feb. 22, 1724
Thankfull Dec. 26, 1726
Nathanael Loomis June 15, 1720" (2)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 69
2) Westfield Family Histories as obtained from the Files at City Hall, Westfield c. 1945 p. 41

[NI0433] "(Stephen Kellogg) m. (1) May, 1719, Abigail Loomis, b. 3 May 1701, daughter of Nehemiah Loomis, b. 15 July, 1670 and Thankful Weller.
She died 13 Jan 1734...
He and his wife Abigail were admitted to the church in Westfield, 1726."(1)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 69

[NI0434] "Abigail Loomis, b. 3 May 1701, dau. of Nehemiah Loomis, b. 15 Jul 1670 and Thankful Weller." (1)
Nehemiah is undoubtedly the grandson or great-grandson of Joseph Loomis Loomis #12608, who died in Windsor, CT.
"Loomys, Nehemia Birth 15Jul1670 CHS930:50
Father Loomys, Samuel" (2)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 69
2) Holbrook, Jay Mack; Connecticut Colonists: Windsor 1635-1703 (Holbrook Research Institute, Oxford, Mass 1986) p. 175

[NI0435] "Arent Winne, bap. in Kingston 5 Sept. 1725, m. 2 Feb 1753 Annetje Langendyck...

[NI0436] "31. Ensign Stephen, 4 son of Lieut. Joseph 3 (17), b. 9 Apr 1668; m. 8 May 1694, Lydia Belden...
He d. 5 Jun 1722; his gravestone is now standing in the cemetery in Westfield.
He was a weaver; removed to Westfield in 1697. His will was dated 2 Jun 1722 and proved 5 Feb., following...
Children.
117 Stephen, 5 b. 3 Feb 1695
118 Lydia, 5 b. 24 Jan 1697
119 Moses, 5 b. 20 Oct 1700; d. 15 Sept 1704
120 Abigail, 5 b. 27 Dec 1702
121 Daniel, 5 b. 15 Dec 1704
122 Ephraim, 5 b. 2 Jul 1707
123 Mercy, 5 b. 30 Oct 1709
124 Noah, 5 b. 13 Feb 1711
125 Silas, 5 b. 7 Apr 1714
126 Amos, 5 b. 30 Sep 1716
127 Aaron, 5 b. _________" (1)
From his father's will:
"I give and bequeath unto my loving sons Stephen Kellogg and Nathaniel Kellogg, considering that I had a considerable estate with their mother out of Father Terry's Estate therefore I give to them all that alotment that was my Father Terry's lying in Hockanum in Hadley bounded by the land of John Smith northeast and the land of Thomas Hovey southwest abutting on the River both North & South to be equally divided to them after my wife's decease, not to have ye use or possession of said land till then and then to be to them and their heirs forever." (2)
It appears that he did not live to inherit this since his mother outlived him.
Abigail married Benjamin Sheldon (S0174) on August 13, 1726. They have her birth date as March 19, 1703 in Hadley, Mass. That, in fact, may be her baptism date.
"Kelogg, Stephen and Lidiah A-111
Lidiah Born, Jan. 24, 1697
Moses Oct. 20, 1700; died Sept. 15, 1704
Abigeirl Dec. 27, 1702
Daniell Dec. 16, 1704
Ephraim July 2, 1707
Mercy Oct. 30, 1709
Noah Feb. 13, 1711
Silas Apr. 7, 1714
Amos Sept. 30, 1716
Stephen Kelogg, Sr., died June 5, 1722" (3)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 42
2) Ibid., p. 29
3) Westfield Family Histories; p. 42

[NI0438] Children:
Robert Luce
Remember Luce b. 1669 Martha's Vineyard
Israel Luce b. 1671 Martha's Vineyard
Experience Luce b. 1673 Martha's Vineyard
Eleazer Luce b. 1675 Martha's Vineyard
Henry Luce b. 1677 Martha's Vineyard
Thomas Luce b. 1679 Martha's Vineyard
William Luce b. 1681 Martha's Vineyard
David Luce b. 1683 Martha's Vineyard
Josiah Luce b. 1685 Martha's Vineyard (1)
"Henry Luce born between 1640 & 1645 possibly in the Bristol area of England. Bank's statement in the preface to his book that "it may be assumed that immigrants arriving from 1630-40 were born at the beginning of the century" leads one to conclude that the Henry, b. 1640, was the son of a Luce immigrant, who was also related to Harke Luce as possibly younger brother, son, or nephew. Harke, a res. of Scituate in 1643.
Henry, may have simply come over as a youth between 1656/60 as no record of him exists until 1666 in America. In either case, his origins are still unproven. Some people believe he was of Welsh descent and his father was Israel Luce, who married Remember Munson (per--L.D.S. Archive Record for Madge Marsh Mills). Some believe his line came from the Isle of Jersey; and others think his ancestors came from Normandy with William the Conqueror. Henry Luce's family was probably from Gloucestershire and the Bristol areas of England. He might have resided in Barnstable, but no records found. Henry was a resident of Scituate in 1666; of Rehoboth in 1668; and he removed to the Island of Martha's Vineyard ca. 1670 where he lived until his death which occurred between May 1687 (last record of him) and Mar 1689 (when his wife mentioned as "widow, Remember Luce").
Henry Luce married ca. 1666 in Scituate or Barnstable, MA. to Remember Litchfield...
As to the Luce name being DeLuce/DeLucie/DeLuze, etc., Mrs. McCourt agrees with Shorthouse's "Hist. of English Surnames" which points out "Luce" was the plebian (or yeoman & immigrant) form of the name; Lucy or deLucy, the royal form of the same name. A fact agreed to by Sir Richard H. Luce, of Derby, Eng., who wrote letters to Mrs. McLaughlin at the turn of the century. - Some in Martha's Vineyard desired home rule - Henry Luce signed appeals during Dutch Rebellion, to unseat Gov. Mayhew, 1673... (Mayhew was the founder of Martha's Vineyard -- JH)
(first five generations follow Banks' History of Martha's Vineyard")
Luce children:
Robert b. ca. 1667
Remember b. ca. 1670
Israel b. ca. 1671
Experience b. ca. 7 Feb 1673
Eleazer b. ca. 1675
Henry b. ca. 1677
Thomas b. ca. 1679
William b. ca. 1681
David b. ca. 1683
Josiah b. ca. 1685" (2)
1) Luce document in NYPL
2) Luce Genealogy p. 16

[NI0439] "Henry Luce married ca. 1666 in Scituate or Barnstable, MA to: Remember Litchfield, daughter of Lawrence Litchfield & Judith Dennis. Judith was the daughter of William Dennis of Scituate, MA & ---?... Remember Litchfield was born ca. 1644 prob. Barnstable, MA. (or Scituate) Her death is unknown, but she was still alive in 1708...
"The Descs. of Lawrence of Litchfield", p. 1-36, by W.J. Litchfield; this book may have some errors regarding the Luce family's ancestry." (1)
1) Luce Genealogy p. 16

[NI0440] "(Ensign Stephen Kellogg) m. 8 May 1694, Lydia Belden, b. Mar 1675, dau. of John and Lydia Belden, of Wethersfield, Conn...
She m. (2) in Westfield, 17 Jan 1734, as his second wife, Benjamin Lewis, of Colchester, Conn.
He died in Colchester, 6 Sep 1753, in his seventy-ninth year; she d. there 6 Jan 1759 in her eighty-fourth year." (1)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 42

[NI0441] "Elizabeth (Seymour)... m. at Wethersfield, 7 Feb 1711/12, Gideon Belding, b. at Wethersfield 24 Mar 1692/3, d. in 1733, s. of Samuel [3] (John, [2] Richard, [1])" (1)
"John Belden, son of Richard Belden, was born in England about 1631, and accompanied his father to America, settling in Wethersfield, where he was made a freeman in 1657. He enlisted as a trooper under Captain John Mason during the years 1657-8, and took an active part in the affairs of the town. He inherited a large portion of the real estate of his father, and acquired much of his own by purchase, building a moderate fortune. He was licensed to be a tavern keeper by the town, and in all probability was a merchant. The inventory of his estate amounted to 911 pounds. He died June 27, 1677, aged forty-six years. The Wethersfield Land Records, pages 225-258, bear his autograph "John Belden". John Belden married Lydia Standish, daughter of Thomas and Susanna Standish. Their children were: 1. John, born June 12, 1658. 2. Lieut. Jonathan, June 21, 1660. 3. Joseph, April 23, 1663. 4. Samuel, mentioned below. 5. Sarah, March 31, 1668. 6. Daniel, Oct. 12, 1670. 7. Child, Jan. 8, 1672. 8. Lydia, in March, 1675, married Stephen Kellogg. 9. Margaret, March 29, 1677." (2)
"Belden, John (1631-1677) & Lydia (?Riley); 24 Apr 1657; Wethersfield, CT" (3)
1)NEH&GR July 1918 p. 212
2) Belden and Allied Families; Americana Illustrated; Fourth Quarter 1919 Vol. XIII p. 394
3) Torrey, Clarence Almon; New England Marriages Prior to 1700 (Genealogical Publishing Co., Balt. 1985) p. 60

[NI0443] "17. Lieut. Joseph 3, son of Martin 2 (7), bap. in Great Leighs, England, 1 Apr 1626; m. (1) probably in England, Joanna _____.
She d. in Hadley, Mass., 14 Sep 1666. He m. (2) Abigail Terry...
He d. between 27 Jun 1707 when his will was dated and 4 Feb 1708 when it was proved...
It is not known in what year he came to America. He was in Farmington, Conn., in 1651, where he was an early settler and served several terms as selectman. He and his wife were "joined" to the church, 9 Oct 1653. (They must have known the Harts.)
His home lot, consisting of four acres, was purchased from John Andrews, from whom he also bought a twelve-acre lot of plowing land curiously called "Nod Land". He sold this property in Feb 1655, and removed about 1657 to Boston, where "Joseph Kelog, weaver, late of Farmington, in the colony of Connecticut, now of Boston," bought from Peter Oliver and his wife, 16 Oct 1659, their dwelling house, fronting to the street leading to Roxbury, for one hundred pounds starling." Joseph "Kelog" and Joanna, his wife, mortgaged the same premises, 18 Nov 1659 to Sergt. Thomas Clarke, to secure the payment of one hundred pounds to be paid "in good wheate, pork and pease at merchants currant price."
The sold the same premised to John Witherden, 13 Jun 1661...
He removed from Boston to Hadley and was one of the proprietors. In 1661, the town made an agreement with him to keep the ferry between Hadley and Northhampton, and he built his house on a small "home lot" which had been reserved by the town for a "Ferry lot."
In January 1675 a committee appointed by the Court made an agreement with him. He was to have a boat for horses and a canoe for persons, and to receive for man and horse, 8d. in wheat or other pay, or 6 d. in money; for single persons, 3d. and when more than one 2 d. each... He and his son John, and grandson James Kellogg kept this ferry until 1758...
He was selectman in Hadley, 1665, 74, 77, 79, 81, 85, 92... He was on the committee for the purchase, from the Indians, of Swampfield (for which the Indians received 26 pounds) have been formed, in whole or in part, the towns of Sunderland, Montague and Leverett.
He was a member of the school committee in 1686, and opposed taking the management of the Hopkins School from the committee...
The County Court approved the choice of Joseph Kellogg as Sergeant of the Company, Mar 1663. The General Court of Massachusetts appointed him, 9 May 1678, Ensign in the Foot Company of Hadley, and 7 Oct of the same year, Lieutenant of the same company. He served in that office until 1692, his military service thus extending over twenty-nine consecutive years...
He sustained his part in the struggle of the settlers against the Indians, and was in command, as Sergeant, of the Hadley troops at the famous "Turners Falls" fight, 18 May 1676 which broke the power of the river tribes...
Children by his first wife.
22 Elizabeth, 4 b. Farmington, 5 Mar 1651
23 Joseph, 4 b. 11 Aug 1653
24 Nathaniel 4 bap. 29 Oct 1654
25 John, 4 bap. 29 Dec 1656
26 Martin, 4 b. in Boston, 22 Nov 1658
27 Edward, 4 b. in Boston, 1 Oct 1660
28 Samuel, 4 b. in Hadley, 28 Sept 1662
29 Joanna, 4 b. in Hadley, 8 Dec 1664
30 Sarah, 4 b. in Hadley, 27 Aug 1666
Children by his second wife, b. in Hadley
31 Stephen, 4 b. 9 Apr 1668
32 Nathaniel, 4 b. 8 Oct 1669
33 Abigail, 4 b. 9 Oct 1671
34 Elizabeth, 4 b. 9 Oct 1673
35 Prudence, 4 b. 14 Oct 1675
36 Ebenezer, 4 b. 22 Nov 1677
37 Jonathan, 4 b. 25 Dec 1679
38 Daniel, 4 b. 22 Mar 1682 d. 5 Jul 1684
39 Joseph, 4 b. 12 May 1684
40 Daniel, 4 b. 10 Jun 1686, died young
41 Ephraim, 4 b. 2. Jan 1687; died young" (1)
"In the Connecticut Valley another innovative captain, William Turner, continued to be vexed and frustrated by the set-piece strategies of Massachusetts Bay's high command. These policies did nothing but encourage the native allies to make such bloody raids as the one launched on Hatfield on May 12. Led by Pumham, the venerable Narrangansett sachem, this raid succeeded in taking seventy head of cattle from the embattled town--whose defenders seemed totally uninterested in pursuit. They were there for guard duty, they had been told.
Then, through the report of a settler's son recently released from captivity in a native village called Peskeompskut, Turner learned some intriguing details about that upriver encampment. In the first place, Peskeompskut had become the supply base for the western division of the Algonquian army...
Secondly, the place was poorly guarded, the warriors off on their missions and the women virtually defenseless. As Turner presented his argument for an immediate attack on Peskeompskut he must have explained away the natives' laxness in defense by saying that they had learned the wrong lesson from the English military's bastion-minded lack of aggressiveness... But now he and his band of freethinkers, accompanied by a number of settlers who yearned to get the war over with so they could plant their fields, would execute this smashing surprise attack...
His espousing of the campaign had captured the enthusiasm of so many other volunteers that his strike force finally numbered 150 men in all, though some of these were more interested in the possibility of booty than in observing proper military procedures.
Turner and his men, planning to attack after a nighttime trek, were assissted by the wet spring weather. A thunder shower at the end of the day had persuaded the native sentries that it would be far preferable to concentrate on the night's feast of captured beef than to maintain their guard. So the approaching task force, having followed the directions of the recently released captive, successfully made their way on horseback and by foot to the first of the several native camps at Peskeompskut. Here at daybreak on May 19 they discovered nothing stirring, the effects of the feasting on beef and salmon having kept the sentries long abed. Turner commanded that the soldiers leave their horses at this point, lightly guarded; the bulk of the force advanced to the attack on foot...
When the occupants of the first camp were awakened from their slumbers at sword point, they thought at first that they were under attack from their ancient enemies to the west. Chroniclers reprot that the cry of "Mohawk! Mohawk! was heard before that voice was silenced by the thrust of the blade. The English attack was swift and brutal, with no prisoners taken. Turner's men advanced on the base itself, then set the wigwams ablaze, hurling the forges into the river, decapitating the women and children and oldsters. Panic-stricken people dashed for the canoes, overfilled them in their hast to cross the river. As the canoes capsized in the waves, the passengers were thrown over the falls and dashed upon the rocks by the might of the river. There was hardly time to fire a shot in defence; it was a total slaughter of the villagers.
But suddenly native warriors were seen nearby, on the opposite bank. Now it was the turn of the English to panic. Running back to where their horses had been tethered, the farmer-soldiers found the horseguards under attack, ambushed by encircling native. And, as Turner and his men straggled south in disarray, away from the scene of easy slaughter, they fell into additional ambushes...
Turner himself, still suffering from his illness, lost command of his men. Some went this way, some that in flight. He himself was ambushed crossing the Green River. He fell with thirty others, leaving the command in Holyoke's hands." (2)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) pp. 25-31
2) Bourne, Russell; The Red King's Rebellion (Atheneum New York 1990) p. 189-92
See also Willard-Bradley Memoirs, p. 85-7

[NI0444] "(Joseph Kellogg) m. (2) Abigail Terry, b. in Windsor, Conn., 21 Sep 1646, dau. of Stephen Terry, b. Stockton, Wiltshire, England, 25 Aug 1608 and Elizabeth ______...
Abigail in 1673, was among those presented by the jury at the March Court of Hampshire, as persons of small estate, who "use to wear silk contrary to law." She was acquitted, but this attempt to enforce the sumptuary laws showed that her husband's estate was below the 200 pounds needed to allow her to wear "gold or silver lace, gold or silver buttons, bone lace above 2 s. per yard or sillk hoods or scarfs, " which the good men of that period looked upon as extravagance in dress." (1)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 25 & 28
Terry Tales, P.O. Box 195, Granville, MA 01034 Arlene (Terry) Bower $15 per year pub. quarterly

[NI0445] "Stephen Terry
Origin: Dorchester, Dorsetshire
First Residence: Dorchester
Removes: Windsor 1636, Hadley
Return Trips: Returned to england to marry in 1633, and then back to New England in 1634.
Freeman: Requested 19 October 1630 and admitted 18 May 1631 (MBCR 1:80, 366)...
On 11 March 1657/8 Stephen Terry was one of thirty-seven "troopers" organized under the command of Major John Mason (CCCR 1:309)...
In his will, dated 19 September 1668 and proved 29 September 1668...
Birth: Born 25 August 1608 and baptized 31 August 1608, Stockton, Wiltshire, son of John and Mary (White) Terry (NEHGR 54:103, 55:222-23).
Death: Hadley...
Marriage: (1) Symondsbury, Dorsetshire, 13 March 1633/4 Jane Hardey...
(2) After 1647 Elizabeth _____; she died at Hadley on 11 August 1683, aged 90 years (HamVR 80)...
Associations: Stephen Terry's mother was sister of the Rev. John White of Dorchester, Dorsetshire (Frances Rose-Troup, John White... (New York 1930), pp. 406-7). Another sibling was Martha White who married William Cooke; their daughter Elizabeth Cooke married Rev. William Walton of Marblehead (NEHGR 142:361-68).
Comments: Stephen Terry is placed as a passenger on the Mary & John because he was in New England by 1630, his first residence was Dorchester and he came from the West Country (NEHGR 147:155). He returned briefly to England by 1633, for he married in Symondsbury, Dorsetshire, on 13 March 1633/4 and returned to New England in 1634 on the Recovery (NGSQ 71:171, 77:250).
Matthew Grant said that Stephen Terry had four children born in Windsor (Grant 93)." (5)
"Stephen Terry, son of John Terry and Mary White, came to America on the "Mary and John" in 1630; admitted freeman in Dorchester, Mass., 16 May 1631; removed to Windsor, Connecticut, in 1637, where he was a member of the first troop of cavalry organized in this country. He removed to Hadley as early as 1663, and was its first constable. He d. there 1668; his wife d. 11 Aug 1683." (1)
"Stephen Terry, according to Savage, came in 1630, probably in the "Mary and John." He settled in Dorchester, Mass., where he was admitted freeman May 18, 1631, and held the office of constable. About 1636, he removed to Windsor, Conn., where he lived for some years. He was several times a member of the grand jury, and of the jure of "life and death," served on committees for laying out highways, and held the office of constable. About 1660, he removed to Hadley, Mass., being one of its "first settlers," was the first constable of the place, and afterwards a selectman. He was rated at 200
pounds, and had nearly nine acres of land assigned to him. None of his townsmen were rated higher, but several were rated the same. He was married in Dorchester, but lost his wife by death in Windsor, June 1647. He died in Hadley Sept, 1668, leaving a widow named Elizabeth, and from the fact she died about 1683, aged about ninety years, and their probable relative ages, we may conjecture that he was born as early as about 1590. Perhaps Hadley was the name of his native place in England.
(Children:)
Mary; b. in Dorchester Dec. 31, 1635; d. in Deerfield, Mass., 1692; m. Dec 8, 1659, deacon Richard Goodman, of Hartford, Conn. who was b. 1609, and was killed by Indians Apr 1, 1676. They were of the party that left Hartford on account of church differences, and settled Hadley, Mass...
John; b. in Windsor Mar 6, 1637-8; d., 1691; m. in Hartford, Conn., Nov. 27, 1662, Elizabeth, dau. of William Wadsworth...
Elizabeth; b. in Windsor Jan 4, 1641-2; killed by Indians, in Hadley, Sept 19, 1677...
Abigail; b. in Windsor Sept. 21, 1646; was living in 1715; m. May 9, 1667, Joseph Kellogg, who d. Jan., 1708. He was a weaver, and lived in Farmington, Conn., whence he removed to Boston, Mass., and thence to Hadley. He became a lieutenant of militia. They had eleven children." (2)
"Stephen Terry, born at Stockton, Wiltshire, 25 August, baptized 31 August 1608, was the youngest child of John Terry. At the death of his father, 10 May 1625, he was less than 17 years old. His uncle and guardian, John White of Dorchester, was at that time busy with his plans for the settlement of New England. The family were puritan to the very bone...
His widow, Elizabeth Terry, survived him nearly 15 years and d. 11 August 1683." (3)
"[daughter] Elizabeth,... Married Philip Russell, of Hadley, January 10, 1665. She and her son Stephen were slain by the Indians in September, 1677." (4)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 25
2) Terry, Stephen; Notes of Terry Families in the USA (Hartford 1887) p. 248-9
3) Kellogg, Justin P.; A Supplement to notes on Joseph Kellogg of Hadley containing notes on the families of Terry, White and Woodbury (1899) p. 8
4) Goodwin, Nathan; Genealogical Notes on First Settlers of Connecticut and Massachusetts (Baltimore; Genealogical Publishing Co. 1969, orig. pub. 1856) p. 223
5) The Great Migration Begins, p. 1805-6

[NI0446] "(in Seneca Co. James A. Swarthout) married Betsey Ketchum of Romulus who had been born in Orange Co." (1)
(James Swarthout's) wife died Jan 10, 1832" (2)
I HAVE A STRONG FEELING THAT BETSEY COMES FROM THIS FAMILY. NOTE THAT VII. MARTHA MARRIED AN EASTWOOD (OSTERHOUT)
"54. John5 Ketcham (John4, John3, John2, Edward1) was born on 24 Feb 1716 at Huntington, New York.638,639 He married Sarah Matthews on 2 Feb 1740/41 at First Church, Huntington, New York.640 He died on 21 Apr 1794 at Deerpark (Mount Hope), Orange Co, New York, at age 78.641,642

Resided at Goshen, New York.643 He immigrated in 1774 to Deerpark (Mount Hope), Olde Ulster (Orange) Co, New York.644

Children of John5 Ketcham and Sarah Matthews were as follows:

96. i. Philip6, m. Elizabeth Young; b. 17 Jun 1744.
97. ii. John, m. Abby Hawkins; b. 28 Feb 1748.
98. iii. Joseph, b. 23 Sep 1750 at Huntington, Orange Co, New York; m. Prudence King.
iv. Isaac; b. 26 Oct 1752;645,646 d. circa 1776; died in captivity in prison ship off Long Island.647
99. v. Elizabeth, m. John Case; b. 12 May 1755.
100. vi. James, b. 22 Jul 1757; m. Rhoda Campbell.
vii. Martha; m. (--?--) Eastwood;648 b. 20 Mar 1759.649,650
viii. Ruth; m. James Tucker;651 m. William Davis;652 b. 28 Aug 1761.653,654
ix. Mariam; m. Jonathan Carpenter;655 b. 25 Jun 1764.656,657
x. Mary; m. Andrew Davis;658 b. 2 Jan 1766;659,660 d. 29 Oct 1808 at age 42.661
Notes
638. Seversmith, Colonial Families, p. 1,702.
639. Electa Ketcham Penney, Ketcham Family History. The descendants of John Ketcham and his wife Sarah Matthews of Mt. Hope Township (one time known as Deerpark, later Calhoun, and finally Mt. Hope) Orange County, N.Y. (Salem, Mass. [?]: Higgenson Book Co. [W. J. Coulter], 1997 [1954]), p. 1. Hereinafter cited as Ketcham Family History.
640. Seversmith, Colonial Families, Ketcham, 1, 701 & 703.
641. ibid, Ketcham, 1, 702.
642. Penney, Ketcham Family History, p. 1.
643. Seversmith, Colonial Families, Ketcham, 1, 702.
644. Penney, Ketcham Family History, p. 2.
645. Ketcham Genealogy, New York DAR Genealogical Records Committee Report, Series II, vol #V602, p. 3.
646. Penney, Ketcham Family History, p. 2.
647. Ketcham Genealogy[ITAL], p. 3.
648. ibid.
649. ibid.
650. Penney, Ketcham Family History, p. 2.
651. Ketcham Genealogy[ITAL], p. 3.
652. ibid.
653. ibid.
654. Penney, Ketcham Family History, p. 2.
655. Ketcham Genealogy[ITAL], p. 3.
656. ibid.
657. Penney, Ketcham Family History, p. 2.
658. Ketcham Genealogy[ITAL], p. 3.
659. ibid.
660. Penney, Ketcham Family History, p. 2.
661. Ketcham Genealogy[ITAL], p. 3." (3)
1) Ruth Thoden quoting Dick Apolant
2) Ruth Thoden quoting Yates Co. Chronicle (1871?)
3) Ketcham Genealogy

[NI0447] "John Terry the elder... b. 1555, at Long Sutton, Hants, in the Manor of Crondal, the eldest child of his father Stephen Terry. He was admitted to Winchester College in 1572, he succeeded to a schol
arship in New College Oxford 10 March 1574-5 and at the end of two years was admitted a fellow of New. He risigned his fellowship in 1590 in consequence of his presentation to Stockton in Wiltshire.
He was ordained by John Pierce, Bishop of Sarum and soon after became domestic chaplain to Thomas Cooper, Bishop of Winchester, who presented him to the Rectory of Stockton.
He published in 1600 a work with the title "The Trial of Truth" which was dedicated to Henry Lord Bishop of Sarum. He published in 1602 the second part of "The Trial of Truth", dedicated to Dr. Rives
, Warden of New College, Oxford. The above works can be found in the library of the British Museum. He also published in 1617 a sermon with the title "The Reasonableness of wise and holy truth; and
the absurditie of foolish and wicked Errour" and dedicated it to the Right Rev. Father in God, Arthur Lord Bishop of Bath and Wells, Warden of New College Oxford.
He died 10 May 1625 of an atrophy, and was buried by his own request among the poor in the churchyard of Stockton...
The oldest monument in the Chancel of the Church in Stockton is over the Chancel-door on the north wall. It is a mural tablet (to John Terry)...
John Terry m. about 1590 Mary White, dau. of John White... Six sons were born of this marriage who all, except the eldest, survived their father. They are entered in the parish registers of Stockton
as follows
Stephanus Terry, bapt. 20 Aug 1592, d. in Oxford 28 July 1608
John Terry bapt. 1 Nov 1593
Samuel Terry bapt 6 Jul 1595
John (Josiah) Terry bapt. 25 May 1597
Nathaniel Terry bapt. 11 November 1599
Stephanus Terry, b. 25 Aug bapt. 31 Aug 1608" (1)
1) Kellogg supplement p.5-7 (see Stephen Terry)

[NI0449] "Mary (White) Terry, wife of John Terry, was the eldest child of her father John White of Stanton St-John, Oxford, who was the nephew of Thomas White, chancellor of Sarum, who d. 11 June 1588.
John White was probably the son of Robert White, brother of Thomas.
Mary White was born about 1570, and must have been some 55 years old at the death of her husband. In the will of John Terry, dated 25 April 1625 and proved 5 July 1625, she is made the residuary legatee and sole executrix. In the will of her father John White, dated 30 Sept. 1616, and proved 26 Sept 1618, I find a gift to her of twenty pounds." (1)
1) Kellogg supplement p. 7 (see Stephen Terry)
Possible Source: NEHGR 55:22-31

[NI0455] "Mark Kelsey was probably the eldest child of William and Bethia Kelsey and born about 1628, probably in England. He lived in Windsor and Wethersfield; died before Feb. 27, 1722/3, probably at Windsor. Married first, March 8 1659, at Windsor, Rebecca Hoskins... Mark Kelsey married second, Dec. 26, 1683, probably at Wethersfield, Mrs. Abigail (______) Atwood, born about 1645-48; died Mar. 28, 1713, widow of Captain Thomas Atwood of Wethersfield.
Children: 8 (?) (Kelsey), five sons and two daughters of whom records can be found, and perhaps one other, sex unknown. All probably born at Windsor.
Rebecca, born Jan 2, 1659/60
John, born about 1661(?); died June 18, 1685
Thomas, born Oct. 16, 1663; died May 9, 1715.
a son, name unknown, born about 1667.
William, born about 1670; died Nov. 8, 1698
Joseph (?), born about 1673; died about June 1742.
Ruth, born about 1676...(1)
"Kelcy, Mark Children Born 1 1677 CHS930:92
Kelcy, Mark Marriage 26 Dec 1683 WIN638:58
Wife Atwood, Abigail
Kelly, Mark 628 Estate in Pounds= 63 1674 GRA674:17...
Kelsey, Mark Freeman 27 Apr 1703 CHS930:120...
Kelsie, John Death 18 Jun 1685 WIN638:46
Kelsie, Mark Marriage 2 Mar 1659 WIN638:58
Wife Hoskins, Rebekah
Kelsie, Mark Estate in Pounds= 61 1686 CHS930:168
Note Taxable Heads 2
Kelsie, Mark Estate in Pounds= 26 1702 WIN702:11
Note Taxable Heads 1...
Kelsy, Mark Estate in Pounds= 69 1675 GRA675:20
Kelsy, Mark Estate in Pounds= 74 1676 GRA676:29
Kelsy, Mark Estate in Pounds= 69 1677 GRA677:3" (2)
"Mark b. (by present estimate, say 1634, most likely at Cambridge), d. prob. Windsor bet. May 1715 and Feb. 1722/3. He m. (1) Windsor 8 March 1658/9 Rebecca Hoskins (Windsor VR), b. ca. 1634, d. 23 Aug 1683, aged 49, (Stile's Windsor, 2:404), but not a daughter of Windsor's John Hoskins as Stiles claims (TAG 30(1954):191-2). Mark m. (2) Windsor 26 Dec. 1683 Abigail (_____) Atwood (Windsor VR), b. ca. 1645-8, d. 28 March 1713, widow of Capt. Thomas Atwood of Wethersfield. It seems that Mark was little past his teenage years on 7 Dec. 1654 when he was found guilty at Hartford of "several evill carriages & misdeameanors," for which he was "to be publiquely Corrected to Morrow morning & in the meane time to goe to prison" (Particular Court Recs., 133=34). As shown above, Mark took inventory of his brother-in-law James Eggleston's estate at Windsor in 1679.
Winthrop made several references to Mark Kelsey worthy of note. He put Mark down as " a young married man bruised by fall about making an house" at Windsor 19 March 1658/9. By 27 Nov. 1663, Mark was "of Hockanum," prob. in that section of it in present Glastonbury, then Wethersfield, when his 3 1/2-year-old daughter Rebecca was "broake out about the Eys." He was still there in November 1665 when his "child (of) 4 months old" received Winthrop's attention. Mark was "of Hartford," however, on 3 March 1667/8 when his daughter Hester, aged "2y & 2 months" received similar treatment. (Winthrop Med. Recs. 455, 522, 608, 790.) The four-month-old child in Nov. 1665 and the daughter Hester, b. ca. Jan 1665/6 - the birth dates conflict - are not among the eight children included in the Kelsey Genealogy (p. 40) (3)
1) Kelsey Genealogy Vol. 1 p. 40
2) Holbrook, Jay Mack; Connecticut Colonists: Windsor 1636-1703 (Holbrook Research Institute, Oxford, MA 1986) p. 159-160
3) TAG Oct 1993 p. 214

[NI0456] "(Mark Kelsey) married first, March 8, 1659, at Windsor, Rebecca Hoskins, born about 1634; died Aug. 28, 1683, daughter of John Hoskins and his wife Ann Filer. (John Hoskins came to New England in the "Mary and John" in 1630; was deputy to the General Court in 1637 and died May 3, 1648. His wife died Mar 6, 1662.)" (1)
"Older sources claim that John Hoskin's wife was Ann Filer sister of Walter Filer, and that there were two more children: Anthony Hoskins, who married in 1656, and Rebecca, who also married in 1656. There is, however, no evidence for the identity of Hoskin's wife, and Anthony and Rebecca are more likely his nephew and niece, or even totally unrelated. Genevive Kiepura presented the arguments for excluding Anthony and Rebecca (TAG 30:191-92), and her conclusions were supported by Coddington a few years later (TAG 38:1-4).
Thomas and Katherine were clearly both children of Ann (_____) Hoskins, but it is not clear whether Katherine was daughter of John Hoskins; and these two children and the probable John were all born in the second decade of the seventeenth century, while Anthony and Rebecca would have been nearly a generation younger. See also the more recent work of Gerald Parsons (NEHGR 143:117-19), which is in agreement with Kiepura and Coddington on these points." (2)
1) Kelsey Genealogy, Vol. 1 p. 40
2) The Great Migration Begins, p. 1002

[NI0457] "William Kelsey, born in England about 1600, died about 1680 at Killingworth and was probably buried there. He married probably about 1625-8 in England, Bethia Hopkins (?), born about 1605-10, in England,; died _______. (Bethia possibly died about 1636 and William may have married a second wife shortly after this, who would thus have been the mother of the four younger children, and possibly of John.) There is no mention of William Kelsey's wife in any known records.
Children: 9 (Kelsey), five sons and four daughters.
Mark...
Bethia, born about 1630...
Priscilla, born about 1632...
Mary, born bout 1633...
John, born about 1636...
Abigail, born April 19, 1645
Stephen, born Nov. 7, 1647
Daniel born July 6, 1650...
William, born Mar. 23, 1654" (1)
"Hannah Ingersoll was married to Stephen Kelsey, of Hartford, Conn., November 15, 1672. He was son of William Kelsey, one of the first settlers of Hartford, and was baptized November 7, 1647. Mr. Stephen Kelsey died November 30, 1710, aged 63." (2)
"William Kelsey
Origin: Unknown
Migration: 1633
First Residence: Cambridge
Removes: Hartford, 1635, Killingworth, 1668
Freeman: In Killingworth section of 1669 Connecticut list of freeman (as "William Keilsey") [CCCR 2:525].
Education: Signed deed by mark [CaBOP 42].
Offices: On 11 May 1671 "W[illia]m Callsey" was deputy to Connecticut General Court from Killingworth [CCCR 2:147].
On 24 March 1657/8 "William Kelsey is freed from watching, warding & training" [CCCR 1:314].
Estate: Granted one rood for a cowyard in Cambridge, 5 August 1633 [CaTR 5]. Granted three acres in Westend Field, 4 August 1634 [CaTR 9]. Granted a proportional share of one in the meadow ground, 21 April 1635 [CaTR 13].
In the Cambridge land inventory on 5 October 1635 "William Kellsie" held five parcels: half a rood in town with one house, garden and backside; three acres on Small Lot Hill; three acres in the Great Marsh; half an acre in the West End; and three acres in Westend Field [CaBOP 24]. On 19 April 1636 "William Kelsey of the New Towne [Cambridge]" sold to Thomas Fisher his right in "any parcel of meadow ground lying & being in the New Towne aforesaid" [CaBOP 42].
In the Hartford land inventory of February 1639 "Will[ia]m Kelsy" was credited with twenty-one parcels: one acre with dwelling house, outhouses, yards & gardens; three acres "lying partly in the neck of land"; one rood in the Little Meadow; two roods eighteen perches in the North Meadow; five acres, three roods and thirty-eight perches of meadow and swamp in the North Meadow; one acre eight perches on the east side of the Great River; five acres int he Cowpasture; nine acres three roods in the Middle Oxpasture (annotated "sold Wm. Spencer"); five acres of meadow on the east side of the Great River "which he received in exchange of William Spencer"; one acre, two roods and fourteen perches in the neck of land; three roods thirty-seven perches in the neck of land; seven acres, twenty-four perches in the Cowpasture; two acres, one rood and thirty-one perches in the neck of land "part whereof he received of Edward Ellmer"; three score perches in the neck of land; three acres, three roods and twenty perches in the neck of land; one acre, thirty-three perches in the neck of land "which he bought of John Maynord"; three acres in the neck of land "which he bought of Richard Goodman"; one acre in the neck of land "which he bought of John Tallycott"; five acres on the east side of the Great River " part of which he bought of William Edwordes"; and two roods "that he bought of William Williams and did sometime belong to John Beddell" (annotated "sold to G. Grannis 1664" [HaBOP 141-44]. Five of these parcels were marked as given to "Steven Callsey" in 1670/1.)
Birth: By about 1609 based on estimated date of marriage.
Death: Killingworth between June 1675 and 21 September 1676 [TAG 69:218].
Marriage: By 1634 _____ _____,...
Children:
i Mark...
ii Hester, b. say 1636; m. (1) by 1656 James Eggleston, son of Bigod Eggleston; m. (2) Windsor 29 April 1680 James Eno; m. (3) 10 June 1686 John Williams. (See TAG 68:208-10 for a detailed discussion of Hester's marital career, which includes full documentation.)
iii John, b. say 1638; m. by 1668 Hannah Desborough [TAG 38:210-11, 68:214].
iv Priscilla, b. about 1640 (aged 17 on 22 December 1657 [TAG 68:214, citing WMJ 74]); m. by January 1659/60? Cornelius Gillett, son of Jonathan Gillett [TAG 68:214].
v Mary, b. about 1644 (aged 14 in May 1658 [TAG 68:215, citing WMJ 109]); m. Windsor 23 April 1661 Jonathan Gillett [Grant 39], son of Jonathan Gillett.
vi Abigail, b. Hartford 19 April 1645 [HaBOP 575]; m. Killingworth 3 December 1668 John Hull [TAG 68:215].
vii Stephen, bp. Hartford [blank] July 1650 [HaBOP 581]; m. (1) Killingworth 27 March 1672 Mary Stevens [TAG 68:215}; m. (2) by 1693 Jane Chalker [TAG 68:231]...
"William Kelsey was born about 1600 and was living at Killingworth, Connecticut, in June 1675 (Kelsey Gen., 24, 34). He married probably about 1632 or 1633 in England, or perhaps soon after he arrived at Cambridge in New England, an unidentified woman born about 1613 and living at Hartford in December 1666 (Winthrop Med. Recs., 143, 691)." (4)
Bibliographic Note: In 1993 Gale Ion Harris published a definitive study of the family of William Kelsey [TAG 68:208-15]." (3)
1) Kelsey Genealogy Vol. 1 p. 38
2) First Settlers (see Thomas Welles) p. 120
3) The Great Migration Begins p. 1117-9
4) TAG 68:213-4
Kelsey Family Association (Kelsey Kindred) c/o Grace Kelsey Benoit, 113 Montoya Dr., Branford, CT 06405-2501; tel. (203) 481-9804

[NI0476] "Francis Armstrong
d 1782
married Martha
children
1 William Armstrong b. 10-25-1722 d 1805
2 Archibald Armstrong b 2-7-1727 d 1800
3 John Armstrong b 10-21-1727
4 Robert Armstrong b 4-19-1730 d 1780
5 David Armstrong
6 Francis Armstrong b 1-3-1735 d 9-1-1799
11 ?7 Eley Armstrong
?8 Mary Armstrong
?9 James Armstrong b 4-2-1740
?10 Elizabeth Armstrong
Francis Armstrong imigrated from Iniskillean, Ireland to Long Island in 1727. He removed to Warwick, Orange County, New York in 1729. His will is on file in Albany, N.Y.: In Fernow Collection of Wills it is Page 9, No 35. It is dated 9-5-1781 and probated 2-25-1783.
Sources "Independent Republican" 5-9-1946
Col. M.S. Month 1973" (1)
"The Armstrong Family
(Sent in by Mrs. Louise Carlin, 2623 18th Ave., Rockford, Ill. 61108 (C-7)
This Armstrong Family is said to have left Liddesdale, Scotland, in 1640 to County Lough, Ireland. Francis Armstrong (b. 1695; d. 1785) came from Lisbon, County Down, Ireland. In 1723 to New York City, 1727 to Jamaica, Long Island and in 1729 to Florida-Warwick, Orange Co., N.Y. He married Deborah Lattimore." (2)
"Write to William S. Armstrong, 9811 NE 91st Ave., Vancouver, WA 98662-1935. Tel. 206-256-5299. He and his wife Pat are the authorities on Francis Armstrong. [I sent them a letter on 11/11/98.] And here's a cousin: Evelyn Rey Monson, 438 43rd St., Richmond, CA 94805. She also a desc. of Anthony Swarthout." (3)
Possible source:
Everton Family Group Sheets #11685-11688
1) Pridmore Collection, Orange County Genealogical Society; Armstrong No. 11
2) Orange County Genealogical Society (?) May 1974 in OCGS Family file
3) Smith Higgins, Jr. (STRB84A@prodigy.com))

[NI0478] Common ancestor of John and Ann Hope
"Researchers have not yet discovered who Jacob's parents were, or his ancestors. They have told us a great deal though, about the man and his family from old Dutch records. Jacob, born in 1616, lived in Wageningen, Gelderland and became a metselaar (stone mason). He married Stijntje Douwes at Amsterdam in 1638. They were twenty-one and twenty years old at that time... The records show only one child baptized to Jacob and Stijntje in Amsterdam - a daughter also named Stijntje.
Jacob had a brother Urbanus Luurszen, also a stone mason, who married Jannetje Claes Boone in Amsterdam. Urbanus and Jannetje had four children baptised in Amsterdam.
The two brothers, Jacob and Urbanus, brought their families to New Amsterdam around 1645...
Urbanus was drowned at sea on a return trip to the homeland in 1647. Also aboard the same ill-fated ship was governor Kieft who had been replaced by Peter Stuyvesant for his inept administration of New Netherlands. Urbanus, Kieft and about eighty other passengers were drowned when their ship, de Princes, was caught in a storm and sank off the coast of Wales...
Jacob and Stijntje had a son, Luur (our ancestor), baptised at New Amsterdam in 1650...
In 1651, Jacob migrated with his family to Fort Orange, described as a miserable little fort made of logs and outfitted with a few cannons to fight off the periodic Indian raids. That same year, Jacob took a loyalty oath to the patroon and settled in Rensselaerwyck. The following year, he was granted a plot of land by Peter Stuyvesant in the adjacent community of Beverwyck. Although their baptismal records have not been found, it is believed that Jacob and Stijntje had two more daughters and possibly another son in New Netherlands. Jacob died in 1655 when he was only 39 years old and his children were quite young...
Children
Stijntje b. Jan. 17, 1638 Amsterdam
Luur Jacobsen b. May 29, 1650 New Amsterdam
Jacomyntie b. New Netherlands m. Thomas van der Marck
Agniet Coens b. New Netherlands m. Dick Cornelis Keyser
Teunis b. New Netherlands m. Maria Vos
From "Other Children of Stijntje Douwes and Jacob Luurszen"
compiled by Emily Stowell
"As to Teunis Jacobsen, there is some circumstantial evidence but no clear proof that he is a brother nor even overwhelming evidence as in the cases of Jacomyntie and Agniet. He or his wife served as witness at bpatisms in all of these families and lived in the same villages at the same times... There were several men named Teunis Jacobsen in the colony"" (1)
"Jacob Luyersz (Luursen) Van Kuykendall
of Amsterdam, Holland
The earliest record mentioning Jacob Luyersz (Luursen) Van Kuykendall was his marriage banns (intentions) to "Stijntje Douwes" which was recorded at Amsterdam, Holland on August 28, 1638. Although this record does not give the names of their parents it does give their ages and places of birth. It also mentions that Jacob was a bricklayer. Jacob was 22 years old, and was from Wageningen, Holland on the Rhine River. Stijntje was 21 years old, and was from Enkhuizen, Holland where she was born in January of 1617. She was daughter of Douwe Wiggersz and Agniete Coensen. Styntje's baptismal record and marriage intentions are located at the archives of Amsterdam. After Jacob's death in 1655, Styntje married (2nd) Claes Teunissen.
There has been some confusion regarding the marriage date of Jacob Luyersz and Styntje Douwes. This is because there is a baptism record that claims that Styntje Douwes and Jacob Jansen (probably a different person than Jacob Luyersz) baptized a child named "Stijnje" at Amsterdam on January 17, 1638. A woman named Tryntje witnessed the baptism. This is probably not the same Styntje who published her marriage banns to Jacob Luyersz on August 28, 1638. There is nothing to indicate that Jacob Jansen was her first husband. It is just a coincidence that Jacob Luyersz and Styntje Douwes named their first child "Stynje." "Stynje" was just a baby in 1640 when they moved to America. Neither Jacob or Urbanus Luursen (Luynsen / Metselaar), who is believed to be Jacob's brother, used the name Jansen ever in America. It is also interesting to note that Aaltje Douwes, who was probably Styntje's cousin, married Jan Jansen on August 4, 1635 at Amsterdam. It is possible that she was the sister of the woman named Styntje Douwes who married Jacob Jansen. There were other Douwes in Amsterdam, as well. A woman named Hester Douwes from Amsterdam married there on January 19, 1641 to Jelle Douwes of Agnum. Another woman named Hester Douwes from Amsterdam (the daughter of Douwe Pieters) married there on November 5, 1644. Certainly Douwes was not an uncommon name in Holland at that time.
As mentioned earlier, Jacob was probably the brother of Urbanus Luursen (Luynsen / Metselaar) who married Jannetje Claes (Boanes), and had at least four children baptized at Amsterdam between January 1, 1640 and December 13, 1643. Urbanus "of Wageningen" spent his lifetime as a mason in New Netherland in the service of the Dutch West India Company. After his death, his widow gave her Power of Attorney to her mother, Beatrix Hermans, who resided at Boom Street in Amsterdam, to collect 221 guilders that Urbanus earned on the ship De Princes on September 19, 1648.
As these records indicate, Jacob and Urbanus were both sons of a man named Luur or Luyer. Jacob was born about 1616, and Urbanus was born about 1618 in Wageningen.
In 1640, Jacob, Stynje, and their baby daughter Stynje arrived in Fort Orange on the ship De Princes owned by the Dutch West India Company. Jacob and his brother came to America to work, possibly as mechanics, for Kiliaen Van Rensselaer who gave them land. On November 28, 1651, "Jacob Luyersz" signed an Oath of Allegiance to the "Patroon of Rensselaerswyck" (Kiliaen Van Rensselaer). This Patroonship included most of present-day Albany, Columbia, and Rensselaer counties. Since 1629, the Dutch West India Company set up patroonships for weathy Dutch men provided that they could colonize their lands. Kiliaen Van Rensselaer of Gelderland was one of these men. His homeland was also the homeland of Jacob and Urbanus Luursen. His business office was in Amsterdam where Jacob and Urbanus also lived. Kiliaen is believed to have personally recruited them and brought them to America to work for him. He was certainly the one who gave them their land leases, thus making sure that they would become permanent settlers.
Although it is very possible that Kiliean Van Rensselaer brought Jacob and Urbanus to America to be his mechanics, New York Historical Manuscripts concerning shipping details of the Dutch West India Company sheds some light on another of Jacob's jobs. On September 6, 1641, the officers of the ship "The Angel Gabriel," including "Jacob Luersen," signed a declaration which urged the captain to head for New Netherlands (New York) because their ship was damaged. Jacob was listed as the Chief Boatswain. On January 1, 1648, "Corporal Jacob Luersen," filed a complaint against Roulaf Cornelius who inflicted five wounds on him as he tried to break up a fight between Roulaf and Casper Steinmetsel. In the Court Records of New Amsterdam we discover that after the death of Urbanus Luursen, his widow tried to collect 221 guilders that Urbanus earned on the ship De Princes on September 19, 1648.
Jacob was granted a lot in Beverwyck (now Albany, NY) near Fort Orange on October 25, 1653. There he built two homes and a garden. He lived on that land until his death on April 26, 1655. He was survived by his wife, three daughters and a son.
Court Records Mentioning Jacob Luyersz in New York
August 7, 1647- Jacob (who was at Fort Amsterdam in Manhattan, NY) gave his Power of Attorney to Aeltje Jansen (wife of Symon Jansen Breetjn) in Amsterdam to collect 150 guilders that Jacob earned in New Netherland (New York) from the Dutch West India Company
October 19, 1650- Jochem, the baker, had the court order that Jacob Luyersz fulfill his contract with him.
October 21, 1650- Jacob Luyersz claimed that Jochem, the baker, struck him on the arm with a piece of wood, and threatened him with a biscuit knife. He also claimed that Jochem called him a little dog. Jochem claimed that Jacob drew the knife on him first.
November 30, 1650- Jacob denied having drawn a knife on Jochem, the baker. The Court charged them both £10, Jochem for striking Jacob with a piece of wood and Jacob for drawing a knife on Jochem.
March 7, 1652- A negro woman named Cathalina, a slave of Sander Leendertsz, accused Jan Michielsz and Jacob Luyersz of stealing a cap. Apparently Jacob had promised to take "the negress" to Manhattan to find a husband. He also took a tub of butter of her master's, claiming that her master knew about it. Something happened to the butter, and Jacob (as he claimed) showed her a cap, saying that he would get it for her if she kept quiet about the butter. She refused the cap, and Jacob accidentally put it in his pocket. He claimed that he had no reason to steal the cap except that "He was dejected in spirit." Jacob admitted showing the cap to her, but denied giving it to her. He acknowledged the she openly openly accused him in the presence of Jacob Jansz Stol and Philip Pietersz Scheuler.
April 17, 1652- Jan Michielsz and Jacob Luyersz sued Sander Leendertsz over the trouble that his slave woman caused them. He stated that he "brought no complaint against the plaintiffs," and that it was the negress who circulated the story.
June 11, 1652- The Court ordered that Cathalina, "the Negress of Sander Leendertsz," to depart in four days from Rensselaerswyck for bringing false charges against Jacob Luyersz and Jan Machielsen. The Court recommended that she go to the island of Cornelis Segertsz.
June 11, 1652- Machiel Ryckertsen was condemned to pay 4 guilders for drinking at the house of Jacob Luyersz during divine service.
June 18, 1652- Jacob Luyersz requested a place for a house on the spot where his present home stood. His request was granted, and he later was assigned a garden.
July 16, 1652- Jan Machielsz and Jacob Luyersz complained to the Court that Sander Leendertsz' Negress continued to reside in Rensselaerswyck. Officer Dyckman was ordered to "conduct the negress outside the limits" of the village.
March 18, 1653- Jacob Luyersz sued Jacob Flodder (Jacob Jansz Gardenier) for slander. Jacob Flodder claimed "that he had nothing to say to the dishonor of the plaintiff."
October 14, 1653- "Officer Dyckman, ex officio," claimed that Jacob Luyersz assaulted him on the street on the 9th of October (possibly concerning Sander Leendertsz' Negress).
November 9, 1653 Jacob Luyersz appealed before the Court concerning Officer Dyckman's charge.
March 31, 1654 The Court notified Jacob Luyersz that he was to file his answer to the written complaint of Officer Dyckman, and that he had to pay 50 guilders for "every house pursuant to the resolution."
April 21, 1654- Jacob Luyersz was summoned by the Court on account of previous misdemeanors. The Court resolved to pardon Jacob for any "abusive words spoken to the officer." Jacob begged for forgiveness, and said that the officer and his wife were honorable and virtuous. He still had to pay the officer 25 guilders for the assault committed on a public street.
September 28, 1654- Marten (Swager Merten) Ottensen, 34 years old and born at Amsterdam, was called by the Court to determine whether or not he was at the home of Jacob Luyersz on September 25. He admitted that he was.
April 29, 1655- Styntje Douwes rented a large pall for the burial of her husband, Jacob Luyersz. He is believed to have died on April 26.
February 7, 1657- Rutger Jacobsen demanded that Claes Teunissen deliver over to him his house that Claes had agreed would be payment of a due owed by Jacob Luyersen, deceased. The Officer of the Court objected in order to preserve the rights of the surviving children of Jacob Luyersen. The Court appointed Jan Verbeeck and Evert Wendel as curators to Jacob's children. Having considered the faithfulness of both those men, the Court appointed them as Orphen Masters of the Colony.
January 22, 1658- Goossen Gerritsen sued Claes Teunissen over a debt that was made by "his wife's former husband, Jacob Luyersen, deceased." Claes insisted that Goossen must sue the curators of Jacob's children for payment.


Jacob and Stynje's children are:
1. Styntie Jacobsen was probably born about 1639 or 1640.
2. Jacomyntje Jacobz was born about 1641, and married Thomas Vander Marke.
3. Agniet Coens Jacobsen was born about 1642 in the Netherlands.
4. Luur Jacobsen Van Kuykendall was born on May 29, 1650 in Albany, NY, and died after 1720 at Port Jervis, NY. He married Grietje Artze Tack (baptized on June 18, 1663), the daughter of Aert Pietersen Tack of the Barony of Brenda in Brabant, Holland and his wife Annetje Adriannsen. His children dropped the word "Van" from their last name, and started what is now known as the Kuykendall family.


For more information on the family of Luur Jacobsen see The Kuykendall / Neuffer Genealogy Site
Resource
"Kuykendall Families of America", Volumes 1-3, by Velma K. Winn" (2)
1) Kuykendall Genealogy (see Sarah) p. 24-6
2) David Jansen's Northeast United States Genealogy Page

[NI0504] "Among the family names connected with the early history of both northern Kentucky and southern Ohio is that of the Bennett family. Thaddeus Bennett was a Revolutionary soldier and served with the New York Militia in 1777. He married Eunice Bentley and, with his wife and seven children, he left New York about 1818 on a raft which he had built at Olean, New York, and floated down the Alleghany and Ohio Rivers, landing near the mouth of the Little Scioto River in Ohio. They located near Stockdale in Scioto County, and later moved to the present site of Harrisonville. Two more children were born in Ohio, making a family of nine in all. A widowed daughter, Sallie Bennett Fenton, with four small children, came with the family from New York...
Joseph Bennett, born in New York in 1794, was the seventh child of Thaddeus and Eunice Bentley Bennett, and married a widow named Elizabeth Miles Bennett...Joseph Bennett was a soldier in the War of 1812, and died at the home of his son in Greenup County, but was buried in the cemetery at Harrisonville, Ohio." (1)
Children of Thaddeus Bennett and Eunice Bentley:
1.
2.
3.
4. Sallie (?)
5.
6.
7. Joseph b. 1794 New York
8. b. Stockdale, Scioto, County, Ohio (?)
9. b. Harrisonville, Scioto County, Ohio (?)
"Thaddeus Bennett
At the time this history was started, family informants said that Thaddeus was born August 23, 1764 in Warwick, N.Y., son of Samuel Bennett, and that he married Eunice Bentley on February 28, 1782, in Stratford, Connecticut.
As I wished to have as many facts proved by records as I could, I began researching for verification of Thaddeus' birth and marriage, and have not been able to substantiate the claims noted in the first paragraph. I did, however, find other material that will bear out my claims as to Thaddeus' parentage, birth, and marriage, and I will use these as my basis for this history.
'The Official Roster of Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in Ohio' gives Thaddeus' father's name as Ephraim. S. B. Bennett, in his book referred to in the previous chapter, names Ephraim as Thaddeus' father. In this same book the author included a letter from B. F. Bennett of Greenup, Ky. (who, by family knowledge and records was a grandson to Thaddeus) in which Mr. Bennett specifically stated that he was the 'son of Rev. Joseph Bennett of Thaddeus of Ephraim.'
As to birthplace, Pierce & Hurd's History of Tioga, Chemung, Tompkins & Schuyler Counties, states that Ephraim and his family left Providence, R. I. in 1775 [Ephraim actually became a member of the Warwick Old School Baptist Church in 1769.], and Thad himself was a member of the Orange Co. Militia, New York State, in 1776, so he must have been born in Rhode Island. To further this claim, Thad's oldest brother Ephraim, Jr., was born in Rhode Island in 1762 as proved by the inscription on his tombstone (see Chapter One).
Marriage - in January, 1955, the Connecticut Historical Society wrote me that a search of their available church and marriage records for the years 1687-1828 failed to show a marriage for Thaddeus Bennett and Eunice Bentley (Thad's first wife). They do, however, have a marriage record for a Thaddeus Bennett and Martha Hall, on February 28, 1782. They lived at Weston, Conn. in 1789 and this Thaddeus died at Newton in 1831. Very obviously this is not our Thaddeus. Further research revealed that this Thaddeus descended from a brother of the Edward of Weymouth who began our American line of Bennetts. ('The Bennetts 1628-1910' - E. B. Bennett).
I believe that our Thaddeus was married while the family was in Goshen, N.Y. This belief is further borne out by the 1790 census which indicates Thaddeus had five children at that time. His brother, Ephraim, Jr., married Hannah Bentley, daughter of Green Bentley, 1781 in Goshen. Since there were only two years between Thad and Ephraim, I feel that Thad probably married about the same time, especially since he married Eunice Bentley (by family knowledge) also believed to have been a daughter of Green Bentley.
Upon the basis of all these findings, I give Thaddeus history as follows:
Thaddeus, son of Ephraim Bennett, was born in 1764 in Rhode Island. He was with the Bentley-Bennett party which left Rhode Island in 1775, heading for the Wyoming Valley (in present Pennsylvania). Stopping over in Orange Co., New York, Thaddeus served as private in Col. John Hathorne's Regiment, Wm. Blain's Co., Orange Co. Militia, from 1776-1780. The National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution No.'s 124691, 127619, 232099, give his services: Enlisted 1776, served 2 weeks; enlisted Fall 1777, served 3 weeks; enlisted 1778, served 8 mos; enlisted 1779, served 12 mos.
Thaddeus married Eunice Bentley in 1781-82. Eunice is said to have been a daughter of Green Bentley, but none of the family histories of this man indicate he had a daughter of that name. The only thing I found in all my researching to back up this claim was the statement in S. B. Bennett's book (page 36) that Green Bentley, Jr. had a daughter in Clay Center, Kansas, Mrs. Margaret Craig, who stated that Ephraim Bennett's wife was her aunt Hannah and that she had a sister Eunice. Hannah's relationship to Mrs. Craig is correct, since Hannah Bentley was a sister to Green Bentley, Jr. Mrs. Richard Backus, Huntington Park, California, who is a Bentley descendant, wrote me in May 1959, that Eunice was a daughter of Green Bentley, Jr.
In 1785 the Bennett and Bentley families left Goshen, N.Y. and continued on their way to the Wyoming Valley. Published records have not named Thaddeus as being in this group, but since he was a deacon in the Wellsburg Church at the time this pioneer group organized that religious association (see Chapter One) I believe he was a part of that migratory band which left the Wyoming Valley in 1788.
["This was the first church west of Binghamton, N.Y. Although organized in 1789, the Wellsburg Baptist Church did not commence a record until on 3rd of February, 1791... In 1794, William Buck, T. Bennett, and T. Keeney were ordained to the office of deacons. The second session of the Chemung Baptist Association was held at Chemung on November 9, 1797. Published minutes of this meeting listed 'Minister and messengers: Roswell Goff, Thomas Keeney, Thaddeus Bennett.'" (3)]
By the 1790 Census Thad's family consisted of himself, two sons under 16, and four others, which meant three smaller children and his wife. In 1794, by family knowledge, Thaddeus' youngest son, Joseph, was born, and in the same year Eunice died. All efforts so far have failed to locate any record or location of her grave.
Now the family consisted of sons Thaddeus, Jr., Benjamin, Jehial and Joseph, and daughters Mary, Mehitable, Eunice, Rhoda, and Sarah. I cannot give the order of birth as the only dates I have are for Joseph and Benjamin (1788). The names are given in N.W. Evans' "History of Scioto Co., Ohio", as well as Thaddeus' will, which will be found in the following pages.
The family remained in Chemung Co., where Thaddeus is listed on the 1800 tax assessment roll, until early in the 1800's. In 1812-13 Thaddeus was a member of the county board in the Township of Can[e]adea, 1812-13, Allegany County, N.Y. Benjamin served in the army during the War of 1812 and gave Town of Can[e]adea as his residence...
By 1815, ever lured on by better lands at lower prices, pioneers began to settle the Western Reserve and Thaddeus Bennett and his family were among the thousands who migrated to this section between the years 1815-1820.
N. W. Evans, in his "History of Scioto Co., Ohio" stated that in the fall of 1817 Thaddeus and family, including a widowed daughter, Sallie Fenton and her four children, and several other families left their homes by covered wagon. They wintered at the head of the Allegany River where they sawed lumber and built rafts upon which they placed cabins. In the spring of 1818 they floated down the Alleghany and Ohio Rivers and landed at the mouth of the Little Scioto River in Ohio on April 27, 1818. They lived in a schoolhouse while looking for a location and finally settled inland, away from the river mists and insects, in Madison Township, Scioto County, Ohio.
Evans says settlements were made in this township as early as 1797. Some of those who made their homes here between 1797-1820 were Robert, Caleb, John, and Charles Bennett; John and Jacob Rickey; Nathaniel Squires; Daniel Dodge; James, Benjamin, Ephraim, Jonathan and Ezra Rockwell, and Judah Mead [the father of Thaddeus' second wife].
The Baptist Church was the first church organized in Madison Township and it was founded in 1825 by Thaddeus Bennett. The early members were William Crawford and wife (Thad's daughter Rhoda); Jacob Rickey and wife; James Rockwell and wife; Thaddeus Bennett and wife. (second wife).
The children of Thad's first marriage settled mostly in Ohio and Kentucky and many of their descendants can be found there yet. Mary wed Nathaniel Squires; Sallie wed John Fenton (who died while on a trip to Philadelphia in the early 1800's and Sallie and her children became part of Thad's family once again); Rhoda wed William Crawford; Eunice wed Elijah Gaston; Hetty wed Daniel Dodge; Thaddeus, Jr., wed Abigail Wait; Benjamin wed Ellinor Batterson (this by family knowledge only, I cannot find a public record); Jehial have nothing about him; Joseph married first Elizabeth Mills Bennet, widow of Thomas Strait Bennett, Joseph' cousin. Thomas was the son of Thaddeus' older brother Ephraim, Jr. After Elizabeth's death, Joseph then married Anna Crain McCoun, widow of Sam McCoun. Anna Crain was the oldest sister of Mary Crain who was to become the wife of Joseph's nephew, Jehial, and the direct ancestor of the Juneau County Bennetts, as well as the Ohio branch.
According to the "History of Lower Scioto Valley, Ohio", published in 1884 and Evans' "History of Scioto Co., Ohio", Thaddeus' second wife was Rachel, daughter of Judah Mead, a farmer born in England who came to Ohio from Tioga Co., N.Y., in 1815.
Thaddeus and Rachel had several children as mentioned as his will. He died January 8, 1834, and is buried in the Stockdale Cemetary, just outside Portsmouth, Ohio. His will recorded in September 1834, indicates he was a man of some wealth at the time of his death." (2)
"Bennett, Thaddeus [buried] His farm, nr Minford, Scioto Co OH 1955" (4)
1) History of Greenup County, p. 120-1
2) Jehial Bennett (see Gershom Bennett) p. 8-12
3) Ibid., p. 5
4) Abstracts of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots found by DAR Vol. I, p. 74

[NI0505] "At the time this history was started, family informants said that Thaddeus was born August 23, 1764 in Warwick, N.Y., son of Samuel Bennett, and that he married Eunice Bentley on February 28, 1782, in Stratford, Connecticut...
Marriage - in January, 1955, the Connecticut Historical Society wrote me that a search through their available church and marriage records for the years 1687-1828 failed to show a marriage for Thaddeus Bennett and Eunice Bentley (Thad's first wife). They do, however, have a marriage record for a Thaddeus Bennett and Martha Hall, on February 28, 1782. They lived at Weston, Conn. in 1789 and this Thaddeus died at Newton in 1831. Very obviously this is not our Thaddeus. Further research revealed that this Thaddeus was descended from a brother of the Edward of Weymouth who began our American line of Bennetts...
I believe that our Thaddeus was married while the family was in Goshen, N.Y. This belief is further borne out by the 1790 census which indicates Thaddeus had five children at that time. His brother, Ephraim, Jr., married Hannah Bentley, daughter of Green Bentley, 1781 in Goshen. Since there were only two years between Thad and Ephraim, I feel that Thad probably married about the same time especially since he married Eunice Bentley (by family knowledge) also believed to have been a daughter of Green Bentley...
Thaddeus married Eunice Bentley in 1781-82. Eunice is said to have been a daughter of Green Bentley, but none of the family histories of this man indicate he had a daughter of that name. The only thing I found in all my researching to back up this claim, was the statement in S. B. Bennett's book (page 36) that Green Bentley, Jr., had a daughter in Clay Center, Kansas, Mrs. Margaret Craig, who stated that Ephraim Bennett's wife was her aunt Hannah and that she had a sister Eunice. Hannah's relationship to Mrs. Craig is correct, since Hannah Bentley was a sister to Green Bentley, Jr. Mrs. Richard Brockus, Huntingdon Park, California, who is a Bentley descendant, wrote me in May 1959, that Eunice was a daughter of Green Bentley, Jr." (1)
"10. EUNICE6 BENTLEY (GREENE SR.5, WILLIAM JR.4, WILLIAM SR.3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1) was born Abt. 1761 in Richmond, RI, and died Abt. 1834. She married THADDEUS BENNETT Abt. 1782 in Warwick, Orange county, NY.

Child of EUNICE BENTLEY and THADDEUS BENNETT is:
i. HETTY7 BENNETT. " (2)
1) Jehial Bennet (Gershom Bennett) p. 8-9
2) A Bentley Family Tree William Bentley of Kingstown, RI - To rectify some old errors.
Elaine C Cowan
1712 Van Epps Dr
Carson City, NV 89701
United States
>

[NI0506] "Cornelius Langendyke and Jannetje DeWitt were m. in Kingston 19 July 1717. He was bap. in N.Y. city 16 April 1693, son of Pieter Jansen van Langendyck and Geertie Cornelis." (1)
Since his last child, Jannetje, was baptised in Saugerties, he may have moved there between 1736 and 1738.
1) Burhans Genealogy p. 176

[NI0507] "Jannetje DeWitt was bap. in Kingston 7 March 1697, dau. of Lucas DeWitt and Annetje Delval." (1)
1) Burhans, Samuel, Jr.; Burhans Genealogy (1893 New York) p. 176
Information on her family from DeWitt Genealogy p. 16

[NI0509] Affidavit for pension
Clarence E. Pierce, Springfield, Mass.
Nathan Wheeler, Ensign, commenced Aug. 16th, 1819. Certificate 15163. Act March 18th, 1818. File 40686. Pension.
I, Nathan Wheeler, formerly of Royalston, the State of Massachusetts, now of Bethelem, in the County of Grafton and State of New Hampshire, of 68 years of age, deposes and says, that in April, A.D. 1775, I enlisted for eight months into the revolutionary army, in the Continental establishment as a sergeant, into Capt. Micajah Gleason's company in Col. John Nixon's regiment, it being the 6th regiment in the Massachusetts line, for one year; which time I faithfully served, and immediately on its expiration, I again enlisted as a quartermaster's sergeant for three years and was attached to Capt. Adam Wheeler's company in the 6th Massachusetts regiment then commanded by Col. Thomas Nixon, which term of three years, I faithfully served my country in said regiment, and from January, 1780, the period when my first three years expired, I continued to serve and do duty until the 5th day of October, 1780, when I was discharged at Tappan, in the State of New York. I further testify and say that during this last three years service I was appointed and received an Ensign's commission in said regiment in November, 1779, but my commission bore date five or six months previous to the month of November, 1779, when it was received, and I did the duty of ensign for eighteen months or more previous to the 5th of October, 1780, the time I was discharged. I further testify and say that the small portion of my commission which is attached to my son's Luther Wheeler is all that remains of my commission in my possession on knowledge and I have received no other evidence of my said services; in the first eight months service I was in the battle of Bunker's Hill; in the other service I was in the battle of Trenton, Princeton, and Woodbridge. I further testify and say that I am in indigent circumstances and stand in need of assistance from my country for support.
August 16th, 1819 Nathan Wheeler
State of New Hampshire, Grafton, ss:
August 16th, 1819, Nathan Wheeler, Esq., personally appeared and made oath to the truth of the foregoing declaration by him subscribed before me. Ezra Bartlett, Justice (of the) Peace
He is listed on the 1820 Pension List of Revolutionary Veterans.
Nathan Wheeler died July 15th, 1825. Nathan Wheeler transferred from New Hampshire to Ohio, January 17, 1822, Scioto County.
"County Officers...
1817...
Nathan Wheeler was Sheriff and Collector of Land Taxes" (1)
"Wheeler, Nathan III & Nancy Chamberlin. Wyatt Chamberlin attests her age. 13 May 1812. M[arriage] A[ffidavit], R[eturn], A-319." (2) This must be his son Nathan.
"Nathan Wheeler was born at Royalstown, New Hampshire, in 1751. He was reared a farmer. In April, 1775, he entered the first Massachusetts Infantry as a private and served eight months. He was then made a sergeant. After eighteen month's service, he re-enlisted for three years. In May, 1799 [79?] he was made Ensign. He participated in the Battles of Bunker Hill, Trenton, Princeton and Woodbridge. He served five years continously and was discharged at Tappan, New York, September, 1780. After that he located at Bethlehem, New York [sic-probably NH], and while there applied for a pension and obtained the same. His application for pension was made at Graffton, New York [sic-probably Grafton, NH] on the 16th of August, 1819, before Ezra Bartlett, Justice of the Peace. He says that he enlisted in April, 1775, for eight months in Captain Abel Wilder's Co., Colonel Dolittle's regiment and served that time. Immediately after the expiration of his time, and before he returned home, he enlisted again in the Revolutionary army as a Sergeant in Captain Gleason's Company, in Col. John Dixon's regiment, 6th Massachusetts, which time he faithfully served. Immediately on the expiration of his time, he enlisted as a Quartermaster Sergeant for three years in Colonel John Nixon's regiment which regiment for three years he served faithfully, and from January 1780, a period before his first three years expired, he continued to serve and do duty until the 5th day of October 1780, when he was discharged at Tappan, New York. He further says that during the last three years' service, he was appointed and received an Ensign's commission in November, 1779, but it bore date six months previous to that date; that he did duty of Ensign for eighteen months or more previous to October 1780, when he was discharged. He says that in the first six months service he was in the battle of Bunker Hill and that in the other service he was in the battles of Trenton, Princeton and Woodbridge. He states that he was in indigent circumstances and needed the assistance of his country for support. It appears that he was transferred from New Hampshire to Ohio on the 20th of March 1822. He only lived in Scioto County until the 15th day of July, 1823 [actually 1825]. The place of his burial is not known. His children were Nathan Wheeler, Jr., Levi, Luther and Elmira Chaffin.
Among his descendants in Scioto County are: Mrs. William H. McCurdy, Sr., of Wheelersburg; Mrs. Lillian C. Finney, wife of Prof. J.H. Finney, of Portsmouth, Ohio; Mrs. Nettie Davis of Sciotoville and Mrs. Ida Friel, wife of G. Frank Friel of Ashland, Kentucky; and George Wheeler of American P.O., Wheeler's Mills, Ohio." (3)
1) History of Lower Scioto Valley, Ohio (Interstate Publishing Co., Chicago 1884) p. 143
2) Scioto County Marriages p. 144
3)Evans, Nelson W.; History of Scioto County, Ohio (Portsmouth, Ohio 1903) p. 214

[NI0516] "Joseph Hastings, son of Deacon Thomas and Margaret (Cheney) Hastings, born September 12, 1657; married November 21, 1682, Ruth, daughter of Matthew and Martha (Lamson) Rice of Sudbury. He settled in Watertown, Mass., where she died January 28, 1683, in her 21st year. He married (2nd) January 8, 1684, Martha Shepard. He had his father's homestead -- died October 7, 1695, aged 38. His estate was settled by his widow. Had 4 children, viz:
Joseph, born January 3, 1685...
Martha... married September 15, 1714, Joseph Harrington...
Thomas Hastings... born February 14, 1692.
Ebenezer Hastings..." (1)
1) Hastings Memorial p. 83-4

[NI0518] "Thankslord Perkins, Wife of Ralph Shepard of Dedham, Massachusetts
A footnote in The Shepard Families of New England points out that Sarah, daughter of Ralph and Thanks (or Thanks-ye-Lord) Shepard of Dedham, Mass., was baptized at Stepney, co. Middlesex, England, on 6 Aug. 1633 (Gerald F. Shepard and Donald Lines Jacobus (New Haven, Conn., 1971-73) 1:2). The following is the long-sought marriage record of the immigrants: Ralph Sheaphearde married Thankslorde Perkins on 21 May 1632 in the parish church of St. Bride on Fleet Street in London, England (1988 IGI and the original parish register, Family History Library #380,154).
Penny G. Douglass, P.O. Box 23, Newton UT 84327" (1)
"Ralph Shepard b. c. 1606 Stepney, Eng. died Malden, MA. 11 Sep 1693 son of Isaac Shepard of London. Ralph m. 21 May 1632 in London to Thankslord Perkins." (2)
"The American Genealogist, vol. 67, #1, p. 29, Jan. 1992 refers to FHL Film # 380, 154 as the source for the marriage of Thankslord Perkins to Ralph Shepard." (3)
"I. Ralph Shepard, of Stepney Parish, London, England, was born in 1603, and died in Charlestown, Massachusetts, September 11, 1693, his burial being in Malden, Massachusetts. He was a tailor by trade and probably an officer in the Draper's Guild. He sailed for New England on June 30, 1635, in the ship "Abigail," Robert Hackwell, master, accompanied by his wife and daughter, Sarah. On arriving in Massachusetts he became one of the original settlers of Dedham, later removing to Malden, and he is recorded also in Weymouth and Concord. He purchased a farm in Concord of Joseph Wheeler in 1666. He was made a freeman of the colony in 1650-1.
Ralph Shepard married Thanklord. Children: 1. Sarah, born in England about 1633. 2. Thomas, of whom further. 3. John, died December 15, 1699; married Sarah Goble, daughter of Thomas Goble of Concord. 4. Isaac, born June 20, 1639, killed by Indians, February 12, 1676; married Mary Smedley, daughter of Baptiste Smedley. 5. Trial, born December 19, 1641, died February 22, 1708; married, March 11, 1661 Walter Powers. 6. Abraham, died February 22, 1715-6; married Judith Philbrook. 7. Thanks born February 10, 1651; married Peter Dill. 8. Jacob, born June 16, 1653. 9. Walter, of Sudbury, Massachusetts.
(Dedham Historical Register," Vol. XIV, pp. 27-28) " (4)
Possible Source:
Shepard, Gerald Faulkner; The Shepard Families of New England (1972)
1) TAG January 1992 p. 29
2) Frank Bouley (FVPX24A-Prodigy)
3) Barbara Moore (RJTA10B-Prodigy)
4) Daggett and Allied Families, Americana Vol. 26 p. 103

[NI0519] "Godfrey Smith was born near Redstone, Pennsylvania, in 1752. He enlisted in the Patriot Army of Virginia, commanded by Colonel Buford, in 1779. In 1780 he reenlisted and was in the battles of Camden and Eutaw Springs, South Carolina. He served five years altogether in the Continental Army. After the war he married Margaret Hoover of Pennsylvania and they had six sons and three daughters. Jacob, the eldest son, was born in 1785.
In 1810 the family moved to Greenup, coming down the Ohio River in flat boats. He settled on a branch below Greenup and both the settlement and branch took his name. In 1819 he received a pension for his services in the Virginia Army, and died in 1847.
Jacob, the eldest son, married Elizabeth Gray of Greenup County in 1824. Cynthia married James Littlejohn of Tygart Valley. Another son, Benjamin, of Greenup, operated the Little Sandy Ferry in the early days." (1)
"Fayette County...
German Township...
Smith, Godfrey Males over 16 1; Males under 16 1; Females 2" (2)
Fayette Co. is on the border with Virginia, so it makes sense that he joined the Virginia troops. Fayette Co. is also on the Ohio River.
German Township, Fayette Co. is bounded on the North by Luzerne and Red Stone.
"Virginia Military Land Warrants
Virginia Military District of Ohio, Granted for Revolutionary War Services
State Continental Line, Beginning August 8, 1782
8019 Smith, Godfrey Soldier" (3)
"Smith, Godfrey Cont & VA line, S37426, BLW#1006-100, He applied for the pension on 27 Oct 1819 Greenup Co KY aged 57, sol had enl in Shenandoah Co Va [now West Virginia]" (4)
1) History of Greenup County (see Jacob) p.258-9
2) 1790 Pennsylvania Census p. 107
3) Revolutionary War Records: Volume I, Virginia p. 508
4) Abstract of Rev. Pens. Files p. 3187

[NI0522] Possible source:
Pathways of the Puritans, p. 49 mentions the Wheeler House, 15 Sudbury Road, Cambridge
"Abigail (Munroe) Wheeler... m. Captain Timothy Wheeler on 25 June 1719
b. 8 Mar. 1696/7 at Concord, Mass.
d. 7 May 1782 at Concord, Mass." (1)
"2019. Timothy Wheeler, son of Timothy (2008) and Lydia (Wheeler) Wheeler. Born at Concord, Mass., March 8, 1696/7; died at Concord, Mass., May 7, 1782. Married (1) June 25, 1719, Abigail Munroe, who died 1743. He married (2) May 31, 1744, Mehitable Whittemore, at Concord, Mass. She died March 2, 1772. He was called Captain at the time of his death.
Children: (born at Concord, Mass.)
2031. Jonas Wheeler, born May 18, 1720.
2032. Abigail Wheeler, born Dec 7, 1721.
2033. Timothy Wheeler, born March 19, 1722-3.
2034. Lydia Wheeler, born Oct. 5, 1724.
2035. Nathan Wheeler (Ann's ancestor), born Feb 9, 1726-7.
2036. Amos Wheeler, born Oct. 19, 1727.
2037. Elizabeth Wheeler, born Dec. 10, 1728.
2038. David Wheeler, born July 22, 1730.
2039. Mary Wheeler, born April 23, 1732.
2040. Lucy Wheeler, born Nov. 5, 1733.
2040-a. William Wheeler, born Jan 17, 1734-5.
Child, 2nd marriage:
2041. Joel Wheeler, born Nov. 8, 1748." (2)
1) History & Genealogy of the Lexington, Mass. Munroes (see William Munroe) p. 18
2) Wheeler, Jr., Albert Gallatin, The Genealogical and Encyclopedic History of the Wheeler Family in America (Boston, 1914) p. 147

[NI0523] Possible source:
Pathways of the Puritans, p. 49 discusses Wheeler House, 15 Sudbury Road, Cambridge; p. 100 discusses the Munroe Tavern in Lexington
"Abigail (Munroe) Wheeler
b. 28 June 1701 at Lexington, Massachusetts
d. 1743 or 1753
m. Captain Timothy Wheeler on 25 June 1719.
b. 8 Mar. 1696/97 at Concord, Mass.
d. 7 May 1782 at Concord, Mass.
Children: b. Concord, Mass.
13-21 1 Jonas Nathan, b. 18 May 1720.
13-22 2 Abigail, b. 7 Dec. 1721.
13-23 3 Timothy, b. 19 Mar. 1722/23.
13-24 4 Lydia, b. 5 Oct. 1724
13-25 5 Elizabeth, b. 10 Dec. 1728.
13-26 6 David, b. 22 July 1730.
13-27 7 Mary, b. 23 Apr. 1732.
13-28 8 Lucy, b. 5 Nov. 1733.
13-29 9 William, b. 17 Jan. 1734/5."(1)

The Munroe genealogy does not list Nathan or Amos Wheeler. This is the connection for the rest of the descent. Arlene Whiteman probably took the connection from the Wheeler Genealogy (see Timothy Wheeler)
1)History & Genealogy of Lexington, Mass Munroes (see William Munroe) p. 18 His sources: History of the Town of Lexington by Hudson and History of Lexington, Mass. Vol II (1912); Concord, Mass. vital
records; Miss Edith Monro of Swansea, Mass.; Miss Elizabeth Fitch of Wilmette, Illinois.(



[NI0535] "2008. Timothy Wheeler, son of Thomas (2000) and Sarah (Meriam) Wheeler. Born at Concord, Mass., July 24, 1667; died 14 April, 1718. Married May 19, 1692, Lydia Wheeler (124) dau. of John Wheeler and Sarah (Larkin) Wheeler. She was born Oct 27, 1675.
children:
2018. Lydia Wheeler, born May 5, 1694; m. April 24, 1713, Joshua Brooks.
2019. Timothy Wheeler, born March 1696/7.
"2008. Timothy Wheeler, son of Thomas (2000) and Sarah (Meriam) Wheeler. Born at Concord, Mass., July 24, 1667; died 14 April, 1718. Married May 19, 1692, Lydia Wheeler (124) dau. of John Wheeler and Sarah (Larkin) Wheeler. She was born Oct 27, 1675.
children:
2018. Lydia Wheeler, born May 5, 1694; m. April 24, 1713, Joshua Brooks.
2019. Timothy Wheeler, born March 1696/7.
2020. Jonas Wheeler, born June 19, 1699. Killed by falling from a horse, Aug. 30, 1716.
2021. Sarah Wheeler, born Nov. 3, 1701. She probably married Feb. 15, 1721, John Wallis.
2022. Mary Wheeler, born Aug. 12, 1704.
2023. Elizabeth Wheeler, born Aug. 13, 1707.
2024. Benjamin Wheeler, born Aug. 13, 1709.
2025. Anna Wheeler, born Sept. 26, 1713.
Will of Timothy Wheeler...
Item I give and Bequeathe to my son Benjamin Wheeler when he comes of the age of twenty one years the Lott which I purchased of Daniel Hoar and that Lott which was goodman Wheats and that Lott which purchased of Benjm. Whitemore and my whole Lott lying in the Subuerb plain bounded westwardly with the Fence as it now stands and eastwardly with the subuerbs swamp about ten or twelve acers with one half of my Lott in Chestnutt feild in Quantity and Quallity... (dated April 8 1718)" (1)
I found his grave in the Old Hill Burying Ground in Concord, MA. He is buried next to his son Jonas who according to the tombstone died at age 17 and is the son of Timothy and "Lydea".
1) Wheeler Genealogy (see Timothy Wheeler) pp. 145-146

[NI0537] "Family 28.
Children of Jannetje De Witt (71) and Cornelis Langendyk...
Annetje, b. 1731; m., Feb. 2, 1753, Arent Winne."
"Children (with Annaatje Langendyk):
Petrus baptised July 1, 1753 (Sponsors: Petrus Langendyk and Maria Langendyk)
Jannetje baptised Mar 31, 1755 (Sponsors: Lucas Langendyk & Jannetje Langendyk)
Catharine baptised Oct. 2, 1757 (Sponsors: Petrus Langendyk & Jannetje Langendyk)
Cornelis Langendyk baptised Apr 7, 1760 (Sponsors: Petrus Langendyk & Jannetje Langendyk)
Arend baptised May 13, 1762 (Sponsors: Matheis Merkel & Margriet Keel)
Maria baptised Sept. 8, 1764 (Sponsors: Petrus & Maria Langendyk)
Annatien baptised Aug. 1768
Gertjen baptised Aug 26, 1771
Sarah baptised Aug 9, 1774
Sponsored:
Margriet dau. of Matheis Merkel & Margriet Keel June 25, 1750
Annatien dau. of Frederick Rauh & Christina Van Etten Feb. 4, 1767
Maria dau of Lowy Baldon and Catharina DeWitt Apr 10, 1769
Annatjen dau. of Petrus Wennen and Annatjen DuBoys Aug 20, 1770" (1)
"Arent Winne, bap. in Kingston 5 Sept. 1725, m. 2 Feb. 1753 Annetje Langendyck. He was son of Pieter Winne and Antje Merkel." (2)
"Arent Winne, born Bef. September 05, 1725 in Kingston, Ulster, NY17. He married Annatje Langendyk February 02, 1753 in Kingston, Ulster, NY18.
More About Arend Winne:
Ancestral File Number: 77J5-NH
Baptism: September 05, 1725, Kingston, Ulster, NY19
Baptism Minister: Domine Petrus Vas of Kingston, NY20
Baptism Witnesses: Johannes Traphagen, Jannetjen Pier21
Religion: Dutch Reformed21 " (3)
1) Source: Katsbaan and Saugerties Reformed Church, Ulster County, NY
2) Burhans Genealogy p. 176-7
3) Ancestors of John O. Bailey

[NI0569] "Tomys Swartwout, Schepen of Midwout. 1607-1662...
As elicited from different records, Rolef Swartwolt had four sons severally named Wybrandt, Tomys, Herman and Aldert; Tomys having been born in 1607 and Herman (or Hermanus) in 1608....
Rolef Swartwolt and his wife Catryna, with their children, were on September 21, 1616, residing in Groningen, on the Straight Passage (het Rechte Fath), now identified by the sculptured face of a bearded man, embellishing the front wall of a brick house standing on the east side of the street, and an inscription engraved below the effigy: Ick Kick Noch Int (I still peep into it).
(Note: In modern Dutch it would be Ich Kijk Nock In't.) (Note: The house stands on the southeast corner of the Oude Kijk en 't Fatstraat (Old Peep into the Passage Street) and the Loopendediep (the Running-deep canal).)...
By conveying, by a deed of partition, on June 4, 1617, his right, title, and interest in the building and lot on the east side of the Rechte Fath, to the owners of the three-fourths of the dwelling, at the north end of Lamhuingestraat, and by paying one hundred and eighteen dalers, three Brabant stivers, and six and a quarter placken, he obtained entire possession of the house on Lamhuingestraat, of which he had been one-fourth an owner...
Standing as the building was at the corner of Lamhuingestraat and Cromme Fath (Crooked Passage)...
There are no other particulars extant concerning Rolef and Catryna Swartwolt excepting the meagre information that she died some time prior to his decease in 1634...
The engagement in 1629 of Wybrandt, Tomys and Herman Swartwout as a firm in the wholesale busines of buying and selling tobacco in the city of Amsterdam evidently gave the three brothers no little importance among its merchants." (1)
"The ease of access and egress to and from the Keizergracht, for sailing vessels crossing the Ij, in all probability led the three members of the firm of the Swartwout Brothers to select this recently laid-out part of the the city as their place of business and residence. Standing, as their dwellings and warehouse were, on the streets running along the west side of the Keizersgracht and within sight of the Brouwersgracht north of them, they were not far from either the Oude-Kerk or the Nieuewe-Kerk.
Wybrandt Swartwout, probably the eldest of the three brothers, may have been the first to marry. Herman Swartwout had, on May 1, 1629, become, at Amsterdam, the husband of Geertruijt Schutte, of Lockum, a village in the province of Gelderland." (2)
"Tomys Swartwout, on becoming betrothed to Adrijetjen, daughter of Sijmon Sijmons, a broker, dwelling on the Prinsengracht, in the city of Amsterdam, had their proposed nuptials proclaimed in Groningen, whence he had moved to Amsterdam....
"February 4, 1630
The Honorable Tomas Swartwolt of Groningen [living recently] in Lamhuinge Street, and the virtuous maiden Aerijaentijen Sijmens of Amsterdam; the publication was allowed here inasmuch as it must be proclaimed there, as the attestation hereof shows."
The attestation for the publication of the banns at Amsterdam, dated March 21, 1630, contained in the Church Registry Book and presented here by photography, as a special value as a memorial, inasmuch as it displays the signatures of the man and the woman (ie., both were literate)...
"For this appeared Thomas Swartwout of Groningen, twenty-three years old... a tobacco merchant, residing on the Keysergracht, and Ariaentje Sijmons of Amsterdam, twenty-two years old, assisted by her father, Sijmon Sijmons, and by her mother Catryna Grebbers, residing on the Prinsengracht...
As recorded in the marriage book of the Nieuwe-Kerk, Tomys Swartwout and Adrijetjen Sijmons were joined in holy matrimony on April 7, 1630...
Their conjugal happiness was unfortunately brief, for, in giving birth to a son, on the seventeenth of December, that year, the earthly life of the suffering mother abruptly ended. Jan, their son, who was baptized in the month of January, 1631...
It was Tomys Swartwout's good fortune to become acquainted with Hendrickjen, the amiable daughter of Barent Otsen, a prominent book-publisher of the city of Amsterdam...
(Banns recorded) on the tenth of May, 1631... Heyndrickje Barents, of Amsterdam, twenty years old, assisted by her father, Barent Otsen, residing in Breestraat, at the Ossemarct...
On June 3, 1631, Tomys Swartwout and Hendrickjen Otsen were married in the Nieuwe-Kerk...
The nuptial poem and the bridal sonnets were published by her father." (3)
"The birth of Tomys and Hendrickjen Otsen Swartwout's first child, Roeloff, was followed by his baptism in the Oude-Kerk, on June 1, 1634... Their second son, Barent, baptised in the Oude-Kerk, on July 15, 1638... and their daughter Trijntje (Catrijna), baptized in the same church, on December 15, 1639... and Jacomijntje, baptized in the Nieuwe-Kerk, on February 10, 1646, (received the name of her mother's mother...
Tomys Swartwout was associated with his brothers at Amsterdam as a tobacco dealer." (4)
"At the beginning of the month of March, 1652, on the day for the sailing of the ship in which they had taken passage for themselves and their children to the Mauritius River...
On landing at "Manhattans Island," they were cordially greeted by Director-General Stuyvesant." (5)
"Jan Snedeker, Jan Stryker, and Tomys Swartwout solicited of Director-General Stuyvesant the right of settling together on the level reach of wild land (de vlacke bosch) or the flat bush, adjacent to the outlying farms at Breukelen and Amersfoort...
Through Tomys Swartwout's suggestion, it would seem, the settlement was given the name of the village of Midwout or Midwolde, lying about twenty-five miles eastward of the city of Groningen, where certain of his ancestors had long resided." (6)
Director-General Stuyvesant and the Council of New Netherlands appointed him, on April 13, 1655, a schepen to serve with Jan Snedeker and Adriaen Hegeman, who with him composed the Court of Midwout."
(7)
He reorganized Midwout for better defense after the Indian attacks on Manhattan and Long Island of Sep 1655.
"Having for many years vainly solicited letters-patent for the land occupied and cultivated by him at Midwout, he received, on March 7, 1661, from Director-General Stuyvesant, the long-desired instrument of writing, placing him in legal possession of his farm of... about 116 acres. Intending to change his residence to Wiltwijck, he sold, on March 15, 1661, one-half of his farm to his friend and neighbor, Jan Snedeker. Tomijs Swartwout's signature is found on the original record-book of the Reformed Dutch Church of Wiltwijk... He is also named in the baptismal register of the same church, as sponsor, on January 8, 1662, for his son Roeloff's second son Antoni. Tradition relates the he returned to Holland (perhaps after the decease of his wife), where he died." (8)
"Tomys Swartwold (Swartwout), the American immigrant
Tomys (Thomas) was born in Groningen in 1607. Tomys and his two younger brothers were the first of the Frisian Swartwolts to write their surname the modern Dutch way ("Swartwout"). They were the first Hollanders to buy and sell American tobacco in Holland in 1629. They started their wholesale tobacco business in Amsterdam, the greatest commercial city in Europe at the time. Their business was in a newly laid-out part of the city that allowed them easy access to the Keizersgracht Canal, a canal that allowed vessels to cross the Ij (pronounced "I"), an estuary of the Zuiderzee.

Tomys was married by the Rev. Rudolphus Petri at the New Church (Nieuwe Kerk) in Amsterdam, on April 7, 1630, to Adrijetjen, a daughter of Sijmon and Catryna (Grebbers) Sijmons. Their banns (marriage intentions) were announced on February 4, 1630, and read (translated to English): "The Honorable Tomas Swartwolt (previously) of Groningen in Lamhuinge Street, and the virtuous maiden Aerijaentijen Sijmens of Amsterdam..." The attestation for the publication of the banns in Amsterdam is dated on March 21, 1630, and says: "For this appeared Thomas Swartwout of Groningen, twenty-three years old, a tobacco merchant, residing on the Keysersgracht, and Ariaentje Sijmons of Amsterdam, twenty-two years old, assisted by her father, Sijmon Sijmons, and by her mother, Catryna Grebbers, residing on the Prinsengracht, seeking the crying out of their banns on three Sundays in order to obtain the solemnization of the aforesaid marriage, and to have it wholly consummated, so far as otherwise before granted ... signed by Tomys Swartwout. Adrijetjen Sijmons." Adrijetjen died on December 17, 1630 at Amsterdam while giving birth to her only child, Jan.

The following year, Tomys became acquanted with Hendrickjen Otsen, the daughter of Barent Otsen, a prominent book publisher residing on Breestraat (Broad Street), near the Ossemaret (Ox Market). He lived outside the Old Regulator's Gate, in the Printing House in Amsterdam. Barent's wife's name was Jacomijntje. Barent Otsen, or Otsz, was established in Amsterdam as a printer in 1612, and his book titled the Great Riddle Book became very popular in 1614. On October 21, 1619, he was enrolled as a member of the Booksellers' Guild. Tomy's and Hendrickjen's banns were published on May 10, 1631, and they were married by Rev. Joannes Cornelius on June 3, 1631 at the New Church of Amsterdam.

Tomys and Hendrickjen lived near the city walls of Amsterdam. On May 1, 1645, they sold their property for 2300 florins, and moved to Saint Peter's cross-street. On May 28, 1648, Hendrickjen sold her interest in that house for 380 florins. About this time, Holland's commercial competitors, England and France, took over several areas that were important to Amsterdam, and placed high taxes on them. Amsterdam's property began to lose it's value, and business in Amsterdam became stagnate. On March 21, 1651, the directors of the Amsterdam Chamber of the West India Company gave word to Director-General Petrus Stuyvesant, of New Netherland (New York), that the corporation was "opening the territory of New Netherland for the settlement of colonists." Later that year, Tomys sold his property in Amsterdam, and, early in March of 1652, he and his family sailed down the Ij and left their homeland for good.

Following his move to America, Tomys was one of 19 representatives who remonstrated against the maladministration of the affairs of the province of New Amsterdam by the arrogant directors of the West India Company. These 19 men wished to have a voice in government of the colony, but their wishes were held in contempt and they were punished.

Tomys' children are:
(all born at Amsterdam, Holland)
(By his first wife, Adrijetjen Sijmons, who died while giving birth)
1. Jan was born on December 17, 1630. He was baptized in January of 1631.
(By his second wife, Hendrickjen Otsen)

2. Roeloff was born and baptized on June 1, 1634
3. Barent was baptized on July 15, 1638.
4. Tryntje (Catryna) was born on December 15, 1639.
5. Jacomijntje was born on February 10, 1646." (9)
1) Weise, Arthur James; The Swartwout Chronicles 1338-1899 and the Ketelhuyn Chronicles 1451-1899 (1899 New York) p. 41
2) Ibid., p. 47
3) Ibid., p. 49-54
4) Ibid., p. 54-56
5) Ibid., p. 62
6) Ibid., p. 65
7) Ibid., p. 84
8) Ibid., p. 89
9) David R. Jansen's Northeast United States Genealogy Home Page

[NI0570] She was twenty at the time of her marriage in 1631 and was probably born in Amsterdam. Since her father was established in Amsterdam as a printer in 1612, it is possible that she was born elsewhere.
She appears to have died in Kingston (Wiltwijk) shortly before her husband's return to the Netherlands. (see Tomys Swartwout and Barent Otsen). Check the baptism register of Kingston to see if she w
as a sponsor, along with her husband at the baptism of her grandson, by Roeloff, of Antoni Swartwout.

[NI0630] Attended the Norton School in Claremont, Ca. Graduated from Pomona College in 1940. Served in the U.S. Navy 1942-45. Commanded landing craft in North Africa, Sicily, Salerno, Anzio, Elba and Southern France. Founded Whiteman School.
He has one child by his first marriage to Madelyn Pierce:
Gregg Pierce
Lowell Whiteman Biography
Lowell W. Whiteman is a native Coloradan, born February 7, 1918 in Hayden, Colorado. His parents were pioneers in Northwestern Colorado.
He attended the Norton School for Boys, a private boarding prep school in Claremont, California.
He was high school student body president.
He was football team captain.
He traveled to Germany in 1936 to see the Olympics.
He received his B.A. from Pomona College.
He was college class president.
He taught in a one-room country school.
He graduated from the United States Naval Reserve Midshipman School at Columbia University, New York City, and was commissioned an officer in the U.S. Naval Reserve.
He attended the American Theater Wing in New York City and studied acting under Lee Strasberg and dance with Hanya Holm.
He took post graduate work in Education at the University of Colorado.
He was a staff member at Perry-Mansfield Camps in Steamboat Springs before and after World War II.
He was radio announcer and actor for Columbia Broadcasting System, Hollywood, California.
He wa deck officer U.S.N.R. for four years during World War II making five invasions in the Mediterranean Theater.
He was Master at Arizona Desert School in Tucson, a private prep boarding school for boys.
He was Founder and Director of Whiteman Camp for Boys, Steamboat Springs.
He was Founder and first Headmaster for the Whiteman School, a coeducational college prep boarding school in Steamboat Springs.
He was Director General of Colegio Americano de Guayaquil and Colegio Americano de Quito in Ecuador, South America.
He was appointed by the U.S. Ambassador to the Fulbright Commission in Ecuador for three years.
He received a U.S. Navy Commendation for an amphibious landing on the island of Elba (World War II).
The "Lowell Whiteman Hall" high school building in Guayaquil, Ecuador was named for him.
He was part of an expedition into the upper Amazon visiting head-shrinking Jibero Indians.
He built a 42-foot gaff-rigged ketch and sailed it from Ecuador to Mexico.
He acted in and directed plays for Community Theater in Steamboat Springs and Quito, Ecuador.
He acted in television commercials in Ecuador and ran a hacienda.
He is presently on the Board of Trustees of the Whiteman School and Perry-Mansfield.

[NI0634] "Baptisms...
Oct. 24 1770 Parents Jacobus Osterhout & Jannetjen DeWitt Child Henricus Witnesses Hendricus Mejer & Annatjen Osterhout" (2)
"206 Jacob 1745 & Jannetie DeWitt
535 DeWitt Osterhout b. 1767 m. Eliz. Monks
536 Hendrick bapt. 29 Oct 1770 Ktsb (Katsbaan Dutch Reformed Church, Saugerties) m. Charity Winne
910 James bapt. 28 May 1797 Oak Hill Ch
911 Peter bapt. 10 Feb 1799 Oak Hill Ch
537 Cath. bt 5 May 1773 Ktsb
538 Maria bt 20 Feb 1776 Ktsb
539 Lucas b. 6 May 1778 bt AscensionSunLoonenburgLuth m. 21 Aug 1800 Ktsb Jacomyntie Young
540 Jacob bt 25 Feb 1781 Ktsb m. Eunice Sharp
541 Martin bt 13 Aug 1784 Ktsb"(1)
1800 Census Index
Hendrick Osterhout, Albany Co. NY 213 01101-00001-02
Henry Osterhout, Ulster Co. NY 185 10001-00010-00
Henry Junior Osterhout Ulster Co. NY 196 11001-42010-00
Jacobus Osterhout Ulster Co. NY 214 10011-00100-00
"Subject: Eunice Thorpe
I have been looking for Eunice Thorpe [daughter-in-law]. Unfortunately, I did not find anything on her. I was able to find a Aaron Thorpe in the History of Cayuga County by Storke. He was associated with an early stage line (page 44 & 45)...
There is a reference to Henry Osterhout on page 480 who was a Commissioner of Highways in the Town of Sempronius in 1798.
If you want copies of these page, they can be obtained from the Cayuga County
Historians Office. See our Historian page." (3)
"Cayuga County Wills 1799-1842 Vols. 1-4 1947 by Barber
Vol. 2
Will of Henry Osterhout of town of Victory dated November 17, 1822 probated August 9, 1827
names wife Charity, sons; James, Peter, Cornelius, Henry daus; Sophia, Polly, Sally
Executors son Cornelius, brother Lucas [see Osterhout Genealogy above], and John McFadden" (4)
Almira Osterhout had two grandfathers in the Revolutionary War - an Osterhout and a Thorpe. (5)
1) Osterhout Genealogy (see Jan Jansen van Oosterhout)
2) Katsbaan and Saugerties Reformed Church, Ulster County, New York; Jean D. Worden (1982 Franklin, Ohio) p. 44
3) Susan Corcoran, Cayuga County Coordinator, US GenWeb Project (amtsant@aol.com))
4) Arlene Whiteman
5) Ibid.

[NI0635] "Date Child Parents Sponsors
1771 Gretjen Arend Wenne Frederich Rauh
Aug. 26 Annatjen Langendyk Catharina Vannette (p. 46)" (2)
" Date Child Parents Sponsors
June 14, Jane Hendrick Osterhoudt Abm. Jongh
1795 b. April 29 Geertie Vinne Annatie Winne (p. I)
May 28,... James, Hendrick Osterhoudt Aaron Winna
1797 b. Mar. Geertie Winna Tyne Young (p. IV
Feb 3, Hosea Abraham Young Hindrick Osterhoudt
1798 b. Jan 30 Annatie Winna Goertie Winna (p. V)
Feb 10 Peter Hendrick Oosterhoudt James Oosterhoudt
1799 b. Jan 17 Charity Winna Maria Young (p. VII)
Dec 4 Sarah Hendrick Oosterhoudt
1803 b. Sept 29 Charity Winna (p. XVI)
Sept 8 Sophia Hendricus Osterhoudt
1805 b. July 15 Charity Winna (p. XIX)
May 17 Hendrick Hendrick Osterhoudt
1807 b. Mar 9 Charity Winna (p. XXII)
July 23 Tine Henry Osterhout
1809 b. May 21 Charity Winne (p. XXVI)
Apr.21 Charity Catherine Henry Osterhout
181(1) b. Dec. 31 (1810) Charity Winne (p. XXVIII)" (1)
Children:
Jane b. April 29, 1795 Durham, Greene Co., New York
James b. March, 1797 "
Peter b. Jan 17, 1799 " d. aft 11/22/1822 (will)
Sarah b. Sept 29, 1803 "
Sophia b. July 15, 1805 " d. " "
Hendrick b. Mar 9, 1807 " d. " "
Tine b. May 21, 1809 "
Charity b. Dec. 31, 1810 "
Cornelius d. " "
Polly d. " "
Sally d. " "
1) Oak Hill Church Records Bronck Historical Museum & Library, p. IV
2) Katsbaan and Saugerties Reformed Church, Ulster Co., NY; comp. Jean Worden 1982
Aaron and Annatie are probably siblings of Geertie
Winne researcher:
Dot Pratt
The Inn-Apt. 222
16001 Lakeshore Villa Drive
Tampa, FL 33613
Tel. 813-961-1217

[NI0709] "Olivia Augusta Wheeler wife of Clayton Whiteman
Olivia daughter of George and Elisabeth Ann Bennett Wheeler
born April 1, 1879 Leasburg, Missouri
married September 19, 1907
Olivia was the ninth child in a family of ten children. She spent most of her adult life in Colorado and was always dedicated to writing and education. During her later years she spent a great deal of time knitting and writing poetry...
She was affectionately called Granny by her children and friends, however she usually signed her name "Olive" or "Ollie."
Olivia was a brunette, having very dark brown eyes and an olive complexion. Her almost black hair, never became very gray. She was the tallest of the five Wheeler girls being five feet-five inches in height. She was a very good horse-woman and rode a great deal in her early years." (1)
She was divorced from her husband, Clayton sometime after this genealogy was written.
"Warren Wheeler and family were the first to arrive in Hayden. He had the present Zehner ranch, and it has been in the family ever since.
In 1901 Warren's sisters, Olive and Florence Wheeler, arrived by stagecoachand their descendants are living in Hayden as of this date. Olive began at once to teach primary grades... Olive was married in the fall of 1907 to Clayton Whiteman...
Olive Whiteman wrote many poems and a book of her writings has been published." (2)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) Article by Lowell W. Whiteman; Hayden & West Routt County p. 3131) Arlene Whiteman

[NI0710] "Clayton son of George H. and Mary Jan Swartout Whiteman
born June 7, 1880 in Allegany County, New York
Married September 19, 1907 in Denver, Colorado
Died April 6, 1956 in Claremont, California
Had Parkinson's Disease for several years.
Children:
George Kenneth September 7, 1908 married Bernice Meeker
Florence Arlene January 18, 1912 married Henry William Jones
Lowell Wheeler February 7, 1918 married Madelyn Turner
married Marian Davis

Testimonial Dinner by Members of the Food Industry of Southern California Honoring
Clayton Whiteman
Thursday, September 11, 1952
Embassy Room, Los Angeles Ambassador
On this evening of September 11, 1952, members of the food industry of Southern California are gathered together to honor Mr. Clayton Whiteman, whose business acumen, initiative, and integrity have won the admiration and respect not only of local food circles but of the entire food industry of the nation.
First as general manager, then, president, and now Honorary Chairman of the Board of Certified Grocers of California, Mr. Whiteman has probably done more to change the methods of food distribution in Southern California than any other single person.
By sheer determination and insistence on operating principles which assured equal treatment of all members, he reared Certified Grocers from a puny, struggling retailer-owned cooperative, without a home of its own, to be the largest company of its kind in dollar volume of business in the United States.
Although he was born in New York state, Mr. Whiteman moved west with his family when he was 7 years old and spent his early childhood in Colorado and Nebraska, where his father farmed land for corn and wheat. In September, 1900, he entered the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, where he played right half on the football team and developed such an interest in the game it is still his favorite spectator sport. Terminating his college career in 1901, he went to work for G.A. Cramer Co., a wholesale art store in Lincoln.
When the firm's business changed from quick turnover items like picture frames, art supplies and easels to larger, more costly and slower selling objects like pianos and furniture, Mr. Whiteman moved on to Hayden, Colorado, in January, 1906.
His first contact with the grocery business came in April, 1908, when he went to work for J.W. Hugus & Co., a general mercantile store in Hayden. But he went from peddling groceries to peddling stamps in April, 1909, when he was nominated postmaster at Hayden. He was reappointed postmaster in 1911. After a change in administration terminated his postal career, Mr. Whiteman returned to the business field and in 1915 went into partnership and bought the Hayden Drug Store.
Two years later he added to his holdings by buying two other drug stores, one at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, and the other at Craig, Colorado. He operated the three stores until 1921, when he sold the Steamboat Springs store. By January, 1923, he had disposed of his interest in the other stores, and July of that same year found him in California.
Looking for work, he found employment on September 1, 1923, with the Baldwin Park Department Store. When death took the owner, Mr. J. Foto, his widow named Mr. Whiteman superintendent of the entire store. This store held membership in the recently organized co-operative called Certified Grocers. In January, 1926, Mr. Whiteman was elected to Certified's board of directors. He exhibited such leadership as a director that the board named him general manager on August 1, 1926.
From then on the story of Clayton Whiteman is the history of Certified Grocers of California. In addition to an integrity of thought and action which has been described by Certified's Chairman of the Board, Henry Carty, as "super-honesty," he administered his post with impartiality, sound business practices, and an enlighted employee relations program.
Mr. Whiteman remained as general manager of Certified until late in 1945 when ill health forced him to relinquish active leadership of the organization. The value of his experience and his discerning counsel still were made available to the company, however, by his immediate elevation to the less trying position of president, an office which he held until January, 1951. Since that time he has remained as a member of the Board of Directors with the title of Honorary Chairman of the Board and Advisor to the Directors.
Mr. Whiteman's influence has been felt as well in the industrial development of Los Angeles. He served for several years on the Board of Directors of both the L.A. Chamber of Commerce and Merchants and Manufacturers Association.
Emerson once said: "An institution is but the lengthened shadow of one man." If this is so, then Certified's success is a lasting tribute to the policies and personality of Clayton Whiteman." (1)
1) Arlene Whiteman

[NI0715] He moved from New York to Nebraska in 1887. He homesteaded in Hayden, Colorado in about 1903. He was the first person to export hogs from Routt County, at first in 1911 through the railhead in Steamboat Springs. He said at that time that he had been a hog farmer for thirty years in Nebraska. That is probably incorrect, but he may have been a hog farmer for thirty years in New York, Nebraska and Colorado.
"George H. Whiteman was born November 28, 1851. He married Mary Swartout on March 10, 1872. In 1904 they came to Hayden from the area around Lincoln, Nebraska. Two of their sons, Ralph and Clayton, soon came to join them.
George Whiteman's place was about three miles from Highway 40 on the Twenty-Mile Road. George contracted to build roads and dams using horse-power to move earth. He died in 1925, and his wife in 1929. Both are buried in the Hayden Cemetery." (2)
"George was a stocky man, he had very blue eyes and light hair. He wore a mustache most of his life. As his grandaughter, he seemed to me to be rather gruff and did not have much time for children. He spent most of his life farming and ranching. The following clipping describes one of his projects:
[The clipping is from 1911 probably from the Denver Post.]
Routt County Hogs Marketed
First Carload of Hogs is Shipped over the Moffat Road
From Hayden Ranch
Shipper Enthusiastic over Hog Raising Prospects in His District
1911
Denver. -- The Record Stockman of Friday says: George H. Whiteman, a successful stockman and farmer of Hayden, Colo., was on Friday's market with a carload of hogs loaded at Steamboat Springs. This is the first car of hogs ever shipped to market from Routt county and the first car every hauled to market over the Moffat Road from any of its shipping points. The hogs were of very good quality and sold at $8.25 for the big end, with a few pigs at $8.00, a good strong price on the market, and Mr. Whiteman expressed himself as well pleased.
The hogs were fed on Canadian field peas and barley, together with alfalfa which is a combination impossible to beat in hog production, according to Mr. Whiteman, and he ought to know, for he was engaged in the hog business in Nebraska for over thirty years. Mr. Whiteman located on a homestead near Hayden some eight years ago and started his hog raising with two or three sows and a boar. This is the first carload he shipped, though he killed some stuff for local trade occasionally.
"I expect to make hog raising a business," said he, " and am positive that there is no better place to do it than in Routt county. There is no doubt in my mind that one can raise cheaper and better hogs in that section than in any place in the country. The climate there is right, we can raise the best feeds to be found anywhere and hogs are healthy. Back where I used to live I have lost as many as 500 hogs in one season from cholera, but in the eight years I have been raising hogs at Hayden, have never had one die from the disease, and I find that is the experience of everybody."
Mr. Whiteman expected the railroad to be completed to Hayden by this time, when he began raising hogs, and would then have been able to ship without hauling them. As it was, he was compelled to haul the hogs in six sleighs to Steamboat Springs and load there. The railroad, however, will be built on to Hayden within the next year. [The first train arrived October 11, 1913.]" (1)
"Children:
Ralph H. 1873 - 1947 married Mattie Byers
Bertha 1878 - 1923 married Rufus Tyler
Clayton 1880 - 1956 married Olivia Wheeler
Fred 1882 - 1945 married Lena" (1)
"George H. Whiteman, third child of Jacob and Annis Bartoo Whiteman, was born November 28, 1851. He died July 23, 1925. He married Mary Swartout of West Clarksville, N.Y., March 10, 1872. They went to Joshly, Dawson County, Nebraska, but in 1904, they were living somewhere in Colorado. Mary S. Whiteman died August 19, 1929 at Hayden, Colorado.
George H. and Mary Swartout Whiteman had the following children in the ninth generation:
1. Ralph H. Whiteman February 8, 1873
2. Bertha Whiteman January 11, 1878 - February 7, 1923
3. Clayton Whiteman June 7, 1880 - April 6, 1956
4. Fred Whitman January 2, 1882" (1)
1) Arlene Whiteman (1937)
2) Article by Lowell W. Whiteman; History of Hayden & West Routt County 1876-1989 (Curtis Media c. 1990) p. 314-5

[NI0723] "He served in the Union Army in the Civil War, Certificate 868, 865 in the National Archives. the affidavit of Jacob H. Whiteman states that he lived in W. Clarksville at the time of his enlistment.
He was 5' 10", had blue eyes, brown hair and was a farmer. He enlisted in Company A, 136th N.Y. Infantry and later transferred to Company G. He was wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863 in the thigh, lost the sight of the left eye. He continued in service in spite of his wounds. The medals he received are in the possesion of Cameron Clayton Whiteman, son of Lowell Wheeler Whiteman."(1)
The 136th New York was part of the brigade of Col. Orlando Smith (2nd) of Brigadier Adolph von Steinwehr's 2nd Division of the Eleventh Corps of General Howard and General Schurz. Smith's brigade was the last to arrive on the battlefield on the evening of July 1. It took up a position at the intersection of the Emmitsburg and Taneytown Roads on the extreme northwest of the Union position at Cemetery Hill.
"The 136th New York took two days to muster inton the Federal service. On September 25, 1862... On the following day, Companies A and K joined the army. A-96 (men)... The regiment, counting the eight men who were mustered in August, now totaled 969 officers and enlisted men. (p. 38)...
Thursday (October) 2nd (1862)
This morning we started for Washington with our whole Reg't)...
Saturday (October) 4th (1862)
At noon today we were in Washington... Marched to Arlington Heights, and got there at 9 P.M... (p. 27)
(November) 2nd... This morning our Reg't took up up the line of march for the enemy's country. We passed through Centreville, and camped four miles beyond it...
(November) 3rd... We went through Hay Market... We camped two miles beyond Gainsville... (p. 30)
(November) 9th (1862) at New Baltimore (p. 31)...
(December) 12th... Today we have come to a place called Dumfries...
(December) 15th... Today we marched to within 2 miles of the city. (Fredericksburg) (p. 33)
(April) 28th (1863)... We are going to Kelly's Ford on the Rappahannock 30 miles above Fredericksburg...
(May) 1st... Today the battle has commenced. The firing of cannon is but two miles distant...(p. 47)
(May) 2nd... This morning we were moved behind a rifle pit and are waiting for them... This afternoon at 4 o'clock our brigade went up into the woods, where the rebels were, to help some regts that had taken a rebel regt, to bring back the men...
(May) 6th... This morning the troops are all leaving and crossing the river. The troops were all taken away before the pickets were and I was one of the last to go away. We went to the river on a double quick for fear the rebels would take us before we got to our regt. Today we came about 18 miles through the mud and rain and camped in the woods. We are going right straight for our old camp at Stafford C.H... (p. 48)
(June) 12th... we got orders to march... and take the road to Hartwood Church... (p. 49)
(June) 25th... This morning we crossed the Potomac River into Maryland...
(June) 28th... stopped at Frederick City... (p. 51)
(June) 29th... We are now at Emmitsburg near St. Mary's College... Wednesday (July) 1st (1863) This morning we started at 7 1/2 a.m. and went into Pennsylvania to Gettysburg. I think it is about fifteen miles from where we started. When we came here we found that there was quite a battle going on. We went right up for support but today have not fought any (his company I guess). We have had six men wounded in our Regt. today. One will die I think. One belonged to our Company.
Thursday (July) 2nd (1863)
Today we were sent out as skirmishers (our co.) for 2 hours. We had one man a Corp. (John Fiero), very badly wounded and two (Patrick Duffy and one unrecorded) were wounded a little. I came out all right. The balls fell around me pretty fast. Just as soon as you put your head in sight they would fire at you.
At four and a half this afternoon the fight began along the whole line very fury. The rebels advanced on us and then such a firing of cannon and guns I never heard before. The fight continued until ten at night, when rebels fell back to their old places. I think the rebels were whipped pretty well. (p. 53)
The regiment was deployed in line of battle perpendicular to the road (Steinwehr Avenue) which led into the cemetary with one of the flanks near the gate. Later in the day, the regiment moved down in to the road paralleling the front of the cemetary. (p. 79)
July 2, 1863
Company A...
Cpl. Jacob Henry Whiteman - WIA (p. 122)
September 25th At 8 A.M. went on board for some place...
(September) 29th This monring we came into Jeffersonville on the Ohio River. We went across on a ferry boat to Louisville, Ky... (p. 64)
(September) 30th Last night we went through Nashville and out of the state of Tennessee into Alabama... (p. 65)
(October) 29... Last night at 1 A.M. we were woke up by firing and got into line of battle and marched out into the fields. Here we stayed but a few minutes, when the order came to charge up a small but very steep hill, and drive the rebels off. We went up the hill and just at the top the rebels fired and run... We returned the fire with good effect, killing and wounding about 25. We lost 6
or 8 men... We have built breastworks on this hill and are in a strong place. (p. 67-8)
In the Battle of Wauhatchie, TN, three regiments from Colonel Orlando Smith's brigade, made a midnight assault up an extremely high hill against a supperior Confederate force. With orders to use the bayonet only, the three regiments, which numbered less than 700 officers and men, drove an estimated 1,800 Confederates in McIver Law's brigade from the crest... (On the left) After detaching H and K to a hill north of the Confederate position, Colonel James Wood, Jr. moved the rest of his regiment to the right and charged up the hill to support the two regiments already engaged. Wood estimated the hill to be about 180 yards at a 45 degree angle from the base to the top, with a 6 foot wide crest. His regiments fired one volley into the backs of the fleeing Confederates. The New Yorkers captured 5 Confederates and 40 weapons. (p. 84)
(November) 23... At 1 P.M. left our camp and went to Chattanooga. Which place we got to at dark...
(November) 23... At Noon today the enemy was attacked in the center of the army of Gen. (George H.) Thomas, and our corps (Gen. Howard's) was formed on the left and Gen. Hooker on the right opposite Lookout Mountain.
At half past three our corps advanced and drove the enemy about half a mile... the 2nd (our Div.) was on the left and our Regt. was on the right of the Div.
When we advanced Co. I was put forward as skirmishers and the Regt. kept 100 yards behind them...
When we got on to the line we wanted, we were halted and lay down flat on the ground, while a perfect shower of bullets flew over our heads. Here we stayed until dark and then built breastworks of rails & dirts behind which to lie tomorrow...
(November) 24... There has been very hard fighting all day over to the right. Where we are there has been but little firing... & Co's A & G lost each one man. Our Reg't. has had ten wounded & one killed.
(November) 25... This morning our Corps moved to the left & rear of Missionary Ridge, while some of the other troops attacked them in front & on the right. Only a part of our Corps was in this fight & we were lucky enough to be out of it...
(November) 26... This morning before light we were in pursuit of the enemy. Our advance guard and their rear guard fought some today. We did not stop until after dark....
(November) 27... We marched all day & at dark got to Red Clay station. There we tore up the track, burned two bridges & depot with 2 cars. This is the railroad that Longstreet has to get his supplies on. We then went back 6 miles & camped at 12 P.M. (p. 70-71)
(May) 15th... (1864)..This has been the hardest fight that the reg't. was ever in. In about 3 hours... the reg't. lost in all 91 men...
At daylight this morning we were moved about 5 miles to the left, where we remained until noon, when we went about 2 miles further and formed a line of battle. This was about 2 P.M. Our line ran along at the foot of a hill. We were the second line of battle. Now began the hard fight. We charged up the first hill, the balls flying over our heads. Then we went down the hill & up another. When the rebels left their breastwork we followed them. All the while there was a perfect hail of bullets. We drove the rebels off the third hill, when we were ordered to halt.
Thus we drove them off three hills and the last two had breastworks thrown up. The hill that we stopped on had no protection except the breastworks which were poorer than those on the second hill.
By the time we were on the last hill, the regt. ahead of us were so cut up that they fell into our reg't. thus making but one line of battle. The enemy had a cross fire on us. They were mad because we got the last hill and determined to take it again. For this purpose they charged on the hill three times and every time went back with their ranks all cut up. (p. 94)
Losses... March... 15th
Corporal Jacob Henry Whiteman (Co. A) - V(eteran) R(eserve) C(orps) (p. 124)" (3)
It is unclear if Jacob Whiteman took part in the Battle of Resaca, but he probably did. It appears that he remained in Company A throughout.
He was a member of the G.A.R.
"He lived in West Clarksville from 1864 to 1905, and Nile, N.Y. from 1905 to his death. He married a second time in 1904 to Eunice Steenrod Scott Bartoo. It was a third marriage for her.
His mother's name was variously spelled Van Vleet, Van Fleet and Van Vlet...
He was a pensioner, receiving $15.00 per month in 1898." (1)
According to an 1869 map of Clarksville (2), he had a farm about one mile west of West Clarksville in Lot 36 on Hoyett Road. I filmed the current farm house and farm, which may have been built by Jacob Whiteman.
There is a town (more a wide spot in the road) called Van Vleet about 10 miles southeast of Woodhull. It probably named after his mother's family.
There is a grave marker for him in the Clarksville Cemetery in West Clarksville, Allegany County, New York. It says "Jacob H. Whiteman, Co. A. 136th Regt. N.Y.V. Born March 4 1826." It does not list a death date. I therefore think that the monument was erected at the time of the death of his wife (1903) and he may not be buried there. Since he apparently died in Nile, a nearby town, he may be buried there. However, I was unable to find his tombstone in the Nile cemetery.
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) West Clarksville Sesquicentennial: 1835-1985, p. 45
3) Priest, John Michael, John T. McMahon: Diary of the 136th New York 1861-64; White Mane Publishing Company, Inc. c. 1993

[NI0727] "As early as 1804 Henry Whiteman was living in Steuben County. His original name was Henrich Weidmann or Weydmann. In 1800, he was living in Duanesburg, Albany County (now Schenectady) adjoining the household of John Vliet. This may have in fact been John Van Vliet, his father-in-law. In 1816, Henry Whiteman was among the first settlers in the township known as "Ninety-Six" from Section 96, Remsen, Oneida County. In the 1820 Census, he is listed as residing in Remsen, Oneida County (Oneida County p. 170).
"William F. Gardner, Henry Whiteman, and Richard Winship came in 1821, and with him his brother Sylvester, father of Dr. D.C. Winship, a prominent physician of Jasper, located in the southern part of the town.
In 1839, he moved to Jasper, New York. The 1850 Census for Steuben County (Vol. 83) gives his family. 1855 Census of the County lists "Henry Whiteman, 76 male, born in Dutchess County, widower. Had lived in Jasper for 16 years, a land owner."(1)
"Children: 8
Anna married John Worden
Henry A 1817 - married Martha Sanford
Elias 1821 -
Jacob Henry 1826-1918" (2)
"1850 Census for Steuben County (Vol. 83)
Henry Whiteman 71
Martha (Nancy) 71
Samantha 34
Henry A. 33
John 48
Elias 29
Jacob 24
William 33
Calvin 18" (3)
An 1857 map of Steuben County shows "Mrs. Whiteman" and "E. Whiteman" in the SE corner of Jasper Township. "Z. Whiteman" is shown in the NE corner of Troupsburg Township.
He is buried in a rural cemetary 1 mile east of Jasper, Steuben County, New York, next to his wife Martha Van Vliet. Birth and death dates are from his tombstone.
1) Historical Gazeteer of Steuben County by M.F. Roberts, p. 343
2) Arlene Whiteman
3) Ibid.
Other sources:
History of Remsen (New York) by M.F. Roberts

[NI0733] "said to be descended from Dirck Jansen Van der Vliet, who lived in Flatbush, Long Island in 1660 but this is not substantiated." (2)
"Henrich Weydman (Whiteman, Wightman) bapt. January 17, 1779... married Martha Van Vleet (Van Fleet) about 1799. Martha, daughter of John and Sarah (Swart) Van Vleet.
In 1800 Henry Whiteman was living in Duanesburg, Albany County, New York (now Schenectady), adjoining household of John Vliet
2 males over 45 1 female under 10
3 females 10 to 16
2 females over 45
Henry Whiteman and female 16 to 26 years" (1)
"John son of George Van Vleet
born 1749
married
died September 3, 1827
Sarah Swart daughter of Swart
born
married
died February 9, 1835
Source: Old Gravestones of Ulster County, Esopus Township, N.Y.
John Van Vleet was in the American Revolutionary War." (1)
His brother was a private in Captain Lefever's Co. from Kingston, Ulster Co., New York.
John Van Vliet is listed in the 1800 NY Census Index.
No John Van Vliet listed in Steuben censuses until 1825 in Jersey and 1855 in Prattsburgh so he probably did not come to Steuben Co.
1) Arlene Whiteman
Records in Dutch Church, Kingston, Ulster County, New York
Old Gravestones of Ulster County, Esopus Township, N.Y.
2) MS in NYPL dated 10/31/74

[NI0734] See his father for explanation of my speculative connection.

[NI0735] "b. 28 May 1808; d. 9 Jul 1897 at his son, Jesse K. Bartoo's home in Larned, KS; he m. 22 Feb 1829, Caroline Barnes of Greene, NY... He moved to Jasper, NY in 1836. He m. (2) Malinda Chase of Little Valley, NY. She died 5 Jan 1862. Both wives buried near Little Valley, NY. He enlisted in Co. B, 9th NY Cavalry; discharged for disability Oct 1862; later, pensioner. He had 3 sons & 3 sons-in-law in Union Army in the Civil War.
Bartoo children: by 1st wife: Caroline Barnes:
Annis b. 20 Nov 1829
Betsey b. 7 Jun 1831
Olive b. 7 Mar 1833 Greene, Chenango Co., NY (d. 15 Jul 1899)
Armelia b. 15 Jul 1835; d. 29 Jul 1835
Cordelia b. 15 Jul 1835; d. 24 Nov 1835
Lucretia b. 8 Sep 1836; d. 18 Aug 1839 (Jasper, NY)
Laura Etta b. 14 Aug 1839 (Jasper d. 22 Jan 1907)
Hannah b. 24 Aug 1841 (Jasper d. 2 Oct 1892)
Jesse K. b. 26 May 1843 (Jasper d. 29 Aug 1901 Larned, KS)
Lovilla b. 26 Jul 1846 (Jasper d. 21 Apr 1903)
Margaret b. 16 Nov 1847; d. 20 May 1849 (Jasper)
Eli William b. 26 May 1849 (Jasper d. 5 Jan 1918)
Smith b. 1 Apr 1851 (Jasper d. 23 Apr 1910)
George Henry b. 19 May 1856 (Jasper d. 8 Sep 1888)" (1)
"Jesse Luce Bartoo, sixth child of Jesse and Eunice Loomis Bartoo, was born May 28, 1808. On February 22, 1829 he married Caroline Barnes, born June 12, 1812, of Greene, N.Y. He moved to Jasper, N.Y. in 1836. He was a farmer and a short, muscular man. He rafted and run lumber down the Canisteo, Tioga and Susquehanna rivers in the spring freshets, and was considered a good waterman. He had a good eye for a horse.
He was a little visionary and had a roving turn of mind. In the early fifties he started for Oregon which to him was the land "flowing with milk and honey." After reaching the Mississippi River, he came quietly home and said no more about Oregon.
He moved to Little Valley, N.Y. in 1856. His wife Caroline died August 14, 1857. He married for a second wife, Malendas Chase of Little Valley, N.Y. She died Jan. 5, 1862. Both wives are buried near Little Valley, N.Y.
November 1, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company B., Ninth New York Cavalry. He was discharged for disability in October 1862. Later he was a pensioner.
He became deaf and blind in his old age and died July 9, 1897, at his son's, Jesse K. Bartoo, in Larned, Kansas; in the land of the "setting sun", which it had always been his ambition to attain. He had three sons and three sons-in-law in the Union Army of the War of the Rebellion."
See records of Veterans Administration #S.C. 348979(2)
The Ninth New York Cavalry web site is located at "http://members.aol.com/ninthnycav/historyl.htm"
1) Luce Genealogy p. 628-9
2) Arlene Whiteman

[NI0740] According to the Rhinebeck Genealogy, his brother Jacob Whiteman "was regarded as a great rebel by the Tories of the Revolution, and, with Gottlob Martin, George Sharp, and others, held frequent private council to advance the cause of the Revolutionary army. According to Historic Old Rhinebeck, Zacharias Whiteman signed a declaration on April 19, 1775 adhering to the Continental Congress.
Sources: Rhinebeck Genealogy
Historic Old Rhinebeck
He may have had another daughter since the records of St. Peter's Lutheran Church (Route 9, North of Rhinebeck) show Johannes Muller (son of Phillip) married Anneke Weidman (daughter of Zacharias) 10
Mar 1789. That is a different church from the one where Zacharias was baptised (St. Paul's, Red Hook).
He also sponsored the child of Elsjen Ostrander, probably his sister-in-law.
"8. Zacharias, bpt. 15 Feb 1755 - sp.: Zacharias Schmidt and Anna Maria Bender (Red Hook Luth. Chbk.) He md. 1773 Anna Ostrander (Red Hook Luth. Chbk.)." (1)
Children:
Alida Weydman bapt. 7/31/1774 Rhinebeck
Henry Whiteman bapt. 1/17/1779 Rhinebeck
Elisabeth Weydman bapt. 6/10/1781 Rhinebeck
Johannes Weydman bapt. 6/27/1784 Rhinebeck
1) More Palatine Families, p. 303

[NI0742] "C-124 Elizabeth Van Benschoten m. Johannes Ostrander
Egbert-Eltjen...
D-388 Anneke Ostrander, b. 10-17-1752, bp. 12-2; m. Lower Red Hook 1773 Zacharias Weydmann" (x)
"Ship Passenger Lists to NY and NJ 1600-1925, Carl Boyer 3d, pg 30 lists Ostrander, Pieter Pietersen, from Amsterdam. The author cites Old Ulster Magazine.
Going one step further in the index for Pieter Pietersen, I find on page 121:
Apr 25 1659, in "De Moesman," the Market Gardener, Capt. Jacob Jansen Staet, Pieter Pietersen, also called Pia, from Picardy, wife and daughter 16 years old.
pg. 124, soldiers who are to sail in the ship "De Boente Koe" Apr 15 1660, Pieter Pietersen, Adelborst (Midshipman), from Amsterdam, with his wife and three children, 8, 4 and 2 years old." (5)
Sister of Elsjen Ostrander. She sponsored Jacob Mejer with her husband on 30 Jan 1774. Jacob was the son of Elsjen Ostrander and Nicklas Mejer.
"I find John, Wm, Henry, Daniel, Abraham in Dutchess Co, NY 1775-81. William b 1759 Livingston's Manor, Dutchess Co was in Hoosack, Rensselar Co before the REV WAR. He m prob #2 Maria Plimley 1 Jan 1819. His son Jacob b 1806 was living in Dutchess Co at the time of his death in 1839." (1)
The Weydman's were also connected with the Livingstons. Perhaps this is a connection.
"all Ostrands and Ostranders in the U.S. and Canada are descended from him."(2)
Elsjen had another child baptised 28 Jan 1781 in Rhinebeck. The sponsors were John Ostrander and Catharina Wetzel, probably her brother and sister-in-law.
Jonothan Oststrander baptised 13 Jan 1748, parents Wilhelm Oststrander and Comfert Bock, sponsors Jonothan Bock and Marri Endersse (probably the grandparents), Rhinebeck GRC
Antje Oostrander baptised 11 Mar 1750 at Rhinebeck GRC, parents, Jacobus Oostrander and Margrietje Heermanzen, sponsors, Henrich Heermanzen and Annatje Heermanzen (possibly grandparents)
Antje rebaptised (apparently) 27 Mar 1751 Rhine Flats RDC
Anneke Oostrander baptised 3 Dec 1752 (born 17 Nov) Parents Johannes Oostrander and Elisabeth van Bunschoten, sponsors Gerrit Van Buiren and Rebekka Westfaal, Rhine Flats RDC
[Baptised 27 Nov 1720 Kingston Dutch Reform Church: Johannes son of Theunis Oostrander and Marytjen Zuyland: Source: Ostrander Family Records p. 18]
Alida was baptised on 14 Aug 1774 at the Rhinebeck German Reformed Church.
Henrich was baptised 17 Jan 1779 at the Rhinebeck German Reformed Church.
Elisabeth was baptised 10 Jun 1781 at the Rhinebeck German Reformed Church. (3)
Elsjen and Johannes (husband of Catharine Whetsel) were children of Johannes and Elizabeth Van Bunschoten. Annecke is listed as marrying John Miller in the same source. (4)
the records of St. Peter's Lutheran Church (Route 9, North of Rhinebeck) show Johannes Muller (son of Phillip) married Anneke Weidman (daughter of Zacharias) 10 Mar 1789. That is a different church from the one where Zacharias was baptised (St. Paul's, Red Hook). tHIS MAY BE A SECOND MARRIAGE FOR ANNEKEN.
1) Nancy Carter (JQNL62A-Prodigy)
2) Dee Kermode (TUJS28A-Prodigy)
3) Ostrander, Emmett, Ostrander Family Vital Records; (1989)
4) De Bonte Koe October 1985 p. 7
5) Nancy Curran (MBFH73A-Prodigy)
6) Heidgerd, Ruth P.; The Schoonmaker Family: Descendants of Hendrick Jochemsz Schoonmaker 1624-1683 Part I p. 78
Other Ostrander researchers:
Nancy Gustafson (HDXZ81A-Prodigy)
Andy Ostrander (LMXZ48A-Prodigy)
Possible source:
Mr. Emmett Ostrander
The Ostrander Family Association
115 Lincoln Ave., E.
Cranford, NJ 07016

[NI0746] "Henrich Weidmann
(Waidmann, Weydmann, Whiteman)
Several Swiss emigrants of this name emigrated in the mid-18th century. The Dutchess Co., N.Y. settler was probably the Heinrich Weidmann, b. 2 Feb 1718 who left the parish CH 8164 Bachs after 1734 (but probably came later - HJ) to journey to the new world. He emigrated with his sister Anna, b. 3 July 1707, and his brother Johannes, b. 4 May 1724, and all were called "all un-md. and ch. of the deceased Hans Weidmann" (Faust & Brumbaugh, Vol. I, p. 34).
Henrich Weidmann, single man b. Switzerland, md. 12 April 1741 Clavi Koch...
Henrich Weitmann joined the Red Hook Lutheran Church 14 April 1745. He took a lease from Robert G. Livingston on a farm 2 1/2 miles s.e. of Red Hook on 1 May 1751 (History of Rhinebeck, by E. Smith, p. 208). A Henry Whiteman was nat. 3 May 1755 (Scott & Stryker-Rodda, p. 72). The ch. of Henrich Weidmann and his wife Clavi were:
1. Margaretha, bpt. 10 may 1741 - sp.: Marcus Wekman and Nenni Douti (Kingston Ref Chbk.). She md. 19 Jan 1762 Henrich Schmidt (Red Hook Luth. Chbk.)
2. Catharina, bpt. 11 Dec 1743 - sp.:Johannes Schram and wife Catharina Weid (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
3. Hans Henrich, bp. 31 Dec. 1745 - sp.: Johannes Krepser and Catterina Koch (Red Hook Luth. Chbk.).
4. Anna, bpt. 4 Jan 1747 - sp.:Jacob Henrich and Catharina Koch (Red Hook Luth. Chbk.). She md. Johan Velten Schaffer (HJ).
5. Elisabetha, bpt 25 Oct 1748 - sp.:Johannes Weber and wife Catharina Denemarck (Red Hook Luth. Chbk.).
6. Hans Henrich, bpt. 24 Aug 1750 - sp.: Johannes Krebser and Cattarina Schreiber (Red Hook Luth. Chbk.). He md. 14 Dec. 1773 Maria Hoff (Red Hook Luth. Chbk.).
7. Jacob, b. 9 Feb 1753 - sp.: Jacob Maul and Anna Dorothea (Rhinebeck Luth. Chbk.). He md. Catharina Neber (HJ). They are bur. in the Red Hook Luth. Cem.: her stone states she d. 10 May 1814, aged 58, and that he d. in his 86th yr.
8. Zacharias...
9. Alida, bpt. 22 May 1757 - sp.:Gilb. Robert Levingston and Alida Levingston (Red Hook Luth. Chbk.). She md. Johan Velten Bender (HJ)." (7)
"Henrich Weidman Married: Claphena (Clevi) Koch
son of Hans Weidmann and ? 12 April, 1741 dau. of Hans Koch and Verena Meyer
Born: 2 February, 1718 Kingston, NH [SIC] Christened: 2 August, 1716
Place: Switzerland Place: Switzerland
Siblings: Anna, Johannes Siblings: Cathrj
Children
Margaret Johannes Catherina
Hans Henrich (1) Anna Lisebeth
Hans Henrich (2) Jacob Zacharius
Alida" (6)
"About the year 1722, three brothers Martinus, Johannes, and Henrich Weidman, set out from the canton of Zurich, Switzerland and settled in Rhinebeck. The shield brought to the coungry by Henrich Weidman, the youngest of the brothers represented a hunter, full armed. According to the Burgerliche (of Zurich?) the shield of Weidmann or Weydmann shows a crossed hammer and sword. They were all followers of the Reformer, Zwingli, and belonged to the German Reformed Church." (1)
" St. Paul's Evangelical Church is an outgrowth from the old "Pink's Corner" (hence Red Hook or Red Hoek in Dutch) Church, which was the parent body and was German Reformed. The baptismal record runs back to 1730." (5)
Martten Wheitman was listed as a taxpayer in the North Ward of Dutchess County (now Red Hook) in 1723. (2)
"Henrich Weidman, the youngest brother, had received the advantages of education in the free city of Zurich, and came to be employed for some years as an agent of some of the land of Gilbert Livingston and subsequently of Robert G. Livingston."(1)
(His first child, Hans Henrich, was baptised 31 Dec 1745 (where?) and died soon after.)
His second child, Anna, was baptised at St. Paul's (Zion's) Lutheran Church, Red Hook, Dutchess County 4 Jan 1747, so they were no doubt living there at that time. Baptismal Records of St.Paul's (Zion's) Lutheran Church, Red Hook, N.Y.(3)
On the 1st of May, 1751, Henrich Weydman, then of Rhinebeck precinct, took from Robert G. Livingston, merchant of the city of New York, a lease of the farm situated about two and a half miles southeasterly from the present village of Red Hook, which continued in the possession and ownership of his descendants for a period of one hundred and twenty-five years thereafter. In 1876, the sons of John Elseffer and Catherine Whiteman Elseffer conveyed the same to Garret Moore. (1)
His connection with the Livingstons must have been rather close. On 22 Jun 1755 Gilbert Robert Livingston and Alida Livingston sponsored the baptism of his last child Alida (3).
The family had strong Revolutionary sympathies. His son Zacharias, his son-in-law John Bender (Johannes Bender)(Alida's husband) signed the Revolutionary pledge on 19 Apr 1775. (2)
"Another early resident of the town was Hendrick Weidman, afterwards written Whiteman. He came from Zurich, Switzerland about 1736 and ten years latter settled on a farm here (Red Hook), acting as a land agent. His son Jacob, in 1796, purchased the fee of the farm. (That son is buried at St. Paul's in Red Hook.) Both father and son warmly supported the cause of the Colonists during the Revolution, and the night of October 15, 1777, a band of Tories attacked the Whiteman homestead, but were effectually repulsed." (4)
Henrich was still alive on January 17, 1779 when he sponsored his grandson Henrich (Henry Whiteman) 's baptism at Rhinebeck. (1)
1) Rhinebeck Genealogy
2) Historic Old Rhinebeck
3) Baptismal Records of St. Paul's (Zion's) Lutheran Church, Red Hook, N.Y.
4) History of Dutchess County, New York, edit. Frank Hasbrouck, S.A. Matthieu, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 1909 p. 429
5) Ibid., p. 434
6) Bernklow web site/Ginny B's G Page: http://www.bearclaws.basken.com/hencla.html
7) Jones, Jr., Hank Z.; More Palatine Families (Universal City, CA) 1991, pp. 303-4
Possible Source: Early Settlements in Dutchess County, New York (Rhinebeck, N.Y. Kinship, c 1994, vii, 213 (F127/D8/E37/1994) in NEHGRS Library

[NI0747] Also known as Klavy. She was a member of St. Paul's (Zion's) Lutheran Church in Red Hook, N.Y. She was still alive on January 17, 1779, when she sponsored the baptism of her grandson, Henrich (Henry Whiteman) at that church. She may have had a sister named Catharina Koch, who was having children baptised in the same chuch at the same time as her children were baptised. That sister was married to Jacob Hendrich or Henrich. Jacob Hendrich and Catharina Koch were sponsors at the baptism of Anna on 4 Jan 1747.
Henrich Wiedmann... md. 12 April 1741 Clavi Koch, single woman b. Switzerland (Kingston Ref. Chbk.). She probably was the "Cleophee, d/o Hans Koch and Verena Mayer, bpt. 2 Aug 1716," noted as leaving Obersteinmur in Switzerland in March 1741; Hans Koch, s/o Michel Koch, was bpt. 14 Aug 1681, and his wife Verena Meyer was bpt. as "Cathrj" 18 Feb 1720 (Faust & Brumbaugh, Vol. I, p. 85); it was probably she who sp. the Weidmann couple at Red Hook in 1745 & 1747 as "Catterina Koch" (HJ)." (1)
1) Jones, Jr., Hank Z.; More Palatine Families (Universal City, CA) 1991, p. 302
Koch Researchers:
Debi Koch ZJEL35A@prodigy.comm

[NI0760] 1850 Census Fleming, Cayuga County
p. 204 Dwelling 507 Family 527
James Osterhout 68 years farmer born N.Y.
Eunice 60 years N.Y.
Ira 26 years N.Y.
1 Jan Jansen van Oosterhoudt b. 1630 at Oosterhout North Brabant, Netherlands m. Annetje Hendricks 25 Oct 1653 in Dutch Reformed Church in New Amsterdam. One Jan Jansen signed the agreement to form Wiltwyck (Kingston) 31 May 1658. Unknown if Jan Oosterhoudt. He owned a house there in 1660.
9 Teunis Osterhoudt
"50 Hendrick...
206 Jacob 1745 & Jannetie DeWitt
535 DeWitt Osterhout b. 1767 m. Eliz. Monks
536 Hendrick bt 29 Oct 1770 Ktsb m. Charity Winne
910 James bt 28 May 1797 Oak Hill Ch
911 Peter bt 10 Feb 1799 Oak Hill Ch
537 Cath. bt 5 May 1773 Ktsb
538 Maria bt 20 Feb 1776 Ktsb m. 24 Jan 1792 Roch.
539 Lucas b. 6 May 1778
540 Jacob bt 25 Feb 1781 Ktsb m. Eunice Sharp
541 Martin bt 13 Aug 1784 Ktsb" (2)
"Oak Hill was the earliest settlement in the town (of Durham, Greene County). It belonged to the patent granted by King George II of England to Colonel Richard Maitland, a Scotch officer in the British army... The settlers were obliged to take leases of Maitland's executors, he having died. These leases were dated May 3, 1774. Lucas DeWitt's lease stipulated... In the lease it is stated that Lucas DeWitt, Jr. a yeoman from the Blue Mountains, was in possession of the land, and also that the place was known as DeWittsburg. After the massacre of the Stropes or Strops at Round Top the settlers took their families to Ulster County.
The first church organization in the town was at Oak Hill and of the Dutch Reformed faith. The church building was about a mile from Oak Hill, on the road to Preston Hollow, and the site donated by Stephen Van Rensselaer. It was probably organized about 1787...
Jan. 2, 1796, "At a meeting of the citizens of a place called Oak Hill in the town of Freehold, they being desirous of changing the name of said village, it was unanimously voted to call it by the name of DeWittsburgh." (1)
1)Van Vechten Vedder, J.; History of Greene County, New York 1651-1800 (1927 Hope Farm Press, Cornwallville, NY 1985) p. 77-78
2) Osterhout Genealogy, p. 17-8
Other Osterhoudt researchers:
Scott (Grace) Ogden (ZSES51A-Prodigy)
Send Grace any additional info.
Lorraine Luke (GKRU05A-Prodigy)
Ken Osterhoudt (XXMK96A-Prodigy)
Janet Brown (QPNW16A-Prodigy)
Diann Spence (PJXJ54A-Prodigy)
Patrice Schadt (FEQS18A-Prodigy)

[NI0761] "I have a Christopher Bergan Thorp/Tharp b. 1811 in Cayuga Co., NY. His father was Jesse Tharp/Thorp
1 Christopher Bergan Tharp b: Feb 11, 1811 Otasco, Cayuga Co., NY d: Mar 14, 1886 Geneva, Adams Co., IN" (1)
"Subject: Eunice Thorpe
I have been looking for Eunice Thorpe. Unfortunately, I did not find anything on her. I was able to find a Aaron Thorpe in the History of Cayuga County by Storke. He was associated with an early stage line (page 44 & 45)
There is also references to the name Thorp in the History of Cayuga County as
follows:
Andrew (page 500 & 503)
Andrew B (page 496)
Daniel (page 495 & 506)
David (page 496)
Harriett (page 495)
Walter (page 307)
Wheeler (page 493)

There is a reference to Henry Osterhout on page 480 who was a Commissioner of Highways in the Town of Sempronius in 1798.

There are references to Swarthout as follows:
D. Swarthout (page 479)
Daniel (page 384)
James (page 384)
Lee (Page 512)
Lee T. (Page 509)
Peter (384)
Simeon (page 384 & 387)

If you want copies of these pages, they can be obtained from the Cayuga County Historians Office. See our Historian page." (2)
1790 Census
Harpersfield [in what became Delaware County, New York]
M>16 M<16 F
304 Thorp, Daniel 1 1 2 Harpersfield
223 Thorp, Joseph 2 3 2 Kortright
5 Thorp, Nathan 2 4 3 Kortright
1800 Census
242 Thorp, Nathan Kortright
1) Cindy Torres Owens (CLO1257@aol.com-Prodigy))
2) Susan Corcoran, Cayuga County Coordinator, US GenWeb Project (atmsant@aol.com))

[NI0762] Ancestral File
Douwe WIGGERSZ (AFN: 5FGW-X2)
Sex: M

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Event(s):
Born: 1592
Of Enkharven , (Enkhuizen), Holland
Married: Abt 1617
Of Enkharven , (Enkhuizen), Holland

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Parents:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Marriage(s):
Spouse: Agniete COENSEN (AFN: 5FGW-Z7)
Marriage: Abt 1617
Of Enkharven , (Enkhuizen), Holland


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[NI0766] "The wife of Adrian was Agatha Jans Spruyt, of Kriekenbeck and Utrecht." (1)
The name of her father is derived from her patronymic, Jans (or Janse).
1) Commemorative Bio (see Adrian van Vliet) p. 409

[NI0770] Cynthia Halsted, sister of Lois Halsted who married Ralph Swarthout, married James Armstrong of Minisink, probably a relation.

[NI0779] "(Anthony Swarthout) married 8 May 1693 in Bergen, New Jersey Church; he was from Esopus (Kingston) and Jannetje from North Albany (Rensselaerswyck), both living in Bergen at the time of wedding; received certificate to Esopus 8 May 1693 (Source: Bergen County, New Jersey Marriages 1695-1800)... Upon his death in Maghaghkemeck in 1700, (she) married on January 18, 1701, Hermanus Brentsen van Nijmegin Inwegen, born in Nijmegin in Gelderland, Holland." (1)
"Harmanus Van Inwegen we first find mentioned as becoming part owner of the twelve hundred acre patent (in Deerpark), doubtless the buyer of the shares sold by the Swartouts. Eager says he married a daughter of one of the Swartouts (actually the widow of one of the Swartouts). He is represented as being a powerful man, so much so that the strongest Indians were unable to cope with him. He took a very prominent part in the border war with New Jersey, and became a member of the committee of safety organized in the Minisink Region in 1777." (2)
"Family of Harmanus van Inwegen and wife, (handwritten: Jannetje Cobes, widow of Tony) Swartwout
His son Gerardus Van Inwegen, married Jane De Witt, daughter of Jacob De Witt, of Rochester, in Ulster County. He became the owner of his father's farm and resided where his son Cornelius lived previous to his removal from this neighborhood.
His daughter, Hannah Van Inwegen, married Thos. Decker. He was or became owner of the present farm of George Cuddeback, and resided at his present residence. (Now, 1889, occupied by Henry Cuddeback.)" (3)
1) Ruth Thoden
2) Stickney, Charles E., A History of the Minisink Region p. 135
3) A History of Deerpark, p. 59-60

[NI0782] "Roeloff Swartwout... married Aug. 13, 1657, Eva Alberts. She was the daughter of Albert Andriesen Bradt de Noorman of Fort Orange, and widow of Anthony de Hooges, by whom she had five children. "Anthony's Nose," on the Hudson is said to have been named after Anthony de Hooges."(1)
"Eva (Aefie) Albertse Bradt b. bef 9 Jan 1633 Amsterdam, Noord, HLD m. (1) Oct. 1643 Esopus, Kingston, Ulster County, NY she d. 1689 Hurley, Ulster County, New York" (2)
"Where and when Anthony de Hooges was born in Holland is unknown, but he obviously was a well-educated young man by the time he emigrated to Nieuw Nederland on the ship de Coninck David in 1641. He prayed for a safe crossing so that the Lord may continue to receive "the offering of our lips," but it was only after a stormy and violent four months at sea and a grounding on a reef off the American shore that he wrote, "the Lord delivered us at last, after much adversity, for which He is praised forever."
Kilian Van Rensselaer, a diamond merchant in Amsterdam, never visited his huge estate in America. Business affairs at Rensselaerwyck were entrusted to Arent Van Curler who had won the respect of Indians for his fair dealing with them in the fur trade.
Anthony de Hooges was sent over as Van Curler's assistant and soon was handling the colony's considerable volume of paperwork, leasing land to tenant farmers, contracting for construction, inventorying merchandise, paying laborers and so on. Van Rensselaer, ever watchful from across the seas, considered de Hooges "an upright young man."
Van Curler returned to Holland in October 1646, leaving de Hooges in charge until a replacement arrived a year and a half later. Under the new manager, Anthony de Hooges served as commissaries and secretary of the colony for seven and a half years until his death on or about 11 October 1655.
Anthony de Hooges had left his sweetheart behind when he boarded ship for the New World, but Van Rensselaer soon wrote that he "need not wait for her any longer," because she had married another. In October 1647, six years after his arrival at Rensselaerwyck, Anthony de Hooges married Eva Albertse Bratt, the daughter of Ablert Andriesz Bratt and Annetje Barents Van Rotmers.
The children of Anthony de Hooges and Eva Bratte were all born in Beverwyck (Albany) between ca. 1648 and ca. 1656. Their only son, Johannes(2), the fourth of their five children, was probably born in 1653 or 1654.
Johannes(2) de Hooges married 4 December 1675 in the Reform Dutch Church in Kingston, New York, Margrietje Poest, daughter of Jan Barentsen Wemp (Poest) and Maritje Mynderts. All eight of their children were born in Hurley between ca. 1676 to 1690. Their seventh child, Maritje(3) de Hooges, born ca. 1688, married ca. 1705 Willem(3) Ostrander, for whom the Willem branch of the Ostrander family is named.
In terms of known descendants on record, the Willem branch ranks as the third largest in the Ostrander family, behind the Arent and Pieter branches.
Anthony(1) de Hooges and Eva Bratt had only one son and that son, Johannes(2), had only one son, Anthony(3), baptized in Kingston 12 October 1684. Apparently Anthony(3) died in infancy or childhood, for the name disappears entirely from the records. With this early death the male line ended and the de Hooges name became extinct in this country.
Even so, Anthony de Hooges and Eva Bratt left a great many descendants, through their son, daughters and grand-daughters. By the fourth generation when Pieter Pieterszen and Rebecca Traphagen had 99 great grandchildren, Anthony de Hooges and Eva Bratt had 143 at least and probably more, none of them named de Hooges.
The de Hooges name (pronounced "de Hoozh," the "oo" sounding like the single "o" in, for example: note, smoke, cone) probably refers to the family origins in Hoogezand in Groningen province, The Netherlands. The given name appears variously as Anthonij, Antoni, Anthony and in occasional formal documents as Herr Theunis de Hooges.
Two geographical sites preserve the memory of his name, using the given name instead of the usual surname. Anthony's Kill is a stream in Saratoga county and Anthony's nose is a Highlands mountain overlooking the Hudson near Peekskill.
After her husband's death, Eva Bratt remained a widow for nearly two years when on 13 August 1657, she married Roelof Swartwout. Leaving her home in Beverwyck, she and her children lived with her second husband at Hurley in Ulster county. Business affairs took Roelof Swartwout back to Amsterdam for a short visit. On 15 April 1660 he received papers appointing him as the first sheriff of Esopus, and on the same day he boarded a ship to return to the colony. That ship was "De Bonte Koe" and among the other passengers was Pieter Pieterzen with his wife and three children." (3)
"Eva Albertse Bradt was baptized on January 9, 1633 at the Lutheran Church in Amsterdam, in the Netherlands. She married (1st) Antoine de Hooges in October of 1647. Antoine arrived at New Netherlands in 1641, and almost immediately succeeded Arendt van Corlear as the Secretary, Bookkeeper, Vorleser, and Superintendent of the colony of Rensselaerswyck on November 29, 1641. Antoine died in 1655. Eva and Antoine had five children.
The children of Eva Albertse Bradt
with her first husband, Antoine de Hooges
1. Johannes de Hooges who married Margarita Post on December 4, 1675.
2. Eleonora de Hooges who married William Menjeur de la Montagne in May of 1673.
3. Maria de Hooges who married (1st) Hendrick Bries and (2nd) Jacob Lookermans on August 21, 1696.
4. Antje de Hooges who married Emanual Van Etten on May 10, 1702.
5. Catrina de Hooges who married Wynant Van Der Poel on August 17, 1706.
In 1656, Eva Bradt de Hooges was residing on the northwest corner of Bever and Handelaars (Broadway) streets, south of the blockhouse church. After asking for her hand in marriage and publishing their banns, Roeloff married Eva on August 13, 1657. Roeloff's father, Tomys, and Eva's father, Albert, were present. Their marriage contract reads (translated from Dutch):
"In the name of the Lord... in the year sixteen hundred and fifty seven on the thirteenth day of the month of August, appeared before me, Johannes La Montagne,... deputy at Fort Orange..., Roeloff Swartwout, in the presence of his father, Thomas Swartwout, on the one side, and Eva Albertse, widow of the late Antoine de Hooges, in the presence of Albert Andriessen (Bradt / Bratt) her father, on the other side, who, in the following manner, have covenanted this marriage contract... in the presence of the orphan-masters, recently chosen here, to wit(ness): Honorable Jan Verbeeck and Evert Wendel, reserves for her and Antoine de Hooges' children, for each of them, one hundred guilders, to wit, for Maricken, Anneken, Catrina, Johannes, and Elconora de Hooges... Barent Albertse (Bradt / Bratt) and Teunis Slingerland, brother and brother-in-law of the said Eva Albertse and uncles of the said children, should be guardians of said children... Done in Fort Orange..." signed by:
Roeloff Swartwout
the mark of "+" Eva Albertse (Bradt / Bratt)
Thomas (Tomys) Swartwout
Albert Andriessen (Bradt / Bratt)
Jan Verbeeck
Evert Wendel
Teunis Cornelissen
witnessed by Johannes Provoost and (mark of "+") Pieter Jacobsen"(4)
1) Deerpark Church Life, p. 218
2) Marge Gray mgray @jax-inter.net; 1224 Knobb Hill Dr., Jacksonville, FL 32221-6117 tel. 904-786-0342
3) De Bonte Koe (The Ostrander Family Association Newsletter), Vol. XIV, No. 3 found at http://home.earthlink.net/~ostrander/dbkv11n1.html#cont3
4) David R. Jansen's Genealogy Page

[NI0803] Abijah Loomis may well have been a "Regulator", that is a rebel during Shays' Rebellion in 1786. "In Berkshire County, the Loomises, Nobles, and Dodges of Egremont helped stop the court at Great Barrington." (8) After the collapse of the Rebellion he may have gone to New York and ultimately to Chenango County.
He left Egremont, Massachusetts in 1795-96 and went to Smithville, Chenango County, N.Y. Later he moved to Greene. (1)
Revolutionary War Vet?
"Abijah son of Josiah and Abigail (Bacon) Loomis born Mar 10 1743 Married 1768 Mary Kellogg who was born 1749 died 1815. He died 1819. They had three children. 1- Abijah (have some data on him) 2. Daniel born 1776 3 Your Eunice born 1778, died 1859. Married Jesse Barton. Kellogg born 1775 in Egremont, Mass. son of Silas and Mary (Kitchen) Kellogg. He died 1823." (5)
First Town Meeting of Greene, Chenango County, New York
"By a late Act passed by the people of the State of New York represented by the Senate and Assembly that all that part of the town of Union and Jericho (bounded thus and so) should be and remain a sep
arate Town by the name of Greene." The first Town Meeting was held the first Tuesday in April 1798 at the house of Conrad Sharp and the following officers elected:... Superviser: Benajah Loomis...
Poor Master: Abijah Loomis" (2)
Cemetery north of Brisben has a tomstone of Benaiah Loomis "who died March 8, 1836 aged 86 years."
"I have information on your Joseph Loomis. His parents are John and Agnes (Lyngwood) Loomis. He married Mary White who is the daughter of Robert and Bridget (Allgar) White.
I have the following references:
1. LDS Ancestral File
2. The Compendium of American Genealogy Vol. V, 1933
3. Loomis Legacies; by Lorell Loomis
4. The American Genealogist Vol 63, No. 1
5. The New England Ancestry of Albert Savage, Vol II
6. A Genealogy of the Church Family
7. Descendants of Joseph Loomis
8. Savage-Stillman-Rogers-Lindsey
9. NEHGRS Nexus, Vol VII #3-4 Jun-Aug 1990
10. 17th Century Colonial Ancestors"(3)
"Joseph's parents are John and Agnes (Lyngwood) Loomis of Shalford Parish, Messing, County Essex, England. Joseph married Mary Allgar there June 30, 1614. Her parents were Robert and Bridget White.
Robert White's parents are unknown... Bridget (Allgar) White's father is William, buried Shalford Parish Aug 2, 1575... his wife and parents unknown."(4)
"Lieut. Stephen (Kellogg) m. 7 Aug 1746, in Westfield, Mass., Mindwell Belden...
He d. 9 Aug 1767 in Egremont, Mass...
She m. (2) Abijah Loomis, of Egremont, and had several children." (6)
"883. Abijah Loomis, b. Conn., 10 Mar 1743/44; m. 30 Mar 1768, Mary Kellogg. He d. 1820, Greene, N.Y. 12 children.
2287. Mephibosheth, b. 6 Jan 1769, d. 28 Feb 1769
2288. Elias, b. 20 Nov 1769. Burlington, PA.
2289. Abigail, b. 2 Nov 1771, d. 9 Nov 1794
2290. Abijah, b. 15 Sep 1774 Conn
2291. Daniel, b. 26 May 1776 Conn
2292. Eunice, b. 17 May 1778; m. Jesse Barto, who d. 1850. She d. 1868. Greene, Chenango Co., N.Y.
2293. Olive, b. 31 May 1780;
2294. William, b. 1 Mar 1783
2295. Tryphena, b. 14 May 1785; m. Stephen Mead, who d. 1854. She d. 1844. Greene, N.Y.
2296. Sarah b. 3 Aug 1787
2297. Thomas, b. 28 Feb 1790
2298. Andrew, b. 22 Jan 1793....
(Daniel, Benajah and Reuben were his brothers 885, 886, 896.) (7)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) Cochrane, Mildred English, From Raft to Railroad: A History of the Town of Greene, Chenango County, New York: 1792-1867 p. 27
3) Karen Cherry (Prodigy-AWYG81A)
4) Richard Boell (TRGH72A-Prodigy)
5) Jean McGowan (BFKJ13A)
6) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 122
7) Loomis, Elisha S., Descendants of Joseph Loomis in America and his Antecendants in the Old World (1909) p. 210
8) Szatmary, David P.; Shays' Rebellion: The Making of and Agrarian Insurrection (Amherst 1980) p. 62
Other Loomis Researchers:
Julia Joaquin (Prodigy-XRSV23A)
Ruthanne Witterman (Prodigy-SNUA51A)



[NI0805] "The Register Book for the Parish of Jamaica...
Elizabeth ye wife of Jno Bartow Mar 2, 1714 aged
Frances, Elizabeth, Hannah, Sarah & Mary, Children of Jno & Eliz. Bartow March 2, 1714 at Jamaica." (3)
"III-5. Francis Barto of the third generation was the fifth child of John and Elizabeth Barto, born August 12, 1711, at Flushing, Long Island. He settled in Hempstead, Long Island and died in West Hills, Long Island, March 26, 1786.
He married Mary Ketcham and they had nine children in the fourth generation:
1. Obadiah Barto 1740 (Oct. 6)
2. Silas Barto 1742 (May 31) - 1831 (Nov. 7)
3. Servia Barto 1744 (Aug. 10)
4. John Barto 1746 (Nov. 4)
5. a daughter
6. Anna Barto 1751 (Apr. 3 - 1838
7. Reuben Barto 1755 (July 30)
8. Morris Barto 1758 (Aug. 18) - 1839 (Feb. 6)
9. Jonah Barto 1760 (Dec. 15)
Note: For the foregoing records I am indebted to Rev. Evelyn P. Bartow, 7 Henry Street, Utica, New York. Signed by Eli Bartoo, Brisben, N.Y. [Younger brother of Annis Bartoo]
Note: A Bartow Genealogy by Rev. Evelyn P. Bartow was published in Baltimore, Md., by Innes and Company, Printers, 1878. The book is now rare. A copy may be found in the Historical Library, St. Paul, Minn., one in State Library at Albany, N.Y. and one in the Congressional Library at Washington, D.C. D.R. Bartoo, Sept., 1938." (1)
Children:
Obadiah Barto b. 6 Oct 1740 d. 19 Mar 1803
"This account of the Barto family of Huntington, Long Island, was found on a sheet of paper in a book belonging to the contributor's grandmother. Henry Conklin (1832-1916) of the Town of Ohio, Herkimer County, New York, was the great-great-grandfather of the contributor.
The original family record (which has not been found) may not have been seen by the Rev. Evelyn Bartow, author of the 1879 Bartow genealogy. The genealogy shows Obadiah Barto at pp. 205, 297 with sons, Alexander, born 1774, and Nathaniel; no daughters are listed.
Baptisms have not been found for any of his children, and he did not leave a will or administration. Neither this family record nor the Bartow genealogy mentions Obadiah Barto's wife; he married Anne Ketcham 29 March 1762 at the First Church in Huntington.
Family Record in Bible Supposed to belong to Ruth Barto Conklin or her Father Obadiah Barto...
Obadiah Barto b. 1740 d. 1803 of Huntington, L.I.
Silas Bartoo
Servia Barto b. 10 Aug 1744
John Barto b. 7 Nov 1746
Ada Barto
Anna Barto b. 3 Apr 1751 d. 15 Dec 1838
Reuben Barto b. 30 Jul 1755
Morris Barto b. 18 Aug 1758
Jonah Barto b. 15 Dec 1760" (2)
Also check Bartow, Morey Hale Huguenot New Rochelle 1885 (IRM p.v. 22, no. 10 in the NYPL)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) Family Record: Barto; contributed by Helen S. Rogers in NY G&BR Vol. 127, No. 2; April 1996 p. 82
3) Ladd, Horatio Oliver; The Origin and History of Grace Church, Jamaica, New York; (New York 1914) p. 270-1

[NI0806] "Edward Ketcham came from England to Massachusetts before 1635.
His son, John, born about 1633, married first Susan ______. Susan having died, he married the second time, Bethiah Richardson in 1676. John Ketcham died in 1697.
John and Bethia (Richardson) Ketcham had three children.
Nathaniel Ketcham
Joseph Ketcham
Hester Ketcham
Joseph Ketcham, the second child of John and Bethiah Ketcham, married, April 7, 1714, Martha Phillips, and lived on Long Island.
Joseph Ketcham, the 3rd generation of Ketchams in America, had one son, Joseph, born on Long Island, March 17, 1715. (The foregoing are extracts in substance, from the New York Historical Records.)". (1)
"Joseph Ketchum b Southold LI NY ca 1654 d (?) Norwalk CT 1730s...
Joseph Ketchum d ca 1772 s of Joseph above m Elizabeth Raymond. Need all data on Joseph & Elizabeth & bdt, bpl of their children.
Dianne Rousseau, 394 Candlewood Hill Rd., P.O. Box 72, Higganum, CT 06441-0072." (2)

"22. Ephriam4 Ketcham (Samuel3, John2, Edward1) married Mary (--?--).219 He was born on 4 Feb 1685 at Huntington, Suffolk Co, New York.220,221,222 He died between Jul 1745 and Dec 1745 at Huntington, Suffolk Co, New York.223

Children of Ephriam4 Ketcham and Mary (--?--) were as follows:

50. i. Joseph5, b. circa 1711 at Huntington, Suffolk Co, New York; m. Sarah Conklin.
51. ii. Benjamin, b. 1715 at Huntington, Suffolk Co, New York; m. Elizabeth Sprague.
iii. Abijah; m. Agnes Pims 13 Nov 1741 at First Church, Huntington, Suffolk Co, New York;224 m. Mary Smith 30 Jun 1778 at First Church, Huntington, Suffolk Co, New York.225
iv. Jonathan; m. Mary Davis 24 Aug 1748 at First Church, Huntington, Suffolk Co, New York.226
v. Susanna.
vi. Mary. [POSSIBLY THE WIFE OF FRANCIS BARTO]

23. Daniel4 Ketcham (Edward3, John2, Edward1) married Easter (--?--).227 He was born on 27 Aug 1684 at Huntington, Suffolk Co, New York.228

Resided at New Jersey.229

Children of Daniel4 Ketcham and Easter (--?--) were as follows:

i. Jonathan5; b. 16 Apr 1712.230
ii. Sarah; b. 6 May 1715.231
iii. Micaiah; b. 6 Mar 1717.232
iv. Mary; b. 18 Jul 1721.233
52. v. David, m. Mary (--?--); b. 20 Oct 1723; m. Anne (--?--).
vi. Easter; b. 17 Apr 1727.234
vii. Daniel.

Notes
205. Seversmith, Colonial Families, Ketcham 1,719...
219. ibid.
220. ibid.
221. Hoff, Long Island Source Records, p. 29.
222. Bunker, Long Island Genealogies., p. 231.
223. Seversmith, Colonial Families, 1,720 (died in later part of 1745).
224. ibid, Ketcham 1, 720.
225. ibid.
226. ibid.
227. Ginger Stork, "Ketcham - Ketcham: Genealogy of Walter Harris Ketchum, 1st - 1851," Flint Genealogical Quarterly 31, no. 4 (Fall 1989).
228. ibid, p. 107 (Stork lists Daniel, b. 1684, as the son of Edward/2, whom she believes to be the son of the original Edward Ketcham).
229. Seversmith, Colonial Families, Ketcham 1, 717.
230. Stork, "", p. 107.
231. ibid.
232. ibid.
233. ibid.
234. ibid.
235. Seversmith, Colonial Families, Ketcham, 1, 700. " (3)

e-mail dated November 1, 1998
John,
Thanks for the email. I've been swamped at work lately and haven't been able to give it the attention it needed until today. I agree, the two Marys are the two possible candidates. Without further information (gravestones maybe), it would be hard to chose, but I agree that Ephraim's daughter looks most likely. I appreciate the compliment on the website, an email like yours every month keeps the site going. I hope you found it useful. I'd appreciated adding any information on your wife's Ketchams to the database. (sent)

John Ketcham
4817 Oak Knob Run
Fort Wayne, IN 46845
jmketcham@earthlink.nett
http://fp-www.wwnet.com/~jketcham (Ketcham Genealogy)

-----Original Message-----
From: John E Hope [mailto:JOHNEHOPE@prodigy.net]]
Sent: Sunday, September 13, 1998 8:40 PM
To: jmketcham@earthlink.nett
Subject: Ketcham Genealogy Webpage


John,
You have made a truly awsome webpage, for which I thank you.
I believe that I have made at least a tentative with my wife's family and your Ketchams.
A Mary Ketcham married Francis Barto b. August 12, 1711 Flushing, Long Island. Their first child Obadiah Barto was born in 1740 and he married Anne Ketcham March 29, 1762 in the First Church in Huntington. There is also a family connection with the Conklin family.
I found two Mary Ketchams in your descendant list who might fill the bill.
1) 23. iv. Mary Ketcham, the daughter of 23. Daniel, b. 1721. I think she may not be the correct one since you mention that Daniel resided in New Jersey.
2) 22. vi. Mary Ketcham, the daughter of 22. Ephraim. No birth date is given, but the time seems to be about right. Two of his children, 22. iii. Abijah and 22. iv. Jonathon, were married in the First Church in Huntington, just as Mary and Francis' son Obadiah was. Furthermore, another child of Ephraim, 22. i. Joseph, married a Conklin.

The whole matter seems highly suggestive of a connection. Any suggestions, criticisms, etc?
John Hope
1) Melchord Helmer Kutch, Genealogy of the Ketcham & Kutch Families, Lib. of Cong. CS71.K4 1939 (Cat.# APV Ketcham) p. 15
2) Nutmegger June 1995 p. 142
3) Ketcham Genealogy
Possible source:
George Lionel Seybolt, Ketcham Geneaology (Cat # APV Ketcham)

[NI0808] "Adrian Gerritsen van Vliet b. in the Province of Utrecht, Netherlands; mar. Agatha Jans(e?) Spruyt, doubtless a descendant of the ancient family of Spruyt of Kriekenbeck and Utrecht...
As quoted from the Commemorative Biographical Record, which is about a third of the following genealogy, Adrian and Agatha, and their five children, came to American in the "Trouw", landing at New Amsterdam on June 13, 1662, and shortly thereafter appeared in the records of "the Esopus" now Kingston, N.Y. By grant and purchase Adrian became the owner of several parcels of land in Kingston and the adjacent parts of Ulster County. In an Indian attack in June 1663 one their daughters captured with some of the other settlers, but they were soon recovered. On April 28, 1667 Adrian, with others, signed a document giving the reasons for their being in arms (against whom? This is around the time of the Treaty of Ryswijk which transferred the area to England.)
Agatha Spruyt van Vliet is reported to have been a frequent witness to baptisms in Kingston.
While no dates of birth or death are available for Adrian or Agatha, at least he probably died prior to Sept. 1, 1689, when there are records of which of his sons did, and did not appear to sign the oath of allegiance (to William & Mary).
The following references have been cited for some of the above information, and may be of future interest to any caring to expand this genealogy:
Doc. Hist. of New York, Vol. I, page 173 and others
Sylvester's History of Ulster County
Schoonmaker's History of Kingston
N.Y.G. & B. Record 1871, p. 145 etc...
Children of Adrian Gerritsen and Agatha Jans Spruyt van Vliet...
Gerrit, or Gerard...
Jan, or John b. about 1650 in the Province of Utrecht...
Dirck b. about 1651 in the Province of Utrecht...
Gertruyd b. about 1654 in the Province of Utrecht...
Machteld b. about 1655 in the Province of Utrecht" (1)
"The "Trouw sailed again on her return to New Amsterdam, March 21, 1662, under the command of Capt. Jan Jansen Bestevan, and arrived on June 13, following, when six pounds of powder were fired (as a salute). Among the passengers on this voyage were Adrian Gerritsen, agriculturist, from the Province of Utrecht, with his wife and five children, aged thirteen, twelve, eleven, eight and seven years. That he was the Adrian Gerritsen, or Adrian Gerritsen Van Vliet, who shortly after appears at "the Esopus" (Kingston), there can be no doubt. At marriage some of his children are recorded as "geboren in't Stigt Van Uytrecht" (born in the Diocese of Utrecht). In the Indian attack of June, 1663, a daughter of Adrian was one of the prisoners taken, but was soon recovered with the rest. On April 28, 1667, Adrian signed, with others, reasons for being in arms (in the context of the English conquest of New Netherlands, presumably). By grant and purchase Adrian became the owner of several parcels of land in Kingston and the adjacent parts of Ulster County [see Doc. Hist. of N.Y.; Sylvester's Hist. of Ulster County; Schoonmakerk's Hist. of Kingston; NYG&B Record, 1871, p. 145, &c]...
The wife of Adrian was Agatha Jans Spruyt...
There five children were:
(1) Gerrit, or Gerard...
(2) Jan (or John)...
(3) Dirck...
(4) Geertruyd...
(5) Machteld..." (2)
1) Van Vliet Genealogy p. 5-6
2) Commemorative Biographical Record of Dutchess County, New York; (J.H. Beers 1897 Chicago) p. 409

[NI0811] His existence is entirely speculative. It is based on the continuation of the the name Jan and the fact that I am connecting Jan Adriansen van Vliet to Martha Van Vleet, through her supposed father John and on the fact that most Van Vleets from Ulster county seem to be descendants of Jan Adriansen.

A pedigree chart of Medora Van Fleet shows his birth date as November 16, 1694 and marriage to Jesyntjen Swartwout, daughter of Thomas Swartwout on March 11, 1752 and his death in Minisink in July 1775. It also appears to show another wife named Decker. I will have her as the mother of Jan Van Fleet, my speculative ancestor of Martha Van Vleet.

[NI0817] The fact that she and six of her children were baptised in 1714 may indicate a religious conversion. The fact that her husband John Barto was not included is curious.

[NI0819] "Jan, or John b. about 1650 in the Province of Utrecht; mar. Judith, daughter of Frederick Hussey, and English settler and large landholder at Kingston.
The Kingston records of September 1, 1689 indicate that "John van ffliet" (son of Adrian), took the oath of allegiance. He and his family remained in Ulster County, where his parents had settled so little more is given in the history of Dutchess County (CBR)." (1)
According to a pedigree chart Medora Van Fleet of Polk County, Florida, he was born in Woerden, Netherlands and married on October 4, 1684.
1) Van Vliet Genealogy p. 6

[NI0826] "Francis Barteau or Breteau came from Holland in 1657 according to Bairds Hugenot Emigration to America, Vol. II, page 80.
According to Obadiah Barto of Hempstead, Long Island, he came from Paris, France; as he was early associated with Claud LeMaistre, who was a carpenter of Harlem and Flatbush. Francis may have been a carpenter.
Francis Barteau appeared at Harlem, New York in 1676 as a petitioner, with others for land, which being denied he went to Flushing, Long Island and there made in 1680 a similar application, stating that he had nine children.
In 1698 he was named on the census of Flushing where the name is spelled as pronounced, Francis Burto, wife Mary and three children, Francis, John and Abigail.
For the calender of New York (MSS. land papers) mention is made of Francis Breteau fo Flushing, Long Island in 1680.
In the Documentary History of New York, September 29, 1683, Francis Breteau had the following taxable property:
Upland............ 12 acres
Meadows........ 5 acres
Horses............. 3
Oxen............... 2
Cows............... 3
Swine.............. 1
Sheep.............. 8
Taxes paid....... 9s, 3d.
In 1683 Francis Barto is mentioned on the Government Organ's patent of Flushing. See Queens County Illustrated, page 75. Also see Rikes History of Harlem and the Bartoo Genealogy and Supplement, pages 205-297.
I. Francis Barteau came from Paris, France to New York in 1657. He lived and died at Flushing, Long Island. Of Mary, his wife, he begat nine children in the second generation, three of whom are postively known.
1. Francis Barteau
2. John Barteau
3. Abigail Barteau
4. Jane Barteau (?)
5. Sarah Barteau (?)
6. Daniel Barteau (?)" (1)
Handwritten note in Bartow Geneaology
"Francois Berteau born say in 1655 at Harlem in 1676"
Bartow Genealogy, p. 204 "Henry D. Barto of Trumansburgh, N.Y. supplied following came with brother John from Paris and settled at Huntington, L.I. Name spelled Barteaux in an old will. Married as a second wife, a lady who came as companion of the wife of James Morris, Governor of Pennsylvania. She was born 1675 and died 1779."
"Date: Tue Dec 17 06:56:39 1996
Name: Eugene Bartoo
E- mail: ebartoo@cecasun.utc.edu
Address: 4115 St. Elmo Avenue Chattanooga, TN 37409
Surname of Immigrant: Barteau
Given name(s) of Immigrant: Francis
Origin of Immigrant: France, probably Paris
Name of Ship: ?
Arrival Date: 1657

Immigrant's Date & Place of Birth: c.1635 Paris France
Immigrant's Date & Place of Death: ?
Immigrant's Spouse: Mary
Source of Information: Bartoo genealogy; Bairds v.2 pg.80; Doc. Hist. of NY; etc.
Immigrant's Children: 1.Francis - Mrs. James Morris (2nd wife)
2.John - Elizabeth
3.Abigail
4.Jane(?)
5.Sarah(?)
Notes: Date of arrival in Bairds vol.2, pg. 80. Early associated with Claud LeMaistre, carpenter in Harlem. Petitioner in Harlem for land in 1676; denied. Petitioner in Flushing for land in 1680; granted. Named on census in Flushing, 1698, name spelled phonetically "Burto". Mention in calendar of New York (mss. land papers) in 1680 and Documentary History of NY, 29 Sept 1683. See also Govt Organ's Patent of Flushing, Queens Co. Illus. pg.75, Rikes Hist. of Harlem. Had nine children. I have complete genealogy of second child, John. Name changed to Barto with John (second child). John had 7 children. Fifth child Francis (1711-1786) had 9 children. Second child of Francis, Silas (31May1742-?Nov1831), used name Bartoo" (2)
"I. Francis1 BARTO (BARTEAU) son of Francis and Mary BARTEAU was born in
1668 at Paris, France. He died on 25 March 1725 at NY. He married 2nd Mrs.
MORRIS, widow of James MORRIS of London. She was born 1675 and died 1779. " (3)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) The Olive Tree Genealogy: 17th Century Immigrants to New York http://www.rootsweb.com/~ote/17th/dny_6.htm
3) e-mail of 12/8/98 from Betty Ralph

Other Barteau researchers:
Pamela Denton (MYTB04B-Prodigy)
Jean Masco (74472,2206-Compuserve)
Ruth Thoden (Ruththoden@delphi.com))

[NI0831] "Wheeler, George W. & Elizabeth A. Bennett. 25 Mar 1860. M[arriage] A[ffidavit], [original] R[eturns], [Volume] D-[p. 118]" (2)
1860 Census, Greenup County, Kentucky
#302 George W. Wheeler 21 M Ohio day laborer married within year
Elizabeth " 19 F Ohio (Bennett, m. 3/25/1860)
William " 19 M Ohio day laborer
Amanda " 17 F Ohio inmate
Luster Davis 23 M Ohio day laborer
According to his daughter Olivia, "He was born in Ohio, lived for some years in Missouri, then pioneered in Kansas, before coming to Colorado. He was a quiet sincere man, honest in his dealings with all men, a kind husband and a good father. While in Missouri, he was a contractor of fuel for the steel mills near Leasburg. He moved his family to western Kansas in a covered wagon, and then some five years later moved on to Colorado by covered wagon. In his later years he and Elisabeth moved back to Willard, Missouri, but was living with his daughters in Colorado at the time of his death."
Wheelersburg, Ohio is on the Ohio River near the Scioto River and the Hocking Valley R.R., not far from West Virginia.
From the birthplaces of his children we can tell something of his movements and occupations. His oldest daughter, Ada, was born in Boone Furnace, Kentucky in early 1861. He was in Springfield, Kentucky in 1862. Springfield is in Central Kentucky near Lebanon. In 1864 he was living in Scioto Furnace, Ohio, very close to Wheelersburg.
"Boone Furnace
Boone Furnace was built on Grassy Creek, a westerly branch of Tygarts Creek,
in Carter County, Kentucky. Construction started in April 1856. Colonel Sebastian Eifort, Thomas Price and John Eifort were the original owners. The first blast was July 4, 1857, the style of the company then being Eifort, Watkins and Co.
Disaster struck the same month as the blow-in. July 25 the coal house, bridge house and cast house burned. There was a $4,000 loss.
Soon afterward Hy Pogue put in 7,000 acres of land to become a partner, and later Thad Bennett, L. Dodge, Eli Glover and H.B. Smith joined the firm. [This Thad Bennett may be George Wheeler's uncle.] The land holdings in 1864 totalled 22,000 acres, at that time an estate sufficient to support two additional furnaces.
The limestone ores in Kentucky often presented great variations in thickness. But on the Boone Furnace lands, at the head of Grassy Creek on a ridge forming the divide between the waters of Tygarts and Kinnikenick Creeks, the limestone occurred regularly from fifteen inches to two feet in thickness and often much thicker in wide pockets. At the Graham bank, near Willard, the ore was found in the usual rolls, some two to four feet thick. This explained, no doubt, the location of the furnace at this point. [It may be that Willard, Missouri, where both George and his father-in-law end up took its name from this Willard.]" (1)
He may have been a Civil War soldier in 1862-64. From 1864/5 to 1868/69 he was in Rockyfork, Ohio. I have not been able to locate Rockyfork, but there is a Rocky Fork Lake near Hillsboro (Hillsborough) in southern Ohio not far from Wheelersburg.
His first child born in Missouri was born in St. Clair, Franklin County on the Missouri River just west of St. Louis. He moved there after 1868, but before 1870. By 1874 he was in Hamilton, Caldwell County, east of St. Joseph. He was there until at least 1876. By 1879 he is in Leasburg, Crawford County, in eastern Missouri, halfway between St. Louis and Rolla. In 1883 he is in Coffeyton (Coffey?), Daviess County, in western Missouri near Hamilton. His last years were spent in Willard, Greene County, near Springfield, where his daughter Rosina died in 1913.
Leasburg and St. Clair are apparently in an iron mining and steel mill area. Near Leasburg is Steelville and near St. Clair is Iron Hill.

Posted by Steve Jackson on Thu, 13 Aug 19988
Lt. Col. William Henry Eifort, 2nd Kentucky Cavalry (US), was killed in action at Triune, Tennessee, September 4, 1864. He was the son of Sebastian and Rachel (Jackson) Eifort of Greenup County, Kentucky. I am a relative and would like to locate where he is buried.
In a request for leave of absence, dated December 5, 1863, William states his post office address as Boone Furnace, Carter County, Kentucky. A search of Stones River National Cemetery records had no results.
Please advise if you have information. Thank you.
1) Rist, Donald E.; Kentucky Iron Furnaces of the Hanging Rock Iron Region (Hanging Rock Press, Ashland, Kentucky 1978) p. 38
2) Scioto County Marriages (see Thaddeus Bennett) p. 144

[NI0843] There is an Isaac Wheeler living in Madison Township in Scioto County, Ohio in the 1830 Census.
"Madison Township...
Wallace Mill is in the southeast corner of the Township on Rocky Fork, a branch of the Little Scioto river. It was built in 1840, by John White and afterwards became the property of Isaac Wheeler who sold it to William Wheeler. In 1870, Samuel Wallace bought the mill." (3)
"P. 407 Enoch Williams vs. Nathan Wheeler, Isaac Wheeler and the Scioto Iron Company - In Chancery 14 Mar. 1843 Plaintiff and James McCarty in 1841 agreed to deliver 100,000 bushels of charcoal to the Iron Company. Wheelers took over the contract, but he has not been paid for his share of work." (2)
"Wheeler, Isaac H. & Sarah Burt. Her father Benjamin Burt Jr. cons[ent] 16 Feb. 1837. M[arriage] A[ffidavit], R[eturn], A-230.
Wheeler, Isaac H. & Elizabeth Burt. 22 Nov. 1856. R[eturn], D-42." (5)
He married the sister of Sarah Burt, Elizabeth, on 22 Nov 1856 and had four more children with her.
"he seems to moved from Ohio to Missouri and back to Ohio after Sarah died and before he married Elizabeth." (1)
He was Sheriff of Scioto County 1844-47 and County Commissioner of Scioto County in 1866. He was probably a Republican, as was his brother Levi.
Sources: Scioto County and Pioneer Records of Southern Ohio
History of Lower Sciota Valley
His family moved to Ohio in 1820.
"Death of a Scioto County Pioneer
Isaac Wheeler, for many years a resident of Harrison township, this county, died at St. Clair, Mo., on the 25th of August, of pneumonia, after an illness of but two weeks. He was first taken with remittent fever, and was attacked with pneumonia during the course of the disease. He was born in the East, Sept. 7th, 1815, and with his father Luther Wheeler, emigrated to this county in his boyhood days. He was twice married, his first wife being Miss Sarah Burt, who died about twenty years ago. His second wife, Elizabeth, is a sister of his first companion, and survives him. He leaves twelve children, seven of whom were born to his first wife.
He removed to Missouri about five years ago, but on account of ill health, the family came back to Scioto county, and last Spring, having recovered, they moved back to the vicinity of their Missouri farm.
Mr. Wheeler was at one time Sheriff, and at another time Commissioner of Scioto county. It will be remembered that the investigating Committee of this county, in preparing statements of amounts drawn by the different Commissioners, among others, by their construction of the laws, had a small balance charged to him. Mr. Wheeler was deeply pained at the publication of the report, and had just completed a lengthy statement for publication in our county papers to set him right among his people. He had commenced copying it and revising it for publication, when he was taken down. He was forced to take this course by the silence with which a letter to Mr. Damarin, one of the investigating Committee, was received. He had addressed a long letter to that gentleman, pointing out where the Committee had done him injustice, and requesting its publication, but receiving no reply he set about to make his own defense, when death came and left the unfinished work in his hands." (4)
I was unable to find a tombstone for Wheeler in the St. Clair area. I found one listing for "Isaac H. Wheeler, b. 13 Feb 1859 d. 16 Mar 1908" buried in the Methodist/IOOF Cemetery in St. Clair. I could not find that tombstone either.
Isaac Hastings Wheeler died in Springfield, Missouri and was transported for burial to St. Clair, Missouri. (6)
"Subject* 01 Sep 1815 Isaac Hastings WHEELER (67) (In Missouri by 1852 with his wife Sarah and family)
BurialSite* __ ___ ____ Wheeler farm cem, Franklin Co, MO (This is the probable site.There is evidence of burials on the farm. Several places in close proximity where the ground is dished in. There are no stones save what looks like a footstone of field rock. This site is in the NW 1/4 of Section 4 TS 41N R1E, near the Meramec River. Picture of the site taken in1983).
Occupation*: __ ___ ____ (Was a miller and farmer. Was a miller in Ohio. Part owner of Harrison Mill with his brothers Nathan and Levi Wheeler. The mill was in Sect. 12 TS 3N R20W in Scioto Co., OH. In Missouri, he was a farmer). Was the sheriff of Scioto Co., OH 1844-1846. Was a County Comissioner of Scioto Co., OH in 1866).
Birth* 01 Sep 1815 NH (Probably born in Grafton Co. Date could be 07 Sept).<1>
Marriage* 16 Feb 1837 Sara BURT (68) (1819-1852); Scioto Co, OH (With the consent of her father, Benjamin Burt).<2>
Census* __ ___ 1840 Scioto Co, OH.<3>
Land Rec* 01 Jul 1845 Scioto Co, OH.<4>
Land Rec: 01 Nov 1846 Scioto Co, OH.<5>
Census* 15 Oct 1850 Sara BURT (68) (1819-1852)<6>
Death* 25 Aug 1875 Franklin Co, MO.<7>
Father* Luther WHEELER (72) (1782-1858)
Mother* Rebecca HASTINGS (73) (1784-1857)
__________________________________________________________________________

Marriage*: 22 Nov 1856 Scioto Co, OH.<8>
Census* __ ___ 1860 Harrison TS, Scioto Co, OH.<9>
Land Rec* 23 Apr 1868 Scioto Co, OH (Harrison Mill Property-sold to his brothers Nathan and Levi).<10>
Probate* 01 Oct 1875 Union, Franklin Co, MO (Probate extended over several years. Includes litigation by William H. Wheeler, son/nephew of Elizabeth Wheeler, which began in 1881. Real property was sold by the court on 09 Mar 1888).<11>,<12>
__________________________________________________________________________

Spouse* Elizabeth A BURT (69)
BurialSite* __ ___ ____ Whitworth Family cem Calvey TS T43N R2E S25?, Franklin Co, MO? (Burial site is probable, since this is where her 2nd husband was buried. There is no visible stone).
Birth* __ ___ 1834 Scioto Co, OH.
Census* __ ___ 1880 Franklin Co, MO.<13>
Marriage*: 09 Dec 1896 James WHITWORTH? (5473) (21 Nov 1829-06 Aug 1912); Franklin Co, MO (09 Dec could be the license date and 24 Dec could actually be the marriage date. It is also possible that this is not the right person, but Leah (Wheeler)Mercer said to me that her grandmother stayed with her other husband until he went blind. This seems to fit information provided in the Whitworth documents which mentions "blind Jim").<14>
Death* c __ ___ 1912 Franklin Co, MO (This date is an estimate taken from the death of her 2nd husband in 1912. There is no death record in Franklin Co., MO. Leah (Wheeler) Mercer said that her grandmother stayed with her blind husband until he died. She probably died soon afterward).
Father* Benjamin F BURT Jr (1247) (12 Jul 1792-1878)
Mother* Elizabeth SWAAR (1248) (09 Jun 1800-17 Mar 1864)
__________________________________________________________________________

Six Children
__________________________________________________________________________

1/M Charles Demetrius WHEELER (15)
Birth* 01 May 1857 Wheelersburg, Scioto Co, OH (Book and Page data missing).<15>,<16>
Marriage* 28 Nov 1882 Mary Elizabeth BREWER (16) (31 Jul 1864-22 Sep 1932); St. Clair, Franklin Co, MO.<17>
Death* 03 Apr 1931 St Louis, MO.<18>,<19>
__________________________________________________________________________

2/M Isaac H WHEELER (852) (May have been divorced or his wife may have died. This conclusion drawn from the fact that his wife was not with him and his child lived with her cousin in Springfield)
Birth* 13 Feb 1859 Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 24 Feb 1892 Eunice MCCOULLOUGH (853) (circa 1872- ); St Clair, Franklin Co, MO (Move to Webb City, MO soon after the marriage).<20>
Death* 16 Apr 1908 Springfield, Greene Co, MO.
__________________________________________________________________________

3/M Kayle WHEELER (857)
Birth* __ ___ 1860 Scioto Co, OH.
Death* a __ ___ 1880 Franklin Co, MO (Death location is probable. His family(him included) are in Franklin Co in the 1880 census).
__________________________________________________________________________

4/M Samuel Edward WHEELER (856) (Disapeared from Sciotoville, OH 30 Mar 1880. The disapearance is detailed in a notebook belonging to his brother, Charles D. Wheeler. the notebook is in the hands of Charles Mercer. Not with the family in the 1880 census)
Birth* __ ___ 1865 Scioto Co, OH.
__________________________________________________________________________

5/F Dora WHEELER (854)
Birth* __ ___ 1870 OH.
Death* a __ ___ 1880 Franklin Co, MO (Death location is probable. Her family (including her) are in the 1880 census for Franklin Co).
__________________________________________________________________________

?/F Belle WHEELER (855) (The existence of this child is identified by Nola (Wheeler)Braswell in a conversation with Charles Mercer)
Birth* __ ___ ____ MO or OH?.
Death* __ ___ ____ Franklin Co, MO (Probably died young.) __________________________________________________________________________

Charles R. Mercer, 240 S. Greentrails Dr., Chesterfield, MO 63017-2925 USA, (chasbo19@idt.net), 03 Sep 19988
__________________________________________________________________________

Marriage* 16 Feb 1837 Scioto Co, OH (With the consent of her father, Benjamin Burt).<31>
Census* 15 Oct 1850 <32>
__________________________________________________________________________

Spouse* Sara BURT (68)
Burial Site* __ ___ ____ Old Wheelersburg cem, Wheelersburg, Scioto Co, OH.
Birth* __ ___ 1819 Scioto Co, OH.
Death* __ ___ 1852 (Death was after 1852-Probably in Scioto Co, OH).
Father* Benjamin F BURT Jr (1247) (12 Jul 1792-1878)
Mother* Elizabeth SWAAR (1248) (09 Jun 1800-17 Mar 1864)
__________________________________________________________________________

Nine Children
__________________________________________________________________________

1/M Henry C WHEELER (858)
Birth* __ Nov 1837 Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 18 Jan 1862 Ruth Ann CUNNINGHAM (859) (Mar 1844-1914); Scioto Co, OH.<33>
Death: 14 Jun 1915 Hamilton Co, OH (This is a tentative identification. Vol. 1670 Cert #33599. Note: there is no death record in Scioto Co).
__________________________________________________________________________

2/M George Washington WHEELER (860)
Birth* __ May 1839 Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 25 Mar 1860 Elizabeth A BENNETT (861) (Jul 1840-1927); Scioto Co, OH.<34>
Death* __ ___ 1915 Hayden, Routt Co, CO.
__________________________________________________________________________

3/M William Harrison WHEELER (872)
Birth* 14 Feb 1841 Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 21 Jan 1865 Rhoda Ann TAYLOR (873) (05 May 1840-19 Jul 1913)
Death* 17 Nov 1896 Sciotoville, Scioto Co, OH.
Probate* __ ___ 1897 Scioto Co, OH.<35>
__________________________________________________________________________

4/F Amanda WHEELER (867)
Birth* 06 Oct 1842 Franklin Co, MO (Birth place taken from 1850 census where she was found with her father and mother in Franklin Co., MO).
Marriage* 11 Jan 1865 William Henry MCCURDY Sr (868) (03 Apr 1840-03 Dec 1914)
Death* 04 Aug 1903 Wheelersburg, Scioto Co, OH.<36>
__________________________________________________________________________

5/F Urania WHEELER (870)
Birth* __ ___ 1844 Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 23 Mar 1865 John T MILLER (871) (circa 1839-1915); Scioto Co, OH.<37>
__________________________________________________________________________

6/M Benjamin Franklin WHEELER (862)
Birth* 13 Oct 1846 Wheelersbirg, Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 25 Aug 1872 Annie Pamela WALLS (863) (11 Nov 1853-06 Nov 1938); Crawford Co, MO.
Death* 23 Dec 1901 Aurora, Lawrence Co, MO.<38>
__________________________________________________________________________

7/F Sophia WHEELER (866)
Birth* 06 Oct 1848 Scioto Co, OH.
Death* 20 Apr 1849 Scioto Co, OH (Not with family in Franklin Co., MO in the 1850 census).
__________________________________________________________________________

8/M Nathan WHEELER (869)
Birth* 20 Jun 1850 Franklin Co, MO (Birth place is taken from the 1850 census data).
Death* 14 Aug 1851 Franklin Co, MO.<39>
__________________________________________________________________________

9/F Maria A WHEELER (864)<40>
Birth* 04 Feb 1852 MO.
Marriage* 27 Sep 1871 James Boone RAY Jr MD (865) (26 Jan 1846-07 Apr 1915)
Death* 23 Nov 1932 Scioto Co, OH.<41>
__________________________________________________________________________

Charles R. Mercer, 240 S. Greentrails Dr., Chesterfield, MO 63017-2925 USA, (chasbo19@idt.net), 03 Sep 19988

Endnotes


**ENDNOTES**

<1>:Obituary Portsmouth Times, (Portsmouth OH: The Portsmouth Times,04 Sep 1875), ;
Charles Richard MERCER.
<2>:Marriage Rec Scioto Co OH Vol A, 16 Feb 1837, 230, Scioto Co. Ohio Court House.
<3>:1840 Census Scioto Co OH Pg117A&B, National Archives-General Services
Administration-NARA.
<4>:Land Rec Scioto Co-USA Cash Entry Certificate, n.d., Certificate #12567 dated 01 Jul
1845. E1/2 SE1/4 S36 T2N R21W-73 34/100 Acres, Down loaded via internet from the BLM
internet site. http://www.glorecords.blm.gov, Bureau of Land Management-Department of the
Interior.
<5>:Land Rec Scioto Co-USA, Cetrificate #12748 dated 01 Nov 1846 SW1/4 NE1/4 S1 T1N R21W
38 66/100 Acres.
Certificate 12749 dated 01 Nov 1846 SW1/4 SE1/4 S31 T3N R20W 33 79/100 Acres.
<6>:1850 Census Franklin Co MO Dist31 Fam999, St. Louis MO Public Library.
<7>:Obituary Portsmouth Times, .
<8>:Marriage Rec Scioto Co OH Book D-Spouse #1, Nov 1856, 42, Scioto Co. Ohio Court House.
<9>:1860 Census Scioto Co OH Harrison TS Ln 30, 482, National Archives-General Services
Administration-NARA.
<10>:Land Rec Scioto Co OH dated 23 Apr 1868 Deed Bk___(Harrison Mill), 23 Apr 1868, 355,
Scioto Co. Ohio Court House.
<11>:Probate Rec Franklin Co MO Box "W"-includes Administrators Bond, 1880, , Franklin
County MO Probate Court.
<12>:Administrators Sale of Real Estate, (Union, MO: Franklin Co Record,23 Feb 1888), ;
Four Rivers Genealogical Society.
<13>:1880 Census Franklin Co MO Central TS Ed72 Ln 22, 22, St. Louis MO Public Library.
<14>:Marriage Rec 2nd Spouse Franklin Co MO BkH Pg249?, n.d., Franklin County, MO
Courthouse Recorders Office.
<15>:Birth Rec Scioto Co Oh Bk (tbd) 01 May 1857 , n.d., 11, Scioto Co. Ohio Court House.
<16>:Bible Rec of Mary E Wheeler (; Unknown, Unknown, Charles Richard MERCER.
<17>:Marriage Rec Franklin Co MO Bk E entry #1, n.d., 149, Franklin County, MO Courthouse
Recorders Office.
<18>:Death Cert. MO Bd of Health Reg No.4101 dtd 03 Apr 1931, n.d., , Missouri State Board
of Health-Bureau of Vital Statistics.
<19>:Obit-Leadbelt News of St Francois Co., MO, (Flat River, MO: Lead Belt News of St
Francois Co MO,10 Apr 1931), ; Charles Richard MERCER.
<20>:Marriage Rec Franklin Co MO 1892 Bk40 Pg105, n.d., Franklin County, MO Courthouse
Recorders Office.
<21>:Obituary Portsmouth Times, .
<22>:1840 Census Scioto Co.
<23>:Land Rec Scioto Co-USA, Certificate #12567 dated 01 Jul 1845. E1/2 SE1/4 S36 T2N
R21W-73 34/100 Acres.
<24>:Land Rec Scioto Co-USA, Cetrificate #12748 dated 01 Nov 1846 SW1/4 NE1/4 S1 T1N R21W
38 66/100 Acres.
Certificate 12749 dated 01 Nov 1846 SW1/4 SE1/4 S31 T3N R20W 33 79/100 Acres.
<25>:Marriage Rec Scioto Co, 42.
<26>:1860 Census Scioto Co, 482.
<27>:Land Rec Scioto Co, 355.
<28>:Obituary Portsmouth Times, .
<29>:Probate Rec Franklin Co, .
<30>:Administrators Sale of Real, .
<31>:Marriage Rec Scioto Co, 230.
<32>:1850 Census Franklin Co.
<33>:Marriage Rec Scioto Co OH Bk D Pg154, n.d., Scioto Co. Ohio Court House.
<34>:Marriage Rec Scioto Co OH Bk D Pg118, n.d., Scioto Co. Ohio Court House.
<35>:Probate Rec Scioto Co OH Case/Will #7275, 1897, , Scioto Co. Ohio Court House.
<36>:Obit-Scioto County Newspaper, (Portsmouth, OH:04 Aug 1903), ; Charles Richard MERCER.
<37>:Marriage Rec Scioto Co OH Bk 1 Pg193, n.d., Scioto Co. Ohio Court House.
<38>:Paxton Funeral Home rec-Springfield MO,, Charles Richard MERCER.
<39>:_________, Stone says Age 1yr 1mo 25days-see picture in (.
<40>:Letters and photographs of the Ray family., circa 1910, Charles Richard MERCER.
<41>:Death Rec Scioto Co OH Vol 17062 Cert # 7583, n.d., , Ohio State Historical Scoiety
Archives and Library.
Charles R. Mercer, 240 S. Greentrails Dr., Chesterfield, MO 63017-2925 USA,
(chasbo19@idt.net), 03 Sep 1998""

1) Arlene Whiteman
2) Shoemaker, Caryn R.; Early Court Records of Scioto County, Ohio (Minford, Ohio April 1981) Vol.2 p. 96
3) A History of Scioto County, p. 379
4) Portsmouth Times, September 4, 1875
5) Scioto County Marriages p. 144
6) Charles R. Mercer, 240 S. Greentrails Dr., Chesterfield, MO 63017-2915 e-mail of 9/1/98 >
Wheeler Researchers (Portsmouth Library files):
Regina Diamond Tackett
Rt. 4, Box 10230
Louisa, KY 41230
Mary Meadows Crabtree
P.O. Box 85
Portsmouth, OH 45662
Possible Source:
Washington Historical Society
113 E. 4th St.
Washington, MO 63090
Tel. 314-239-0280
Cemetery History of Franklin Co., MO
Ken Middleton 314-629-2498
Ken Middleton
Tel. 629-2498

[NI0844] Died between 1852 and 1856. Last child born in 1852 and husband Isaac married her sister Elizabeth on 22 Nov 1856.

[NI0851] "Harrison Township...
Officers...
The first election in the Township was held at the home of Daniel White on the first Monday of May, 1832...
Justices... Luther Wheeler." (1)
"[Luther Wheeler] held the office of Justice of the Peace continuing for twenty years." (3)
"Luther and Rebecca (Hastings) Wheeler, natives of New Hampshire, who came to Ohio in 1820, and located near Wheelersburg, where [Rebecca] died in 1857 and [Luther] in 1858. They reared a family of four children --- Nathan, Isaac, Martha and Levi." (2)
Luther Wheeler and Abigail Wheeler (probably his mother) were living in Porter Township, Scioto Co., Ohio according to the 1830 census. Benjamin Burt, Jr. (probably the brother of his daughter-in-law, Sarah) was also living there.
Came to Ohio with his wife and two older children in 1820 and lived there until his death in 1858. It appears that his father and mother and his brother and sister, Levi and Almira went at the same time.
Counted in the 1850 Census Scioto County p. 490
1)Evans, Nelson; A History of Scioto County, Ohio together with a Pioneer Record of Southern Ohio (Portsmouth, Ohio 1903) p. 374
2) History of Lower Scioto Valley p. 330
3) Ibid., p. 364

[NI0860] Possible ancestry (from GenForum postings by Dennis Norton (denorton@nortonsflowers.com) and Jeannie Pepper (jeanniepepper@juno.com) ) :
William Norton b. 1535 Whitelackington, Somerset, England
Unknown Norton
Nicholas Norton b. 1610
Joseph Norton
Ruth Norton
Benjamin Norton
Jeannie Pepper offered to help. (1/27/1999)

[NI0861] "Elizabeth (Parkhurst), daughter of George Parkhurst & Phebe ---, of Ipswich, England. Res. for family: West Tisbury, MA." (1)
" Suffolk
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Parkhurst, George Ipswich Watertown NEGR 68/
"George PARKHURST
b. 1588, Ipswich, Suffolk, England
occ.
edu.
rel.
d. bef 1695, or near Watertown, Middlesex, MA
br.
res.
m. abt 1611, Ipswich, Suffolk, England
Phebe LEET
. b. abt 1590, or near Ipswich, Suffolk, England
occ.
edu.
rel.
d. abt 1643, or near Watertown, Middlesex, MA
br.
res. Parkhurst Manor,Guilford,Surry,England

ChildrenPhebe PARKHURST
Mary PARKHURST
Deborah PARKHURST
Elizabeth PARKHURST
" (2)
1) Luce Genealogy p. 17
2)

[NI0872] "Remember Luce... b. ca. 1670; d. 31 Jan 1739, age 69; m. ca. 1688, Samuel Merry... They resided at Chilmark, Chickemmoo, MA;..." (1)
1) Luce Genealogy, p. 17
A picture of her tombstone in West Tisbury is at West Tisbury Village Cemetery .

[NI0873] Info on marriage from "The Kelloggs", see husband.

[NI0875] "(Nathaniel Kellogg was) present at an (Baptist) ordination council, 17 Dec. 1788, at which his father-in-law and his brother-in-law, Elder Jeduthan Gray, were present." (1)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 250

[NI0878] Children:
Judith Luce
Henry Luce
Samuel Luce b. 1692 Martha's Vineyard
Jonathan Luce b. 1696 Martha's Vineyard
Desire Luce b. 1700 Martha's Vineyard
Mary Luce b. 1701 Martha's Vineyard
Mercy Luce b. 1703 Martha's Vineyard (1)
"Robert Luce...
b. ca. 1667 possibly Scituate, Plymouth Co., MA; res. of Tisbury, Dukes Co., MA. He died by drowning, between 1711 & 1714 while sailing between Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket; he m. ca. 1684/7, Desire (Norton??), she b.ca. 1670 pos. Tisbury, MA. (Banks' "Hist. of Martha's Vineyard", Vol. III, p. 249: simply says he married Desire ----) The Norton last name came from a long forgotten source in 1973/76; and there is no proof to support it.
Luce Children:
Judith b. 22 Jul 1689
Henry b. 28 Mar 1690/91
Samuel b. 12 Apr 1692
Jonathan b. 7 Jan 1696
Desire b. 5 May 1700
Mary b. 22 Jul 1701
Mercy/Marcy b. 15 Dec 1703
Source: Banks' "Hist. of Martha's Vineyard", Vol. III, p. 249
L.D.S. Archive Rec.: Aleen H. Hansen of Hooper, UT.
Vol. I, p. 39; Vol. I, p. 137 copied from Dukes Co. Probate Records by Richard L. Pease, transcribed 25 Aug 1989, by C.H. Mayhew, D.C.H.S." (2)
1) Luce document in NYPL
2) Luce Genealogy p. 17

[NI0879] "children of Thomas Bryan, bapt. at Aylesbury (Bucks), Elizabeth Nov. 2, 1600, Alexander Sept 9, 1602, Frances March 29, 1604 and Mary Apr 19, 1606...
(this) implies that Mary, wife of Richard Platt, was also sister (of Sarah Astwood) and a relative of Alexander Bryan." (1)
1) Platt Genealogy p. 4b (see Mary Platt)

[NI0883] "Thankful Weller, b 10/15/1674 who married Nehemiah Loomis is the dau. of Nathaniel Weller and Deliverance Hanchett. Nathaniel was bapt. 7/15/1648 at Windsor, d 11/1711, age 63. Deliverance d 11/22/1711, possibly same time as Nathaniel? Nathaniel is the son of Richard Weller and Ann Wilson." (1)
1) Genealogical Notes by Dewey per Judy Lewis
Weller researchers:
Judy Lewis (GYYU98A-Prodigy)

[NI0890] "John Belden married Lydia Standish, daughter of Thomas and Susanna Standish" (1)
(Standishes of Wethersfield, CT)...
Susannah, wife of Thomas, d. 11/30/1692 ae 68 yr...
Thomas, d. 12/5/1692, ae 80 yr" (2)
1) Belden and Allied Families; Americana Illustrated; Fourth Quarter 1919 Vol. XIII p. 394
2)McIntosh, Walter H., The Standish Families Compendium for Mayflower Research (1981) p. 65

[NI0898] "The place of business of Barent Otsen (or Otsz), was then on Broad Street (Breestraat), on which was the space called the Ox Market (Ossemarct), south of the Old Regulator's gate (Oude Regulierspoort
). He had established himself in Amsterdam as a printer in 1612, and in 1614, published the once popular but now rare work (a small octavo) titled the Great Riddle Book ('T Groote Raedteel Boek). In
1626 he printed for C.L. van der Plasse the precious duodecimo, the Golden Harp (de Gulde Harpe), containing the Little Songs de Liedekens), composed by Karel van Mander. On October 21, 1619, he was
enrolled a member of the Booksellers' Guild (Boekverkoopersgilde) of Amsterdam. His trade device is embellished wit his initials and several ecclesiastical symbols." (1)
1) The Swartwout Chronicles (see Tomys) p. 54

[NI0900] He resided in Groningen, and probably died there. See son Tomys.
Children:
Wybrandt
Tomys b. 1607
Herman b. 1608
Aldert
"The Descendants and Ancestors of Roeloff
Swartwout of Holland and New York and
his Scandinavian Wife Eva Albertse Bratt
Surnames began to be passed down from one generation to the next generation in England and France about the Eleventh Century, and were used mainly for records of sale and wills. In the middle ages, the names of the seats of ancestral estates began to be used to designate the families possessing them. The name Swartwout, or Swartwolt, (literally meaning "Black Forest") originally was derived from a forest covered manor in Frisia (Northern Holland), now in the district of Ferwerderadeel, a municipality of the Netherlands in the province of Friesland. The inhabitants called it "het Zwartewoude" (the Black Forest), north of the city of Leeuwarden. This patrial manor was originally politically free.

The Frisians were a Germanic race who were already occupying the northern territory of Belgic Gaul when Julius Caesar invaded it in 57 BC. By that time they were far advanced in the methods of agriculture, and were also rich in cattle. They were known for their fair complexion, blue eyes, auburn hair, and great statures.

Some of the earliest possible Swartwout ancestors include:
Otto Swartewold, of Drenthe, was a member of the constitution of the arbitration commision in 1338. This constitution settled sectional disagreements by singing songs.
Johan Swartwolt (in 1580) and later Herman Swartwolt were Sworn Commons that selected citizens to be municipal officers.
Arent Swartwolt extinguished the flames enveloping the palisades protecting the gateway of the walled town of Steenwijk in 1580 when Spanish troops besieged it. In the Sixteenth Century several Swartwolts moved to Groningen, Holland due to the invasion of Frisia in 1500 by Albert, Duke of Saxony. These Swartwolts were engaged in the highly respectable business of brewing beer. They were members of the Brewer's Guild. Arent Swartwolt was admitted to the guild in 1546. Following his heroic deed in 1580, he was elected in 1581 as a courtier to represent the interests of the occupation in the General Council of the Guilds.
Rolef Swartwold of Groningen, Holland, The
first proven ancestor of the Swartwout family
The Swartwout \ Swartout family is decsended from Rolef (Roeloff / Ralph) Swartwout and his wife Catryna. Rolef, his wife, and his four children were residents of het Rech te Fath (the Straight Passage) in Groningen as early as September 21, 1616. The brick house that they lived in now has a sculpture of a face of a bearded man on the front wall. This house is on the east side of the street. Rolef owned half of the house, and also was a part owner of a dwelling at the north end of Aa-kerk street on the west side. In 1617, Rolef sold his home on the Straight Passage, and bought the entire home on Aa-kerk street (straat), originally Lamhuinge Street. This house was on the junction of Lamhuinge Street and the Cromme Fath (Crooked Passage), near the lofty tower of Aa kerk (a church). This building was believed to have been built in 1446, and was demolished in 1884. Rolef died as a widower in that city in 1634. He was certainly well along in years.
The children of Rolef and Catryna Swartwold are:
1. Wybrandt Swartwold
2. Tomys Swartwold born in Groningen in 1607
3. Hermanus Swartwold, born in Groningen in 1608
4. Aldert Swartwold " (1)
1) David R. Jansen's Northeast United States Genealogy Home Page

[NI0925] "Annetje Adrians remarried 1665 Jacob Jansen (van Etten) (from the same village as her first husband)"

[NI0961] According to History of Royalston, Mass.:
Probably the first of the Wheeler families to settle in Royalston was Lieut. Nathan Wheeler, who settled east of the Centre. He and his wife Mary organized with the Congregational Church in 1766. The records state that Levi, son of Nathan and Mary Wheeler was baptized April 2, 1775, and that David, son of Nathan and Mary, was born May 9, 1766. They removed to Lincoln, New Hampshire, about 1792.
According to Arlene Whiteman:
There is evidence that Nathan, Sr. served in the Revolutionary War as an Ensign and Lt. in the Mass. Line, attached to the 6th Mass. Regiment. [That Nathan is actually his son.]
He and his wife must have lived in Acton, Massachusetts from 1750 to 1766, since four of his children were born there.
Children:
Nathan
Luther DPOB 6 Aug 1754 Acton
Mary DPOB 6 May 1756 Acton
Miriam DPOB 5 Feb 1758 Acton
Amos DPOB 13 Sep 1761 Acton
David DPOB 13 Sep 1766 Royalston
Levi DPOB 2 Apr 1775 Royalston

[NI0966] "Ralph Shepard b. c. 1606 Stepney, Eng. died Malden, MA. 11 Sep 1693 son of Isaac Shepard of London. Ralph m. 21 May 1632 in London to Thankslord Perkins." (1)
"The American Genealogist, vol. 67, #1, p. 29, Jan. 1992 refers to FHL Film # 380, 154 as the source for the marriage of Thankslord Perkins to Ralph Shepard." (2)
1) Frank Bouley (FVPX24A-Prodigy)
2) Barbara Moore (RJTA10B-Prodigy)
Possible Source:
Shepard, Gerald Faulkner; The Shepard Families of New England (1972)

[NI0968] "Fayette County...
German Township...
Hoover, Jacob Males over 16 1; Females 6" (1)
Since this person has the same name as her first son and lived in the same township as her probable husband, it is likely to be her father.
GenForum Posting
"Posted by Pam Hoover-Muncie on September 23, 1998 at 12:56:09:
I came across an extensive listing of HOOVER decendants and thought I would share! The listing is alphabetized.
GENEALOGY OF ONE BRANCH OF THE HOOVER FAMILY, PART II, Decendents of Andrew (Andreas) Huber/Hoover, by Hulda Hoover McLean, Rancho del Oso, California, 1961.
Sorry....I did not copy down the reference number from the Indiana State Library-Genealogy section.
Looks like there is a Part I somewhere.
Hope this helps in your hunting!! "
GenForum Posting
Posted by Susan Greene on September 23, 1998 at 22:45:22::
In Reply to: HOOVER Family History posted by Pam Hoover-Muncie on September 23, 1998 at 12:56:09:
I own the book entitled "Genealogy of the Herbert Hoover Family" Part 1 of this book lists Ancestors of Herbert Hoover. Part 2 lists Descendants of Andrew Hoover. It was written by Hulda Hoover McLean and published in 1967. The Library of Congress Catalog Card Number is #67-19277 and was published by The Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace in Stanford, CA. "
1) 1790 Pennsylvania Census p. 107

[NI0985] "124. Lydia Wheeler (dau. of John Wheeler and Sarah Larkin), b. Oct 27, 1675; m. (1) May 19, 1692, Timothy Wheeler (2008); m. (2) April 21, 1720, Nathaniel Stow." (1)
1) Wheeler Genealogy (see Timothy Wheeler) p. 21

[NI0993] "107. John Wheeler, son of George (100) and Katherine ---. Born at Concord, Mass. Jan. 19, 1643; died Sept. 27, 1713. Married March 25, 1663/4, Sarah Larkin, who was born Jan. 12, 1647; died Aug. 12, 1725, dau. of Edward Larkin and Joanna (---) Larkin. He was made constable at Concord in 1684.
Children:
119. Samuel Wheeler, born July 6, 1664.
120. Sarah Wheeler, born Dec. 12, 1666.
121. Edward Wheeler, born July 17, 1669.
122. Joanna Wheeler, born Dec. 21, 1671.
123. Mary Wheeler, born Sept. 15, 1673.
124. Lydia Wheeler, born Oct. 27, 1675...
125. Esther Wheeler. born Oct. 1, 1678; m. May 5, 1698, Samuel Prescott.
126. Ebenezer Wheeler, born April 3, 1682.
127. Thankful Wheeler, born April 3, 1682; d. Nov. 1716; m. Oct. 5, 1699, Jonas Prescott." (1)
1) Wheeler Genealogy (see Timothy Wheeler) p. 21.

[NI0994] "John Wheeler... married March 25, 1663-4, Sarah Larkin, who was born Jan. 12, 1647; died Aug. 12, 1725, dau. of Edward Larkin and Joanna (---)" (1)
1) Wheeler Genealogy (see Timothy Wheeler) p. 21

[NI0996] " Bedfordshire
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Wheeler, Thomas Cranfield Concord Banks
Fairfield" (2)
"2000. Thomas Wheeler, of Concord, Mass. Of all of the Concord Wheelers whose descendants are readily traceable, Thomas Wheeler affords the fewest clues to his life-history. He was appointed Sergeant in 1642 and on the Concord Records of that time until his death, his name generally appears with that prefix, though sometimes he is called Thomas Wheeler, Sr. He is continually stated by genealogists to have been a nephew of Timothy Wheeler No. 1900, probably based upon the references by Timothy in his will to "my nephew Sergt. Thomas Wheeler," but by reference to that will the unlikelihood of this will be remarked in the fact that this Sergt. Thomas as far as known did not have a son Ephraim, and his son Joseph was dead when Timothy's will was made. All that has been found that can be stated of him as indisputable is given. Died Dec 25, 1704, in his 84th year. Married (1) Sarah Meriam, who died Feb. 1, 1676. Married (2) July 23, 1677, Sarah (Beers) Stearns, the widow of Isaac Stearns. She died Jan. 24, 1723-4.
Children: (born at Concord, Mass.)
2001. Sarah Wheeler, born July 10, 1649.
2002. Joseph Wheeler, born Aug 18, 1651; d. March 16, 1676/7
2003. Ann Wheeler, born Dec. 22, 1653; d. March 20, 1676/7
(It looks like they both died in an epidemic or in King Philip's War.)
2004. John Wheeler, born Feb. 18, 1655.
2005. Mary Wheeler, born Dec. 20, 1658; d. May 26, 1668.
2006. Thomas Wheeler, born March 29, 1662; d. June 12, 1695 unmarried
2007. Elizabeth Wheeler, born Feb. 23 1664.
2008. Timothy Wheeler, born July 24, 1667.
2009. Rebecca Wheeler, born April 3, 1670; d. Nov. 6, 1710.
2010. Ruth Wheeler, born May 10, 1673.
child, 2nd marriage;
2010-a. Ephraim Wheeler, born April 26, 1678." (1)
1) Wheeler Genealogy (see Timothy Wheeler #832) p. 143
2) Topo. Dict. p. 1
A possible source: Wheeler and Warren Familes, by H. Wheeler c. 1892 NEH&GS Catalog
Another source: Concord: An American Town by Scudder c. 1947

[NI0997] I have been unable to make an explicit connection for her ancestors. However, the most likely is:
" Kent
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Merriam, Joseph Hadlow Concord NEGR 24/64"(2)
"Sarah, b. in England about 1626...
(daughter of) Joseph, eldest of the sons mentioned in his father's will, and the only one through whom the family name is descended, was probably born in the county of Kent, about the year 1600. He married Sara, daughter of John and (probably) Frances (Jeffrie) Goldstone, whose brother was a resident of the town of Tonbridge, near by the home of Joseph and that of his father at the period of emigration...
Joseph made his home in Concord, having a comfortable homestead for a "planter." He was soon received to the church , and, in accordance with the method of the time was admitted to the freemanship or citizenship of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay on the 14th of the first month, March 1638-9, nine months after his arrival.
His life in the colony was brief. He died on the first of January, 1640-1, leaving a will which shows his business-like habits and his kindly thought for the welfare of others...
The widow Sara married second, Lieut. Joseph Wheeler of Concord...
Children:
William, b. in England about 1624
Sarah, b. in England about 1626
Joseph, b. in England about 1628
Thomas, b. in England; living in 1637
Elizabeth, b. in England
Hanna, b. England; living in 1637
John, b. after the death of his father, at Concord, July 9, 1641" (1)
1) Merriam Genealogy in England and America by Charles Henry Pope(1906, Boston) p. 32-6
2) Topo. Dict. p. 79

[NI1016] "100. George Wheeler. Probably of all of the Wheelers who came to America before the year 1640 none was of greater distinction or of more importance to the town in which he lived than George Wheeler of Concord. His name appears on the Concord records the 1st year they were kept and every year thereafter till he died. The circumstantial evidence of his having been the brother of Timothy Wheeler and Capt. Thomas Wheeler is of the highest order. The English records make it quite clear that George Wheeler had a brother Thomas and Thomas is clearly proven to have been a brother of Timothy. With Timothy he owned considerable property jointly, and together they were in possession of most of the real estate left by Rev. Peter Bulkeley. Authorities agree that George Wheeler came to Concord about the year 1638 with his wife Katherine and several children. Walcott in his History of Concord asserts that he was one of the few men who "were foremost in the town's business, by virtue of their large estates as well as their integrity and good judgement." He was a man of education, and the owner of a large amount property, his house lot alone consisting of eleven acres, while he possessed lands in every part of the town, at Brook Meadows, Fairhaven Meadow, the Cranefield, by Walden Goose Pond, Flint's Pond, on the White Pond Plain, on the Sudbury line, etc. He held as many positions of trust and was as active in the direction of the town's affairs as any individual in Concord, serving in various times on substantially every committee of consequence, and leading all matters of moment, as is evidenced by the fact that nearly every town deed and petition of any importance from either the Church or the civic community of that time bears his signature. His will, which is given here, is dated January 28, 1684-5 and was admitted to probate June 2, 1687, thus establishing the approximate time of his death...
Children:
101. William Wheeler.
102. Thomas Wheeler.
103. Ruth Wheeler.
104. Elizabeth Wheeler, died June 14, 1704...
105. Hannah Wheeler.
106. Sarah Wheeler, born in Concord, Mass. Jan. 30, 1640.
107. John Wheeler, born Jan. 19, 1643.
108. Mary Wheeler, born July 6, 1645." (1)
"Genealogy for George WHEELER
Sex: Male
Born: March 25, 1605 in Cranfield, Bedfordshire, England
Baptized: March, 1605 in Cranfield, Bedfordshire, England
Died: June 2, 1687 in Concord, MA
Father: Thomas WHEELER
Mother: Rebecca SAYRE
Sibling: William WHEELER
Sibling: John WHEELER
Sibling: Joseph WHEELER
Sibling: Susanna WHEELER
Sibling: Elizabeth WHEELER
Sibling: Richard WHEELER
Sibling: Thomas WHEELER
Married to: Katherine PIN, June 8, 1630 in Cranfield, Bedfordshire, England
Child: Elizabeth WHEELER
Child: Sarah WHEELER
Child: Hannah WHEELER
Child: William WHEELER
Child: Thomas WHEELER
Child: Ruth WHEELER
Child: John WHEELER
Child: Mary WHEELER
Married to: Mary STUDD, May 12, 1628 in Cranfield, Bedfordshire, Eng.
Notes: moved to Concord in 1638 with wife Katherine and children" (2)
1) Wheeler Genealogy (see Timothy Wheeler #832) p. 17-20
2) Harvey Genealogy

[NI1018] "His wife's name was Katherine but nothing more is known concerning her except that she died in Concord, 2 January 1684/5." (1)
1) Wheeler, Henry Warren, Wheeler and Warren Families (Albany, 1892) p. 12

[NI1019] "Elizabeth Dowse, daughter of Lawrence [Dowse], was b. Mar. 15, 1647, in Boston, Mass., and m. (1) June 18, 1674, in Charlestown, as his second wife, Thomas, son of Edward and Joanna Larkin. He was b. Oct. 18, 1644, in Charlestown, where he was a shoemaker and d. Dec. 10, 1677, of small-pox." (1)
"Larkin
Edward, turner, wheelmaker, Charlestown, adm. chh. 23 (7) 1639, frm. May 13, 1640. Wife Joanna adm. chh. 11 (8) 1638. Ch. John b. and bapt. 10 (1) 1640, Sarah bapt. 4 (7) 1641, Elizabeth b. 5 (7) 1641, (sic) Hannah b. 16 (1) 1643, "of John and Joane", Thomas b. 18 (8) 1644, Joanna, Sarah b. 12 (1) 1647." (2)
"Joanna Hale, sister of Robert Hale, may have been the wife of Edward Larkin of Charlestown, and later of John Penticost, also of Charlestown (Stevens-Miller 144). (The argument made by Holman on this point has been undercut by the work of Douglas Richardson, who has made the case that the first wife of John Penticost was not the sister of Edward Larkin (TAG 62:118-201).) It has been suggested, without documentation, that Robert Hale's wife Joanna was a Cutter." (3)
1) Dows, Azro Milton; The Dows or Dowse Family in America (Lowell, Mass. 1890) p. 6
2) Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts p. 278
3) The Great Migration, p. 837-8

[NI1020] "Elizabeth Dowse, daughter of Lawrence [Dowse], was b. Mar. 15, 1647, in Boston, Mass., and m. (1) June 18, 1674, in Charlestown, as his second wife, Thomas, son of Edward and Joanna Larkin. He was b. Oct. 18, 1644, in Charlestown, where he was a shoemaker and d. Dec. 10, 1677, of small-pox." (1)
"Larkin
Edward, turner, wheelmaker, Charlestown, adm. chh. 23 (7) 1639, frm. May 13, 1640. Wife Joanna adm. chh. 11 (8) 1638. Ch. John b. and bapt. 10 (1) 1640, Sarah bapt. 4 (7) 1641, Elizabeth b. 5 (7) 1641, (sic) Hannah b. 16 (1) 1643, "of John and Joane", Thomas b. 18 (8) 1644, Joanna, Sarah b. 12 (1) 1647." (2)
"Joanna Hale, sister of Robert Hale, may have been the wife of Edward Larkin of Charlestown, and later of John Penticost, also of Charlestown (Stevens-Miller 144). (The argument made by Holman on this point has been undercut by the work of Douglas Richardson, who has made the case that the first wife of John Penticost was not the sister of Edward Larkin (TAG 62:118-201).) It has been suggested, without documentation, that Robert Hale's wife Joanna was a Cutter." (3)
"Genealogy for Joanna
Sex: Female
Born: 1616
Died: January 27, 1686
Married to: Edward LARKIN, 1640
Child: Sarah LARKIN
Married to: John PENTECOST, " (4)
1) Dows, Azro Milton; The Dows or Dowse Family in America (Lowell, Mass. 1890) p. 6
2) Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts p. 278
3) The Great Migration, p. 837-8
4) Harvey Genealogy

[NI1021] "he was an ensign in the colonial militia, and hence was denominated as "Ensign Roe" he was admitted into the church 9 April 1699 and his wife Mary on 30 April 1699 and his wife Johanna was admitted on 24 Dec. 1727. He was constable in 1708, assessor in 1713, and selectman in 1724, 1730, 1734 and 1735. He built the Munroe Tavern which is still standing as this account is being written in 1964.
b. 10 Oct 1669 at Lexington, Massachusetts
d. 5 Jan 1759 at Lexington, Massachusetts
m. 1) Mary Cutler on 3 Oct. 1697 by Justice Minot. She was the dau. of Thomas and Abigail ( ) Cutler.
b. circa 1680
d. 26 June 1713 (apparently from complications of childbirth) at Lexington, Mass.
Children:
13-1 1 Mary, b. 3 April 1699, m. 1) Thomas Wheeler of Concord, Mass. in 1721. He d. 1750 at Lincoln, Mass. m 2) Deacon Joshua Brooks of Lincoln on 4 June 1751.
13-2 2 Abigail, b. 28 June 1701 at Lexington, Mass.
13-3 3 William, b. 19 Dec 1703 at Lexington, Mass.
13-4 4 Thomas, b. 19 Mar 1706 at Lexington, Mass.
13-5 5 David, b. 28 Sept. 1708 at Lexington, Mass.
13-6 6 Ruth, b. 16 Mar. 1711 at Lexington, Mass.
13-7 7 Hannah, b. 19 Mar. 1713 at Lexington, Mass.
m. 2) Johanna Russell about 1716, she was the dau. of Philip and Johanna (Cutler) Russell. Johanna Russell was the niece of Mary Cutler, above.
d. 17 Sept. 1748 at Lexington, Mass.
Children:
13-8 8 Philip, b. 26 Feb. 1718 at Lexington, Mass.
13-9 9 Johanna, b. 21 Oct. 1726, she d. 23 Jan. 1749 unmarried." (1)
I found his gravestone in Ye Olde Burial Ground in Lexington, Massachusetts. It says he died at age 92 on 2 Jan 1759.
1) Munroe, Richard S., History and Genealogy of the Lexington, Massachusetts Munroes (1966/1986) pp. 6-7

[NI1022] "William Munroe... m. 1) Mary Cutler on 3 Oct 1697 by Justice Minot. She was the dau. of Thomas and Abigail ( ) Cutler.
b. circa 1680 d. 26 June 1713 (apparently of complications of childbirth) at Lexington, Mass." (1)
"Looking for information on Robert Cutler d. 7 Mar 1665. Wife Rebecca d. 18 Jan 1677. Believe both died in Charlestown, MA. Daughter Hannah, no birth, m. 29 Aug 1654, Charlestown, MA. Died 2 Dec 1674 Charlestown, MA. Married to Matthew Griffin." (2)
This is probably a relative.
"iii. Mary, b. 15 Mar. 1680-81; m. 3 Oct 1697 William Munroe, Jr." (3)
I found her gravestone in Ye Olde Burial Ground in Lexington, Massachusetts. It says that she died on 26 Jul 1713 at the age of 33 years and 3 months.
1) History & Genealogy of the Lexington, Mass. Munroes (see William Munroe) p. 6
2) Francis Farmer (NNEE35A-Prodigy)
3) Hudson, Charles; History of Lexington, Vol. II (Houghton Mifflin Boston 1913) p.143

[NI1023] "It may now be impossible to find exact proof of the origin of William Munroe, who died in 1717 aged 92, but he was probably descended from the Munros of Foulis, Chiefs of the Clan in Scotland, and shipped to America as a political prisoner. He was supposed... by Alexander MacKenzie, author of the History of the Munros (Inverness, 1898), to be the son of Robert Munro of Aldie, near Tain in Ross-shire, fifth in descent from George Munro of Foulis (died 1452). Nothing has been found to contradict these statements, but proof of them is at present lacking (letter from Robert W. Munro, 15a Mansionhouse Road, Edinburgh, 9 Scotland dated October 1965)" (1)
"William Munroe is referred to in the Cambridge records in 1657, when he and Thomas Rose were fined for not having rings in the noses of their swine. He was the first of the Munroes in Lexington, Massachusetts. William, with several of his relatives, was taken prisoner by Cromwell in the battle of Worcester and banished to Boston, Massachusetts along with several others. They were shipped from London on 11 November 1651, by Jo. Reex, Robert Rich, and William Greene, in the "John and Sarah", John Greene, master, and consigned to Mr. Thomas Kemble of Boston. Those banished and listed on board this vessel were recorded on 13 May 1652, the list contains four of the name Munroe, viz.: Robert, John, Hugh, and one other whose first name is obliterated by time. This name is supposed to have been William, the undoubted progenitor of the family of the Munroes of Lexington, Massachusetts..." (2)
"at Dunbar in the early morning of 3 September 1650, the ground underfoot sodden by heavy rain, Cromwell's army won a decisive victory.
Four months later Charles II was crowned at Scone near Perth where the Kings of Scotland had been enthroned for centuries; and in July he marched south with an army of thirteen thousand men, English as well as Scottish, to lay claim to his inheritance in London. He advanced as far as Worcester, recruiting more men on the way, losing other by desertion, attempting to cheer up his General, David Leslie, who gloomy and dispirited, grumbled that "how well, soever" their army looked, "it would not fight."
It did fight; but, outnumbered by the army of the Commonwealth, it was overwhelmed at Worcester on the anniversary of the defeat a Dunbar."(3)
"If William was sold as an apprentice when he first arrived here, it must have been rather short for those days, because he must have been his own man about 1657. Around 1660 he settled in the northeasterly part of Cambridge Farms, now known as Lexington, near the Woburn line. In those days this part of the town was called "Scotland." He was made freeman in 1690 and on 1 February, 1699 was received into Communion of the church. In 1694 he was a selectman of Cambridge and later his name appears in connection with several other important parish offices. In his will dated 15 Nov 1716, he men
tions his sons, John, William, George, Daniel, Joseph and Benjamin, and daughters Eleanor Burgess, to whom he gave the sole use of his house, Martha Comee, Hannah Pierce, Elizabeth Rugg and Mary Fassett.
At first, several of his sons lived with him or not far from him, and it was said by his great-granddaughter, Mrs. Mary Sanderson, who died in 1852, aged 104 years, that his old house looked like a rope walk, so many additions had been made to accommodate his sons, as they settled in life. By adopting the custom of the Scottish clans, he, in a sense, confined the Munroes together, and made them for some time, a distinct people.
William's first wife, Martha George, was the daughter of John George of Charlestown, a prominent Baptist, who was fined, imprisoned, and finally ordered out of town for heresy.
b. 1625 near Inverness, Scotland
d. 27 Jan 1717/18 at Lexington, Massachusetts
m. 1) Martha George about 1665
d. before 1672
Children: b. Lexington, Mass.
11 1 John, b. 10 Mar. 1666.
12 2 Martha, b. 2 Nov. 1667.
13 3 William, b. 10 Oct 1669.
14 4 George, bap. 26 Feb. 1698/99 (sic - probably 1671) (I found his gravestone in Ye Olde Burial Ground in Lexington which says he died at age 73 on 17 Jan 1746).
m. 2) Mary Ball about 1672
b. circa 1652
d. August 1692, gravestone record age 41
Children: b. Lexington, Mass.
15 5 Daniel, b. 12 Aug 1673 (His gravestone is in Ye Olde Burial Ground in Lexington recording his death at age 57 in Feb 1734.)
16 6 Hanah, b. probably 1674
17 7 Elizabeth
18 8 Mary, 28 June 1678
19 9 David, b. 6 Oct 1680
1/10 10 Eleanor, b. 24 Feb 1682/3
1/11 11 Sarah, b. 18 Mar 1684
1/12 12 Joseph, b. 16 Aug 1687
1/13 13 Benjamin, b. 16 Aug 1690
1/14 14 Susanna, bap. 26 Feb 1699
m. 3) Mrs. Elizabeth (Johnson) Dwyer, widow of Edward Dwyer of Charlestown, daughter of William and Elizabeth (no issue)" (2)
I found his gravestone in Ye Olde Burying Ground. It gives his death date as 27 Jan 1717 at the age of about 92.
He is buried next to his wife Mary Ball "Mary Munroo, who died at age 41 years in August 1692.
His third wife Elizabeth is also buried next to him. Her gravestone says Elizabeth Munroo wife of William Munroo and formerly wife to Mr. Edward Wyet (?) of Charlestown died at 79 years 14 Dec 1715.
"William Munroe, a Scotchman, brought to America as a prisoner of war, reached Cambridge Farms, now Lexington, Mass., in 1652 and remained there until his death in 1717. According to Alexander mackenzie's comprehensive "History of the Munros", published in Inverness in 1898, he was a lineal descendant from Donald, founder of the clan Munro, who is said to have come, with his adherents, from Ireland to Scotland in the year 1025 to assist King Malcolm [II] in his war with the Danes. His lineage is traced, not only by Mackenzie but also in "The Munroe Genealogy" by John G. Locke, "The Munro Clan" by James Phinney Munroe, "The Genealogy of Josiah Munro" by Rev. G.S. Northrup and Hudson's history of Lexington" (first edition) from the above Donald Munro through eleven chiefs of the clan, ten of whom were Barons of Foulis and five succeeding generations of Scottish ancestry down to his birth in Aldie, Scotland, in 1625. His father, Robert Munro, was a great-great-great-grandson of Sir George Munro, tenth Baron of Foulis." (5)
1) History & Genealogy of the Lexington, Mass. Munroes (see William Munroe) p. v-vi
2) Ibid., p.1-2
3) Hibbert, Christopher, Cavaliers and Roundheads: The English Civil War 1642-1649 (New York: 1993) p. 290
4) Monroe, Lee; William Munroe of Lexington, Mass., and Descendants in Genealogies of Connecticut Families, Ge-O, p. 577-8
Allison Munro Alger, Secretary, Clan Munro Association, U.S.A., PSC 802, Box 2 FPO AE 09499-0101
Possible source: The Monroe Book; The History of the Munro Clan from its Origins in Scotland to Settlement in New England and Migration to the West 1652-1850 and Beyond, By Joan S. Guilford, PhD. (Joan S. Guilford c/o Genealogy Publishing Service, 448 Ruby Road, Franklin, NC 28734 $45.00 + 4.50

[NI1025] "I have a John George, born 1633 in Dorchester, Mass. Son of Nicholas George who was born 1600 in England. John was baptized in the First Church of Dorchester 30 Feb 1643." (1)
"John George b. 1590 England, d. 1 Jun 1647 Watertown, MA (son of Nicholas and Elizabeth???) m. 1. Mary ??? who died c. 1638 2. Anna Goldstone
I have his children from Mary ??? as;
1. Robert
2. Susanna (my ancestress) b.c. 1632 England who married on 1 Oct 1649 in Watertown Robert Harrington.
3. John
4. Martha...
I have John George b.c. 1590 England with 2 wives. 1. Mary and 2. Ann, widow of Henry Goldstone. #2 died 26 Apr 1670 at age 79. Mary, wife #1 d. about 1638. Mary and John had 4 children:
1. Robert died after 1687
2. Susannah (my ancestress) b. 1632 England) m. 1 Oct 1648 Watertown, MA to Robert Harrington and d. Watertown on 6 Jul 1694.
3. John b. 1616 d. 1666
4. Martha m. c. 1665 William Monroe..." (2)
1) Larry Lee (AKFB10A-Prodigy)
2) Frank Bouley (FVPX24A-Prodigy)
Possible resource:
George Genealogy, by Keith George in AZ; pub. 1991
mentioned by Larry Lee (AKFB10A-Prodigy) Available on LDS microfilm #1697530 entitled "George Genealogy", also in April 1991 NEGHR Vol. 145 "The ancestry of Samuel Blanchard Ordway, 1844-1916."


[NI1026] Info on Simon and his family from Arlene Whiteman.
Information on Simon and his family is also contained in The Hunt Family, Genealogy of the Name and Family of Hunt, T.B. Wyman, 1969 repub of 1863, p. 85. According to the same source (p. 25) his will is dated 24 Oct 1786.
I found his tombstone in the Old Hill Burying Ground in Concord, MA. He is buried next to his wife.
Children:
Mary...
Miriam b. 21 Apr 1732 Concord d. 17 Sep 1736
Simon b. 8 Apr 1734 " d. 1 Apr 1820
Ephraim b. 28 May 1736 " d. Dec 1821
John b. 9 Jun 1738 " d. 4 Apr 1816
Miriam b. May 1741 "
Reuben b. 25 Jul 1744 " d. 30 Jun 1816
Ruth b. 10 Jul 1746 "
Joseph b. 1 Mar 1749 " d. 28 May 1812

[NI1027] I found her gravestone in Old Hill Burying Ground in Concord, Massachusetts. It says that she died 20 November 1790 at age 84 years.
IGI
Mary Rayment b. August 3, 1710 Beverly, Essex, Massachusetts
Father: Jonathan Rayment
Mother: Sarah Woodbury
Film No. 177926 Page 736 Ordinance No. 28158 Temple Logan
Also Film No. 1063908
Possible source: Raymond - The Raymond Family, by Samuel Raymond c. 1886
Raymond Family Genealogy, Samuel Edward Raymond 1969

[NI1029] "Timothy Halstead (1633-1703; Jonas) was b. in England. In 1661 he was chosen as one of the townsmen of Hempstead. On October 2, 1676, he was one of the signers of a round-robin by Hempstead citizens binding themselves to stand together against a group of men who had taken possession of, "the Neck commonly called ye Great Neck."...
In 1664 Timothy and his brother Joseph joined a group of men who purchased a large tract of land in the Newark Bay and Staten Island Sound district of northeastern New Jersey called Acther Koll or Back Bay. They contributed about four pounds each to the syndicate, on the condition, that, if they did not like the part of the land assigned to them when it was divided up, they could withdraw, which they subsequently did, and their money was returned. Timothy was a witness in the trial of a suit over this land purchase at Elizabeth-town, New Jersey, on November 17, 1685, twenty-one years afterwards.
Timothy was sued for damages by Cornelius Mott. The case was tried January 6, 1676:
"Cornelius Mott declares that he planted a small crop of tobacco on Timothy's Halstead's land and was to have half the crop for his pains, and that Halstead damnified him in some corn that he had growing on his land, and that he got two hundred rails for him for which he was never paid. So he is damnified to the value of 20 s."
Several witness testified that they had heard Timothy Halstead say that the tobacco was the joint property of himself and Mott. The court ordered the defendant to pay the plaintiff one hundred pounds of tobacco, "the good with the bad as it was made up"' and two bushels of corn, "for damage done in cornfield."
Timothy was one of the subscribers to the support of the clergyman in 1682:
We under Richten dew Ingeage each and every one of us to give these under Richten sums to Jersey Hobart yearly during the time we live under his ministry and to pay it in corn or cattel at Prises as passes current Amongst us.
In the census of Hempstead taken in 1698, Timothy was recorded with his wife and three of his children, Jonas, David and Benjamin. Other records show him as the owner of three hundred acres of land in 1685, as a witness to wills and as a member of town committees. His place in the community seems to have been very similar to that of his father Jonas.
Timothy died in March of 1703, and his son Timothy was made administrator of the estate on May 19 of that year. The amount of land he owned is not shown in the records of the administration, but the personal property was inventoried at sixty-nine pounds.
He m. about 1657 Hannah Williams, dau. of Michael and Ann Williams. There were six known children and perhaps three or four others who have not been identified, Timothy, Sarah, Joseph, Jonas, David and Benjamin and perhaps John and Jane who m. Elias Bayles." (1)
"The Timothy Halstead Family
It was reported in the previous chapter Timothy Halstead was born about 1633. Actually it is not clear just when he was born. Virkus reported on page 632, volume VII, of his work that Timothy Halstead was born in 1631 but on page 529 and again on page 671 of the same volume he gave 1633 as the year of birth. Both Shoptaugh and William Leon Halstead accept 1633 as the year of birth but Wardwell reported first that Timothy Halstead was born about 1635 and then later changed the date to about 1637.
Even the place of birth of Timothy Halstead is questioned. Halstead and Shoptaugh report that he was born in England before his father came to America. Wardwell at first gave England as the country of birth but later suggested that it may have been America.
About 1657 Timothy Halstead married Hannah Williams, the daughter of Moyles (or Michael) and Anna Williams. At least seven, and possibly nine, children were born to Timothy and Anna Halstead, namely, Timothy about 1658, Sarah in 1660, Joseph about 1667, Jane about 1672, Jonas about 1673, David about 1675, and Benjamin about 1677. In addition to the seven children listed above, there may have been a daughter named Hannah about 1665 and a daughter named Elizabeth whose date of birth is unknown.
Timothy Halstead was a holder of patent rights in the town of Hempstead and thus one of the proprietors of the town. He was chosen by lot in 1660 to be one of the townsmen of Hempstead. Records show that he served as a member of various town committees and as a witness for various wills. In 1682, Timothy Halstead pledged to contribute yearly to the support of Jersey Hobert as long as he, Jersey Hobert, continued to serve as clergyman in Hempstead, and his contribution was to be made in the form of corn and cattle. Timothy's Halstead's reputation and standing in Hempstead seems to have been similar to that of his father, Jonas Halstead.
Records that Timothy Halstead was a participant in various cases before the courts, sometimes as a witness, sometimes as a plaintiff and sometimes as a defendant. On October 2, 1676, Timothy Halstead was one of a group of citizens of Hempstead who bound themselves together in an agreement to oppose another group who had taken possession of "the Neck commonly called ye Grate Neck." As a result of physical contact between the two opposing groups, five persons, including Timothy Halstead, were arrested and tried for riot. All five pleaded not guilty but the court found them guilty and each of the five were fined.
Like his father, Timothy Halstead was a farmer and he bought and sold cattle and horses as well as operated his farm lands. An earmark for livestock was registered for Timothy Halstead in the town of Hempstead in 1665 and again in 1684. Also like his father, Timothy bought and sold parcels of land. He first took up six acrres of land in the town of Hempstead in 1658. Later, he owned three hundred acres in the town of Hempstead. In addition to these, his name appears in a number of business transactions and in drawings of land. At one time, he and his brother Joseph had a part interest in acquiring a large tract of land in northeastern New Jersey, called Achter Koll or Back Bay, but both of them later withdrew from that enterprise because they were not satisfied with the parcels of land to be apportioned to them.
It is probable that Timothy Halstead came to Hempstead, Long Island, with his father, Jonas Halstead, about 1644 and that he was a resident of the town of Hempstead the remainder of his life. He died at Hempstead in March 1703 and was probably buried there. The administration of his estate was assigned to his oldest son, Timothy Halstead, and an inventory of his property was taken on March 10, 1703." (2)
1) The Story of the Halsteads (see Benjamin) p. 58-9
2) Harrold p. 23-5

[NI1030] "[Timothy Halstead] m. about 1657 Hannah Williams, dau. of Michael and Ann Williams." (1)
1) The Story of the Halsteds (see Benjamin) p. 59

[NI1033] "Jonas, bapt. 1611 (Halifax, West Riding, Yorkshire, England (?))" (2)
"Jonas Halstead was the immigrant ancestor of the most numerous branch of the Halstead family. He came to Hempstead when middle Long Island was a frontier. It is quite possible that he was first at Stratford, Connecticut, as the historian Orcutt says that Jonas Halstead was there early.
The old Dutch and English colonial records and the first town records of Hempstead, Oyster Bay and Jamaica provide all the information that is to be found about Jonas and his family. It is believed that he was born about 1610, was married about 1632, that all his children were born by 1644, and that he died about 1683. Undoubtedly he came to America from England, but what members of his family he first brought there, at what time and by what means are unknown. It is probable that he was from the West Riding of Yorkshire, in the north of England, the same district from which the first Halsteads in New England probably came, and tow whom he may have been related. No facts have as yet been found to connect him in relationship with any of the known English Halsteads or the other Halstead immigrants to America.
The first book of records of Hempstead, covering the period from its English settlement until 1655, has been lost. The earliest record of Jonas Halstead is in the next succeeding book, where his name appears as a witness to a land deed as of December 8, 1655. He was in Hempstead for some part of the preceding eleven years, but probably not earlier than 1647, when sixty-six citizens were given their portion of the common land holdings, in the list of which his name does not appear. Again, he was one of thirty-six citizens of Hempstead who, on July 4, 1656, addressed a joint letter to Governor Peter Stuyvesant on the subject of the town's taxes to the province.
About 1660 Jonas removed to Oyster Bay and shortly thereafter to Jamaica. He is referred to in a deed dated May 30, 1667, as, "Jonas Halsted of Stratton Island, within the County of York in America."
He may have lived on "Stratton Island" (Staten Island) for a short time, but in December of the same year he was a resident of Oyster Bay.
He returned to Hempstead, but his name disappears from all records after 1682, from which fact it is supposed that he died there shortly thereafter, seventy or more years of age. There is no record left either of his will or the administration of his estate....
The town of Jamaica elected Jonas overseer on April 13, 1675...
Jonas Halstead has four known children, Timothy, Sarah, Joseph and Martha.
Sarah Halstead (1638-1683)... probably b. in England, m. 1658 Captain Thomas Carle, who died in 1675...
Joseph Halstead (1642-1679)... was born before the settlement of Hempstead and probably in England... Joseph died prior to 1680..
Marth Halstead (1644-1710) who may possibly have been b. in America, m. 1664 Jonathan Mills...
Timothy Halstead..." (1)
"It is stated in the previous chapter that Jonas Halstead, the youngest son of Abraham Halstead, was born about 1611. He was baptized in the parish church at Halifax in West Riding, Yorkshire, England, on February 23, 1611. Jonas was less than two years old when his father died in 1612. By terms of his father's will the care of Jonas was committed to his mother. Thus, when Susan Whitley Halstead remarried in 1615, Jonas lived with his mother and stepfather, John Lum. It is probable that Jonas worked as a youth in the woolen mills in the Halifax area.
Jonas Halstead was married about 1632 and it may be that his wife was Susan Butterfield but at the present time no proof has been found to confirm either the name of the wife or the date of the marriage. However, it has been reported that Jonas Halstead was the father of four children, namely Timothy about 1633, Sarah in 1638, Joseph in 1642, and Martha in 1644. Arthur Wardwell has suggested that Jonas Halstead may have married about 1635 or 1636 and that the children may have been born a few years later than listed above...
Jonas Halstead was the first member of the particular Halstead family with which this book is primarily concerned to migrate from England to America to seek his fortune in a newly developing country. It is not agreed among various researchers of Halstead family history either when or where the Jonas Halstead family arrived in America. Three writers present three different possibilities.
William Leon Halstead reported in 1934 that it is quite possible that Jonas Halstead first came to a new settlement named Stratford near present day Bridgeport in what was then part of Massachusetts but later became part of the state of Connecticut. However, he states that what members of the Jonas Halstead family, the time of his coming and by what means are unknown.
Arthur S. Wardwell wrote about 1942 that Jonas Halstead is said to have been an early settler of Stratford, Connecticut, and seemed to agree with what William Leon Halstead had written in 1934. He concluded that Jonas Halstead identified with the John Lum family of Halifax parish, England, is reasonably to identified as the Jonas Halstead who migrated to America. Some time later, as a result of further research, Wardwell modified his prrevious statements and wrote that there was a possibility Jonas Halstead came to New England along with Thomas Armitage and other families from Yorkshire, England on a ship, the James of Briston, which arrived on August 17, 1635.
Laura Alta Davis Shoptaugh reported in 1954 that John Lume (Lum) probably was in Stanford [sic-probably Stamford], Connecticut, in 1642 with his family and his stepson, Jonas Halstead, and that Jonas may have settled first at Stratford, Connecticut.
Whether Jonas Halstead first came to Stratford or Sta[m]ford, or any other part of what was then part of Massachusetts is not of great importance because within a few years after he arrived in America he was attracted to the opportunities to be found on Long Island to the south across Long Island Sound...
In 1644 a band of English settlers obtained a patent from the Dutch Governor Kieft to found a settlement designated as Hempstead under the Charter of Freedoms and Exemptions. Other English settlements at Gravesend in 1645, at Flushing in 1645, and Jamaica in 1656, were set up in Dutch territory at the western end of Long Island in a similar fashion, with the inhabitants of each of these settlements swearing allegiance to the Dutch authorities. The Jonas Halstead family was one of the families that migrated to Hempstead "where his name appears on the earliest records. He was probably one of the fifty original proprietors of 1644."...
Jonas Halstead and his family, along with the many other English settlers at the western end of Long Island, remained subject to the Dutch until 1664. In March 1664, Charles II of England granted all of the lands claimed by the Dutch, including the western part of Long Island and Manhattan Island, to the Duke of York. By August 1664, the conquest of the Dutch lands was effected...
It is unfortunate that the first book of records of Hempstead, covering the period from its first English settlement in 1644 to 1655, has been lost. However, many other records would indicate that Jonas Halstead was an active and prominent man in Long Island's early history. About 1660 he move to Oyster Bay and in 1666 he was elected a constable for Oyster Bay. By 1674 he had become a resident of Jamaica and in that year he was designated at a town meeting as one of two residents to seek a minister to come to Jamaica and serve in the community. In 1675 he was made overseer in the town of Jamaica. Jonas Halstead returned to Hempstead to live in 1677 and was made an overseer there in 1681. During his lifetime he served as a member of town committees, as a juror, as a recorder of an earmark for cattle, and as citizen generally active in community affairs.
Jonas Halstead was farmer and a dealer in land and cattle. While in Oyster Bay he built and sold houses. Records show that he was both an owner of land and cattle in each of the communities in which he lived. It is believed that Jonas Halstead died in Hempstead in 1683 and was buried there. He was a highly respected settler on Long Island." (3)
1) The Story of the Halsteads (see Benjamin) p. 57-8
2) Shoptaugh (?)
3) Harrold p. 17-22

[NI1034] "Jonas Halstead was married about 1632 and it may be that his wife was Susan Butterfield (Note: The name of Susan Butterfield as the wife of Jonas Halstead was suggested as a possibility by Mrs. Dorothy Vanderveer Steward of Longmeadow, Massachussetts, in a letter written in January 1973. Frederick A. Virkus states on page 529, volume VII, that the first name of Jonas' wife was probably Sarah but the family name was not listed.) but at the present time no proof has been found to confirm either the name of the wife or the date of the marriage. However, it has been reported that Jonas Halstead was the father of four children, namely, Timothy about 1633, Sarah in 1638, Joseph in 1642, and Martha in 1644. Arthur S. Wardwell has suggested that Jonas Halstead may have married about 1635 or 1636 and that the children may have been born a few years later than listed above." (1)
1) Harrold p. 17-8

[NI1035] "At the present time, Abraham Halstead is the earliest known ancestor of record in the particular Halstead family line with which this book is primarily concerned. It is believed that he was born about 1570 in the eastern part of Lancashire, England, but a birth certificate or baptismal record has not bee found to confirm this belief. By 1596, Abraham Halstead had become a resident of North Owram, a township in Halifax parish, West Riding, Yorkshire, England. He lived in North Owram until he died and was reported to have been a clothier...
Abraham Halstead worked in the woolen mills in Halifax parish. His father-in-law, John Whitley the Third was a clothier. Before the time of his death Abraham Halstead also had become a clothier, or a master clothmaker.
On September 5, 1596, in the parish church at Halifax, Abraham Halstead married Susan Whitley, who had been born February 1, 1572, the daughter of John Whitley the Third and his wife, Agnes Mawde. Six children are reported to have been born to Abraham and Agnes Halstead, namely Grace in 1597, Abraham in 1600, Susan about 1603, Joseph in 1607, Jeremy about 1609, and Jonas about 1611.
Abraham Halstead died at about forty-two years of age and was buried November 8, 1612 in Halifax parish. His will dated September 5, 1612, was proved on June 10, 1613, and is filed in the York Registry of Wills, volume 32, folio 402. In his will he states that he was a resident of North Owram. An abstract of his will follows:
(Will of) "Abraham Halsteade clothier of Northowram in the county of York dated 5 September, 1612, proved 10 June, 1613, by the executors. Clothier. To be buried in the church or churchyard at Halifax. To Susan Halsteade my wife my best bed with all the furniture and her chist (sic) with things therein and all such pewther and other lynningd as I now have that weare her own goods before she and I married and the sume of three score pounds. The rest of all my goods chattels credits and debts I give to my children Abraham, Joseph, Jeremie and Jonas my sonnes and Grace and Susan my daughters equally.
I commit the education tuition and government of Abraham Halstead my son and his procin to John Whiteley of Burnfield in Bollings of Joseph Halsteade my second sonne to John Boyes of Halifax of Jeremie Halsteade my third sonne to Joseph Wood of Northowram of Jonas my fourth and youngest sonne to Susan my wife of Grace Halsteade my elder daughter to Michael Whitley of Ovenden and of Susan my youngest daughter to Joseph Whitley of Ovenden. Executors John Whiteley of Bowling and Joseph Wood of Northowram.
Overseers John Whiteley the elder and Richard Wood." (1)
"An ancient body of Halsted lived around High Halstead in the West Riding of Yorkshire, England. William and John de Halsted, the first of the line are definately identifed, lived in the reign of Henry V (1387-1422) and were jurors at the Halmont Court in 1425.

Abraham Halsted, father of Jonas Halsted, the emigrant ancestor, was of this line. He was born ca. 1570 and was burried at North Owram, Halifax, Yourshire, 8 November 1612. He married Susan Whitley/Whytley, daughter of John Whitley of Overden, Yorkshire, who was baptized 1 February 1572.
There is a difference of opinion as to the identity of Susan's mother. Either Annis Hartley or Agnes Mawde dau of James Mawde of Earoyd, Halifax, Yourkshire. (National Geneological Society Quarterly, 42:155)

Children of Abraham Halsted And Susan Whitley/Whytley
1. Grace, Baptised 16 May 1597, A Grace Halsted married Michael Barstow of Shelf, not far from North Owram and came with him to America, probably a short time before they joined the first Church of Charleston Mass 1634/5. They went to Watertown., Mass., where Grace died 20 July 16771 and Michael Marstow died in 1676, no evidence of children.
3. Susannah Halsted joined this church at the same time and died 5 July 1669 leaving a small estate with bequests to her sister Grace, with whom she lived, and to daughters of William Barstow, Michael's brother.
2. Abraham, Baptised April 1600 died before 12 April 1615 when his widow Susan married again, John Lum or Lume of North Owram, and by him she had three more children, The Lums came with the Halsteds to Stanford CT., ca 1642. (The American Genealogist January 1942)
4.Jonas Halsted (1611-ca 1683) married Sarah Butterfield. First of the line in America, son of Abraham and Susan (Whitley) Halsted, batized at North Owram Halifax, Yorkshire, England, 23 Feburary 1611, died ca 1683 at Hempsted, L.I., N.Y. He was married in England ca 1632: Most sources say his wife's name is unknown, but because Jonas' eldest daughter and his son Timothy's eldest daughter were both named Sarah it has been supposed her name was Sarah, also. One source has speculated that her Given name may have been Butterfield.

Jonas' name appears among the earliest list of proprietors in the Hempstead, L.I., records. Permanent occupation of the claims at Hempsted was made in 1644 by a group of men, most of whom were from Stanford CT., John Lum and Jonas Halsted were likely among them or followed soon after. The settlers had purchased the land from the Indians in December 1643, and were granted a patent by the province of New Netherlands, 16 November 1644.

It is known that Jonas Halsted was at Hemsted in 1655. About 1660, he went to Oyster Bay. He was a grantee there in 1667, when he is described as being of "Stratton" or "staden"( Staten)Island. He served as a Constable to Jamaica, where he served as Overseer. He returned to Hempsted about 1680, and died there about 1683. He left no will.

Children of Jonas and Sarah Butterfied Halsted are

1. Timothy born 1633 and died 1703 married Hannah Williams.
2. Sarah born 1638 England, died 1685 married Thomas Carle of Hempstead B ca 1638 D 1675. Perhaps 4 children.
3. Joseph B 1642 d ca 1679, probably at Hempstead: married 1670 Susannan Harcourt daughter of Richard and Elizabeth (Potter) of Oyster Bay 5 children.
Married 2nd 4 March 1680 Peter Stringhan of Jamaica, and died shortly thereafter.
4. Martha B 1644 d 1710 married 1664 johnathan Mills son of George Mills of Jamaica.LI At Least 4 Children" (2)
1) Harrold, John W.; One Halstead Family - A Root of Our Family Tree (1975 Century Litho Co., Largo, FL) p. 13-15
2) Genforum posting of August 1, 1998 by Jan Parker >

[NI1036] "John Whitley, buried in England, 1539.
John Whitley, his son buried 3 Dec 1561.
John Whitley, (3rd) bapt. 19 Feb 1540 Halifax, (West Riding, Yorkshire) England; m. 24 Apr 1562 Annes Hartley, dau. of John Hartley of Ovenden.
Susan Whitley, dau. of John and Annes (Hartley) Whitley, bapt. 1 Feb 1572, m. 5 Sep 1596 Abraham Halsted.
Children:
Grace, bapt. 16 May 1597
Abraham, bapt. 27 Apr 1600
Joseph, bapt. 12 Jul 1607
Jonas, bapt. 1611
Abraham Halsted probably d. bet. 1611 and 1615, and his widow, Susan Halsted, m. (2) John Lume of Northowram, 12 Apr 1615; 3 children. John Lumme probably was in Stamford, Conn. in 1642 with his family and stepson, Jonas Halstead. (Data from American Genealogist, Jan. 1942)." (1)
"Susan Whitley Halstead survived her husband, Abraham Halstead. On April 12, 1615, she married John Lum (Lume) of North Owram. Three children were reported to have been born to John and Susan Lum. One report is that Susan Whitley Halstead Lum died sometime after 1621 and presumably she died at North Owram." (2)
1) Shoptaugh, Laura A. Davis; Some descendants of Jonas Halstead; (Oakland 1954) p. 1
2) Harrold, p. 15

[NI1037] "Married (1) Mary Brown (2) Dorothy Merriam "(1)
I found what I believe is his tombstone in the Old Hill Burying Ground in Concord, MA. It says his death date is 3 May 1765 not 26 Dec 1751 as I previously had it. He is buried next to his wife Mary." (1)
Children:
Simon...
Mary b. 1 Jul 1706 Concord, MA
Martha b. Sep 1708
John b. 24 Apr 1712 Concord, MA
Ruth b. 13 May 1714 Concord, MA
Hannah
Elizabeth b. 4 Jan 1718 Concord, MA
Sarah b. 24 Jan 1720 Concord, MA
Abigail b. 27 Mar 1723 Concord, MA
1)The Hunt Family, Genealogy of the Name and Family of Hunt, T.B. Wyman; c. 1969 republish of 1863 p. 65






[NI1038] I found her gravestone at the Old Hill Burying Ground in Concord, Massachusetts. It says that she died 14 Jul 1750 at age 68.
Possible fathers of Mary Brown: Boaz Browne, Jabez Browne, Thomas Browne (see 1664 Concord Pledge of Allegiance to Charles II in Concord Climate of Freedom p. 199)

[NI1041] "THE NORWEGIAN BRADT FAMILY
Albert Andriessen De Noorman aka Bradt and his First Wife, Annetie Barents (Van) Rottmers
Albert Andriessen, or Albert Andriessen Bradt [Bratt] was one of the earliest Norwegian settlers in New Netherland. He came from Fredrikstad, a town at the mouth of the Glommen, the largest river in Norway. In the early records he is often called Albert de Noorman (the Norwegian). After 1670 he became known as Albert Andriesz Bradt. Whether he was related to the Bratts of Norwegian nobility, can not be ascertained. The Bratt family lived in Bergen, Norway, before the early part of the fifteenth century, when it moved to the northern part of Gudbrandsdalen. It had a coat of arms until about the middle of the sixteenth century. Since that time the Bratts belong to the Norwegian peasantry. They have a number of large farms in Gudbrandsdalen, Hedemarken, Toten, and Land.' In the state of New York there are many families of the name of Bradt, descendants of the pioneer from Fredrikstad.

The name of Albert Andriessen occurs for the first time in a document bearing the date August 26, 1636, an agreement between him and two others on the one hand, and the patroon of the colony of Rensselaerswyck, Kiliaen van Rensselaer, on the other. The agreement was made and signed in Amsterdam. It states that Andriessen was a tobacco planter. He may have learnt the cultivating of tobacco in Holland, where tobacco was raised as early as 1616.

"In the name of the Lord, Amen. On conditions hereafter specified, we, Pieter Cornelissen van munnickendam, millwright, 43 years of age, Claesz jans van naerden, 33 years of age, house carpenter, and albert andriessen van fredrickstadt, 29 years of age, tobacco planter, have agreed among ourselves, first, to sail in God's name to New Netherland in the small vessel which now lies ready and to betake ourselves to the colony of Rensselaerswyck for the purpose of settling there on the following conditions made with Mr. Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, as patroon of the said colony, etc.

"Thus done and passed, in good faith, under pledge of our persons and property subject to all courts and justices for the fulfillment of what is aforewritten, at Amsterdam, this 26th of August [1636].

'In witness whereof we have signed these with our own hands in the presence of the undersigned notary public . .

"Kiliaen Van Rensselaer
"Pieter Cornelissen
"albert and riessen . . -. "Claes jansen.
"J. Vande Ven, Notary."

As Andriessen was twenty-nine years of age when he made the agreement with Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, he must have been born about 1607. Pursuant to the stipulation in the agreement, he sailed, accompanied by his wife, Annetje Barents of "Rolmers," and as it would seem by two children, October 8, 1636, on the "Rensselaerswyck," which arrived at New Amsterdam March 4, 1637.

On this voyage, which was very stormy, his wife gave birth to a son, who received the name of Storm and who in later records is frequently called Storm from the Sea. The log of the ship ("Rinselaers Wijck") contains under the date of November 1 and 2 [1636J, the following interesting entries which are given in facsimile in the "Van Rensselaer Bowier Manuscripts," 360 f.:

The translation is as follows:


November

Saturday 1. In the morning we veered toward the west and drifted north. The Wind S. W with rough weather and high seas. The past half day and entire night.

Sunday: 2. Drifted 16 leagues N. E. by E.; the wind about west, the latitude by dead reckoning 41 degrees, 50 minutes with very high seas. That day the overhang above our rudder was knocked in by severe storm. This day a child was born on the ship, and named and baptized in England Stoerm; the mother is Asnetie Baernts. This day gone.


Inasmuch as there were eight children born to Andriessen and his wife, Storm being the third, two of their children, Barent and Eva, were likely with their parents on this voyage. Five of their children were born in the new world: Engeltje, Gisseltje, Andries, Jan and Dirck

Andriessen and his partners were to operate a mill. But not long after his arrival he took the liberty of dissolving partnership and established himself as a tobacco planter. Van Renssselaer had sent greetings to him in a letter dated September 21, 1637, (addressed to the partner of Andriessen, Pieter Cornelisz, master millwright) but in a subsequent letter, of May 8, 1638, to Cornelisz he wrote: "Albert Andriessen separated from you, I hear that he is a strange character, and it is therefore no wonder that he could not get along with you."6 Nevertheless, Van Rensselaer entertained the hope that Albert Andriessen would succeed as a tobacco planter. On December 29, 1637, he wrote to Director William Kieft that he should assign some of the young men on board the "Calmar Sleutel", commanded by Pieter Minuit and sailing in the same month, to tobacco planting with Aiidriessen "if he has good success," otherwise they were to serve with the farmers.

These young men were inexperienced, it seems. One, Elbert Elbertz, from Nieukerck, eighteen years old, was a weaver; Claes Jansen, from the same place, seventeen years old, was a tailor; Gerrit Hendricksz, also from the same place, fifteen year old, was a shoemaker. Gerrit must have served Andriessen for a term of at least three years; for his first three years' wages, from April 2, 1638 to April 2, 1641, are charged to Andriessen.

In a letter of May 10, 1638, Van Rensselaer advised Andriessen that he had duly received his letter stating that the tobacco looked fine. But he was desirous to get full particulars as to how the crop had turned out, and to get a sample of the tobacco. He expressed dissatisfaction at Andriessen having separated from Pieter Cornelisz, and liked to know the cause of his dispute with the officer and commis Jacob Albertsz Planck and his son. He informed Andriessen that he was obliged to uphold his officers. and promised him to stand by him and cause him to be "provided with everything." But he would not suffer bad behavior. He also informed him that it was apparent from the news he had received from several people that he was "very unmerciful to his children and very cruel" to his wife; he was to avoid this "and in all things have the fear of the Lord" before his eyes and not follow so much his own inclinations. But there was also another matter for which Van Rensselaer censured him: he had traded beaver furs with Dirck Corszen Stam contrary to contract, defrauded and cheated him. For seven pieces of duffel he had given him only the value of twenty-five merchantable beavers.

Van Rensselaer also addressed a letter, of the same date, to Jacob Albertsz Planck informing him that he had written to Andriessen that he should have more respect for the officers. Planck was instructed to notify Andriessen and all others living in the colony not to engage in "such detrimental fur trade," for he did not care to suffer in his colony those who had their eyes mainly on the fur trade.'

Notwithstanding, it was Dirck Corszen that was an unfaithful supercargo. And Van Rensselaer requested, in a letter of May 13, 1639, of Andriessen, that he should write him the truth of the matter and pay him what he still owed Corszen. If he saw that Andriessen acted honestly herein, he would do all in his power to help him. Andriessen should go to the superintendent of the colony, Arent van Curler, and purchase necessaries for himself and his own people at an advance in price of 50 per cent. He should get merchandise for the Indian trade at an advance of 75 per cent. In return he was to furnish Van Curler with skins at such a price that he could make something on the transaction.

Van Rensselaer also informed Andriessen that he would try to sell his tobacco at the highest price and furthermore give him 25 per cent more than his half of the net proceeds would amount to. He would moreover grant him 25 per cent discount on the grain which he bought. In fact, Van Rensselaer's confidence in Andriessen seemed to be increasing. For he not only acknowledged that he had received several letters from him, but also wished to say to his credit that he had received returns from no one. but him. He complained, however, of the tobacco which had been sent to him in barrels. It was a great loss to both that the "tobacco was so poor and thin of leaf that it could not stand being rolled." This. he thought, was likely due to Andriessen having left too many leaves on the plants. But not this alone: the weight was short. One barrel, put down at 292 lbs., weighed but 220 lbs. This was perhaps due to deception on the part of a certain Herman, a furrier. But anything like this should be avoided in the future. The tobacco amounted to 1,156 pounds net, which was sold for 8 st. (16 cents) a pound. Had it not been so bad and wretched, it could have been sold for twenty cents a pound. A higher price could be obtained if Andriessen would be more careful in the future and leave fewer leaves on the plants. He should try to grow "good stuff", for the tobacco from St. Christopher, an island in the West Indies, was so plentiful in Netherland that it brought but 3 stivers a pound. Andriessen should also each year make out a complete account of all expenses and receipts from tobacco, so Van Rensselaer could see whether any progress was made.

But Andriessen was a poor accountant. Neither Van Rensselaer nor his nephew, the former Director Van Twiller, could understand his accounts.1' Van Rensselaer therefore gave him directions to follow in making his entries and statements, claimingthat any other procedure would "leave everything confused and mixed up." He complained that Andriessen laid certain transactions before the patroon, which should be laid before the cornmis. He expressed the sentiment that Andriessen was making him his servant when he wrote to him "about soap and other things." He also complained that Andriessen caused great loss by making him hold the tobacco too high: it was safest to follow the market price in Netherland. Finally he censured him for buying unwisely - he had paid f. 200 for a heifer, "which is much too high." is The patroon and Andriessen had several disagreements.

The latter, with his brother Arent Andriessen, sent to the patroon sometime in 1642, 4,484 lbs. of tobacco. It was sold on an average of eight and one half st. a lb. Deducting 270 lbs. for stems, the net weight brought a sum of f. 1790:19. But the duty, freight charges, and convoy charges amounted to f. 629:15. The patroon said he would deduct only half of this if Andriessen compensated him according to his ordinance for his land on which the tobacco grew. But as long as he was in dispute with him he would deduct the whole sum. Andriessen did not suffer. Van Rensselaer complained in letter of March 16, 1643, to Arent van Curler that he did not know what privilege Albert Andriessen had received, since "his cows are not mentioned in the inventory sent him." He stated he would not want any one, no matter who he was, to own any animals which were not subject to the right of pre-emption. Therefore, Curler should include Andriessen's animals in the inventory, or make him leave the colony and pay for pasturing and hay during the past year

In September 5, 1643, the patroon stipulated the following with respect to Andriessen, whose term had long before expired without his having obtained a new lease or contract.

He "shall . . . be continued for the present but shall not own live stock otherwise than according to the general rule of one half of the increase belonging to the patroon and of the right of preemption and, in case he does not accept this, his cattle shall immediately be sent back to the place whence they came, with the understanding, however, that half of the increase bred in the colony shall go to the patroon in consideration of the pasturage and hay which they have used; and as to his accounts he shall also be obliged to close, liquidate and settle the same; and as far as the conditions after the expiration of his lease are concerned, the patroon adopts for him as well as for all others this fixed rule, of which they must all be notified and if they do not wish to continue under it must immediately leave the colony, namely, that every freeman who has a house and garden of his own shall pay an annual rent of 5 stivers per Rhineland rod and for land used in raising tobacco, wheat or other fruits 20 guilders per Rhineland morgen, newly cleared land to be free for a number of years, more or less, according to the amount of labor required in such clearing.

Andriessen not only cultivated tobacco. He operated "two large sawmills," run by a "powerful waterfall," worth as much as f. 1000 annual rent, but the patroon let him have them for f. 250 annual rent. 17 From May 4, 1652, to May 4, 1672, Andriessen is charged with the annual rent for these two mills and the land on Norman's Kill. 18 Originally this Kill was called Tawasentha, meaning a place of the many dead. The Dutch appelative of Norman's Kill is derived from Andriessen.

In New Amsterdam he had acquired a house and lot from Hendrick Kip, August 29, 1651. It lay northeast of fort Amsterdam." Under date of October 5, 1655, we find that he was taxed fi. 20 for this house and lot.

In May, 1655, before the court of the Burgomasters and Schepens in New Amsterdam, Roeloff Jansen, a butcher, appeared and made a complaint against Christiaen Barentsen, attorney for Andriessen. Jansen had leased a house and some land belonging to Andriessen who was to give him some cows. But the house was not tight" and "not enclosed," and the cows were missing. might still suffer. The defendant, as attorney for Andriessen, replied that it was not his fault that the demand had not been complied with according to the contract. He requested time to. write to his principal about it. The Court granted him a month's time in which to do this. In due time, however, the court ruled that Andriessen should make the necessary repairs.

Some years later, Simon Clasen Turck started a suit against Andriessen, of which we shall let the court minutes of New Amsterdam speak:


[August 19, 16591. "Simon Turck, pltf., vs. Dirck van Schelluyne as att'y of Albert Andriessen, deft. Deft, in default. Symon Turck produces in Court in writing his demand against Albert Andriessen concluding, that the attachment on the two cows grazing with Wolfert Webber shall stand good and have its full effect, until the said Albert Andriessen shall have paid him his arrears to the amount of fi. 2, sent to him by Joris Jans Rapalje Ao. 1649, the 3d Septr. in the absence of Pieter Cornelissen, millwright, decd., not accounted for nor made good by him." The attachment on the cows is declared valid by the Court.22
[August 19]. "Dirck van Schelluyne in quality as att'y for Albert Andriessen Noorman, answers demand of Symon Clasen Turck. The court orders copy to be furnished to party to answer thereunto at the next Court day."23
[September 2]. "Symon Clasen Turck replies to answer of Dirck van Schelluyne, att'y of Albert Andriessen. Court orders copy to be furnished to party to rejoin at the next court day,"24
[September 23]. "Tielman van Vleeck as att'y for Turck requests by petition, that Sybout Clazen shall be ordered to deliver by the next Court day his papers used against the abovenamed Symon Turck; also that Dirck van Schelluyne, att'y of Albert Andriessen, shall be ordered to rejoin to Symon Turck's reply.

Apostille: Petitioner's request is granted, and parties shall be ordered to prosecute their suit by the next court day.

"On date 17th January 1660, has Dirck van Schelluyne furnished me Secretary Joannes Nevius, his rejoinder, and demand in reconvention, as attorney of Albert Andriessen against Tielman van Vleec, att'y of Symon Clazen Turck, also rejoinder of Abra ham Verplanck against ditto Van Vleeck as substitute of Anthony Clasen More: Whereupon the President of the Burgomasters and Schepens ordered: Copy hereof to be furnished to party, and parties are ordered to exchange their papers with each other and to produce their deductions and principal intendit by inventory on the next Court day."

On January 22, 1660, the Burgomasters and Schepens dismissed the "pltfs. suit instituted herein" and condemned him to pay the costs incurred in this suit.

But a few days later, on January 28, 1660, it rendered the following decision: "Burgomasters and Schepens of the City of Amsterdam in N: Netherland having considered, read and reread the vouchers, documents and papers used on both sides in the suit between Tielman van Vleeck attorney of Simon Clasen Turck, (as husband and guardian of Merretje Pieters, daughter of the dec[eas]d Pieter Cornelissen, millwright, and his lawful heir, as well for himself as representing herein the orphan child of Tryntie Pieters, deceased daughter of said Pieter Cornelissen) pltf. against Dirck Van Schelluyne, attorney of Albert Andriessen Noorman, residing at Fort Orange, deft. relative to and concerning two hundred guilders, which Symon Clasen Turck is demanding from Albert Andriesen for so much, that Albert Andriesen has received from Jorsey in the absence of Pieter Comelissen, millwright, dated 3rd September, 1649, gone to Virginia and not computed by him nor made good as appears by contract made between Albert Andriessen and Symon Clasen Turck by the intermediation of - Corlear and Dirck van Schelluyne according to acte thereof executed before D: V. Hamel, Secretary of the Colony of Reinselaars Wyck, dated 27th September, 1658; and whereas the words of the contract read as follows :-


'Firstly, Symon Turck shall collect, receive, retain and dispose of as his own according to his pleasure, all outstanding debts receivable, wherever they be; all effects and goods found in the house of the deceased Pieter Cornelissen, whether belonging to him individually or to his Company or Association; On the other hand, Albert Andriesen assumes himself all the debts payable where and to whomsoever they may be, relating to their partnership, whether these stand in the name of Pieter Cornelissen or his own name. promises to release Symon Turck from all claims relating hereunto.' - having looked into, examined and weighed everything material, Burgomasters and Schepens find it right, that the pltf's demand be dismissed, inasmuch as they find, that the two hundred guilders were not to be received, but were paid several years since to Joris Rapalj e, who sent the same to Albert Andriesen Noorman and are accordingly not payable to the estate of Pieter Cornelissen, but whenever Symon Turck or his attorney can prove that, at the time of the settlement of accounts and writing of the contract, Albert Andriesen Noorman notified Symon Turck, that he should receive the 11. 200., hereinbefore in question, from Sybout Clasen, then Albert Andriesen shall give and pay the above mentioned fi. 200., with costs, and in default of proof the pltf. is condemned in the costs of the suit. Regarding the demand in reconvention about certain planks, no disposition can be made therein as the same is moved according to the Lites Contest atio. Thus done and adjudged by the Burgomaster and Schepens of the City of Amsterdam in New Netherland as above.

"Adj. as above

"Martin Kregier."


The court minutes under date of June 8, 1660, regarding this litigation, state:


"On petition of Tielman Van Vleeck, attorney for Symon Clasen Turck, wherein he requests that the Court may not only examine, but also expedite the solution given by him relative to the fulfillment of the interlocutory judgment pronounced 28th January last, it is ordered :-Copy of the solution shall be furnished to party to answer thereunto at the next Court day.

And under date of January 29, 1661, the minutes pertaining to this case read: "On the petition of Tielman van Vleeck, agent of Symon Clasen Turck, wherein he requests, as Albert Andriesen Noorman remains in default, to answer the solution given in to Court on the 8th of June 1660, that the above named Albert Andries(e)n shall in contumacy be condemned to pay him petitioner the computed two hundred guilders remaining due to him; Whereupon was ordered: The petitioner shall notify his party hereof according to law before June 5, 1662.



"Appeared before me Robert Livingston, secretary etc., and in presence of the honorable Messieurs Philip Schuyler and Dirck Wessells, commisaries etc., Albert Andriese Bratt, who acknowledged that he is well and truly indebted and in arrears to Mr. Nicolaus Van Renselaer, director of colony of Renselaerswyck, in the sum of 3,956 guilders, as appears by the books of the colony of Renselaerswyck, growing out of the part rent for the mill and land; which aforesaid 3,956 guilders the mortgagor, to the aforenamed Mr. Director or to his successors, promise to pay, provided that whatever he, the mortgagor shall make appear to have been paid thereon shall be deducted: pledging therefor, specially, the produce of his orchard, standing behind the house which the mortgagor now possesses, from which produce of the orchard he promises to pay in rent during life twenty guilders in patroon's money in apples, and generally pledging his person and estate, personal and real, present and future, nothing excepted; submitting the same to the force of all laws and judges to promote the payment thereof in due time, if need be, without loss or cost.

"Done in Albany, without craft or guile, on the 30th of October, 1677.

"Aalbert Andriess Brat.
"Philip Schuyler.
"Dirck Wessels.
"Acknowledged before me,
"Robt. Livingstone, Secr.

Albert Andriessen died June 7, 1686

Albert's First Wife, Annetie Barents (Van) Rottmer and her mother, Geesie Barentsdr.
Gissel or Geesie Barentsdr. [Barentsdochter] assisted her daughter Annatie Barents Van Rottmer at the signing of banns on 27 March 1632 for her marriage to Albert Andriessen. Annetie was 24 years old. When Annatie's brother Barent Barents signed his banns at the age of 22, on 21 Apr. 1632 he too was assisted by his mother. At the time Gissel was living on the Schaepensteegje or Sheep Alley in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Geesie's husband Barent Rottmer is never listed, so it is assumed he died before 1632.

When Geesie Barents came to New Netherland on board "Den Waterhondt" in the fall of 1640 her husband Barent Rottmer was dead. By the end of 1640 she had married Pieter Jacobse Van Rynsburgh, whether in Holland or not is not known. Pieter was probably the West India Company gunner at Fort Orange.

The passenger list of Den Waterhondt, which sailed from The Texel in June or July 1640 for New Netherland, lists Gijsje Berents, wife of Pieter Jacobsz. Gijsje was charged with board on den Waterhondt in 1640 and credited with 28 days work done by her husband at the home of Arent van Curler. Pieter Jacobsz may have been the "constapel" of Fort Orange, who on 15 April 1652 by order of Johannes Dyckman, tore van Slichtenhorst's proclamation from the house of Gijsbert Cornelisz, tavern keeper.

Geesie and Pieter filed a joint will in New Amsterdam in June 1642 leaving all of their separate estates to each other. If Geesie died first, Pieter was to pay her daughter Annatie, twenty carolus guilders. Since Pieter made the first of three payments to the deacons of Fort Orange for an adult funeral pall, on 12 April 1658, it appears that Geesie had died that previous winter or spring.

Geesie's daughter, Annetie Bradt, appears to have died early in 1661 since a payment for a pall was made on 13 February that year.

Albert's Wives
sp1-Annatie Barents VAN ROTTMER (1608-1661)
sp2-Pietertje JANS ( -1667)
sp3-Geertruy Pieterse COEYMANS ( -1695)
(Children are all by first wife)

3-- Aefje (Eva) BRADT-
sp-Antony DE HOOGES-2931 ( -1655)
sp-Roeloff SWARTWOUT-2932 (1634-1715)
3-- Barent BRADT-469 (1634)
sp-Susanna Dirckx MEYER-470 (1640-1722)
3-- Storm Albertse VANDERZEE-2277 (1636-1679)
sp-Hilletje LANSING-6135
3-- Engeltie BRADT-2278 (1637-1683)
sp-Teunis SLINGERLAND-2933
3-- Gisseltie BRADT-2279 (1640-1677)
> sp-Jan VAN EECHELEN-2934
3-- Andries BRADT-2280 (1642-1706)
sp-unknown-2935
sp-Neeltie-2936
sp-Cornelia VAN WIE-2937
3-- Jan Albertsen BRADT (1648-1695)
sp-Maria Moockers POST (1649)[Lorine's line]
3-- Dirk BRADT-2281 (1650)
Albert's Brother, Arent Andriesse
Arent Andriesse BRADT-253 ( -1662)
sp-Catalyntje DE VOS-254 ( -1712)

Children:
3-- Aeffie BRADT-255 (1649-1728)
sp-Claes Fredickse VAN PETTEN-6029 (1641-1728)
3-- Ariaantje BRADT-256 ( -1717)
sp-Helmers OTTEN-4373 ( -1676)
sp-Reyer Jacobse SCHERMERHORN-4374
3-- Andries Arentse BRADT-257 (1653-1690)
sp-Margareta (Grietje) VAN SLYCK-261 (1665-1733)
3-- Cornelia BRADT-258 (1655-1690)
sp-Jan POOTMAN-3380 ( -1690)
3-- Samuel Arentss BRADT-192 (1659-1713)
sp-Susannah VAN SLYCK-191 (1662-1713)
3-- Dirk Arentse BRADT-259 (1661-1735)
sp-Maritje VAN EPS-260 (1661)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sources

1. Scandanavian Immigrants to New York 1630-1674 by John O. Evjen. 1916
2. Bradt: A Norwegian Family in America by Peter R. Christoph " (1)
1) Olive Tree Geneaolgy

[NI1042] "Maria Pels, daughter of Evert Pels and Jannetje Symens...
The charter of Esopus or Wyltwick (now Kingston), was granted May 16, 1661 to Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentsen Sleight and Albert Heyman Roosa, Schepens, (Magistrate), who with Roeloff Swartwout, as Schout, formed the court of justice for the government of the new village." (1)
Possible source: Jacob Aertsen van Wagenen of Wageningen, Holland 1637-1944 by Carl S. Van Wagenen (1944: $75 Carl S. Van Wagenen, 12 Forest Drive, Woodstock, NY 12498)
1) January 1894 Old Deerpark Days p. 235

[NI1044] "Note: No proof has been found to support the tradition in WETHERSFIELD CT BY STILES 2:658 that Thomas Standish of Wethersfield CT was a son of Myles Standish. He is not mentioned in the will." (1)
"Thos. Standish, the settler... there is a lot of info on the new NEGHR cds and also about his wife, Susannah Smith. Susannah's father Richard Smith died 1670 at age 80 in Wethersfield, CT. Two pretty good articles about this man that I have found so far. I am still trying to tie Thos. Standish to Myles." (2)
1) Warner, Russell L.; Mayflower Families in Progress: Myles Standish of the Mayflower and his Descendants for Five Generations (General Society of Mayflower Descendants 1990) p.2
2) Gary Murray (SJJA18A@prodigy.com))

[NI1046] "Richard Halstead (1700-1785; Joseph (3)) m. 1727 Esther Oldfield. He removed to Goshen, Orange Co., N.Y. and had sons Richard (1728-1804); Joseph (1736-1797); Isaiah (1738-1797); Benjamin (1740-1801); Michael (1748-1820); another son and four daughters whose names are unknown." (1)
"The Richard Halstead Family
Richard Halstead, the second son of Joseph and Sarah Ferris Halstead, was born about 1700 in the town of Hempstead, Long Island, New York, which at that time was a part of Suffolk County. His father and family moved to the town of Westchester, county of Westchester, New York, after 1715 and it is probable that Richard lived in Westchester county with his parents for a short time. Records indicate that by 1721, he was a resident of the town of Goshen, Orange County, New York...
On July 10, 1721, Richard Halstead was one of four residents of the area then known as Goshen who signed a petition to the colonial authorities requesting that a township be formed from part of what was then known as Goshen...
Richard Halstead is reported to have been one of the first merchants of Goshen. Also he was a buyer and seller of land in Orange County as will be noted in the transactions stated below.
On April 29, 1703, Queen Anne of England granted a large tract of land west of the Hudson River highlands and east of the Minisink Hills to a group of twelve men [see Anthony Swarthout] and this became known as the Wawayanda Patent. Richard Halstead was not one of the original twelve patentees but by 1722 he had become one of the proprietors as well as a holder of lots in the patent.
On April 17, 1722, Richard Halstead was one of a group of owners and proprietors of a large tract of land in the Wawayanda Patent that conveyed a parcel of two hundred acres of land to John Bradner to encourage him to be the first minister of the gospel to settle to Goshen. The church established by John Bradner in Goshen was the Presbyterian church...
In 1742, Richard Halstead and his brother-in-law, Elias Oldfield, served as executors of the will of Joseph Oldfield of Goshen, Orange County, New York. Joseph Oldfield was the father of Elias Oldfield and the father-in-law of Richard Halstead.
About 1727, Richard Halstead married Esther Oldfield who had been born October 9, 1707, and baptized September 30, 1708, the daughter of Joseph and Martha Grassett Oldfield. The family lived on the road from Goshen to the village of Florida near what was known as the Snyder place.
About eleven children were born to Richard and Esther Halstead, namely, Richard, about 1728, Sarah about 1734, Joseph about 1736, Isaiah in 1738, Benjamin about 1740, John (?) about 1742, a daughter about 1746, Michael in 1748, and three other children who are believed to have been daughters, two of whom may have been Esther and Martha.
It is believed that Richard Halstead did not serve as a member of the armed forces during the Revolutionary War because at that time he was over seventy five years old. However, it is believed that he was one of the persons who was paid for drawing military supplies for the armed forces. It is known that he was a partisan for the cause of the Revolution. Records show that on June 8, 1775, he was one of many men in Goshen who signed the Revolutionary Pledge of loyalty to the cause.
There is some evidence that suggests Richard Halstead may have lived in Pennsylvania for one or more periods of his life. Wardwell reported that "Isaiah Halstead, son of Richard and Esther (Hester) (Oldfield) Halstead, was born at Pittston, Pennsylvania, 11 March 1738." If this is so, Isaiah's parents must have been in Pennsylvania at some period. The 1790 United States Census lists a Richard Halstead and a Richard Halstead, Jr. as heads of family in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. However, it will be noted that the records cited in this chapter show that Richard Halstead was a resident of Orange County, New York, in 1721, 1722, 1726, 1731, 1736, and 1775. Also, it is noted that Richard Halstead died in Goshen, New York in 1785, five years before the 1790 United States census was taken. It may be that Richard Halstead migrated to the Wyoming Valley in Pennsylvania sometime after 1736 and returned to New York after 1738.
Richard Halstead died at Goshen, New York in 1785. His will, dated May 5, 1744 (sic), was proved on December 1, 1785. His wife Esther Oldfield Halstead died after 1785."(2)
1) The Story of the Halsteads (see Benjamin) p. 61
2) Harrold p. 28-32

[NI1047] "About 1727, Richard Halstead married Esther Oldfield who had been born October 9, 1707, and baptized September 30, 1708, the daughter of Joseph and Martha Grassett Oldfield." (1)
1) Harrold p. 31

[NI1048] "John Whitley, buried in England, 1539.
John Whitley, his son bur. 12-3-1561.
John Whitley, (3rd), bp. 2-19-1540 at Halifax, Eng.,; m. 4-24-1562, Annes Hartley, dau. of John Hartley of Ovenden.
Susan Whitley dau. of John and Annes (Hartley) Whitley, bp. 2-1-1572, m. 9-5-1596, Abraham Halsted.
Children:
Grace, bp. 5-16-1597.
Abraham bp. 4-27-1600.
Joseph bp. 7-12-1607.
Jonas bp. 1611.
Abraham Halsted probably d. bet. 1611 and 1615, and his widow, Susan Halsted, m. (2), John Lume of Northowram, 4-12-1615; 3 chil. John Lume prob. was in Stamford, Conn. in 1642 with his family and stepson, Jonas Halsted. (Data from American Genealogist, Jan. 1942)." (2)
"Joseph Halsted, b. 1665; d. 1736; m. (1) 1693, Sarah Ferris; m. (2) Sarah ________; res. Hempstead, L.I., where he owned a large estate; removed later to Westchester Co., N.Y." (3)
"Will dated 22 Jan 1736, proved 10 Aug 1736...
Joseph Halsted died in New Rochelle in 1736, having had a 2nd wife, also named Sarah" (1)
"Joseph Halstead (1665-1736:Timothy) m. 1st. 1693 Sarah Ferris, dau. of Zachariah Ferris; 2nd. wife Sarah, a widow. He resided at Cow Neck, Hempstead, L.I., and then removed to Westchestertown, Westchester Co., N.Y., where he died. His will, proved Aug. 10, 1736, disposed of a large estate to his wife and children." (4)
"The Joseph Halstead Family
Joseph Halstead, the second son of Timothy and Hannah Williams Halstead, may be the first Halstead in the particular line of Halsteads with which this book is primarily concerned to have been born in America... Joseph was born in the town of Hempstead, Long Island, about 1667...
During the first part of his life Joseph lived in the town of Hempstead as also did his father. One area of the town of Hempstead in which he lived was known as Cow Neck and his brother Timothy also is reported as living in Cow Neck for a time and it may have been that all of the family of Timothy Halstead lived there for a period.
About 1694, Joseph Halstead married Sarah Ferris who had been born in 1676, the daughter of Zachariah Ferris and his wife Sarah Bloude. Nine children were born to Joseph and Sarah Halstead, namely, Joseph about 1694, Phoebe about 1697, Abyah about 1703, Samuel about 1705, Anna about 1707, Ezekiel, about 1708-9, and Michael about 1715.
All of the children of Joseph and Sarah Halstead were reported to have been born in the town of Hempstead on Long Island. Some time after the youngest child was born in 1715, when Joseph was nearly fifty years old, the Joseph Halstead family moved from Long Island to the town of Westchester in the county of Westchester. Here in Westchester, Joseph Halstead established his home and it is believed that he lived in Westchester throughout the rest of his life.
Sarah Ferris Halstead, the first wife of Joseph Halstead, died about 1723 or 1724. Some time after her death, Joseph Halstead married a widow who also had the first name Sarah but whose maiden family name or the name of her first husband is not identified. No children are reported to have been born to this second marriage.
Joseph Halstead died in 1736 and is believed to have been buried in Westchester County, New York. His will dated January 22, ... 1736, was proved August 10, 1736. In his will, Joseph Halstead bequeathed his large estate to his second wife and to his children." (5)
1) Shoptaugh, Laura A. Davis; Some descendants of Jonas Halstead; (Oakland 1954) p. 2
2) Ibid., p. 1
3) Ferris Genealogy Vol. 5 p. Z-12
4) The Story of The Halsteads (see Benjamin) p. 59
5) Harrold, p. 26-7

[NI1049] Source: The Hunt Family, Genealogy of the Name and Family of Hunt, T.B. Wyman; c. 1969 repub of 1863 p. 74
"Nehemiah Hunt, son of William and lord of Punkatassett, lived on the estate bought by his father of Rev. Peter Bulkeley, and now owned and occupied by his descendant William Hunt." (1)
Children:
Mary b 28 Sep 1664 Concord
John b 16 Apr 1666 d 19 May 1666
John b. 16 May 1667 d 10 Jun 1669
Nehemiah b. 29 Sep 1669 d 27 Oct 1718
William b. 1672 d 15 Jul 1673
John
His grave is in the Old Hill Burying Ground of Concord, MA. His gravestone says that he died 6 Mar 1717.
1) Walcott, Charles H.; Concord in the Colonial Period (Boston 1884) p. 86



[NI1052] "neamia hunt & mary Tooll maried 1 Jun: 1663" (1)
I found her gravestone in the Old Hill Burying Ground in Concord, Massachussetts. It says she died 29 Aug 1724 at age 84.
1) Concord, Mass. Births, Marriages and Deaths: 1635-1850 p. 13

[NI1053] "Lucas, bapt. Sept. 5, 1703; m., Jan. 17, 1729, Catherine Roosa... Among the descendants of this Lucas is the Rev. John De Witt, New Brunswick, N.J., one of the Committee on the Revision of the Bible." (1)
Children of Lucas De Witt and Catharine Roosa
Annatje, bapt. Oct. 5, 1729
Evert, bapt. Nov. 25, 1733...
Marytje, bapt. March 7, 1736.
Jan L., bapt. (Kaatsbaan Ch. Rec.) May 4, 1736...
Lucas, bapt. Aug. 20, 1738...
Abraham, bapt. Feb. 15, 1741.
Jannetje, bapt. July 31, 1743.
Rachel, bapt. (Kaatsbaan Ch. Rec.) Aug. 22, 1745.
Catharine, bapt. (Kaatsbaan Ch. Rec.) Sept. 5, 1748
Petrus, bapt. Nov. 2, 1755." (2)
"(Note: Unless otherwise specified the baptisms are taken from the records of the Dutch Church at Kingston, N.Y.)" (3)
See James Osterhout. Lucas De Witt's son was the original leaseholder in Oak Hill, Durham, Greene County.
1) Evans, Thomas G.; The De Witt Family of Ulster County, New York (NYG&GR Oct 1886 rep. New York 1886) p. 10
2) Ibid., p. 17
3) Ibid., p. 5

[NI1054] "(Lucas De Witt)... m., Jan. 17, 1729, Catharine Roosa (bapt. Feb. 16, 1709 [Kingston, New York]) daughter of Evert Roosa and Tietje Van Etten." (1)
1) The De Witt Family (see Lucas) p. 10

[NI1055] "Lucas, m., Dec. 22 1695, Annatje Delva... Lucas was commander, and joint-owner with his father, of a sloop called the St. Barbara, "of about fifty Dutch feet by the keele," which in 1698 they sold to Capt. Daniel Hobart, of the Island of Barbadoes, for 200 pounds. He died in 1703." (1)
"Children of Lucas De Witt and Annatje Delva.
Jannetje, bapt. March 7, 1697; m. July 19, 1717, Cornelis Langendyk...
Barbara, bapt. Nov. 12, 1699; d. young.
Jan, bapt. Dec. 8, 1700; m., Sept 26, 1731, Ariaantje Osterhoudt...
Lucas..." (2)
"Ariaantie/Harriet bapt. 9 Mar 1712 m. 26 Sept 1731 Jan de Witt bapt 8 Dec 1700 (Son of Lucas de Witt & Annetje Delva NYGBR 18:19" (3)
1) The De Witt Family (see Lucas) p. 6
2) Ibid., p. 9-10
3) Osterhoudt Genealogy, p. 37

[NI1056] "(Lucas De Witt), m., Dec. 22, 1695, Annatje Delva, daughter of Anthony Delva and Jannatje Hillebrants. She was a Roman Catholic... On March 31, 1706, his widow married Gerrit Van Benschoten, and re
moved to the vicinity of what is now Catskill, Greene County, N.Y. Becoming again a widow, she married, Oct. 26, 1721, Hendrick Rosekrans, whose first wife was Antje Vredenberg." (1)
1) The De Witt Family (see Lucas) p. 6

[NI1057] The charter of Esopus or Wyltwick (now Kingston) was granted May 16, 1661 to Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentsen Sleight and Albert Heyman Roosa, Schepens. (see Albert Roosa)
Maria Pels was the daughteer of Evert Pels and from this I conclude that Evert Roosa was her son.
"Lucas (de Witt)... m. Jan 17, 1729, Catherine Roosa (bapt. Feb 16, 1709), daughter of Evert Roosa and Tietje van Etten."(1)
1) De Witt Genealogy, p. 10

[NI1058] "He sailed in the year 1635... From different counties came the hardy settlers. The goodly and godly Peter Bulkley, Capt. Willard, the Wheelers, Thomas Bateman... to Boston... so they came up soon to Musketaquid now changed to... Concord... The township was regularly bought of the Indians. The bargain was made by Captain Willard and others, at the house of Mr. Bulkely with Squa Sachem, Nuttunkurta... The habitation of our ancestor was built... by digging into the bank of a hill, driving posts into the ground and covering the sides with brushwood... He was one who petitioned the Governor and Assembly, in 1645 concerning matters of finance... (see George Phillips, 557) Our... ancestor, after taking to his bosom a second wife, closed his useful life in the town Marlborough in 1667."
Married (1) Elizabeth Best (in England) she died 1661 (2) Mercy Rice (1664)
He had the following children: Nehemiah; Samuel b. 1633; Elizabeth; Hannah b. 12 Feb 1640-41; Isaac b. 1647(1)
"Hunt
William, Concord, rem. to Marlborough, frm. June 2, 1641... He signed his wil Oct. 23, 1667 date of probate not given, beq. to wife Mary, and sons Samuel, Nehemiah and Isaac and dau. Elizabeth Barnes." (2)
1) The Hunt Family, Genealogy of the Name and Family of Hunt, T.B. Wyman; c. 1969 repub. of 1863 p. 89
2) Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts p. 248

[NI1059] Possible Ancestor: John Best who emigrated from Sandwich, Kent to Salem, Mass. (Banks, p. 82)
Another Possible Ancestor: Henry Best and Grace Boithes, parents of Bridget Best (b. 9 Apr 1592, Ovenden, England; m. Abraham Shaw before 1617) per Nina Bowling WMJG06B@prodigy.com..
"Ann Pudeator's crime was scolding. John Best, speaking about how he had several times found Pudeator's cow among his father's when he rounded up the herd, explained that the reason he "did ConClude said pudeator was a wich" was that she "would Chide when I Came houm from turning the Cow bak." (Note: C. Mather, Wonders of the Invisible World, 216-7.)" (1)
1) The Devil in the Shape of a Woman, p.129

[NI1066] "6. John, (Daniel, John) b. in Newbury July 10, 1676, m. 1st Elizabeth ------ who d. Jan. 10, 1715. He m. 2nd, Oct. 22, 1717, Elizabeth, dau. of William and Sarah Burrage, b. in Boston June 10, 1691. She survived him and m. as a second husband, Benjamin Whitmore of Newton, Oct. 23, 1729. They had children: (1) John Whitmore, b. June 28, 1730, (2) Joseph Whitmore, b. Oct. 13, 1732, and (3) Sarah Whitmore, b. July 29, 1735." (1)
1) Cheney Genealogy p. 225-6

[NI1067] "110. Benjamin Whitmore, b 1696 bp 28 Nov 1696, md 23 Oct 1729, Elizabeth Cheney [Wrong-see wife]. Children:
I. John Whitmore, b. 28 Jun 1730, md Beulah
II. Joseph Whitmore, b. 13 Oct 1732, md Susanna Chick
III. Sarah Whitmore, b. 29 Jul 1735." (1)
1) Cooke, Whitmore p. 20

[NI1070] "Samuel 2 Born at Cambridge, Mass., May 1, 1658. Died at Lexington, Mass., May 22, 1724. Married March 31, 1686, Rebecca Gardner. She was born 1665-1666. Died at Lexington June 5, 1709. They resided at Lexington.
Children
Francis b. Lexington, 9 Dec 1686
Samuel b. Lexington 1 Apr 1688
Rebecca b. Lexington 9 Feb 1690 (I found her gravestone next to her parents in Ye Olde Burial Grounds in Lexington. It says she died at age 19 years, 4 months on 5 June 1709.
John b. Lexington (I found his gravestone next to his parents in Ye Olde Burial Grounds in Lexington. It says he died at age 21 years and 11 months on 5 May 1714.)
Benjamin b. Lexington m. 1729 Elizabeth Cheney
Abigail born Lexington, 8 May 1698
Sarah b. Lexington 10 Apr 1701
Nathaniel b. Lexington 7 May 1702
Mary b. Lexington May 4 1704
Samuel married second, Mary , widow of Abraham Watson. He lived in Lexington, probably in his father's house, which was on the boundary line between Lexington and Cambridge." (1)
"[married] (2) c 1713 Mary Butterfield, b. 1670 d 14 Nov 1730, ae 60, dau of Jonathan Butterfield & Wid of Abraham Watson." (2)
I found his gravestone in Ye Olde Burial Ground in Lexington, Massachusetts. It says he died on 22 May 1724 at the age of 66 years and 21 days.
1) The Whitmore Genealogy; A Record of the Descendants of Francis Whitmore of Cambridge Massachusetts (1625-1685) by Jessie Whitmore Patten Purdy (1907) p. 18
2) Cooke, Raeola Ford; My Own Record of Descendants of John Whitmore/Wetmore c. 1987 p. 6


[NI1071] "(Samuel Whitmore) married 31 Mar 1686, Rebecca Gardner. She was born 1665-6. Died at Lexington, Massachusetts 5 Jun 1709. They resided at Lexington." (1)
I found her gravestone in Ye Olde Burial Ground, Lexington, Massachusetts. It says she (Rebeckah wife of Samuel) died at the age of 43 years, 2 months and 10 days on 5 June 1709.
"Gardener, Gardiner, Gardner...
Richard, yeoman, not the son of Thomas of Salem. Woburn, propr. 1648. He deposed in 1658, ae. about 39 years. Bought lands of Thos Boughton in 1658. Rem. to Charlestown. bought land in 1676. He m. Oct. 18, 1651, Anna Blanchard. Ch. John b. Aug 14, 1652, Anna b. Jan. 17, 1654, Benjamin b. Dec. 26, 1656, Henry b. Feb. 12, 1657, Esther b. Oct. 15, 1659, Ruth b. April 1661.
He gave security 5 (2) 1653, to pay #108 to the 2 children his wife had by her former husband.
He d. May 29, 1698 ae. 79 years. Will dated March 15, 1696-7, prob. June 6, 1698, beq to only son Henry; to his son John; to the ch. of daus. Hannah Coddington, Ruth Gypson, (Ruth and Anna); daus. Hester, Abigail, Rebecca and Mehitabel; gr. sons Benjamin Johnson son to dau. Hester, John Whitmore, son to dau. Rebecca, John Connett, son of dau. Mehitabel, Richard and Simon Thompson, sons of dau. Abigail; Maj. William Johnson and pastor, Mr. Jabez Fox." (2)
1) Whitmore Genealogy (see Samuel Whitemore) p. 18
Gardner researchers:
Gerald Ring (GKDP81A-Prodigy)
John Gardner (PDKF06A-Prodigy)
Dean (Lila) Johnson (Gardner) (DMMJ61A-Prodigy)
Lila Coyle (TMEC59A-Prodigy)
David Lehman (TEPK79A-Prodigy) Send him any additional info on her ancestors.

[NI1077] "Francis Whitmore Born in England in 1625. Died at Cambridge October 12, 1685. Married Isabel Parke, daughter of Richard and Margery Crane Parke. She died at Cambridge March 31, 1665. They resided at Cambridge.
Children
Elizabeth. b. Cambridge 2 May 1649
Francis. b. Cambridge 12 Oct 1650
John. b. Cambridge 1 Oct 1654
Samuel. b. Cambridge 1 May 1658. m. Rebecca Gardner
Abigail. b. Cambridge 30 Jul 1660
Sarah. b. Cambridge 7 Mar 1662
Francis married second, 10 Nov 1666, Margaret Harty. She died 1 Mar 1686. They had
Margaret. b. Cambridge 9 Sep 1668
Francis b. Cambridge 3 Mar 1671
Thomas b. Cambridge 1673
Joseph. b. Cambridge 1675
Francis came to this country probably during the 1630's, and had established his residence at Cambridge prior to 1648, as about this time he married at that place, Isabel Parke. Brooks, in his history of Medford, tells us he owned property in Cambridge near the Plains, Charlestown near the Menetomie River, near Dendruck Meadows; also in Medford and Lexington. His house stood on the dividing line between Lexington and Cambridge, and is mentioned in the Act of Division. His name, with that of his wife, appears on a petition in favour of an old woman charged with being a witch, so he can hardly have been of the extreme Puritan Party, (WRONG, this had little to do with religion) though a member of church.
He served in King Philip's War; was Selectman and Constable in 1668 and 1682. In his will he makes provision for the education of his children, thus early evidencing that regard for education that is so marked a family trait. This document, which is interesting in that it gives us a light on the character of our first American ancestor, is given in full in the appendix." (1)
"Francis, tailor, Cambridge, propr. 1648; frm. May 3, 1654. He deposed 18 (10) 1660, ae. about 35 years. [Mdx. Files.] He m. about 1648, Isabel, dau. of Thomas Parks. [MDX files, 1672.] She d. March 31, 1665. He m. 2 Margaret Harty; ch. Elizabeth b. 2 (3) 1649, Francis, John, Samuel, Abigail bapt. July 3, 1659, Sarah bapt. March 30, 1662, Margery bapt. March 27, 1664, Hannah (by second wife) bapt. Feb. 15, 1667. [Mi].
He d. Oct. 12, 1685, [Town Rec.] ae. 62. [Gr. St.] Will dated 8 (8) 1685, beq. to wife; eldest son Francis; two youngest sons Thomas and Joseph; other children; the ch. of his dau. Elizabeth and her husband Daniel Markham; son Samuel has had his portion already. Friends William Locke and Francis Moore execs. The widow Margaret d. march 1, 1658-6. Admin. on both estates was gr. June 17, 1690, to son John and son-in-law William Locke., Jr.j; sons-in-law Thomas Carter and Jonathan Thompson united in the petition." (2)
1)Whitmore Genealogy (see Samuel Whitemore) p. 13-14
2) Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts p. 494

[NI1078] "(Francis Whitmore) married Isabel Parke, daughter of Richard and Margery Crane Parke. She died at Cambridge March 31, 1665. They resided at Cambridge."(1)
"Isabel Parke was born in England, about 1628; came to American with her father 1635, and died 31 Mar 1665. She married Francis Whitmore." (2)
1)Whitmore Genealogy (see Samuel Whitmore) p. 13
2) Parks, Frank Sylvester; Genealogy of the Parke Families of Massachusetts; (Washington, 1909) p. 35

[NI1085] "Ricard Parke appeared at Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1635. He was a miller by occupation and a large landowner. Born in England, he sailed from London in the ship "Defence," which left England August 10, 1635 and arrived at Boston October 3, 1635.
"The Original Lists;" edited by John Camden Hotten, under "Register of the names of all ye Passinger wch passed from ye Port of London for on whole year Endinge at Xmas 1635;" page 105, has the following
xjo die Julij 1635
Theis vnder-written names are to be transported to New-England imbarqued in the Defence of Lndon Edward Bostock Mr. p. Certificate of his Conformitie in Religion & that he is no Subsedy-man.
A Miller Richard Perk 33
Margery Perk 40
Isabel Perk 7 yeres
Elizabeth Perk 4...
In the "Proprietors' Records of Cambridge," a number of references to Richard Parke are found, as follows;
1639 "Richard Parke. One house upon the Cowe Common with halfe an Acre of ground. Persival Greene west, John Wilcock East, Swampe northeast, Cow Common southwest....
Jackson's "History of Newton," says in part:
"Richard Park was a proprietor in Cambridge 1636, and of Cambridge Farms, Lexington 1642. His house was near the Cow Common in Cambridge. The very ancient dwelling house which was pulled down about 1800, was supposed to have been built by him. It stood within a few feet of the spot now occupied by the Eliot church...
In 1663 he was released from training, on account of his age. He d. 1665, leaving wid. Sarah, son Thomas and two daughters. One of the daughters m. Francis Whitmore of Cambridge...
Richard Parke married 1st, Margery ____. (One correspondent stated that her name was Crane.) No record of her death has been found. Aobut 1656 he married 2nd, Sarah, daughter of William and Jane Colier, and widow of Love Brewster. He had no children by his second wife.
Children:
Richard
Thomas, b. about 1628-9
Isabel, b. about 1628-9
Elizabeth, b. 1631, in England; d. Sept. 19, 1690; m Edward Winship, of Cambridge, as his second wife." (1)
1) Parke Genealogy (see Isabel Parke) p. 25-30

[NI1087] "Another Hastings appeared in 1778, when Isaac Hastings settled on what is now the Athol Road about one half a mile from the center of the town. Later he built his second home where Stephen Clark's house now stands. One of his sons, Daniel, became the father of the Samuel Hastings who was to be prominent in Warwick for many years around the end of the nineteenth century. Another son of Isaac was Caleb, and he and his son Caleb W. were to live on the Hastings Pond Road in the house now owned by Mrs. Bertha Coe." (1)
We found the grave of Isaac Hastings at the Warwick Cemetary on the Orange Road south of Warwick.
"Isaac Hastings, son of Joseph and Hannah Hastings, born in Shrewsbury, (Mass) April 5, 1751, and settled in Warwick. He married, 1775, Sarah Goddard of Petersham, (Mass) who died November 11, 1804.
He married Sarah Whipple of Grafton, (Mass) who died November 15, 1844. He died September 25, 1831." (2)
Warwick was one of the centers of the famous Shays Rebellion. "at a town meeting at Warwick, January 16 (1787), it was voted that the town would send a petition to the General Court in support of the (Hatfield) convention... During this month of January Shays and his army of some 1100 men marched to Springfield with the intention of seizing the Springfield arsenal...(after being defeated by General Lincoln) Shays with about 100 men escaped to Warwick where they spent the next night at the taverns owned by Col. James Goldsbury and Asa Conant. The following day, February 6, Shays and the remnant of his army reached Winchester, New Hampshire." (It is not known what role, if any, Isaac Hastings played in this episode.) (3)
Children:
Isaac Hastings
Rebecca Hastings
1) Morse, Charles A., Warwick, Massachusetts: Biography of a Town, Dresser, Chapman & Grimes, Cambridge, Mass. 1963
2) Arlene Whiteman
3) Morse, Op. Cit.

[NI1088] "(South Warwick) was incorporated as the District of Orange... It was not until 1810 that it was incorporated as a town. By this action Warwick lost many estimable citizens who had been prominent in many town activities and were now to become the leaders of Orange. Among these were the families of... Nathan Goddard.'' (1)
This Nathan is probably her brother.
1) Morse, Charles A., Warwick, Massachusetts: A Biography of a Town 1763-1963 Dresser, Chapman & Grimes Cambridge, Mass. c. 1963 p. 98
Possible source: Harms, J.W., The Goddard Book c. 1990

[NI1089] "Z-12 Sarah Ferriss m. ca. 1693 Joseph Halstead
b. Sept. 12, 1676 b. ca. 1665
bapt. 12 Nov. 1676 Hempstead L.I., N.Y.
Charlestown, MA
d. after 1723 d. 1735/36
New Rochelle, N.Y.
In 1712 Joseph and Sarah Halstead of Hempstead sold to Samuel Ferris of Newton, CT right in property once in the occupancy of David Jenkins, which descended to Sarah Ferris, now Halstead, by her father's will.... This deed, which shows that Sarah Ferris Halstead was living in 1712, proves that all of Joseph Halstead's children, save possibly the youngest, were by Sarah Ferris." Scofield p. 2" (1)
1)Ferris, Capt. James S.; A Ferris Genealogy Vol. 5 (1980 Coronado, CA) p. Z-12

[NI1090] "Benjamin 3 Goddard was one of the committee appointed to negotiate with Indians for the purchase of the Grafton, Mass., town site where he settled as a housewright. He was born at Watertown, 1705, and died at Grafton, Dec.9, 1759. He m. in Cambridge, Dec. 9, 1731, Mary Kidder, and had Elizabeth 1733-1820, m. Robert Goddard, Petersham, Hannah, Sarah, Hulda, Rhoda, Joel, Nathaniel, Stephen, John,
Levi, Nahum, Robert." (1)
I have the feeling that Sarah Goddard (536) may actually be the daughter of Robert Goddard and Elizabeth Goddard of Petersham, since otherwise she would have been born circa 1735 and have been 40 at the time of her marriage to Isaac Hastings and probably past childbearing age.
Hannah Goddard was born in 1749 according to Laurie Lightfoot (Prodigy).
"uncel Beniamin Died in 55 year of his age December the 9 1759" Goddard Bible, New England Historical & Genealogical Register April 1899 p. 244
"William Goddard (RD-Royal Descent) & Elizabeth Miles (parents of Benjamin & Edward)... Benjamin Goddard & Martha Palfrey... Benjamin Goddard, Jr. & Mary Kidder (parents of Samuel)... Samuel Goddard & Catherine Parker (parents of Danford)... Danford Goddard & Elvira C. Goddard... Nahum Parks Goddard & Mary Pease Upham... Nahum Danford Goddard & Fannie Louise Hoyt... Robert Hutchings Goddard (the inventor of the modern rocket)". (2)
From this I conclude that Benjamin and Mary had another son named Samuel, who is not mentioned above.
"Of Goddard's kin, I might note that a great-great-grandfather, David Goddard (b. 1786) of Royalston, Mass., son of two Goddards and father-in-law of another, was a double third cousin of Mormon president and Utah founder Brigham Young." (3)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) Roberts, Gary Boyd, Notable Kin; NEHGS Nexus, Vol. XII, No. 5, p. 156
3) Ibid., p. 155
Possible sources: J.W. Harms, The Goddard Book, vol. 2 (1990), pp. 891, 1108, 1083-88, 1173-80, 1213-16

[NI1091] Info on father, mother, birth & death dates and child Hannah's birth and death dates supplied by Laurie Lightfoot (NDSC79B-Prodigy).
According to Arlene Whiteman, other children after Sarah included Hulda, Rhoda, Joel, Nathaniel, Stephen, John, Levi, Nahum, and Robert.
Kidder researchers: Gloria Reidinger (SRMT19A-Prodigy)
Karen Velez (NUCM81B-Prodigy)
George Kidder (CQKU63A-Prodigy)

[NI1094] "Benjamin Goddard, a carpenter, born at Watertown, August 17, 1668, was the eldest of the three sons born in America. He died October 24, 1748. He married, 1689, Martha, dau. of John Palfrey, who died Nov 26, 1737, and he married 2nd, Anne Oldham, who survived him. Children by first wife Martha:
Nathaniel, 1692-1770 Weston, Mass., m. Mary Cooper
Martha, 1702-1768, Cambridge, m. Walter Cooper
Benjamin 1705-1759, Grafton, Mass.
He resided in Charlestown, Mass." (1)
"My Hon'd Father Benja Goddard Deceasd October 24 1748 And left his youngest Brother 4 Sons & One Daughter" (2)
"Benjamin Goddard, Sr. (4th surviving son of William Goddard = (Elizabeth Miles); b. & d. - nr. He was a carpenter of Charlestown, MA (see SAG, p. 2). He mar. - 1st: in 1689 = Martha Palfrey... He mar. - 2nd: Ann Oldham - noi. Issue - Five (1st mar: Goddard=Palfrey union); 4 sons & a dtr., next:
Nathaniel Goddard = (1st: Mary Cooper; & 2nd: Lydia Cutting). Issue - None
Benjamin Goddard, Jr. = (Mary Kidder)...
John Goddard = (Elizabeth Frost). Issue - Seven; 3 sons & 4 dtrs.
Thomas Goddard = (Hannah Gove). Issue - Four; 3 sons & a dtr.
Martha Goddard (Cooper) = (Walter Cooper). Issue - noi
Note - The sources used in making the above summary are WAG (pp. 8 & 12); Bond (p. 238); and CAG (p. 2). A copy of his will was included as an Appendix by WAG (pp. 61-64). The will showed that he owned property in the towns of Charlestown, Middlesex Co; Weston, Cambridge and Lexington. He also represented himself to be a "joyner" (cabinet maker) in this document." (3)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) From the Bible of Benjamin Goddard and Descendants The following records were copied from three Bibles and a notebook now at Austin House, 21 Linnaean Street, Cambridge, Mass... (see Paige's History
3) The Goddard Book (see William Goddard) p. 76
His will showed that he owned property in the towns of

[NI1096] Children: Nathaniel, 1692-1770 Weston, Massachusetts, m. Mary Cooper; Martha, 1702-1768, Cambridge, m. Walter Cooper; Benjamin, 1705-1759, Grafton, Mass.
"My wife deceased ye 26 November 1737..."(1)
"Benjamin Goddard, Sr... mar. - 1st: in 1689 = Martha Palfrey; b. in 1670; d. 27 Nov. 1737." (2)
1) From the Bible of Benjamin Goddard and Descendants The following records were copied from three Bibles and a notebook now at Austin House, 21 Linneaean Street, Cambridge, Mass... (see Paige's History
2) Goddard Book (see William Goddard) p. 76

[NI1097] "William Goddard, the first immigrant of the branch of the family, with which this record deals, to come to New England, was the seventh son of Edward and Priscilla D'Oyley Goddard, born at Englesham, England, 1627. He was a citizen and grocer of London, trading on wholesale. Meeting with losses at sea and other financial reverses, he came to America to collect a debt owing to his mother-in-law.
He landed at Watertown, Mass., in 1665. His wife and 3 sons, William, Joseph and Robert, joined him the next year. He died in 1691, and his wife, who was Elizabeth Miles, in 1697, at Watertown, Mass....
The name Goddard, is of Saxon origin. With slight variations, it can be traced back to the earliest period when surnames were first adopted. It appears in Domesday Book, as early as 1100. There were families of the name in Norfolk and Wiltshire, Eng., and the first Goddard Genealogy published in 1833 connects the Watertown immigrant with the Norfolk branch. Although this origin is vouched for by the learned grandson of the American settler, later thorough research of genealogists are more inclined to credit the forbears of William as being of County Wilts and their contention is supported by the opinion of our English cousins. Consecutive historical records begin in the 13th century, when Henry III appointed Walter Goddard castellan of Devizes castle in Wiltshire. John of Gaunt gave them the royal hunting lodge at Upham. There were manors of the family at Clyffe Pypard and Swindon.
...William, engaged in trade in London, and was a member of the "Worshipful Company of Grocers", one of the guilds of that city.
The debt which William came to New England to collect was a loan for 500 pounds made by his mother-in-law, Elizabeth Miles Foote to her brother, Ephraim Childs, an early Watertown settler, who had given a mortgage in 1647, on Watertown real estate to secure payment. Childs died at Watertown 3 years before the arrival of William, who came with power of attorney to foreclose the mortgage. Original copies of this mortgage and power of attorney are on file in Middlesex county court, the oldest Goddard papers in this country." (1)
"My father (William, son of Edward and ______ (Doyley) Goddard) deceased in ye yeare 1691...
Brother robert deceased ye ______ of November 1716
Brother Josiah deceased ye 14 of November 1720" (2)
According to the same bible, Edward was alive after the death of Benjamin (1748)
Children:
Benjamin...
Josiah b. 1672 Watertown d. 1720
Edward b. 1675 d. 1754" (2)
"William Goddard migrated from London, England to Watertown, MA, New England in 1665. Elizabeth Miles and their three sons joined the husband and father in 1666. The sons were William, Jr., Joseph and Robert...
William, Sr. was the 7th and youngest son of Edward Goddard=(Priscilla D'Oyly) of Upham and Inglesham, Wiltshire, England." (3)
"In the 25 years following his arrival in Watertown, William Goddard and Elizabeth Miles had six more children, three of whom survived: Benjamin, Josiah and Edward; and he lived the relatively quiet life of a small town pioneer farmer and teacher of English and Latin.
This leaves a lot of questions unanswered. Here was a man who in England was active in national politics, held the rank of general in the Parliamentary Army under Cromwell, and who later became of some consequence and wealth in London as wholesale grocer dealing in overseas shipping but suffered financial reverses.
Why did he finally settle for a very modest life in a small town as a teacher and farmer? Surely there must have been commercial opportunities in nearby Boston for a man with his experience. Boston was a center of commerce in the New World. Judging by his actions he did not attempt to recoup his social and financial status in New England.
There are no known surviving records that would throw light on William's real motives for spending the last 25 years of his life as he did. His youngest son, Edward Goddard, skirts these questions in his memoir but does not answer them. At one point Edward wrote (as reported by WAG, p. 65):
"I often reflect and think how great a trial it must have been to my parents being brought up tenderly in youth, educated for and acquainted only with a city life, for so many years, to come into a remote and infant country; yet God so provided for them that they lived comfortably and as far as I ever understood, had ye (sic) good esteem of their neighbors..."
In the same memoir (again as reported by WAG, p. 64), he wrote:
"My parents were both of them Religious persons -- my mother was esteemed eminently so -- and tho' she never inclined to say much about the outward circumstances of the families from whom my father and mother descended, yet I have often heard her say that they were both of them very Religious families..."...
William Goddard, the original immigrant progenitor of this family came to New England in 1665/66;...
He was bap. 28 Feb. 1627, Inglesham, Wiltshire, England; d. 6. Oct. 1691, Watertown, Ma, New England. He mar: =Elizabeth Miles of London, England; b. (nr); d. 8 Feb. 1697. Issue - Twelve; 6 sons survived - the other six died young; those with known names next:
xxx three children; b. & d. in London, England
William Goddard, Jr. = (Leah Fisher)
Joseph Goddard = (Deborah Treadway)
Robert Goddard = (Elizabeth Shattuck)
xx Thomas Goddard; b. 8 June & d. 9 July 1667
Benjamin Goddard + (Martha Palfrey)
Josiah Goddard = (Rachel Davis)
Edward Goddard = (Susannah Stone)
x Unnamed child - died young" (4)
"Edward Goddard, born in 1675 in Watertown, Mass., grew up being told the story of how disappointed his father, William Goddard, was to arrive in New England in 1665 expecting a fortune and finding debts. Edward wrote about his father and about family connections in England.
... His (William Goddard's) mother-in-law, Mrs. Foot, in her widowhood, lent #100 sterling to a brother of hers in New Englande, who, for her security, mortgaged his house and land; but though he lived many years afterward, yet paid neither principal nor interest. Consequently, at his (the brother's) death, his (William Goddard's) mother (in-law) gave him the debt, and he coming over for it in 1665, found nothing to be had, except the housing and lands mortgaged. His contracted circumstances and the plague then raging in London... was probably the occasion of his concluding to tarry here and sending for his wife and children who came over in 1666. His wife's maiden name was Elizabeth Miles, daughter of Benjamin Miles; and her mother's third husband (actually her son by her second husband) at his death left them a legacy of #400 sterling (William Austin Goddard, A Genealogy of the Descendants of Edward Goddard (Worcester, Mas., 1833)" (5)
"5. WILLIAM GODDARD, a citizen and grocer of London, 7th son of Edward Goddard,
of Englesham, by his wife Priscilla D'Oyley
m. Elizabeth, daughter of Benjamin Miles of Ware, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter
of Wolstone Child, by his wife Ellen Empson, and had issue by her.
I. William, b. 1653, in London, m. Leah Fisher, of Sherbourne, Mass. USA
II. JOSEPH, b. 1655, in London, m. Deborah Treadway, of Watertown, Mass. USA. Of whom hereafter.(6)
III. Robert, b. 1662, in London, m. Elizabeth Shalluck, of Mass. USA
IV. Thomas, b. 1667, in Watertown, Mass. USA, died young.
V. Benjamin, b. 1668, in Watertown, Mass. USA, m. Martha Palfrey, of Mass. USA
VI. Elizabeth, Died Young
VII. Josiah, b.c. 1672, Watertown, Mass. USA, m. Rachel Davis, of Roxbury, Mass. USA
VIII. Edward, b. 1675, in Watertown, Mass. USA, m. Susannah Stone, of Newton, Mass. USA" (6)
1) Arlene Whiteman (The Samuel Goddard Families by Charles Austin Goddard)
2) From the Bible of Benjamine Goddard and Descendants The following records were copied from three Bibles and a notebook now at Austin House, 21 Linnaean Street, Cambridge, Mass... (see Paige's History of Cambridge) New England Historical & Genealogical Register April 1899 p. 242
3) Harms, John W. & Harms, Pearl Goddard; The Goddard Book (Gateway Press, Baltimore 1984) p. 69-70
4) Ibid., p. 72-73
5) TAG, Vol. 63, #1, 1/1988, p. 21
6) Goddard, Malcolm; My ancestral pedigree from The Goddard's of North Wiltshire, England, U.K. c. 1500-1997
Possible Sources:
For the royal descents of... William Goddard,... see G.B. Roberts, The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants to the American Colonies or the United States (1993)


"The Samuel Goddard Family" by Charles Austin Goddard, Jr., pg 2

[NI1098] She had three children born in England (probably London), William, Joseph and Robert, who traveled with her to Massachusetts in 1666, one year after the arrival of her husband.
"[William Goddard's] wife, Elizabeth Miles and their three sons joined the husband and father in 1666." (1)
"iii Elizabeth [Miles] b.ca. 1631 [bp. at Ware, Hertfordshire, England]; named in 1646 in the will of her stepfather; named by her son Edward Goddard in his memoirs; married William Goddard, lived for several years in London, and then sailed to New England in 1666." (2)
1) The Goddard Book (see William Goddard) p. 69
2) TAG, Vol. 63, #1, 1/1988, p. 25
Per "The Goddard Book": no record of birth, at time of marriage

[NI1101] "Edward, of Englesham, father of our William, matriculated at Oxford in 1601... Edward was an adherent of the Parliamentary party during the civil wars and member of a commission for Wiltshire. His elder brother, Thomas, Squire of Swindon, was a Royalist. The two families by connection with opposing sides, were able to protect each other from the disabilities inflicted by the party in power. Edward died in Lower Upham, 1647." (1)
"William, Sr. was the 7th and youngest son of Edward Goddard = (Priscilla D'Oyly of Upham and Inglesham, Wiltshire, England...
Edward Goddard, father of William, Sr., has to be introduced into the narrative at this point in order to remove some confusion about the place of William's birth - as well as about the home of his progenitors. JWHG's account (see Bibliography, Appendix I) is as follows (from the chapter that will appear in Vol. II):
"Edward Goddard of Inglesham is one of the most interesting characters in the family history. Born in 1584, he was the second son and third child of Richard Goddard = (Elizabeth Waldron) of Upper Upham & Swindon. He married Priscilla D'Oyly...
He (Edward) lived at Inglesham, near Cricklade, and was at one time a wealthy man, although he lost much of his property in the Civil War. He was a supporter of Parliament at that time and it is said that he was driven from his home at Inglesham by the Royalist forces who then set fire to it. He was a Parliamentary Commissioner in Wiltshire and later one of Cromwell's assessors. Two of his sons, John the eldest and Thomas the fourth son were also Parliamentary Commissioners in the County. His second son James was a treasurer under the County Parliamentary Committee as was James' son Thomas."
The editors have concluded that the record produced by JWHG is the correct one:
That Edward Goddard lived at Inglesham, Wiltshire, until after the destruction of his home there, at which time he lived with his son, John at Upton Noble in Somerset, probably until his death; and that his son, was born in Inglesham." (2)
"4. EDWARD GODDARD, of Englesham, who m. Priscilla, daughter of John D'Oyley Esq.
of Chiselhampton, in Oxon., by Ursula his wife, daughter of Sir Anthony Cope, bart. of Hanwell and had issue by her.
I. John, b. 1614, m. Sarah, daughter of Thomas Benett, esq. of Norton Bavent.
II. James, b. 1615
III. Francis, b. 1616
IV. Elizabeth, b. 1617
V. Priscilla, b. 1618
VI. Martha, b. 1619
VII. Thomas, b. 1620, of Box, from whom came the inheritor of the Swindon estates.
VIII. Edward, b. 1622
IX. Richard, bp. 1625. Baptised 3rd day of June anno. 1625, at Englesham.
X. WILLIAM, bp. 1627-8. Baptised 28th day of February anno. 1627-8, at Englesham.
Of whom hereafter.(5)
XI. Josiah, bp. 1630. Baptised 30th day of March anno. 1630, at Englesham
XII. Benjamin, bp. 1631. Baptised 20th day of March anno. 1631, at Englesham
XIII. Vincent, bp. 1639. Baptised 26th day of May anno. 1639, at Aldbourne." (3)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) The Goddard Book (see William Goddard) p. 70-1
3) Goddard, Malcolm; My ancestral pedigree from The Goddard's of North Wiltshire, England, U.K. c. 1500-1997

[NI1102] "The D'Oyley family... came to England with William the Conqueror, and one of them built Oxford Castle." (1)
"William's mother was Priscilla D'Oyly, a descendant of a prominent family of Normandy, France, that occupied the barony of Ouilly le Vicomte. Priscilla descended from the youngest of three brothers who was with William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings when he wrested the throne of England from King Harold. Her earliest progenitor in England was Nigell D'Oyly. Priscilla's lineage will be the subject of a chapter in Volume II of The Goddard Book...
[Edward Goddard] married Priscilla D'Oyly, daughter of John D'Oyly of Chiselhampton, Oxfordshire. Priscilla's mother was Ursula Cope, sister of Sir Anthony Cope of Hanwell...
A record of the D'Oylys by William D'Oyly Bayley (hereafter referred to as Bayley; see Bibliography, Appendix 1) says that Priscilla D'Oyly of Chislehampton, Oxfordshire, married "Edward Goddard, Esq. of Englesham (sic), co. Wilts."
The Bayley record has every charasteristic of being a meticulously researched genealogy." (2)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) The Goddard Book (see William Goddard) p. 70
The D'Oyly families of England (pronounced, Doi'le) had thier

[NI1103] "Married in Waltham (Mass)...by Rev. Warham Williams, Hannah (Hastings-his cousin), daughter of Ebenezer and Ruth (Phillips) Hastings of Watertown. He removed from Waltham to Shrewsbury a few years after his marriage. "He was very deaf, in the latter part of his life. When at meeting, on the Sabbath, he sat in the pulpit, using an ear trumpet that extended to the preacher's mouth.""
Source: Arlene Whiteman

[NI1105] When Lydia Brown died, "he married January 16, 1769, Sarah, daughter of Deacon Isaac and Elizabeth (Child) Stearns (an Ephraim Child shows up somewhere else-a relative?) , born 22 May 1744. His Homestead, on which he lived and died, was on the Trapoli (sic) Road, now called North Street. He was a housewright and farmer. He was selectman of Waltham, 1748. He had 14 children." (1)
The Family Group Record of Keith Steven Butler (W4727 Green Street, La Crosse, WI 54601 Tel. 608-787-0636) prepared October 3, 1998 gives his birth date as September 26, 1697.
1) Arlene Whiteman

[NI1107] "HTML created by GED2HTML v3.1a-UNREGISTERED (8/20/97) on Sun Feb 15 20:26:02 1998.

Lydia BROWN
BIRTH: 30 Dec 1697
DEATH: BEF. 15 Dec 1739
Father: Abraham BROWN
Mother: Mary HYDE

Family 1: Joseph HASTINGS



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

_Jonathan BROWNE __
_Abraham BROWN _|
| |_Mary SHATTUCK ____
|
|--Lydia BROWN
|
| _Job HYDE _________
|_Mary HYDE _____|
|_Elizabeth FULLER _" (1)
1) Linda Lingoes: Genealogy Beginnings

[NI1108] Arlene Whiteman states that his daughter Hannah (548) was a cousin to her husband Joseph (547). This would seem to make Ebenezer a brother to Joseph (549). However, Ebenezer is not listed among the children of John Hastings and Abigail Hammond.
"Ebenezer Hastings, son of Joseph and Martha (Shepard) Hastings, born March 2, 1693-4; married August 12, 1717, Ruth Phillips, daughter of Jonathan and Sarah (Holland) Phillips; granddaughter of Rev. Samuel and Sarah (Appleton) Phillips of Rowley, Mass. He settled in Watertown; by trade a tailor, but devoted much time to town business. They had 4 children, viz:
Martha, baptized August 27, 1718.
Ruth... born May 25, 1721; married Uriah Clarke
Hannah... born 1723; married July 10, 1744, her cousin Joseph Hastings of Waltham.
Joseph, born January 11, 1726." (1)
1) Hastings Memorial (Boston: 1866) p. 84

[NI1109] Phillips Family Finder - Wilma Ingersoll Prodigy SJNP28A
Phillips Family Newsletter: Donald B. Bright, Phillips Family News; RR#5, Box 67 B; Emporia, KS 66801 Subscription $10.00 per year.
Phillips Family Finder; Wilma Ingersol, 3394 Areca Palm Ave., Melbourne, FL 32901

[NI1110] "A justice of the peace of Watertown. "He appears to have lived on the homestead with his mother." He married in his 47th year 26 Jan 1680/81, Sarah Holland. Children (in addition to the first three):
Sarah, b. 4 Aug 1689; m. John Barnard
Abigail, b. 22 Apr. 1693; died young
Johnathan, bap. 20 Jun 1697
Hannah; bap. 23 Apr 1699; m. Nathaniel Dewing
George, bap. 23 Feb 1700/1
"(son) of Samuel and Sarah (Appleton) Phillips of Rowley, Mass."(1)
"iv Jonathan, b. Watertown 16 March 1633/4 (WaVR 1:3); m. Watertown 26 January 1680/1 Sarah Holland (WaVR 1:49; NEHGR 110:276-81)." (2)
"On 11 December 1656 "Jonothan Phillips appearing by the appointment of the seven (selectmen) to give answer of his loose living, it was ordered that some way should be thought of to acquaint Mrs. Phillips that except she undertake for her son as to have him under government, or otherwise to dispose of him to some such place or way, that may enable the town to give answer to the law, when it shall be called for" (WaTR 1:49)." (3)
1) Hastings Memorial p. 84
2) The Great Migration Begins, p. 1449
3) Ibid., p. 1450

[NI1111] A Nathaniel Holland came to Watertown from St. Sepulchre Parish, London. (1)
He is probably related.
"Jonathan [Phillips]... m. Watertown 26 January 1680/1 Sarah Holland (WaVR 1:49); NEHGR 110:276-81)" (2)
1)Topo. Dict. p. 103 citing Prerogative Court of Cantebury Archives/ 9 Pell
2) The Great Migration Begins, p. 1449

[NI1114] "Phillips, Rev. George Watertown A native of Raynham, co. Norfolk, but at the time of emigration was preaching at Boxford, Suffolk. Died 1 July 1644 (Massachusetts Colonial Records I, 73).
Phillips, _________ Wife of Rev. George. She was the daughter of Richard Sergeant. Died 1630 (Dudley Letter).
Phillips, Samuel Son of Rev. George (Bond).
Phillips, Abigail Daughter of Rev. George (Bond).
Phillips, Elizabeth Daughter of Rev. George (Bond)." (10)
"Only two regular clergymen came with Winthrop -- the Reverend John Wilson, a native of Windsor, Berkshire, who had been preaching at Sudbury, Suffolk, and the Reverend George Phillips, similarly employed at Boxford in the same county, within six miles of each other with Groton [John Winthrop was Lord of the Manor of Groton] between the two. Their inclusion in this company may be credited to the personal influence of Winthrop, and Phillips was a fellow passenger in the Arbella." (11)
"no record of the deaths occurring at sea or after arrival is extant. We only know of a few of the more prominent persons like Isaac Johnson and his wife, the Lady Arbella, the wives of Reverend George Phillips and Mr. William Pynchon, and the accidental drowning of young Henry Winthrop." (12)
"Rev. George Phillips, the first minister of Watertown, Mass., son of Christopher Phillips of Rainham (probably Raynham), was born about 1593, at Rainham, St. Martins, near Rougham (probably Rudham), in the district of Gallow, County of Norfolk, England. He graduated B.A. from Gonville and Cains College, Cambridge, 1613, and received the degree of M.A. 1617. "He gave early indications of deep piety, uncommon talents, and love of learning, and at the Universiry distinguished himself by his remarkable progress in learning, especially in theological studies for which he manifested an early part
iality." He settled for a time in Suffolk County, but suffering from the storm of persecution which then threatened the nonconformists of England, he determined to leave the mother country and take his lot with the Puritans.
He embarked for America, April 12, 1630, in the Arbella, with his wife and two children, as fellow-passengers with Gov. Winthrop and Sir Richard Saltonstall, and arrived at Salem, June 12.
Before the final embarkation which had been considerably delayed, Gov. Winthrop says, in a letter to his son, John Winthrop: "From aboard the Arbella, riding before Yarmouth, April 5, 1630. Yesterday we kept a fast aboard our ship and in the Talbot. Mr. Phillips exercised with us the whole day, and gave very good content to all the company, as he doth in all his exercises, so as we have much cause to bless God for him."
In Salem, his wife died soon and was buried by the side of Lady Arbella (Arabella) Johnson, both evidently, being unable to endure the hardship and exposure incident to a tedious ocean voyage." (1)
"'aboord the Arbella, April 7, 1630.' ... Master George Phillips, who became the first minister of Watertown,... There was plenty of excitement as well, since war was still on with France. Many other vessels were sighted, and some were spoken. The Arbella was cleared for action when eight sail, supposed to be corsairs of Dunkirk, hove in sight. Cannon were well charged, women and children placed amidships, while each man ground his cutlass to a razor edge and prepared for rough work...
On June 8, just two months out, the Arbella, now alone raised the bald summits of Mount Desert. It was one of those heaven-sent June days in the Gulf of Maine, with clear sunshine, light fleecy clouds, and an off-shore wind: 'so pleasant a sweet air as did much refresh us, and there came a smell of the shore like the smell of a garden.' the Arbella proceeded cautiously, picking up landmarks like the Camden Hills. On June 10, Cape Porpoise and Agamenticus were sighted and Boon Island weathered.... on June 12 Marblehead loomed up on the western horizon.... on June 14 the Arbella was warped up Beverly Harbor to find anchorage in the North River, then Salem's front door." (3)
"Traveling in the comfort of a cabin was Lady Arbella (Arabella) Fiennes, sister of the Earl of Lincoln, in whose honor the ship had received her name. Also on board was her husband, Isaac Johnson, a rich landowner in the county of Rutland; her brother Charles Fiennes;" (2)
"He soon located in Watertown, and without delay was settled over the church in that place which was called together in July.
At the Court of Assistants, Aug. 23, 1630, it was "ordered that Mr. Phillips shall have allowed him 3 hogsheads of meale; 1 hogsh of malte, 4 bushells of Indean corn, 1 bushell of oatmeale, halfe an hundred of salte fish." Another statement from the same source says, "Mr. Phillips hath 30 ac of land graunted him vpp Charles Ryver on the South side." His first residence was burnt before the close of the year. There is a tradition that his later residence is still standing "opposite ancient burial ground, back from the road." (1)
"the first Court of Assistants (was) held on the soil of Massachusetts, at Charlestown on August 23, (1630)... and their first item of business was to provide house and maintenance for two ministers, George Phillips and John Wilson." (4)
"His name appears in the list of those admitted freeman, May 18, 1631, which is the earliest date of any such admission." (1)
"He continued to be pastor of this church, greatly respected and beloved, till his death fourteen after his arrival. He died at the age of about fifty-one years, July 1, and was buried July 2, 1644.
He was the earliest advocate of the Congregational order and discipline. His views were for a time regarded as novel, suspicious and extreme, and he, with his ruling elder, Mr. Richard Brown, stood almost unaided and alone, until the arrival of Mr. John Cotton, in firmly maintaining what was and still is, the Congregationalism of New England. It is not now easy to estimate the extent and importance of Mr. Phillips in giving form and character to the civil and ecclesiastical institutions of New England." (1)
"Salem and the earlier churches had gathered themselves with no outside help, and the members had both called and ordained elders. But (Thomas) Shepard and his friends invited (1635) all the neighboring churches to send their elders and messengers to assist; and all did so (including John Cotton) except Watertown, where Master Phillips insisted that every church was competent to act alone." (7)
This is an important doctrinal point, since the Puritan (Congregational) movement was based partly on a reaction against any type of religious hierarchy over individual congregations.
"John White had done all in his power to restrain the emigrants in Winthrop's company from (innovations). Three out of four persons of the emigration had, he tells us, been conformable puritans. Winthrop, Dudley, Johnson, Saltonsall, and Phillips, in White's "'Humble Request' attested their affection for the Church of England. There was nothing whatever to prevent them if they chose from setting up Church of England parishes as in Virginia... Yet when the First Church of Boston (first of the Winthrop migration) was formed, it was on the same congregational model as Salem. ... And George Phillips told Dr. Fuller of Plymouth in private, that he would not accept the ministry of Watertown by virtue of holy orders, but only after Congregational ordination.. ... John Cotton of St. Botolph's who felt so strongly on the subject of Anglican orders that he refused on the voyage over to baptize his seaborn son, on the ground that without a church there could be no minister, soon added the weight of his theological learning to the views of Wilson and Phillips." (8)
"For five years the colony was untroubled by anything of the sort (religious schism). The ministers, solidly grounded in the Church Fathers, agreeing substantially on the Augustinian interpretation of the Scriptures, dealt individually by argument and admonition, with the more opinionated parishioners. ... Master George Phillips and Elder Browne of Watertown announced the shocking doctrine that the Roman Catholic Churches were true churches; so Winthrop and Dudley and Nowell, with some of the Boston church, went over to Watertown and held a forum on the question. The vote at the end found Phillips and Browne in a minority of three." (9)
"Watertown, which seems to have contained more upstanding lovers of liberty than any other of the first settlements, objected to a tax levy made by assistants alone. Master George Phillips, the minister and elder Richard Browne assembled the people and declared ' that it was not safe to pay moneys after that sort, for fear of bringing themselves and posterity into bondage.' ... In consequence they were haled before Winthrop (the governor of the Bay Colony), admonished and silenced, but not convinced. The freeman, not to be put off with such chaff, chose deputies just before the spring election of 1634, and respectfully requested the Governor to give them a look at the Charter (of the colony), which hitherto had been carried about on state occasions in its leather-covered case, to impress the populace. ... Winthrop yielded. ... That little visit to the Governor's house punctured the legislative power of the oligarchy. The deputies of the freeman took their seats in the General Court, sitting as one house with the Assistants, which may be said to have founded representative government in Massachusetts Bay." (5)
"Winthrop records in his journal, that when the ship in which Humfry (a discontented colonist who tried to persuade others to go to Barbados) was returning neared the English coast, several passengers spoke reproachfully of New England. Gales and tempests promptly arose and tossed them about, until, in imminent peril, they prayed the Lord to pardon them for speaking ill of New England. The prayers of Master George Phillips, who had wisely refrained from these revilings, saved them from being dashed on the rocks, and brought them to the haven where they would be." (6)
This would seem to indicate that Phillips made at least one return trip to England before his death.
"His inventory amounted to 550 pounds, 2 shillings, 9 pence... His library was valued at 71 pounds, 9 shillings, 9 pence.
He married (1st) a daughter of Richard Sargent. He married (2nd) Elizabeth _________, probably a widow of Capt. Robert Welden. She died in Watertown, June 27, 1681.
Pictures of members of this family hang at Brechin Hall at Andover, the library of the theological school, in the great halls of the academies at Andover and Exeter, and in Memorial Hall at Harvard College." (1)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) Hackett Fischer, David, Albion's Seed, p. 14
3) Morison, Samuel Eliot, Builders of the Bay Colony, Sentry Edition, 1964, pp. 76-78
4) Ibid, p. 79
5) Ibid, p. 87-89
6) Ibid, p. 98
7) Ibid, p. 112
8) Ibid, pp. 114-115
9) Ibid, p. 117
10) Winthrop Fleet (see Robert Lockwood) p. 86
11) Ibid. p. 21-2
12) Ibid. p. 48

GenForum
In Reply to: Re: George Phillips, early MA 1600's 1700's posted by Sharon Stalker on October 02, 1998 at 15:34:20:
The Widener Library at Harvard has a short book on Rev. George Phillips, who was an overseer of Harvard University from 1642 until his death in July 1644. There is a monument on the Charles River near Cambridge in honor Grandpa George, who was the first person in this land to protest, "No taxation without representation." He founded Watertown, was intellectually gifted and described in Samuel Eliot Morrison's The Founding of Harvard College. He sailed on the Arbella with John Winthrop in 1630, carrying with Winthrop the Charter for the Mass. Bay Company. Widener library may allow you to copy the book if you call them at Harvard.

For additional information see Great Migration pp. 1446-1450
Biographies in Cotton Mather, Magnalia 1:375-79; Prince 375-77; Bond 404-05, 872-76; Dict. of Nat. Bio.; Dict. of Am. Bio.; and Henry Wilder Foote in 1930 (MHSP 63:193-227)

[NI1115] Was first married to Captain Robert Welden
Other children by her second marriage:
Theophilus, b. 28 May 1636
Annabel, b. Dec 1637; d. April 1638
Ephraim, b. Jun 1640; died young
Obadiah; died young
Abigail, m. 8 Oct 1666; d. Sep 1672 (1)
"Weldon, Elizabeth Wife of Capt. Robert. Member of First Church, No. 91. Marked 'gone to Watertown.' (3)
The second house of her second husband and presumably where she continued to live was an " old house whose solid oaken frame is said to have been brought over by Sir R. Saltonstall, has a projecting second story, partly concealed by a modern piazza, and stands well back from the street. Externally there is nothing to indicate great age, but its interior retains many marks of antiquity. It formerly had three proticos, which have been removed from its front, and a steep roof which has given place to one of much less altitude.(2)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) History of Middlesex County, p. 450. S.A. Drake.
3) Winthrop Fleet (see Robert Lockwood ) p. 96

[NI1118] "Mr. Hastings' homestead was in that part of Watertown that in 1737 was made a separate town - Waltham. In the old graveyard in that town is a gravestone bearing date of his death March 28, 1717-18, aged 64; and another of Abigail, wife of John Hastings, age 63; died April 7, 1717-18." (1)
Children:
Abigail b. 8 Dec 1679
John b. 1681
Elizabeth bap. 4 Dec 1687 Watertown, Mass
Hepzibah bap. 4 Dec 1687 Watertown, Mass
William bap. 13 Jul 1690 Watertown, Mass
Samuel bap. 8 Sep 1695 Watertown, Mass
Samuel bap 10 Jul 1698 Watertown, Mass
Joseph...
1) Arlene Whiteman









[NI1119] "In 1690 her father's assessment was the largest in town; and she received from his estate, what, in those early days of the Colony, was called "quite a property." Arlene Whiteman
The Family Group Record of Keith Steven Butler (W4727 Green Street, La Crosse, WI 54601 Tel. 608-787-0636) prepared October 3, 1998 gives her birth date as June 2, 1659.

[NI1120] "Albert Heymans Roosa died at Hurley on February 27, 1679. In 1685 his widow, Wyntje Allard secured a grant of 320 acres at Hurley." (1)
"Date: Wed Jan 8 14:15:32 1997
Name: Pat ShawE- mail: pshaw@jorsm.comm
Address: 652 N 700 West Hobart, IN 46342
Surname of Immigrant: Roosa
Given name(s) of Immigrant: Albert Heymanse
Name of Ship: Spotted Cow
Arrival Date: 1660
Origin of Immigrant: Herwynen, Gelderland, Netherlands
Immigrant's Date & Place of Birth: 1610-1621 Netherlands
Immigrant's Date & Place of Death: Feb 27, 1679 Wildwyck, Ulster Co NY
Immigrant's Spouse: Wyntje Ariens DeJongh
Source of Information: Ulster Co Under The Dutch,Ulter Co Probate Records
by Anjou, New World Immigrants by Tepper
Immigrant's Children:
Hymen Albert Roosa b. ca 1643 Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands d. 1708 Hurley, Ulster Co NY m. Anna Margriet Rosevelt
Arien Roosa b. 1645-1650 in Herwijnen,gelderland, Netherlands
Aert Roosa b. abt 1646 in Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands
Jan Roosa b. 1651 in Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands m. Hillegondt Willems Van Buren
Neeltje Roosa b. 1652-1656 in Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands m. aft Nov 3, 1676 in Marbletown NY to Henry Pawling
Eike Roosa b. abt 1653 in Herwijnen, Gelderland, Netherlands m. Roelof Kierstede
Mary Roosa b. abt 1654 m. 1672 to Lauren Jansen Low
Jannetje Roosa b. 1656-1658 m. November 16, 1679 in Hurley NY to Mathys TenEyck
Guert Roosa b. 1660-1664 d. June 15, 1664
Annetje Roosa b. abt 1662
Notes: Albert Heymanse Roosa was sometimes listed as Allert Heymanse and Aldert Heymans. I am descended from his son Hymen Albert Roosa who married Anna Margriet Rosenvelt daughter of Claes Martenszen Van Rosenvelt. Albert Heyman lived in Wildwyck and later in Hurley, Ulster Co NY. He appears to have been a feisty individual and his name was often mentioned in court records. He had two daughters kidnapped by the Esopus Indians in the uprising of 1663. He later got both daughters back." (2)
1) NYG&BR Oct 1900 p. 235
2) The Olive Tree Genealogy: 17th Century Immigrants to New York http://www.rootsweb.com/~ote/17th/dny_7.htm

[NI1127] "He was treasurer of Watertown 1695-1700; assessor 1705-08; selectman in 1712 and 1726, town clerk in 1712; innholder 1709-12. Upon the final settlement of the estate of his grandfather Abraham Browne in Jan 1694 (his father being deceased), all the real estate including the homestead of his grandfather, was assigned to him by consent of the other heirs, he paying them for their portions. His will, dated 28 Jul 1728, proved 8 Dec 1729, makes his second son, Samuel, his executor. 10 Nov 1707, Ephraim Williams of Newton, afterwards a pioneer in the settlement of Stockbridge, and father of the
founder of Williams College, chose Captain A. Brown, for his guardian."(1)
1) Arlene Whiteman

[NI1129] She "was buried in the Waltham graveyard. Her epitaph, "Pious in Life, (illegible) at Death." Arlene Whiteman
Buried next to her husband Abraham Brown.

[NI1130] Information on his family supplied by Polly Boissevain (NGZK37B on the Prodigy Network).
The family name at that time was also spelled "Hide" or "Hides".
"The Middlesex Co. Probate Records, Job Hides, No. 11246, administration of the estate. Administration lists Elizabeth (1st child), wife of William Hides, Mary (4th child and our ancestor), wife of Abraham Brown, Sarah Hides, Hannah Hides, John Hides, Jonathan Hides and Bethiah Hides. Signed Settlement: John (S. Davidson?), James Trowbridge, Andrew Jackson, Thomas Oliver, John Mason. John Fuller prepared account 4 Feb 1694, also signed by Samuel Hides, Jacob Brown, Benjamin Dana, Daniell Dana and Samuel Phipps." (1)
His children were:
Elizabeth, b. 29 Aug 1664, Cambridge d. 7 Apr 1743, Newton m. William Hide
Samuel, b. 5 Mar 1666, Cambridge d. 27 May 1741 m. Deliverance
Job, b. 6 May 1669, Cambridge died young
Mary, b. 21 Jun 1673, Cambridge m. Abraham Brown of Watertown
Sarah, b. 2 Oct 1675, Cambridge d. 13 Mar 1754, Newton m. Daniel Hide (brother of William above).
Bethia, b. 24 Feb 1678, Cambridge m. Jacob Hide (brother of William and Daniel above). Joseph Fuller became her guardian 24 Dec 1694 (a common practice, see Albion's Seed)
Hannah, b. 20 May 1680, Cambridge d. 7 Jun 1720 Newton m. Eleazer Hide (brother of William, Daniel and Jacob above!) Jonathan Fuller appointed guardian 24 Dec 1694.
John, b. 1 Feb 1681, Cambridge d. before 1739 John Hides appointed guardian 24 Dec 1694
Jonathan, b. 22 May 1684, Cambridge d. 2 Aug 1731, Newton Jonathan Hides appointed guardian 24 Dec 1694. (2)
"Job Hyde, ca. 1643-Cambridge 19 Nov. 1685 ae. 42 (VRs 2:600); m. by ca 1663 (NEGHR 71:146)
Elizabeth Fuller, ca. 1647-Cambridge 28 Nov. 1685 (VRs 2:600)" (3)
It would appear that something happened around Dec 1694, perhaps the death of Elizabeth Fuller to require guardians for all the younger children.
1) Polly Boissevain (NGZK37B-Prodigy) from Baldwin, Thomas W., compiler, Vital Records of Cambridge, MA to the Year 1850, (Boston: Wright and Potter, 1914)
2) Jackson, Francis, A History of the Early Settlement of Newton, MA 1639-1800, (Boston: Stacy and Richardson, 1854)
3) NEHGS Nexus, Vol. XIV, No. 5, p. 147

[NI1131] Fuller researchers: Brenda Lindsey (ESGG98B-Prodigy)
Robert Johnson (RMXK91A-Prodigy)
June Zintz (CMNW01A-Prodigy)
Info on her parents and marriage and death date from:
Descendants of Captain Matthew Fuller, also of John Fuller of Newton, John Fuller of Lynn, John Fuller of Ipswich, and Robert Fuller of Dorchester and Dedham, by W.H. Fuller.

[NI1132] " iv Jonathan, b. Watertown 15 October 1635 (WaVR 23); m. 11 February 1661/2 Mary Shattuck (WaVR 23)." (1)
His will was dated Feb. 19, 1690-1, and proved Apr. 7, and inventory dated Ap. 1, 1691. Wife and son Abraham Exec'rs. Real estate, 6 lots of land, amounting to 211 acres, appraised at 247 pounds.
1) The Great Migration Begins, p. 245

[NI1133] "I too am a Shattuck descendant of William Shattuck and his wife Susanna of Watertown, Mass... I own a copy of Lemuel Shattuck's "Descendants of William Shattuck" printed in 1855, but perhaps the be
st authority on the first 8 generations." (1)
She may be descended from Samuel Shattuck who emigrated to Massachusetts on the Mary & John in 1630.
"Mary Shattuck, dau. of William, was b. in Watertown, Aug. 25, 1645; and d. in that part of the town now comprised in Waltham. A grave-stone erected to her memory is still standing in the Waltham bur
ying-ground, bearing the following inscription: "Here lyes buried ye body of Mrs Mary Browne, relict of Mr. Jonathan Browne, who departed this life Oct. ye 23d A.D. 1732, in ye 89 th year of her age.
Pious in life: Resigned in death."
She m. Feb 11, 1662, Jonathan Browne of Watertowne...
Her children by Jonathan Browne, born in Watertown
Mary, b. Oct 5, 1662...
Elizabeth, b. Sept 19, 1664...
Jonathan, b. Oct 25, 1666
Patience, b. March 6, 1669...
Abraham...
Samuel, b. Oct 21, 1674...
Lydia, b. Mar 31, 1677
Ebenezer, b. Sept 10, 1679
Benjamin, b. Feb 27, 1682
William, b. Sept. 3, 1684" (2)
1) Theodore H Bates (VWUY33A-Prodigy)
2) Shattuck, Lemuel; Memorials of the Descendants of William Shattuck (Boston 1855) p. 67-8
Other Shattuck researchers:
Charles Shattuck (KTBD22A-Prodigy)
E Macintosh (SBGK50A-Prodigy)


[NI1134] "Thomas Hastings aged 29 years, with his wife Susanna, aged 25, embarked at Ipswich, Eng. 10 April 10, 1634, in the Elizabeth, Williams Andrews, master, for New England, and settled in Watertown, Mass., then known as "The Massachusetts Bay Colony," where he was admitted freeman, May 6, 1636. He "laid down" a lot in Dedham in 1635 or 6, but never lived there. Was selectman from 1638 to 1643, and again from 1650 to 1671; town clerk, 1671, 1677, 1680; representative, 1673, and long held the office of deacon. The first wife Susanna d. Feb. 2, 1650, and he m. 2nd, Margaret Cheney... She was the
mother of all his children. There is no record of children by the first wife,... He died 1685, aged 80. According to Inventory, dated September 9, 1685, real estate amounting to 421 pounds, he owned two farms and as many as fifteen other lots. He was grantee for seven lots, the remainder he purchased. The West side of School Street, then called Hill Street was always his residence, which he enlarged by the purchase of the lot of H. Bright, senior. This homestead passed to his son Samuel.
In his will, dated March 12, 1682/3, proved September 7, 1685, he gave son Thomas only 5 pounds, saying "I have been at great expense to bring him up a scholar, and I have given him about threescore pounds to begin the world with." To sons John, Joseph, Benjamin, Nathaniel, Samuel, and daughter Hepzibah Bond, he gave each 40 pounds; to eldest daughter Margaret, of son Thomas, 5 pounds; to 2nd daughter Hannah, 3 pounds. The remainder to wife Margaret. They had 8 children, viz.:
1. Thomas, Born July 1, 1652; died July 23, 1712
2. John, born March 4, 1654; died March 28, 1718
3. William, born Aug. 8, 1655; drowned Aug. 1669, aged 14.
4. Joseph, born September 11, 1657; died October 7, 1695
5. Benjamin, born August 9, 1659; died December 18, 1711
6. Nathaniel, born Sept. 25, 1661; died Dec. 25, 1694
7. Hepzibah, born January 31, 1663
8. Samuel, born March 12, 1665; died 1723 " (2)
"There is a Hastings Genealogy on Thomas Hastings published by Higginson Books for about $25.00." (1)
Another source: The Hastings Memorial, A Genealogical Account of the Descendants of Thomas Hastings of Watertown, Massachusetts from 1634 to 1864 by Lydia Nelson in the NEH&GS Catalog
1) Carol Williams (Prodigy- KGNV76A)
2) Arlene Whiteman
Hastings Researcher: Keith Butler, butlerke@lse.fullfeed.comm

[NI1135] "Margaret, 2 b _______, m. in Roxbury, in April, 1650, Dea. Thomas Hastings, one of the leading men of Watertown, both in civil and religious affairs....
Children of Dea. Thomas and Margaret (Cheney) Hastings;
1) Thomas Hastings, b. July 1, 1652;
2) John Hastings, b. March 1 1653/4;
3) William Hastings, b. Aug. 8, 1655;
4) Joseph Hastings; b. Sept. 12, 1657;
5) Benjamin Hastings; b. Aug. 9, 1659;
6) Nathaniel Hastings, b. Sept. 25, 1661;
7) Hephzibah Hastings, b. Jan. 31, 1663-4, m. Dea. Wm. Bond;
8) Samuel Hastings, b. March 12, 1665/6" (1)
1) Arlene Whiteman

[NI1137] " Essex
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Cheney, William Waltham Abbey Roxbury Banks" (2)
"William Cheney was a very early resident of Roxbury, in the colony of Massachusetts Bay, in New England, (now included in the city of Boston.) The oldest records of that town which have been brought down to modern times are contained in a volume whose opening sentence says that the book was bought in 1639 for the purpose of recording various matters relating to the inhabitants. Its earliest entries are not dated. One of these is a list of the men who owned land and lived in the town, entitled, "A note of the estates and persons of the Inhabitants of Rocksbury." Seventy men are enrolled; they range from "Edward Pason," possessor of 3 acres of ground, to "Mr. Thomas Dudley" with his 356 acres. "Wm. Cheiney" is the fortieth name, with 24 1/2 acres, showing that he was above average in wealth. This list is on a page where the year 1640 is given as the date of the preceding...
From some cause or other William Cheney himself did not join until he had been in Roxbury at least twenty four years; for it was "5th Im 1664/65" that he was "admitted to full communion." His wife joined much earlier. In view of her membership it was that "4 (4) 1643 Mehittabell Cheyny the daughter of Willia Cheyny" was baptized. But Mr. Eliot does not give us the date when she joined. Her name is the 210th in his series; it follows a little way after some who are said to have arrived in 1636, 1638 and 1641, mingled with undated names; and that the next member whose date of joining is given was "received the 21 of the 2d 1644."...
William Cheney was one of the two constables in 1654/5 and his final account was approved Feb. 13, 1655/6...
Jan. 19, 1656/7 he was elected a member of the board of selectmen, associated with men of education and rank.
Jan. 18, 1663, he was made one of a committee to inspect Peter Gardner's "leanetoo" and "the fence that doth range from it" to see that they did "not intrench upon the high way."
We have already seen that he was chosen one of the feofees of the Free School in 1664; and on the town record we find him written down "as Feofee" in an agreement touching some money belonging to the school fund, and affixing W (his mark) (he must have been illiterate) to the page along with half a dozen regular signatures, Jan. 25, 1666/7.
May 23, 1666, he was made a "freeman of the Colony", which made him eligible to colonial office and capable of voting on matters relating to the general government. But he did not live to make use of this franchise. He fell sick in the spring of 1666/7, as we learn from the open phrases of his will; and after a few weeks he passed beyond the reach of care of pain. The town clerk made this entry in his list of persons deceased:
"William Cheney aged 63 yeares died June the 30th day, 1667"...
Rev. John Eliot or Rev. Samuel Danforth wrote in the church book among the burials:
"1667. Moneth 5 day 2 William Cheany sen." (1)
"Cheney
William, planter, Roxbury... Wife Margaret; ch. Ellen,... Margaret... He d. May 2, 1667 ae. 63 years." (3)
"William CHENEY was born about 1604 in England?.(513) He died in 1667 in Roxbury, MA.(514) The Cheney family in America
Additional information on the immigrant family is found in The Ancestry of Eva Belle Kempton 1878-1908: Part I The Ancestry of Warren Francis Kempton 1817-1879, by Dean Crawford Smith and edited by Melinde Lutz Sanborn (Boston, 1996), pages 224-233.

William and Margaret Cheney
William CHENEY - b. about 1604, England; d. Jun. 30, 1667, Roxbury, MA. His will was dated Apr. 30, 1667 and proved Jul. 30, 1667. Although some suggestions have been made, there has been no evidence found for the CHENEY ancestry in England. Resided at Roxbury before 1640, owning 24 1/5 acres of land; freeman 1666; militia member 1647; constable; selectman 1656-7. Ensign in the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Society. He was a founder of the Roxbury Free School in 1664. Married about 1625, England.

Margaret - b. England; d. Jul. 3, 1686. In his will of 1667, William CHENEY called Margaret his 'deare and Afflicted wife," and Rev. John ELIOT wrote in 1674 that she had been released from being "under a melancholick distemper, (above 10 or 11 years) wch made her wholly neglect her Calling & live mopishly." As Widow CHENEY, she married second in late 1676 Mr. BURGE (d. before Mar. 15, 1679/80). Her will, dated May 15, 1686 and proved Sep. 23, 1686, names son Joseph, daughter Mehitable, and three grandsons, the sons of William.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Children of William and Margaret Cheney
Elinor (or Ellen) - b. about 1626, England; d. night of Sep. 28/29, 1678, Hingham, MA. Resided at Roxbury and Scituate, MA. Married Mar. 20, 1642/3 at Roxbury, MA, Sgt. Humphrey JOHNSON, son of Capt. John JOHNSON and Mary HEATH. Refer to JOHNSON line for children and additional information.
Margaret - b. Nov. 20, 1628, England. Married Thomas HASTINGS.
Thomas - b. about 1631; died in infancy.
Thomas - b. about 1633, Roxbury, MA; d. 1693/5, Cambridge, MA. His will was dated Oct. 23, 1693 and proved Mar. 4, 1694/5. Constable 1659, freeman, 1666. Served in Capt. JOHNSON's company in 1675. Married Jan. 11, 1656, Roxbury, MA Jane ATKINSON (d. Jul. 1724), and lived at Brighton and Cambridge. Children: Margaret; Thomas; Mehitable; John; William; Mary; Jane; Joseph; Hannah; Benjamin; and Ebenezer.
William - b. 1635, Roxbury, MA; d. Sep. 21, 1681 (hanged), Dorchester, MA. Married Deborah WISWALL (bap. Mar. 30, 1641), daughter of John of Dorchester. While married to Deborah, William became father of son William (b. Aug. 3, 1666 and probably surnamed DANIELS) by Sarah DANIELS, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth DANIELS. William was found guilty and sentenced to be hanged for rape, although his wife Deborah called Experience HOLBROOK (daughter of Capt. Joseph and Elizabeth HOLBROOK) a "lying wench." Deborah married second Ebenezer WILLIAMS. Son of William and Sarah: William. Children of William and Deborah: an infant; Deborah died as infant; William died as infant; Deborah; William; John; Benjamin; and a child born after William's execution.
John - b. Sep. 20, 1639; d. Oct. 12, 1671. He drowned "as he was catching of eales."
Mehitable - b. Jun. 1, 1643; d. 1693/4, probably at Medfield, MA. Married by 1663 Thomas WIGHT, Jr. (b. 1635; inv. Sep. 25, 1690), son of Thomas and Alice. The WIGHTs were burned out of their home by Indians in 1676. Children: Mehitable; Thomas; Mary (or Marie) married Joseph CLARK; Eleazer; and Joshua.
Joseph - b. Jun. 6, 1647, Roxbury, MA; d. Sep. 16, 1704, Medfield, MA. Married first Mar. 12, 1667/8 at Medfield, MA, Hannah THURSTON (b. Apr. 28, 1650, Dedham, MA; d. Dec. 29, 1690, Medfield, MA), daughter of John and Margaret THURSTON. Joseph married second Jul. 21, 1691 at Medfield, MA, Mehitable (PLIMPTON) HINSDALE, daughter of John PLIMPTON and Jane DAMON, and widow of Ephraim HINSDALE. Mehitable married third Dec. 12, 1717 Jonathan ADAMS. Children of Joseph and Hannah: Hannah; Margaret married Joseph BULLARD; Prudence died young; Joseph died young; Susannah died young; Mehitable married Jeremiah MORSE; Mary married first Benjamin CHENEY (her first cousin and son of Thomas CHENEY and Jane ATKINSON), and second Micahel FELSHAW;
Josiah married first Hannah, and second Hannah MASON, widow of Samuel SMITH who was great grandson of Rev. Henry SMITH (Josiah, by his second wife, became ancestor of Pres. William TAFT); Prudence married Gershom LAKE; and Melatiah married Henry AMIDOWN. Children of Joseph and Mehitable: Hannah died as infant; Joseph died unmarried; Ephraim married Ann CLARK; and Hannah died young.
666. William CHENEY [AWFK, see also Stephen Lawson's page], b. Abt 1604; d. 30 Jun 1667, Roxbury, MA
AWFK, p. 225; b. England, abt 1604; d. Roxbury, MA, 30 Jun 1667; m. likely in England, bef. 1623, Margaret -----
William is noted in the Johnson genealogy as being the ancestor of President Taft.
He was married to Margaret UNKNOWN c1625 in Roxbury, MA.(515) (516)(517) Children were: Elinor CHENEY." (4)
Waltham Abbey, William Cheney's birthplace, is very close to Great Amwell, the birthplace of his son-in-law, Humphrey Johnson.
1) Arlene Whiteman taken verbatim from the Cheney Genealogy p. 17-32
2) Topo. Dict. p. 53
3) Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts
4) Francis Cooke and the Early Families of New England

[NI1138] " Northamptonshire
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Burgess, Thomas Earl's Barton Charlestown Aspinwall" (2)
This may be her father.
"The will of Mrs. Margaret (Cheney) Burges
I Margaret Burges widdow now living in Boston being at present of sound mind memory and reasonable understanding, praised by ye Lord do make this my last will and testamt in manner and forme following
That is to say, First I give my precious soul into the hands of my heavenly father and dear Redeemer and my body to be decently buried according to ye good discretion of my hereafter named Execr. in hope of a blessed Resurrection at the last day.
Item I give & bequeath to my son Joseph Cheney thirty pounds in moneys
Item I give and bequeath to my dauther Mehitabel Wight all my cloaths.
It. I give and bequeath to my grandson Wm. Cheney five pounds and to his two brothers Jno and Benjamin I give to each of them fifty shillings and do make my son Joseph sole Execr. of this my last will and tetamt all former wills being void as Witness my hand and seal this fifteenth day of may in the year of our Lord 1686...
The "old South Church" had been her church home, but she was laid by her former husband at Roxbury, July 3, 1686... by the venerable "Apostle Eliot, for the church record has this entry: 1686 M. 5. d. 3 Aged Sist. Cheny buryed."" (1)
"Cheney
William... Wife Margaret;... The widow m. 2 ______ Burge, who d. before 3/1679/80. She rem. to Boston; made will 9/23/1686, d. 2 or 3 (5) 1686." (3)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) Topo. Dict. p. 125
3) Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts p. 97
Possible source:
The Burgess Family Tree, by Paul F. Burgess (ZBSF94A-Prodigy)

[NI1140] "His age was given as 7 years at the time he came to America with his mother, which practically agrees with the latter date, but his tombstone gives his age at his death 1709 as 85 years and 4 months, which places his birth in July 1624.
He married (1) about 1652, Abigail Salter, ...She died about 1663 and he married (2) in 1664, Sarah Nichols, of Charlestown, Mass., who died Jan. 14, 1688, aged 45 years. He married (3) in 1689, widow Prudence (Wade) Cotton, daughter of Jonathan Wade, of Ipswich, Mass., and widow of Seaborn Cotton, of Hampton." (1)
"Seaborn Cotton was the son of John Cotton and Sarah Story, brother of Maria Cotton (who married Increase Mather) and hence uncle of Cotton Mather. "The matriach of this family, Sarah Story Cotton Mather, might be taken as the genealogical center of New England's elite." (2) This marriage shows Lt. Hammond's close connection with this elite.
"In 1665 he was appointed guardian of his kinswoman, Mehitable Hawkins, dau. of Timothy and Hannah Hawkins. He was selectman in Watertown, in 1664, 1670, 1692, 1698, and 1701. In 1690 his assessment was the largest in Watertown.
His will, (Middlesex Probate, No. 7151) dated Nov. 18, 1709, proved Dec. 9, 1709, mentions wife Prudence, son John, daughters Elizabeth Mason, Abigail Hastings, Hannah Poulter and Hepzibah Shattuck, and also sons-in law John Mason, John Hastings, John Poulter and William Shattuck.
His inventory, dated Nov. 29, 1709, amounted to 961 pounds, 8 shillings. Through an error the account of the settlement of his estate Jan 26 1712-13, is filed at East Cambridge with the papers relating to the estate of John Hammond of Newton, (No. 7152) who died in 1762. Account of John Hammond, John Mason and John Hastings, executors of will of Lt. John Hammond, Jan. 26, 1712-13." (1)
In addition to the above children with Abigail Salter, he had John b. 1661.
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) Albion's Seed, p. 41

[NI1144] " Suffolk
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Salter, George Rattlesden Watertown NEGR 57/331"(1)
1) Topo. Dict. p. 159

[NI1146] There was a Benjamin Burt living in Bloom Township in Scioto County, Ohio in the 1830 Census. According to the census both he and his wife were between 20 & 30 years of age.

"Subject* 12 Jul 1792 Benjamin F BURT Jr (1247)<1>
BurialSite* __ ___ ____ Old Wheelersburg cem, Wheelersburg, Scioto Co, OH.
Birth* 12 Jul 1792 Sussex Co, NJ.
Census: __ ___ 1820 Scioto Co, OH.<2>
Census: __ ___ 1830 Scioto Co, OH.<3>
Land Rec* 01 Aug 1839 Scioto Co, OH.<4>
Census* __ ___ 1840 Scioto Co, OH.<5>
Land Rec: 25 Jun 1841 Scioto Co, OH.<6>
Death* __ ___ 1878 Scioto Co, OH.
Father* Benjamin F BURT Esq. (1249) (10 Mar 1761-28 Feb 1849)
Mother* Mehetable BONSER (3684) (04 Jun 1760-15 Jul 1839)
__________________________________________________________________________

Note* __ ___ ____ Scioto Co, OH (Daughters Sarah and Elizabeth both married Isaac H. Wheeler).
Marriage* 29 May 1817
Census* __ ___ 1850 Scioto Co, OH.<7>
Census: __ ___ 1860 Scioto Co, OH.<8>
__________________________________________________________________________

Spouse* Elizabeth SWAAR (1248)<9>,<10>,<11>
BurialSite* __ ___ ____ Old Wheelersburg cem, Wheelersburg, Scioto Co, OH.
Birth* 09 Jun 1800 PA.
Death* 17 Mar 1864 (Probably died in Scioto Co, OH).
Father* Jacob SWAAR (3947) (circa 1767-before 1881)
Mother* Sarah Elizabeth TBD (3948)
__________________________________________________________________________

Eleven Children
__________________________________________________________________________

1/F Nina BURT (4521)
Birth* 17 Nov 1817 Scioto Co, OH.
__________________________________________________________________________

2/F Sara BURT (68)
Birth* __ ___ 1819 Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 16 Feb 1837 Isaac Hastings WHEELER (67) (01 Sep 1815-25 Aug 1875); Scioto Co, OH (With the consent of her father, Benjamin Burt).<12>
Death* __ ___ 1852 (Death was after 1852-Probably in Scioto Co, OH).
__________________________________________________________________________

3/F Eliza BURT (3729)<13>
Birth* 05 Aug 1822 Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 28 Feb 1838 James COOPER (3730)
__________________________________________________________________________

4/M Samuel BURT (3553)
Birth* 02 Aug 1824 Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 21 Oct 1847 Mary Jane BRIGGS (10062) (02 Oct 1831-24 Mar 1914); Scioto Co, OH.
Death* 26 Jan 1895 Moselle, Franklin Co, MO.<14>
__________________________________________________________________________

5/F Mariah BURT (4520)
Birth* 30 Aug 1827 Scioto Co, OH.
__________________________________________________________________________

6/M Benjamin William BURT (1458)
Birth* 04 Mar 1829 Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 11 Aug 1847 Sara Jane RICE (1459)
Marriage: 10 Jun 1854 Lucinda LIVELY (3552) (circa 1834-circa 1878); Franklin Co, MO.
Marriage: c __ ___ 1879 Martha GARRETT (1460) (Dec 1860-15 Oct 1917); Washington Co, MO.
Death* 26 Jan 1899 Franklin Co, MO.
__________________________________________________________________________

7/F Elizabeth A BURT (69)
Birth* __ ___ 1834 Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 22 Nov 1856 Isaac Hastings WHEELER (67) (01 Sep 1815-25 Aug 1875); Scioto Co, OH.<15>
Probate* 01 Oct 1875 Isaac Hastings WHEELER (67) (01 Sep 1815-25 Aug 1875); Union, Franklin Co, MO (Probate extended over several years. Includes litigation by William H. Wheeler, son/nephew of Elizabeth Wheeler, which began in 1881. Real property was sold by the court on 09 Mar 1888).<16>,<17>
Marriage: 09 Dec 1896 James WHITWORTH? (5473) (21 Nov 1829-06 Aug 1912); Franklin Co, MO (09 Dec could be the liscense date and 24 Dec could actually be the marriage date. It is also possible that this is not the right person, but Leah (Wheeler)Mercer said to me that her grandmother stayed with her other husband until he went blind. This seems to fit information provided in the Whitworth documents which mentions "blind Jim").<18>
Death* c __ ___ 1912 Franklin Co, MO (This date is an estimate taken from the death of her 2nd husband in 1912. There is no death record in Franklin Co., MO. Leah (Wheeler) Mercer said that her grandmother stayed with her blind husband until he died. She probably died soon afterward).
__________________________________________________________________________

8/F Amanda BURT (3685)<19>
Birth* 09 Oct 1835 Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 31 Dec 1856 Obediah CHAPMAN (3728) (circa 1815- )
__________________________________________________________________________

9/M Henry C BURT (3686)<20>
Birth* 07 Apr 1838 Scioto Co, OH.
__________________________________________________________________________

10/M Amaziah BURT (3687) (Had 10 children, but only one name is known)<21>,<22>
Birth* 03 Feb 1841 Scioto Co, OH.
Marriage* 12 Mar 1865 Evaline Ada PURDY (3965) ( -1908)
Death* 01 Jan 1908 Redondo Beach, LA Co, CA.
__________________________________________________________________________

11/F Mary Frances BURT (3688)<23>
Birth* 20 Jul 1844 Scioto Co, OH.
__________________________________________________________________________

**ENDNOTES**

<1>:_________, Info provided by Charles Mercer, Shirley Farnesi and Larry Hindley in (.
<2>:1820 Census Scioto Co OH Porter TS, National Archives-General Services Administration-NARA.
<3>:1830 Census Scioto Co OH Porter TS, National Archives-General Services Administration-NARA.
<4>:Land Rec Scioto Co-USA Cash Entry Certificate, n.d., Certificate #7883 dated 01 Aug 1839 SW1/4 NW1/4 S35 T3N R20W 32 29/100 Acres., Down loaded via internet from the BLM internet site. http://www.glorecords.blm.gov, Bureau of Land Management-Department of the Interior.
<5>:1840 Census Scioto Co OH Porter TS, National Archives-General Services Administration-NARA.
<6>:Land Rec Scioto Co-USA, Certificate #10001 dated 25 Jun 1841 E1/2 SW1/4 S4 T2N R20W 67 90/100 Acres.
<7>:1850 Census Scioto Co OH Porter TS Pg492 Ln12, National Archives-General Services Administration-NARA.
<8>:1860 Census Scioto Co OH Porter TS Wheelersburg Pg359 Ln19, National Archives-General Services Administration-NARA.
<9>:_________, Info provided by Charles.
<10>:Swaar Info provided by Alice Hudson 9000 Zuni Rd SE Unit F13 Albuquerque NM 87123-3154, n.d., Alice Hudson-Swaar Family researcher.
<11>:Letter to brother John Swar dtd 15 July 1860 owned by Alice M. Hudson 422 E. 4th St, Wellston OH 45692, n.d., Alice Hiudson-Swaar Family researcher.
<12>:Marriage Rec Scioto Co OH Vol A, 16 Feb 1837, 230, Scioto Co. Ohio Court House.
<13>:Info provided by Larry Hindley, 28 Jun 1998, Address: 1970 NE Jamie Dr. Hillsboro, OR 97124-2108. E-mail: KHindley@aol.com, Larry Joe Hindley..
<14>:Will-Franklin Co MO Probate Court Box B 1893-1896. Also Codicil dated in Jan 1895., 17 Jun 1889, , Franklin County MO Probate Court.
<15>:Marriage Rec Scioto Co OH Book D-Spouse #1, Nov 1856, 42, Scioto Co. Ohio Court House.
<16>:Probate Rec Franklin Co MO Box "W"-includes Administrators Bond, 1880, , Franklin County MO Probate Court.
<17>:Administrators Sale of Real Estate, (Union, MO: Franklin Co Record,23 Feb 1888), ; Four Rivers Genealogical Society.
<18>:Marriage Rec 2nd Spouse Franklin Co MO BkH Pg249?, n.d., Franklin County, MO Courthouse Recorders Office.
<19>:Info provided by Larry Hindley, Charles Mercer and Edna Moody 1607 Mound St., Portsmouth OH 45662-3713, n.d., Charles Richard MERCER.
<20>:Info provided by Larry Hindley and Charles R. Mercer, Jul 1991, Charles Richard MERCER.
<21>:_________, A great/great/grand son is: Charles Davenport Rt1 Box 7 Brixley, Mo 65618 Ph 417-679-4635 in (.
<22>:Info provided by Shirley Farnesi and Charles R. Mercer, 04 Aug 1995, Charles Richard MERCER.
<23>:Info provided by Larry.
Charles R. Mercer, 240 S. Greentrails Dr., Chesterfield, MO 63017-2925 USA, (chasbo19@idt.net), 03 Sep 1998" (1))
1) e-mail from Charles R. Mercer dated 9/1/19988

Burt Researchers(Portsmouth Library):
Anna Williamson
1301 Polk City Rd. #93
Haines City, FL 33844
Gary Hatfield
1913 Moore Dr.
Plano, TX 75074-2709

[NI1147] Samuel Swaar is listed as an early pioneer of Scioto County, Ohio 1796-1806 in the History of the Lower Scioto Valley.
A John Swaar was living in Porter Township, Scioto County, Ohio according to the 1830 Census. Possibly a brother. This is the same town that the Wheelers and Benjamin Burt, Jr. lived in at that time.
Sarah Elizabeth Swaar lived in Porter Township, Scioto County, Ohio according to the 1820 Census. Probably her mother.
"the 1850 census data regarding Mrs. Benjamin Burt (Elizabeth Swaar, daughter of Jacob Swaar), indicating that she was born in Pennsylvania..." (1)
"Burt, Benjamin Jnr. & Elizabeth Swaar. Of Port Tp. Her father Jacob Swaar cons[enting], att[esting] her brother George Swaar. 29 May 1817 M[arriage] A[ffidavit], [original] R[eturns], [Volume] A-[p.] 29" (2)
"Elizabeth SWAAR (1248)<9>,<10>,<11>
BurialSite* __ ___ ____ Old Wheelersburg cem, Wheelersburg, Scioto Co, OH.
Birth* 09 Jun 1800 PA.
Death* 17 Mar 1864 (Probably died in Scioto Co, OH).
Father* Jacob SWAAR (3947) (circa 1767-before 1881)
Mother* Sarah Elizabeth TBD (3948)
Notes
<9>:_________, Info provided by Charles.
<10>:Swaar Info provided by Alice Hudson 9000 Zuni Rd SE Unit F13 Albuquerque NM 87123-3154, n.d., Alice Hudson-Swaar Family researcher.
<11>:Letter to brother John Swar dtd 15 July 1860 owned by Alice M. Hudson 422 E. 4th St, Wellston OH 45692, n.d., Alice Hiudson-Swaar Family researcher.
" (3)
1) Letter dated April 10, 1995 from:
Worth Fitzgerald
2245 Double Eagle Court
Reston, Virginia 22091
2) Scioto County Marriages (see Thaddeus Bennett) p. 19
Swaar Researchers (Portsmouth Library):
Kenneth D. McGallian
5200 Irvine Blvd. #181
Irvine, CA 92720-2040
Alice Hudson
9000 Zuni Rd., S.E., Apt. F13
Albuquerque, NM 87123-3154
3) e-mail from Charles R. Mercer dated 9/1/19988

[NI1148] "Benjamin Burt who was buried at the east end of the bridge over the Little Scioto, was a Revolutionary Soldier. He enlisted May, 1777, and served three years as an artificer under Colonel Baldwin, Captain Peter Mills in the Massachusetts Artillery. He enlisted again in May 1810 (sic- must be 1780), and served nearly two years as an artificer in Captain Thomas Patton's company, Col. Lamb, 2nd New York Artillery. He was discharged in 1782 at West Point, N.Y. He was at Yorktown at the surrender of Cornwallis. When he enlisted he was a resident of Sussex County, N.J. He applied for a pension Nov. 17, 1824, then a resident of Scioto County, Ohio. He was then at the age of 63 years. He died at Wheelersburg, Ohio, March 1, 1849. His surviving children at that time were Benjamin, Samuel B. and Munsell Burt and Mehitable Bonser." (1)
"Burt, Benjamin, Mary, W1137, Cont & NJ Line, sol appl 28 Dec 1847 Scioto Cty OH aged 87 a resident of Wheelersburg OH, sol had orig appl 17 Nov 1824 Scioto Cty OH & had a wife aged 66 & a son aged 21 (insane), enl. in Sussex Cty, NJ, wid appl 23 June 1851 Scioto Cty OH aged 72 a res of Madison OH, sol d. 1 Mar 1849 aged 88, sol & wid m in April 1841, sol's son Benjamin Burt, Jr. & states sol d leaving 5 children Samuel B. & Munsell Burt of Edgar Cty, IL, Benjamin Burt, Elizabeth Scott & Mehitable Bonser of Porter Twp. in Scioto County, OH, wid was sol's 2nd wife & they had no children (1st wife not named)" (2)
Benjamin F. Burt is listed as an early pioneer of Scioto County, Ohio 1796-1806 in the History of Lower Scioto Valley.

Early Marriages in Scioto County...
June 1, 1817 --- John Olliver, to Patty Munn, Benjamin Burt, J(ustice of the). P(eace).

Children:
Samuel Burt
Munsell Burt
Mehitable Burt
Elizabeth Burt
Benjamin Burt
"Benjamin Burt
Revolutionary Soldier
By June Stroth
Benjamin Burt was born in 1761, possibly in Sussex County, New Jersey. Records show Sussex County as his home in 1777, when he enlisted in the Massachusetts Artillery under Captain Peter Mills and Colonel Baldwin. He was an artificer, a soldier able to do emergency repairs and mechanical work on the guns and equipment. He served in the Massachusetts Artillery from May, 1777 until May 1780. He then enlisted in the 2nd New York Artillery as an artificer under Captain Thomas Patton and Colonel Lamb. He served this unit from 1780 until 1782. He was discharged at West Point, New York in 1782.
During his service with the Massachusetts and New York Artilleries, Benjamin Burt would have been under the direct command of General George Washington in the campaigns against the British at New York City. The 2nd New York Artillery was one of the units which kept Lord Cornwallis trapped on the peninsula at Yorktown until the arrival of the French fleet in 1781. Benjamin Burt was present with his artillery unit at the surrender of the British at Yorktown.
Benjamin Burt applied for a Revolutionary Soldier's pension while a resident of Scioto County in 1824. The date of his arrival in this area is unknown... [Before his brother, Christopher's, marriage in Scioto County in 1810, presumably]
It seems reasonable to infer that the family reached Scioto County in the period between 1800 and 1815...
Benjamin Burt died at Wheelersburg, Ohio, March 1, 1849. He left as surviving children at that time Benjamin, Samuel B., and Munsell Burt and Mehitable Bonser. The old soldier was laid to rest in the pioneer cemetery just above the mouth of the Little Scioto River. After resting there for almost 70 years, his grave was disturbed by the construction of the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad bridge over the Ohio. One of the piers came to be built where the cemetery lay. In 1917 the graves of the pioneers were moved to the old Wheelersburg Cemetery, where they were buried near the entrance."
Birth and death dates and spouses of his children are taken from a family group sheet prepared by an unknown person, which I found in the Portsmouth Public Library. A family group sheet on his father Samuel shows Benjamin's birth date as April 18, 1762 and death date as February 28, 1849.
"Burt
Benjamin E-1849 SC c5163 [#212] d. 3/1/1849" (3)
"Sounds like you have pretty much the same information on Benjamin and Rhoda Burt, and their relationship with the Bonsers that we do. Never have been able to find Rhoda in a Bonser family. Seen several references to Benjamin's wife name as Mehitable. I suspect she is one and the same. Guess if my name was Mehitable that I would not want to be called that either. I have some family records in my
possession (very old) on what is the family of Benjamin's son Samuel B. Burt, and on the record Samuels mother is listed as Rhoda. Samuel Burt who died in Scioto Co. 1808, is suspected to be the father of Benjamin, as both Benjamin and Christopher are listed on the will. There are also 2 Samuel's on this will.
There is Samuel B. Burt (Ben's son) and a Samuel J. Burt (most probably Ben's brother), besides Abigail and Christopher, there was a sister Hannah, and another brother John.
The following are * christening dates from the Church of Christ in Salem, Westchester Co. N.Y.
Father Samuel;
Children; Samuel * Oct.9,1757
Hannah * May 1,1763
Benjamin * Apr.18,1762 ** Mar.10,1761
John * Feb.17,1765
Christopher * Apr.5,1767 **Jan.1,1768
Abigail * Aug.20,1769 ** 1769

** Dates we have as birth dates, The dates, and names of Benjamin, Christopher, and Abigail, are just too close, for this not to be the family of our Benjamin Burt.
We also suspect that the father of this family Samuel Burt, is the son Samuel of Christopher Burt and Joanna St. John who raised their family in Ridgefield, Fairfield Co., Ct., a mere 10 miles from Salem, N.Y. And Christopher's parents were Benjamin Burt and Sarah Belden, Benjamins father, David Burt, David's father Henry Burt and Eulalia Marche. There is a Henry Burt Book, but our line is not there it is documented to the son Samuel, who we suspect is Ben's father.
When we do find new information, I like to send it out to the other Burt researchers in a mass mailing, if you don't mind I would like to add your e-mail address to this mailing. If I can be of further assistance please don't hesitate to ask.

Larry Hindley
1970 N.E. Jamie Dr.
Hillsboro, Or. 97124" (4)
1) History of Scioto County, p. 203
2) Abstracts of Revolutionary Pension Files, p. 488
3) Ohio Wills and Estates to 1850; An Index by Carol Willsey Bell (Bell Books, Youngstown OH 1981) p. 52
4) E-mail from Larry Hindley >

[NI1149] "John: My info on the Bonsers came from "Pioneers of Scioto County Ohio" >by James Keyes, Portsmouth, OH 1880-DAR Library in Washington. I show Joseph Bonser as the father of Isaac Bonser who married Abigail Burt. I also have a note that I thought that Rhoda/Mehetable Bonser was Isaac Bonser's sister-not proven. I also have a note that a will exists in Northumberland Co., PA in the index 1772-1859, recorded 20 Apr 1777 with a reference to the death date. I also have the date of 11 Feb 1777 as the death date for Joseph Bonser. I also refer to a bible record of Nathaniel Bonser which was contributed by Mrs. M.C. Fisher of Chariton, IA. The article indicates that one of Isaac Bonser's children's name was Joseph.
We need a good link between Joseph and Rhoda/Mehetable-this may be it and also settle/further confuse the name issue.
Charlie" (1)
"Hi cousins,
I just finished reading the Scioto Co.,OH court case of 1858 concerning the heirs of Isaac Bonser,Sr. et al vs. Benjamin Burt,Sr. et al. It is 15 pages of old print concerning the conveyance of a small area of
Burt's land for one acre of Bonser land to build and run a water powered mill on a run (Bonsers Run or Little Scioto River), I don't know which and I suspect it really doesn't much matter to anyone but me since I am the only one who lives here. It was finally resolved to the agreement of both parties. It truly didn't seem like any big deal, however 140 years ago, it must have been.
Now for the good stuff!! I'm going to type verbatim from the court record what I think may be the defining fact of Rhoda Burt being a Bonser. If any of you have other ideas, let's hear them and by all means pass this on to the other Burt relatives that I don't have listed for their thoughts on the subject.
This is Benjamin Burt, Jr. giving testimony in court as one of the defendants. Samuel Bonser is the lead plaintiff.
"He (Benj.,Jr.) admits however that many years since the said Isaac Bonser built a new dam, and changed to some extent the mill race, but this defendant says that there was no agreement between the said Bonser and this defendant in reference thereto, but that this defendant acquiesed in said change to accommodate the said Bonser WHO WAS AN UNCLE OF THIS DEFENDANT, and on this account was permitted to make such changes from time to time as he desired, with understanding however all the time that said privilege was only to continue during the lifetime of the said Isaac Bonser."
I am missing something cousins, as I have never considered myself a Sherlock Holmes*grin*. Think about other relation possibilities, etc. and get back to me if there are any questions.
Hopefully, a very happy cousin
Ralph" (2)
1) 10/18/98 e-mail from Charles Mercer >
2) e-mail dated 2/2/1999 from Ralph F. Scott >

[NI1154] "8. Tietie van Etten b. Marbletown, NY ch. 24 FEB 1684 Kingston, NY m Evert Roosa 10 MAY 1702" (1)
1) Olive Tree Genealogy, 17th Century Immigrants to New York

[NI1155] The will of Thaddeus Bennett, recorded September 11, 1834:
"I give also to my grandson and granddaughter Gashum and Mahitable Bennett fifty dollars each to be paid them by my administrators." (4)
I conclude that he is the son of Thaddeus Bennett, Jr. since Thaddeus, Jr. is not mentioned in the will of Thaddeus, Sr. and thus was probably dead at the time. He is also mentioned together with Mahitable Bennett in the will of Thaddeus, Sr. She was the daughter of Thaddeus, Jr.
He may have been born in Canadea, Allegany County, New York, since his grandfather, Thaddeus, and his uncle, Benjamin, lived there at the time of his birth. (5)
"Gershom I Bennett son of Bennett
born June 1, 1810 in New York State
Married March 27, 1836 in Greenup County, Ky
Died February 15, 1899, Willard, Missouri
Children:
Mary 1839 - 1841 Ohio
Elisabeth Ann...
Calfurnia 1842 - 1866
Henrietta 1845 -
George J.I. 1847 -
Henry I. 1849 -
Orrin 1851 - 1852
Augusta E. 1853 - 1904
Gershom I. Bennett was a Yankee from New York and an orphan. He was a tall, angular, very energetic person, and we all stood in awe of him. He went to California for a short time during the Gold Rush of '49...
Census for 1790: Gershom Bennett, Chemung Township, Montgomery County, New York. 3 Males under 16 2 Females." [See Ephraim Bennett - this may be the Gershom mentioned in Warwick, NY in 1771.](1)
Photocopy of a family history record included in the Arlene Whiteman genealogy:
"This certifies that Gershom I. Bennett and Hulda Smith were solemnly united by me in the [Unreadable] at Greenup Co. Ky on the twenty seventh day of March in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and thirty six conformably to the Ordinance of God, and the Laws of the State. In Presence of By Jehu Rice Esq. Signed R Pierce Jas Patten
Family Record
Name Place of Birth Date of Birth Date of Marriage Date of Death
Gershom I. Bennett N.Y. June 1st 1810 Mar 27th 1836 Feb 15 1899
Hulda Smith Greenup Co., Ky Dec 14th 1815 Mar 27th 36 Feb 11th 1905
Mary Bennett Powellsville Mar 28 1839 Oct 26 1841
Elisabeth A. Bennett Wheelersburg Jul 26 1840 Mar 25th 1859 Feb 20, 1927
(actually 1860) Claremont, Ca
Greenup County is just across the Ohio River from Wheelersburg, Ohio. His daughter married George Washington Wheeler.
"Among the family names connected with the early history of both northern Kentucky and southern Ohio is that of the Bennett family. Thaddeus Bennett... married Eunice Bentley and, with his wife and seven children, he left New York about 1818 on a raft which he had built at Olean, New York, and floated down the Alleghany and Ohio Rivers, landing near the mouth of the Little Scioto River in Ohio.
They located near Stockdale in Scioto County, and later moved to the present site of Harrisonville... Two more children were born in Ohio, making a family of nine in all. A widowed daughter, Sallie Bennett Fenton, with four small children, came with the family from New York...
Joseph Bennett, born in New York in 1794, was the seventh child of Thaddeus and Eunice Bentley Bennett, and married a widow named Elizabeth Mills Bennett." (2)
From the above, I conclude that Gershom was the son or grandson of Thaddeus Bennett.
"Thaddeus Bennett was the progenitor of the Bennett family of Greenup County, Kentucky. He was of Scotch-Irish extraction and a native of Virginia. When a child, he was taken by parents to a farm on the Genesee River in New York where he was reared. At the age of 16 he enlisted in the Continental Army and had service in the Revolutionary War. In 1818 he migrated with his family to Scioto County, Ohio, where he lived until his death at the age of 74 years." (3)
I visited the Wesley Chapel Cemetery (1 1/4 mi. No. of Willard) and the Rose Hill Cemetery (4 mi No. of Willard) in July 1996, but was unable to find either Gershom or his wife.
If his birthdate is 1810, he could not have been the son of Abigail Waite, who married Thaddeus Bennett, Jr. in 1820.
1) Arlene Whiteman, quoting Olive Wheeler Whiteman
2) History of Greenup County, p. 120-1
3) Kozee, William C.; Early Families of Eastern and Southeastern Kentucky and Their Descendants (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Baltimore, 1979) p. 58
4) Kay, Bernadine Smith, Jehial Bennett: A History of the Forebears and Descendants of Jehial Bennett, First of Our Line in Wisconsin (Wisconsin Dells Events) p. 12-13
5) Ibid. p. 10
Possible Sources:
Springfield-Greene County Library District
Main Library
397 East Central Tel. 837-5000 Fax 869-0320
P.O. Box 760
Springfield, Missouri 65801-0760
Tel. 417-837-5000 Fax 417-869-0320
Ozarks Genealogical Society
P.O. Box 3494
Springfield, MO 65808

[NI1156] "Hulda Smith was a small brown-eyed woman of kindly disposition whom we all dearly loved. One of my most pleasant memories was the visits we made to the Bennett's home. She endeared herself to us by her many acts of love and kindness. I still remember the rows of half egg-shell on the shelf that she had filled for us with maple sugar when they gathered the sap in the Spring for their yearly supply of sugar and syrup." (1)
1) Arlene Whiteman quoting Olive Wheeler Whiteman, her grandaughter.

[NI1158] "Jacob, the eldest son, was born in 1785... Jacob, the eldest son, married Elizabeth Gray of Greenup County, in 1824." (1)
1) Biggs, Nina Mitchell; History of Greenup County, Kentucky (1951 Louisville) p. 259

[NI1159] "Elizabeth (1790), also born in Maryland, married Jacob Smith in Washington County, Pennsylvania, and they came to Greenup County with the Gray family, settling on Tygart Creek at Liberty...
Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Lloyd and Mary Bonifant Gray, who married Jacob Smith, lived near Liberty and had a family of two sons and eight daughters. Their daughter, Cynthia married James Littlejohn... Elizabeth Smith Gray died at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Serot, at Jackson, Ohio, in 1880, at the age of ninety." (1)
1) History of Greenup County (see Jacob Smith) p. 171-3

[NI1160] IGI
Thomas Gray b 12/23/1762 Christ Church, Port Republic, Calvert County, Maryland Father: William Gray Mother: Rebecca Gardner
"The Gray family emigrated to Maryland from England at a very early date. Thomas Lloyd Gray was born in Prince George County, Maryland, in 1755. In 1781 he married Mary Bonifant, who was born in the same county April 7, 1764. In 1803 the Gray family moved to Washington County, Pennsylvania, and from there came down the Ohio River on a flat boat to Greenup County about 1808.
Thomas Lloyd Gray had taken the oath of allegiance in Prince Georges County, Maryland in 1779 and served in the Revolutionary Army from Virginia. For his services he received a two hundred acre warrant (old Kentucky records and deeds).
The children of the Gray family were John Lloyd, Elizabeth (Betsy), Elias, James, Letitia, Anary, and others. Elizabeth (1790) married Jacob Smith in Washington County, Pennsylvania, and they came to Greenup County with the Gray family, settling on Tygart Creek at Liberty. Elias married Joana Richards and lived on Tygart Creek; James was the ancestor of the Gray family of Ironton, Ohio." (2)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) History of Greenup County (see Jacob Smith) p. 172

[NI1163] " Children: History of Kentucky by Collins Vol. II p. 301
Son died at age of 90
Elizabeth Gray Smith 1790-1890 (83 at the time of mother's death)
Elias Gray 88 at the time of mother's death
Miss Nancy Gray 73 at the time of mother's death
Joseph Gray 70 at the time of mother's death
This source also states that Mary Bonafil's mother lived to 100 years." (1)
"In 1781 (Thomas Lloyd Gray) married Mary Bonifant, who was born in (Prince Georges County) April 7, 1764." (2)
Listed on page 222 of the 1850 Census for Greenup County as age 90.
Listed in the household of (her daughter?) Nancy Gray as age 101 and born in Maryland (widow of Thomas Lloyd Gray).
A note says "Mary Bonifant Gray, b 3/9/1759 Prince Georges Co., MD, d 11/25/1872."
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) History of Greenup County (see Jacob Smith) p. 171

[NI1215] Possible hint on ancestry: Peter Palfrey of Horton, Somersetshire settled in Salem, Mass. (Topo. Dict. p. 143) Great Migration does not mention John Palfrey under Peter Palfrey.
Info about marriage and death supplied by Laurie Lightfoot (NDSC79B on the Prodigy Network)..
"uncel Palfrey (John Palfrey, son of John and Rebecca (Bordman) Palfrey) died December the 1 71 year of his age 1759" Goddard Bible, New England Historical and Genealogical Register April 1899
"Palfrey
Jane, widow, m. George Willowes or Willis of Cambridge; had ch. John and Elizabeth Palfrey" (1)
"Palfrey, John (otherwise written Palfray, Palfraye, Palfry, Palfory, Paulfrey, Paulfery), m. Rebecca, dau. of William Bordman, 4 Aug. 1664, and had Rebecca, b. 16 Sept. 1665, m. Joseph Hicks 24 Nov. 1716; John, b. 12 Ap. 1667, d. 27 June 1667; Elizabeth, b. 24 May 1668; Martha, b. 18 May 1670, m. Benjamin Goddard 30 May 1689; Thomas, b. 7 May 1672, d. 21 Nov. 1677; Ruth, b. 1 Nov. 1677, d. unm. at Medf. 29 Dec. 1737; John, b. 21 Jan or Feb. 1688-9, a shoemaker, d. unm. 1 Dec. 1759. There were at least two more daughters, one of whom was prob. Mary, who m. Ebenezer Williams 1 Dec 1700. John the f. was a carpenter, resided on the easterly side of North Avenue, near the Common, and d. in 1689. The name, in this family, became extinct." (2)
1) Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts p. 341
2) Paige, Lucius R.; History of Cambridge (Boston 1877 Hurd & Houghton) p. 621

[NI1216] "Her name on the mortgage which brought her son-in-law, William Goddard, to Massachusetts was Elizabeth Miles Foote. The mortgage was to her brother Ephraim Childs. Her maiden name was thus probably Childs and she married first a Miles and then a Foote."(1)
"Birth [of Ephraim Child]: Say 1599, son of Wolstone and Ellen (Empson) Child (TAG 63:17-28)...
In her successful search for the parentage of Ephraim Child, Hyde also showed that Elizabeth Child, sister of Ephraim, married first Benjamin Miles, by whom she had a daughter Elizabeth who married William Goddard, a Watertown settler. Elizabeth (Child) Miles then married Robert Foote, elder brother of Nathaniel Foote who came to New England and settled in Wethersfield (TAG 63:17-28; see also TAG 53:193-206).
In a letter to John Winthrop, dated about 1631, John Bulbrooke of [Great] Wenham, Suffolk, England asks to be remembered to "my cousin Child and his wife" (WP 3:7).
Comments: Although Ephraim Child had moved to Nayland, Suffolk, as an adult, he became known to John Winthrop, who refers to him in a 9 October 1629 letter as "my neighbor Child" (WP 2:157, 173)." (2)
"1631, June 18. Elizabeth Miles appointed administratix of the estate of her deceased husband Benjamin Miles of Ware, county Hertford (PCC Adm. Act Book 1631-1633, p. 37).
1645/6, Feb. 4. Will of Robert Foote, Citizen and Grocer of London; my loveing wife Elizabeth in leiw of forty pounds worth of goods which by Covenant before our marriage (among other things therein) I was to leave her... sonne Robert Foote five hundred pounds at age twenty one, and an allowance in the meane tyme of Fower pounds... sonne Joseph Myles twenty pounds when he shall commence Batchelor of Arts... Proved 4 Sept. 1646...
Robert Foote and Elizabeth (Child) Miles were married about 1632 and lived in the parish of St. Dunstan in East, London. This parish, like others known to be residences of Elizabeth as a child with her father, was in the eastern section of London. However, the previous parishes were located near the east and northeast stretches of the London wall, and St. Dunstan bordered the Thames near London Tower, in the southeast....
Robert had children by both of his wifes rather than by just his first wife... Robert was born in 1577 and became a citizen and grocer of London. Edward Goddard called him "a worthy and religious merchant." He was about twenty years older than his second wife, Elizabeth Child.
Robert married his first wife, Dionis, about 1609, and she was buried 16 Aug. 1630 in the parish of St. Dunstan in the East, London. Robert's will was dated 4 Feb. 1645/6, he was buried 17 Aug. 1646, and the will was proved 4 Sept. 1646. He left legacies to two sons and one daughter by Dionis, to his son Robert by Elizabeth, to Elizabeth's children by her first marriage, and to Elizabeth...
Children (Foote) of Robert and Elizabeth (Child) (Miles) (bp. and bur. in St. Dunstan in the East, London):
v Benjamin bp. 2 June 1633; bur. 5 Jan. 1635/6.
vi Robert bp. 11 Jan. 1634/5; bur. 9 April 1636.
vii Robert bp. 20 Jan. 1636/7; m. lic. 20 Aug. 1679 Anne Skinner, a widow;... By hi will dated 6 April 1714 and proved 15 June 1714, Robert gave generous legacies to the children of his sister Elizabeth Goddard in New England. For further references, see TAG 53:204-5.
viii Benjamin bp. 4 April 1639; bur. 31 Oct. 1641.
The first time that Elizabeth was widowed she had two children two years of age. The second time that was widowed those children were sixteen and fifteen. Three of her children by her second husband were already deceased, and the fourth, Robert, was seven years of age.
Elizabeth's brother Ephraim Child visited England the second winter after her widowhood. Ephraim was planning the trip in Sept. 1647, aaccording to the Aspinwall Notarial Records. Elizabeth was apparently fairly well situated financially, as Ephraim convinced her to loan him money. For security he gave her a mortgage deed to property he owned in New England. A deponent who witnessed the signing of the document stated that Ephraim Child put his signature to it in London on 15 March 1647/8. The amount Elizabeth lent Ephraim was #100, the ammount that Edward Goddard later remembered being told.
Years went by and Ephraim made no payments on the loan. Whether or not Elizabeth paid her counter-agreed grain of pepper each year is unknown; this was only to be given if demanded.
Ephraim died in 1662. In England, Elizabeth received word of his death, but she received no recompense for her brother's debt. Finally, she gave power of attorney to her son-in-law, William Goddard, that he might travel to New England and try to retrieve the debt, sell the land, or do whatever had to be done. Here again Edward Goddard's recollection was surprisingly accurate. Probably the reason that Elizabeth sent her son-in-law to take care of the mortgage was that, being around sixty-five years of age, she felt too old to go and take care of legal matters beyond the sea. Record of her death has eluded searchers." (3)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) The Great Migration Begins, pp. 352-3
3) TAG, Vol. 63, #1, p. 22-6
Childs Researchers:
Gayle Bailey Suggs (JSAE41A-Prodigy)

[NI1218] "Abraham Brown
Origin: Unknown
Migration: 1631
First Residence: Watertown
Occupation: Surveyor
Church Membership: Membership in Watertown church prior to 6 March 1631/2 implied by freemanship.
Education: Abraham Brown's frequent employment as a surveyor implies a solid, basic education.
Offices: Watertown selectman, 1635 through 1641, annually (WaTR 2,3,5,6,7). Appointed to several committees to lay out land and highways, and to regulate timber cutting (WaTR 1-7,9)...
Birth: About 1600 based on approximated date of birth of first child.
Death: Watertown in 1650, prior to 1 October (MPR Misc 79, 82).
Marriage: By 1631 (and by about 1627 if she was the mother of all of his children) Lydia ______; she married (2) Ipswich 27 November 1659 Andrew Hodges; "Lidia Hoges (a widow) died at Watertown 27 September 1686 (WaVR 58).
Children:
i Sarah, b. say 1627; m. Watertown 16 December 1643 George Parkhurst Jr.
ii Mary, b. say 1629; m. Malden 10 April 1650 John Lewis as his second wife.
iii Lydia, b. Watertown 22 March 1631/2 (WaVR 3); married by 1655 William Lakin...
iv Jonathan...
v Hannah, b. Watertown 1 March 1637/8 (calc.) (WaVR 6); bur. there 15 March 1637/8.
vi Abraham, b. Watertown 6 March 1638/9 (WaVR 6); m. Watertown 5 February 1662/3 Mary Dix...
Associations: Bond published a pedigree which stated that Abraham, Richard and John Brown of Watertown were all from Hawkedon in Suffolk, that Abraham and Richard were brothers, and that John was their nephew...
The claimed identification rests on only two records: the 1590 will of Thomas Brown of Hawkedon, naming five sons, including John, Richard and Abraham... and the 11 October 1601 baptism at Hawkedon of John Brown, son of John. This latter record connects tenously with John Brown of Watertown...
Richard was a member of an independent church in London in 1616, and before that was a ferryman at Gravesend, which would place his birth no later than about 1590 (and perhaps earlier) and thus on chronological grounds at least he could have been a son of Thomas of Hawkedon. Abraham, on the other hand, seems to have been a decade or more younger...
Bond sets forth, and then dismisses, some strong evidence which may point to the correct ancestry of Abraham Brown. On 1 January 1672/3 Jonathan Brown of Watertown "cousin and next heir of Edmund Brown formerly of Boston... deceased" relinquished to Richard Taylor of Boston the reversion of two parcels of land owned by Edmund Brown, who is also referred to as "uncle" by Jonathan Brown. Edmund Browne of Boston... would seem to be a brother of Abraham Browne, and this is not reflected in the Hawkedon pedigree." (6)
" Suffolk
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Browne, Abraham Hawkedon Watertown Bond" (4)
"Abraham Browne, a younger brother, or a nephew of the Elder, Richard Browne. He was a very early settler, perhaps one of the first of Watertown, and was admitted freeman, March 6th, 1631-2. He was a land surveyor, and, as is manifest from the records, in the early municipal transactions of the town, he received important appointments, and trusts more numerous than were conferred upon any other person. No two men were more respected and confided in, than he and his relative, Richard Browne. The records of the town do not embrace the transactions of the first four years after the settlement. They commence in 1634, extend to Nov. 28, 1643, when there occurs a hiatus of four years, and recommence Nov. 8, 1647. He was selectman from 1636 to 1643, inclusive.
By wife, Lydia, he (A.B.) had 6 chil., of whom at least one, probably two were b. in England. The earliest record of a birth in Watertown was that of his dr. Lydia.
On the 6th Oct., 1691, the Court ordered the parties concerned in the estate of Abraham Browne, of Watertown, deceased in the year 1650, be sent for, to attend the adjournment of the Court, in order to a settlement of said estate; and they appointed a committee, consisting of John Ward, Jonathan Remington, and Thomas Greenwood, to make proposals for said settlement. The claimants were, 1. The heirs of Jonathan Browne, deceased, the eldest son. 2. George Woodward, in right of his wife, only dr. of Abraham Brown, Jr., deceased. 3. John Parkhurst, son of one of the daughters of said Abraham Browne, Senr. 4. The heirs of (?) Isaac Lewis, deceased, who were children of another dr. of said Abraham Browne. 5. William Lakin, in right of his wife, youngest daughter of said Abraham Browne." (1)
"Abraham Browne assigned everything to the care of his widow, with the land later to be divided equally among his sons, legacies of livestock for his daughters; but the will could not be proved and the court applied the double-partible rule." (2)
"When the Puritans came to America, this ancient system of government by town meetings, selectman and fundamental laws became the basis of local government in New England." (3)
On the basis of the above, we can assume that his family was something like the following:
1) Jonathan Browne, born in England
2) second child, born in England, possibly Abraham Brown, whose only daughter married George Woodward
3) Lydia Browne, born in Watertown, Massachusetts, who may have married FNU Parkhurst
4) a daughter who married Isaac Lewis
5) a daughter, the youngest, who married William Lakin
6) a son?
"Abraham Browne, a younger brother, or a nephew of the Elder, Richard Browne...son of Thomas and Joan, of Swan Hall, Hawkedon, Co. Suffolk; b. about 1575 or 6; settled first in London, where he was a ruler in a church of Separatists, and there rendered important services to some of the persecuted Non-conformists. He was one of the first that applied (Oct. 1630) to be admitted freeman, and was admitted May 18, 1631. Towards the end of 1632, he was removed from the office of Ruling Elder, on account of his sentiments, which were too liberal for the ecclesiastical notions then prevalent. There
was, however, entire concordance between him and his very pastor, Rev. George Phillips [#3372]; and such was Mr. Browne's influence, that Hubbard says, he "was thought sometimes to overrule the Church."" (1)
"Brown
Abraham, Watertown, frm. March 6, 1631/2. town officer, com. of Gen. Court. Wife Lydia; ch. Sarah, Mary, Lydia b. 21 (1) 1632, Jonathan b. 15 (8) 1635, Hannah b/d 1638, Abraham b. 6 (1) 1639.
He d. in 1650. the widow m. 11/27/1659, Andrew Hodges of Ipswich." (5)
1) Arlene Whiteman
2) Albion's Seed, p. 173
3) Albion's Seed, p. 198
4) Topo. Dict. p. 155
5) Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts p. 72
6) The Great Migration Begins, pp. 244-6

[NI1221] " Suffolk
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Hammond, William Lavenham Watertown NEGR 30/28"(3)
"Again settlers felt the need to protest their honesty as they wrote descriptions of this kind (describing abundant game). 'those that did not see them, ' said one, 'might think it was not true, but it is very true.'... Still one of the earliest ecological relationships of which the colonists were aware led them to believe that the numbers of deer might be increased if only wolves could be eliminated. 'Here is a good store of deer,' wrote William Hammond; 'were it not for the wolves here would be abound, for the does have most two fawns at once ans some have three, but the wolves destroy them.'" (1)
""John Lyuermore," aged 28, embarked for New England on the first of April 1634 aboard the Francis of Ipswich. He resided first at Watertown, removed about 1639 to New Haven, and returned to Watertown about 1653, dying there in 1684.
The definitive clues which lead to establishing his English origin are found in the will of Rose Steward of Cockfield, Suffolk, widow of Thomas Hammond and Robert Steward, and mother of William Hammond, 1630 immigrant to Watertown.
Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas (and Rose) Hammond, was baptized at Lavenham, Suffolk, on 1 April 1574, and so probably married sometime in the 1590s. She could have had her four children by 1600 or shortly after, and if the John Livermore of the 1634 passenger list was her son, he would have been born about 1606...
John Livermore sailed on the same ship with the wife and three children of William Hammond, so he would be accompanying his aunt (by marriage) and three younger cousins on the voyage.
Second, Thomas Hammond, son of William Hammond, and by present interpretation first cousin of John Livermore, made Livermore executor of his will, and Hannah (Cross) Hammond, widow of Thomas, made a bequest of money to John Livermore. (note: Frederick S. Hammond, History and Genealogies of the Hammond Families of America, 2 vols. (Oneida, N.Y., 1902-04), 1:64-66)...
Based on the evidence presented above, we conclude that John Livermore, the immigrant to New England in 1634, was born about 1606, probably in Wethersfield, Essex, son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Hammond) Livermore, and grandson of Thomas and Rose (Trippe) Hammond." (4)
"Also see National Genealogy Quarterly July 1995 and book: "History and Genealogies of the Hammond Families of America" by Fred Hammond, 2 Vols, Oneida, NY 1902-04. Especially data about William Hammonds, one from Rehoboth and one from Swansea." (2)
"Hammond, Hammon, Hammers
William, from Lavenham, Eng., came before 1635 to Watertown; from. May 25, 1636. Propr.; town officer. Became surety for a debt in England of his son William, who d. in 1636. (Letter of Robert Ryece to Gov. Winthrop.) He gave letter of attorney 22 (9) 1647, to his son Thomas, to obtain possession of lands at Lavenham, which were the possession of his mother Rose Steward. (A.) Elizabeth, ae. 47, Elizabeth, ae. 15, Sarah, ae. 10, and John, ae. 7, came in the Francis of Ipswich, April 30, 1634. Elizabeth, called by Rev. John Lothrop "my sister," was recd. by him to the chh. of Scituate April 14, 1636, having a dismission from the chh. of Wat.; which seems to be the dau. Elizabeth, m. about that time to Samuel House.
He d. Oct. 8, 1662. Will dated July 1, 1662, ae. about 90 years, beq. to wife; son John; the 4 children of dec. dau. Elizabeth House; dau. Sarah Smith and her son Adam; dau. Barnes; gr. son Thomas, son of dec. son Thomas. (see Cross, John) The widow d. Sept. 14, 1674 ae. about 90." (5)
"Whitehead. Marriages in Babergh Hundred [Lavenham, Suffolk].
1605. 9 June William Hamond Elizabeth Payne." (6)
"Paper endorsed:
John Noebury Esq. John Price Morgan Jones.
Tho. Wyn & Richard Price. 1656.
Tho. Hadley of London Draper
against
Wm. Hamond of Soame in Cambridge.
Rose Trip marieth unto on Hammond having a parsell of Land given her by her Father Trip and to her heirs. She beareth a son by Hammond whose name was William... William Hammond was demed a bankrupt by a statute sued out against him the 26 day fo febr: in the fifth yeare of the first King Charles 1620 [ie. 1629-30]: the 20th of November. After that date he departe the Land and fleth into New England... now in the yeare 1647 (he sendeth oufer his son) his son Thomas cum from New England to be admitted to the Land" (7)
1) Cronon, William, Changes in the Land; Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England c. 1983 p. 23-24 quoting William Hammond to Sir Simonds D'Ewes, September 26, 1633 in Everett Emerson, ed., Letters from New England (Amherst, 1976), p. 111
2) Roger Knapp (HVHJ68A-Prodigy)
3) Topo. Dict. p. 157
4) NEGHS, Vol. 150 Oct. 1996; p. 433-5
5) Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts, p. 210
6) English Origins of New England Families p. 138 (see Rose Trippe)
7) Ibid., p. 138
Other researchers:
Richard Hammond (JLPM19A-Prodigy)
Check Higginson Books for NE Hammond genealogy.

[NI1222] "It is interesting to note that William Payne, the prominent settler in Massachusetts, whose sister, Elizabeth married William Hammond at Lavenham on 9 June 1605 (The [NEGH] Register, vol. 69, p. 252) was steward of Sir Simon d'Ewes [note: See Vol. I of this work, p. 387.] manor at Lavenham...
N.B. First court of Simonds Dewes knt. son & heir of Paul Dewes esq. deceased 27 Ap. 1631.
William Playne [sic], steward." (1)
William Hammond corresponded with Sir Simon d'Ewes.
"The Hammond Family Correction: -- Franklin M. Wright, Esq. of London, England, has called my attention to the fact that William Playne, steward of Sir Simon d'Ewes, was not identical with William Payne, the early Massachusetts merchant, as suggested by me in the Hammond article in The Register for April 1952.
William Playne, Esq., was of Preston, co. Suffolk, and his pedigree will be found in the Visitation of Suffolk for 1612." (2)
1) see Rose Trippe pp. 138 & 141
2) Ibid., p. 144

[NI1223] Information on this person and his family supplied by Polly Boissevain (NGZK37B on the Prodigy Network). She was uncertain about Robert Hyde and Alice Crompton being his parents.
See LDS Ancestral File.
Children:
Joshua Hyde
Job Hyde
"Hyde
Samuel, planter, Cambridge, came in Jonathan in 1639, as he deposed in 1652. Settled at Cambridge. Propr., frm. May 2, 1649, Deacon. Wife Temperance; ch. Samuel, Joshua, b. 12 (1) 1642, Job, Sarah b. 19 (9) 1644, Elizabeth.
He d. 9/14/1669 ae. about 80. Will dated 10 July, prob. 1 (10) 1689." (1)
"Dea. Samuel Hyde, England ca. 1610-Cambridge Village (now Newton) 12 Sept 1689 ae. 79 (NEHGR 71:144)
Temperance _____, d. post 1689" (2)
GenForum Posting
Posted by Andy Kirby on July 10, 1998 at 18:05:35:
In Reply to: Re: Samuel Hyde 1610-1689 posted by J. LuMaye on March 31, 1998 at 11:41:39:

Jonathan Hyde (b Eng 1626) is in fact the younger brother of Deacon Samuel Hyde (b. Eng 1610. The two left England together in 1639 on the ship 'Jonathan'. They are among the original settlers and Founders of Newton, MA (formerly Cambridge Village). Jonathan had 21 children! A very detailed, excellent genealogy of all their descendants through four genrations was published many years ago. Cheers, AFK
1) Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts p. 250
2) NEHGS Nexus, Vol. XIV, No. 5, p. 148

[NI1227] Marci Masse, 4 South Street, Nashua, NH 03060 e-mail: MAMasse@aol.com is preparing a major collection of Family Group Sheets on the descendants of Tjerck de Witt. I submitted my collection 8/10/1997.
"The first mention in this country, of Tjerck Claessen De Witt, the ancestor of the De Witt family, is found in the "Trouw Boeck" or Register of Marriages of the Reformed (Collegiate) Dutch Church, of New York City, where it is recorded that on the 24th day of April 1656, "Tjerck Claessen De Witt van Grootholdt en Zunderlandt," married "Barbara Andriessen van Amsterdam." Zunderlandt has not been definitely located, but it is probably Saterland, a district of Westphalia, on the southern border of East Friesland.
Whether or not any of his family emigrated to America with him has not been ascertained, but it is probable that they did, for in 1662 his sister Emmerentie De Witt married Martinus Hoffman, at New Amsterdam, and in 1699 his brother Jan Claessen De Witt died unmarried at Kingston.
For a short time after his marriage he lived in New York (his first child, Andries was born there), but in the spring of 1657 he removed to Albany, where he had purchased a house and a lot.
In September, 1660, he exchanged his Albany property with Madame de Hutter for land in Wiltwyck (now Kingston), "possession to be given May 1, 1661." He probably took possession at that time, as in September, 1661, he appears as plaintiff in action at law before the Schepens Court of Wiltwyck, and on October 11th the same court ordered the Sheriff (Roeleff Swartwout) to pay him three and a half schepels of wheat in eight days and seven more in one month.
From this time until his death, he resided in Kingston and Hurley, and some of the land which he purchased is still in the hands of his descendants.
That he was a man of considerable means is shown by the fact that in 1661 he was taxed 125 guilders (about $50) to pay for building a church in Esopus.
In 1662 he owned No. 28 of the "new lots."
June 7, 1663, when Kingston and Hurley were almost entirely destroyed by the Indians, his eldest daughter, Taatje, was taken prisoner, but was soon rescued. She afterward married Matthys Matthussen.
"During the winter of 1664 there was much sickness in Esopus [Kingston]. Fever took hold of the people and prostrated half the place. But this did not prevent men from gathering their money. Roeloff Swartwout sold a horse to Tjerck Claessen De Witt, which was taken to the latter's barn, but the ex-sheriff, becoming dissatisfied, took it away secretly. He was sued for the property." [From unpublished "History of Ulster County."]
June 25, 1672, Governor Lovelace deeded him "a parcel of bush-land, together with a house, lot, orchard, and calves' pasture, lying near Kingston, in Esopus."
October 8, 1677, Governor Andros deed him a piece of woodland, containing about fifty acres, at Kingston in Esopus, "to ye west of ye towne."
February 11, 1679, he was one of the signers of a renewal of the Nichols treaty with the Esopus Indians.
In 1684 he signed "the humble petition of the inhabitants of Esopus in the County of Ulster," praying that there might be "liberty by charter to this county to choose our owne officers to every towne court by the major vote of the freeholders." This petition was addressed to Col. Thomas Dongan, Governor-General. It greatly offended the authorities, and the signers were arrested and fined. Thus early in the history of the country arose the questions of local self-government and the right of suffrage. They were easily answered then.
Februrary 13, 1685, one hundred and eighty-nine acres of land lying upon the north side of Roundout Kill, and known by the name of "Momboccus" (in the town of Rochester) in Ulster County. This was laid out for him by Phillip Welles, surveyor, and was granted to him by patent, May 14, 1694.
(Note: The Quicks also purchased land in this areas at the same time.)
March 4, 1689, he was chosen one of the magistrates of Ulster County, having previously held other offices.
Tjerck Claessen De Witt died at Kingston, February 17, 1700. By his will, which bears date the 4th day of March, 1698... to Lucas the one-half of a sloop which he had built the year previous...
Children of Tjerck Claessen De Witt and Barbara Andriessen.
Andries, born in New York City in the early part of 1657. On March 7, 1682, he married Jannetje Egbertsen...
Taatje, born at Albany about 1659; died previous to 1724. She was carried off by the Indians at the burning of Kingston in 1663, but was rescured. In 1677 she m. Matthys Matthyssen [van Keuren]...
Jannetje, bapt Feb 12, 1662 (Kingston); m. Cornelius Swits...
Klaes, bapt. Feb. 17, 1664; d. previous to 1698.
Jan, bapt. Feb. 14, 1666; m. Wyntje Kierstad...
Geertruy, bapt. Oct. 15, 1668; m., March 24, 1688, Hendrick Hendricksen Schoonmaker...
Jacob, m. Grietje Vernooy...
Rachel, m. Cornelius Bogardus...
Lucas...
Peek, m. (1) Jan. 2, 1698, Marytje Janse Vanderberg...
Tjerck. Mentioned in his father's will as the youngest son. No other record.
Marritje, m. (1), Nov. 3, 1700, Hendrick Hendricksen [Kortrreght]... and, having been divorced from him, she married (2) Sept. 6, 1702, Jan Macklin.
Aagje, bapt. Jan. 14, 1684; m. Aug. 23, 1712, Jan Pawling." (1)
See also Everton Family Group Sheet #11713
The Will of Tjerck is online at:
http://members.tripod.com/MAMasse/tjerckwill.htm
1) The De Witt Family (see Lucas) p. 3-6
De Witt researchers:
Mary Chipman (KCPH28A@prodigy.com))

[NI1229] "Tjerck Claessen De Witt... is found in the "Trouw Boeck" or Register of Marriages of the Reformed (Collegiate) Dutch Church, of New York City, where it is recorded that on the 24 day of April, 1656,
"Tjerck Claessen De Witt..." married "Barbara Andriessen van Amsterdam."...
Tjerck Claessen De Witt died at Kingston, February 17, 1700. By his will, which bears date the 4th day of March, 1698... he leaves his property to his wife for life...
His wife Barbara is appointed executrix...
Barbara Andriessen De Witt died on July 6, 1714, and after her death the property was appraised according to the provisions of the will, as appears by the following certificate which is recorded in th
e Ulster County Clerk's Office, Book BB of Deeds, p. 513:
"Whereas by the Last will and Testament of Tyerck Clasen D'Widt, he left his Estate that it should be vallued & prysed by Indifferent and Impartiall men uppon there oath, and application being made un
to the Court for the Ellecting of the psons, & accordingly have made choyce of Capt. Derick Schepmoes, Mr. Adrian Geritsen, Major Johanis Hardenbert, Mr. James Whitaker & Major Jacobus Elmendorf to va
llue & prize the said Estate which they the said psons doe prize accordingly upon oath, being sworne upon the holy Evangelists by Coll. Henry Beekman, the said persons prize the said Estate to be wort
h the som of fourteen hundren & seventy five pounds, Curant monny of New Yorke." (1)
1) The De Witt Family (see Lucas) p. 3-5

[NI1230] Information on this person and his family was supplied by Polly Boissevain (NGZK37B on the Prodigy Network). She was uncertain if this person was actually the father of Samuel.
See the LDS Ancestral File.

[NI1231] Information on this person and her family was supplied by Polly Boissevain (NGZK37B on the Prodigy Network). She was uncertain that this person was the mother of Samuel.

[NI1236] "(Note) Martha, dau. of John and Rebecca (Bordman) Palfrey." (1)
1) New England Historical & Genealogical Register, April, 1899 p. 242 (Records Relating to the Goddard and Frost Families)
Info supplied by Laurie Lightfood (NDSC79B Prodigy).
Laurie Lightfoot
10 Heritage Court
Flemington, NJ 08822-2076

[NI1237] Info supplied by Jeffrey Manson (UWLE78A-Prodigy). Lawrence may well have come from Sussex or Kent since he used the hortatory name "Remember" for his daughter. He lived in Scituate, MA by 1640 since his daughter was born there.
"Remember Litchfield, daughter of Lawrence Litchfield and Judith Dennis... She m. (1) ca. 1640, Lawrence Litchfield and had several children by him... "The Descendants of Lawrence Litchfield, p. 1-36, by W.J. Litchfield; this book may have some errors regarding the Luce family's ancestry" (1)
A Josiah Litchfield is buried in the Scituate, Mass. cemetery at the site of the first church in Scituate.
"Posted by Richard Luce on April 29, 1998 at 06:44:56:
In Reply to: Henry and Remembrance (LITCHFIELD) LUCE posted by Sherry Morell Shelts on December 17, 1997 at 22:18:22:

The first records we have of Henry Luce is in Scituate, Massachusetts on November 13, 1666. At that time he married Remember Litchfield, the daughter of Lawrence and Judith (Dennis) Litchfield of Barnstable, Massachusetts. Prior to being residence of Barnstable, the Litchfield lived in England where Judith Litchfield had been married to and divorced from John Allen. John Allen and his second wife later came to Scituate, too. Records of Governor John Winthrop say that "Lawrence Litchfield was here to greet friends" when they arrived here in 1643, having come here previously on one of the trips of the "Griffin". The Litchfields were a family of considerable means.
Henry and Remember resided in Scituate, Massachusetts in 1666, Rehoboth, Massachusetts in 1668 and in Tisbury on Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts about 1670.
Henry was probably born about 1640 to Israel/Harke and Remember (Munson) Luce. Of Horton, Gloucestershire, England near Wales. He lived in Tisbury until his death somewhere between May 1687 and March 1689. His wife survived him as late as 1708.

Before February 1, 1661, Henry Luce acquired a home lot on the west side of the Old Mill River about 40 rods north of Scotchman's Bridge. Besides this home lot he owned land at Great Neck and Kepigon. He also purchsed 60 acres in Christiantown that borders Great James Pond"
1) Luce Genealogy p. 16
Possible Source: Philip J. and June C. Currier; Litchfield Family Records, (Henniker, N.H., 1982)

[NI1238] Info supplied by Jeffrey Manson (UWLE78A-Prodigy).
"Remember Litchfield , daughter of Lawrence Litchfield & Judith Dennis. Judith was daughter of William Dennis of Scituate, MA. & ----? Judith Dennis, was born possibly Kent, Eng.; she m. (1) ca. 1640, Lawrence Litchfield and had several children by him. She m. (2) 2 Oct 1649, William Peakes, by whom she had 2 sons. (Note: William Peakes & Henry Luce impanelled on jury in Scituate, Nov 13, 1666)" The American Genealogist William Dennis of Scituate, MA." p. 154-5" (1)
1) Luce Genealogy p. 16

[NI1241] Info on Samuel and wife supplied by Laurie Lightfoot (NDSC79B-Prodigy).
"Samuel ... seems to have resided while young with his uncle, Francis Moore, who gave him the family residence and farm in Cambridge. The old Kidder mansion, in Cambridge, stood near the corner of Main St. and Kidder's Lane (now Spruce St.); tradition says it was built in 1660, probably James Moore, Jr. He was a deacon of the church, selectman for four years - 1716-1721, and a man of some importance in the town. He had a mill for manufacturing malt... The inventory of his estate amounted to 1,356.6 pounds, which was a large amount at that day.... Children: Sarah b. 17 Aug 1690; Francis b. 1692; Samuel b. 1694; James bapt. 1696; Thomas b. 18Dec 1698; John b. 25 Nov 1700; Nathaniel b. 20 Nov 1702; Joseph b. 23 Mar 1704-5; Mary; Hannah, b. 5 Mar 1708-9" (1)
1. A History of the Kidder Family, F.E. Kidder, c. 1886, p.19

[NI1242] Info from A History of the Kidder Family by F.E. Kidder, p. 19.
"David [Rainsford]... m. (2) by about 1683 Hannah Griggs, daughter of John and Mary (Patten] Griggs of Roxbury (TAG 56:174-78)" (1)
"Children, all born Roxbury:...
J4H - Sarah, bap. 19 Aug 1666; d. 15 Nov 1738, Cambridge. Mar. 23 Oct 1689 at Cambridge, Samuel Kidder, son of James and Ann (Moore) Kidder (see I388A), b. 7 Jan 1666, Billerica, MA; d. 4 Jul 1724, Cambridge.
Children: Sarah (1690), Francis (1692), Samuel (1694), James (1697), Thomas (1698), John (1700), Nathaniel (1702), Joseph (1705), Mary (1707) and Hannah (1709). Further descent available." (2)
1) The Great Migration Begins p. 1547
2) Ancestors of Susan Griggs Kamen (?) (CS 71 G8175 1993 v.1, Sutro Library) p. 13

[NI1243] Birth and death date supplied by Laurie Lightfood (NDSC79B-Prodigy).
According to Karen Velez (NUCM81B-Prodigy), James Kidder is the 6th generation descendant of Richard Kidder, who lived in Maresfield, Sussex, England in 1492. Marriage place and date also supplied by Velez.
"James Kidder, who was born at East Grinstead in Sussex, England in 1626... he was at Cambridge as early as 1650... We first find him located at Cambridge, Mass., where he was married, probably in 1649, Anna Moore, daughter of Elder Francis Moore. As the family of Elder Moore was then one of the most wealthy and respectable in that place,...
In 1653 he was occupying a farm of 289 acres, lying on the north side of Fresh Pond and Menotomy River, which he had leased of Deacon Sparrowhawk three years previous. (The location is now in West Cambridge.) His name appears in the Treasurer's records for that year... as having received ten shillings as the bounty for killing a wolf.
In 1653 the General Court granted Shawshine, now Billerica, to Cambridge... It is certain he was residing there with his family as early as 1656. Both he and his wife were members of the church in Cambridge... and six children were baptized there... When a church was organized in Billerica, they were among the first to become members of it. In 1662, he was a juror of the court in Cambridge...
(also in that year) in the Court records we find the following entry: James Kidder is allowed to be Sergeant of the Military Company of Billerica"... He was also a selectman for 6 years...
In 1675, when King Phillip's War took place, he was in the public service, and kept guard over the small tribe of Indians at Wameset, now forming part of Lowell, and soon after was appointed to the command of a garrison-house, which contained seven families, including his own and that of his son James. He died 16 Apr 1676, in the midst of the war, aged about 50, it has been suggested from disease caused by his exposure in this war... (footnote: There was an Indian foray April 16, 1676, on a hill near Kidder's garrison-house. James was either killed or mortally wounded, and died a few days afterward - (old MS. document at the State House.))
Children: Hannah b. 1 Mar 1650-1; Dorothy b. 1651-2; James b. 3 Jan 1653-4; John b. 1655-6; Thomas b. 1 Mar 1657; Nathaniel b. prob. 1658; Ephraim b. 31 Aug 1660; Stephen b. 26 Nov 1662; Enoch b. Sep 1664; Samuel; Sarah b. 1 Jun 1667; Joseph b. 20 Nov 1670" (1)
"Ch. Hannah b. 1/1/1649, Dorothy, James, John, Thomas, all bapt. Camb.; Nathaniel bapt. 2/27/1658, Eph. bapt. 5/26/1661." (5)
James Kidder's ancestors are as follows:
Richard Kidder fl. Maresfield, Sussex 1492
Richard d. 1549
Richard d. 1563
m. Margarette d. 1545
John d. 1599
m. Margarett Norman of Little Horsted d. 1569
John bp. 1561 d. 1616
m. Joanne Burgh d. 1610
John bp. 1590 d. 1638
m. Maria Bedell d. 1646
Thomas b. 1593 d. 1598
Richard b. 1594 d. 1609
James bp. 1595
James Kidder [b. abt. 1626]
m. Anna Moore (2)
"Maresfield is a large parish joining Uckfield " (3)
"ample evidence is available to prove quite conclusively that the Kidder family lived in Sussex more than six hundred years ago, when certain of that name are to be found as land owners in the time of Edward II (1307-27). The Subsidy Roll for 1332 for Sussex, 6 Edward III carries the name of " Simon at Hole" as Simon Kydder was then known by reason of his residing in a deep forest glen within the borders of Lancaster Great Park - a large section of Ashdown Forest enclosed John of Gaunt as a royal preserver.... Simon served as a " Bayliffe." Among the many duties ... was that of safeguarding the King's deer, particularly the young of "kid deer", hence the name." (4)
1) A History of the Kidder Family, by F. E. Kidder, p. 11
2) Ibid. p. 8
3) Ibid. p. 10
4) A Genealogy of the Kidder Family, Morgan Hewitt Stafford, c. 1941, p. XVII
5) Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts p. 269
Kidder researcher
Karen Velez (NUCM81B-Prodigy)

[NI1244] Marriage info supplied by Karen Velez (NUCM81B-Prodigy).
"She was the daughter of Elder Frances Moore. As the family of Elder Moore was then one of the most wealthy and respectable in that place (Cambridge)" (1)
It appears that she had a brother named Francis and another named James. (2)
"5815. Anna Moore #644 b. abt. 1630, England, m. (1) Abt. 1649, in Cambridge, Middlesex Co, MA, James Kidder, Jr. #643, b. 1626, East Grinstead, Co of Sussex, England, bap. 1626, ? East Grinstead, d. 16 Apr 1676, Billerica, Middlesex Co, MA, m. (2) 17 Mar 1684/5, in Chelmsford, MA, William Underwood #646. Anna died 1691, Billerica, Middlesex Co, MA. " (3)
1) A History of the Kidder Family, F.E. Kidder, p. 11
2) Ibid. p. 19
3) Beth's Genealogy Page

[NI1251] " Suffolk
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Fuller, John Lavenham Cambridge N.E.G.R. 49/491"(2)
"John Fuller, one of the first settlers of Cambridge Village, was born in England in 1611, came to America about 1635 and settled in Cambridge Village, now called Newton, about 1644... In December 1658, John Fuller bought 750 acres of land for about $1.00 per acre, the tract being bounded on the north and west by Charles River. Later he increased his holdings to upwards of 1000 acres and became one of the two largest land owners in the village. His tract was long known as "Fuller Farm."
He divided his land among his children in his lifetime, confirming the division by his will, with the proviso that they should not sell to any stranger, until they, or their next relation should have the offer of it. Pope in his "Pioneers of Massachusetts" says he was a farmer and a maltser.
He made his will in 1696 and died "Feb 7 1697-8, aged 87" according to his gravestone record.
His wife's name was Elizabeth _________. She died 13 Apr 1700. Children: John b. 1645; Jonathan b. 1648; Elizabeth d. 28 Nov 1685 m. 1663 Job Hyde; Joseph b. 10 Feb 1652; Joshua b. 2 Apr 1
654; Jeremiah b. 4 Feb 1658; Bethia b. 23 Nov 1661; Isaac b. 2 Dec 1665 died unmarried (very unusual in those days!)" (1)
1) Genealogy of some descendants of Captain Matthew Fuller, also of John Fuller of Newton, John Fuller of Lynn, John Fuller of Ipswich, and Robert Fuller of Dorchester and Dedham, by W.H. Fuller, c.
1914, p. 97
2) Topo. Dict. p. 157
Fuller researchers: Brenda Lindsey (ESGG98B-Prodigy)
Robert Johnson (RMXK91A-Prodigy)
June Zintz (CMNW01A-Prodigy)

[NI1276] "Maj. William Bordman (Andrew, _____), of Cambridge, Mass., tailor, baptized in the parish of St. Clement, Cambridge, England, 6 Jan. 1615/16, died at Cambridge, Mass., Frances ____, ... He accompanied his mother and stepfather, Stephen Day, to New England in 1638, sailing in the John of London, and settled in Cambridge. He was admitted a freeman in 1652, and with his wife Frances, joined the church in Cambridge. About 1659 his stepfather Stephen Day, paid to him a legacy of 50 pounds, left to him by his father, and acknowledged that it should have been paid to him twenty-three years agone.
" (cf. will of Andrewe Bordman, supra p. 306) As early as 1656, he owned and occupied the estate at the easterly corner of Harvard Square and Dunster Street. At the death of Day in 1668, he came into posession of the estate on the on the opposite corner, to which his son Aaron added the adjoining land, extending to Brighton Street... He was appointed, probably in Dec. 1663, steward of Harvard College, but resigned this position in Dec. 1667, and was thereafter, until his death employed as college cook. His title of major was probably derived from his office of steward, the steward being looked upon as a sort of major-domo. He deposed 26 Aug 1672.
Children:
i. Moses, b. probably about 1640 d. 16 Mar 1661/2
ii. Rebecca, b. 1 Nov 1643
iii. Andrew, b. about 1645 d. 17 Dec 1690
iv. Lt. Aaron b. about 1649 d. 15 Jan 1702/3
v. Frances b. about 1650 d. unmarried (!) 16 Sept. 1718
vi. Martha b. about 1653 d. 9 Feb 1692
vii. Mary b. 9 Mar 1665/6 d. 28 Oct 1712
viii. William b. 6 Dec 1657 d. 14 Mar 1695/6
ix. Elizabeth b. 17 Aug 1660 d. 15 Nov 1714" (1)
Died 25 Mar 1685. (2)
1) New England Historical and Genealogical Register October 1923 p. 311
2) Laurie Lightfoot (Prodigy NDSC79B), 10 Heritage Ct., Flemington, NJ 08822-2076

[NI1354] "Thomas Sherwood born in Sherwood Forest, Nottingham, England, 1585, died in Fairfield, Conn. 1655. Sailed from Ipswich, April 21, 1634 on ship Frances with wife Alice who was born 1587, and five children. Alice was the daughter of Robert Seabrook. Children as follows: Ann b. 1624; Hannah b. 1626; Rose b. 1628; Thomas b. 23 Jan 1630 was baptised from St. Michaels Pond; Rebecca b. 1632;
Landed in Boston 1634-June. Settled first at Wethersfield where first wife died about 1640. The above are births by first wife in England.
Jane b. 1634; Tamsen b. 1636; Sarah b. 1638
Moved to Stamford, Conn. in 1641. There married 2nd wife, Mary, daughter of Thomas Fitch and Ann Reeve, who after his death married John Banks. Children by second wife:
Stephen b. 1641; Matthew b. 1643 d. Oct. 26, 1715; Ruth b. 1645; Isaac b. 1647 married Elizabeth Jackson; Abigail b. 1649 died young; Mary b. 1652" (1)
"Mary Sherwood, daughter of Thomas Sherwood and his second wife Mary. He was born in England in 1586, traveled to America with his first wife Alice (Seabrook). Arrived in Boston in 1634. He was one of the first settlers in Wethersfield, Conn. Moved to Fairfield where built the first grist mill in 1644. He was deputy to the General Court of Conn. in 1646 and 1650. He died in 1655. Thomas Sherwood born 1624 was his son by his first wife, your Mary's half brother." (2)
"Sherwood Family (Fairfield)
Sherwood, Thomas.
On some branches of this family we have been greatly assisted by Mrs. G.E. Fellows, of Salt Lake City, Utah; but the editor assumes responsibility for the conclusions stated.
Thomas came to Boston in the Frances, Apr. 1634, ae. 48, with wife, ae. 47, and children Anna (14), Rose (11), Thomas (10, and Rebecca (9). He came to Wethersfield with the first settlers, 1635, was a carpenter, and sold his lands to George Wyllys, 25 Mar. 1640. He removed to Stamford, where he lived until 1648, when he sold to John Holly, and settled in Fairfield. He may have been related to Thomas Morehouse, whose holdings adjoined his in Wethersfield, and who accompanied him in his subsequent migrations.
If the age of the son Thomas was misstated in the ship's list, he could have been the Thomas son of Thomas and Alice bapt. at St. Michael's, London, Eng., 23 Jan. 1630.
Will 21 July 1655, proved 25 Oct. 1655; children by former wife, Thomas, Jane, Tamsen, Margaret, Sarah, Hannah, Rose, Rebecca; wife mary, and children by her, Stephen, Matthew, Mary, Ruth, Abigail, Isaac...
Children (by first wife):
Jane.
Thomasin.
Margaret.
Sarah.
Hannah, b. abt. 1620.
Rose, b. abt. 1622; m. (1) Thomas Rumble; m. (2) Thomas Barlow; m. (3) Edward Nash.
Thomas, b. abt 1624.
Rebecca, b. abt. 1625.
Children (by second wife):
Stephen; conveyed 1680/1 to "my father Banks."
Matthew, b. abt. 1644.
Mary.
Ruth, m. at Windsor, 4 June 1663, Joshua Holcomb.
Abigail, d. in 1692; m. abt. 1668, Daniel Lockwood.
Isaac." (3)
According to the Nutmegger June 1994 p. 2ff he died July 21, 1655 in Stratford, Connecticut. WRONG, that is the date of his will.
Thomas Sherwood ancestor #1664 of Herbert Hoover per TAG 54, No. 1 (1978), p. 12
GenForum Posting
"Posted by Dwight William McGrew on March 26, 1998 at 14:06:54:
1) Thomas SHERWOOD (Mayor), b 11 sep 1548, Bradninch, near Exeter, Devonshire, ENG. m ?
2) Thomas SHERWOOD, b 24 Dec 1590, St Mary-St Peter, Moblethorpes, ENG. m Mary FITCH 1641. He, d 21 Jul 1655, Stratford, Fairfield, CT.
Sp-Mary FITCH, b Bocking, Essex, ENG, d 6 Jan 1694, Rye West, NY
3) Matthew SHERWOOD, b 1633/34, Concord, Middlesex, MASS,
m Mary FITCH, 1668, Windsor, Hartford, CT. He-d 26 Oct 1715, Stratford, Bridgeport, CT.
sp-Mary FITCH, b 1643/44 Norwalk, Fairfield, CT, d 25 Dec 1730, Stratford, Fairfield, CT
4) Anne SHERWOOD, b abt 1690, New Haven, New Haven, CT, d ?.
m Joseph TROWBRIDGE 1708/1711, New Haven, New Haven, CT.
Sp-Joseph TROWBRIDGE, b 1676, New Haven, New Haven, CT d 1715 CT.
This is all I have on my SHERWOOD connection, that is, I don't have the names of any of the chilren of the above, except for the next generation." (4)
NOTE: Jacobus does not agree with the above.
1) Undated MS from Betsy King p.7
2) Janice Wiser (UPXZ43A-Prodigy)
3) Families of Old Fairfield, Vol. 1, p. 548-9
Other Sherwood researchers:
Kathleen Temple SJPR16A-Prodigy
Another source:
Sherwood, Andrew; Daniel L. Sherwood and His Paternal Ancestors(Ryder Printing Co., Portland, 1929)

[NI1356] "Elizabeth [Beach] m Eliasaph Preston. He was born with his twin brother Hackaliah, April 9, 1643: was a son of William Preston, one of the first settlers of New Haven. Their mother was probably William Preston's 2d wife, and a daughter of Robert Seabrook, another of whose daughters was the wife of Thos. Fairchild, and an original proprietor in Stratford, Connecticut." (1)
"Seabrook, Robert.
An elderly man, one of the early settlers in Stratford, he did not long survive. His will is not found, and our only knowledge of it comes from mention made of it in Stratford Deeds, where land was entered to the following persons which they had by gift from their grandfather Robert Seabrook:--- Samuel Fairchild, Thomas Fairchild, Jehiel Preston, John Wheeler's wife, Samuel Stile's wife, and perhaps others not noted. From this we deduce that he had daus. who m. Thomas Fairchild, William Preston, and Thomas Sherwood; the wives of Wheeler and Stiles were daus. of Sherwood.
Preston was from Chesham, co. Buckingham, and the name Seabrook is common in that county, where at Wingrave a Robert Seabrook m. 12 Sept. 1596, Alice Goodspeed. She was a cousin of Roger Goodspeed, the Barnstable settler. If this was the emigrant Robert, he may have married more than once; but unless research in England be made, we have only vague surmise on which to build.
Children (perhaps other):
"?Mary, b. abt. 1601, living in 1680; m. (1) abt. 1635, William Preston, and came with him to New England in 1635 ae. 34; m. (2) Thomas Kimberly, of New Haven and Stratford.
Daughter, b. by 1620; m. by 1639, Thomas Fairchild, of Stratford.
Sarah, b. abt. 1623; m. by 1642, Thomas Sherwood, of Stratford." (2)
1) Wallingford Families (see John Merriman) p. 32
2) History and Genealogy of the Families of Old Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 523

[NI1379] "Andrew Bordman (____), of the parish of St. Clement, Cambridge, England, baker, the testator of 10 Feb 1616/17, was buried in the parish 18 Feb 1616/17. He married in the parish of St. Edward, Cambridge, 24 1605, Rebecca Wright...
Children, baptized in the parish of St. Clement
i Richard bapt. 14 Sept 1607
ii Andrew bapt. 24 Nov 1609 bur. 26 Nov 1609
iii Andrew bapt. 13 Jan 1610/11 d. 28 Sept. 1654
iv Thomas bapt. 29 Feb 1612/13
v William" (1)
"the family had attained some position in the old Cambridge beyond the Atlantic. Its members belonged to the class of well-to-do tradesmen and merchants who were rapidly coming to the front in the da
ys of the late Tudors" (2)
"The will of Andrewe Bordman of Cambridge, Co. Cambridge, baker dated 10 February 1616/17. To my eldest son Richard Boardman and to my sons Andrewe Bordman, Thomas Bordman and William Bordman, to each 40 pounds at the age of one and twenty years... To my wife Rebecca Bordman my house in fee simple, which I purchased of Thomas Reade of Cambridge, carpenter, to have the same during her life..." (3)
Born: Abt 1582, Cambridge, England; Mar: Abt 1607; Died 1617, Cambridge, England. (4)
1) New England Historical and Genealogical Register Oct. 1923 p. 310
2) Ibid. p. 305
3) Ibid., p. 306
4) Laurie Lightfoot

[NI1380] "(Andrew Bordman) married in the parish of St. Edward, Cambridge, 24 Aug 1605, Rebecca Wright, baptized in that parish 2 Oct 1588, daughter of Richard of the same parish,.. She married secondly, probably not long after the death of her first husband, Stephen Day of the parish of St. Clement, locksmith; and with him, with William Bordman, her youngest child by her first husband, and with Stephen and Matthew Day, two sons by her second husband, she emigrated in 1638 to New England, where her husband, Stephen Day, had charge of the first printing press in the Colonies, which was set up at Cambridge, Mass., in Mar 1638/9. She died at Cambridge, Mass. 17 Oct 1658
Children, baptized in the parish of St. Clement
i Richard (Bordman), bapt. 14 Sep 1607
ii Andrew (Bordman), bapt. 24 Nov 1609 bur. 26 Nov 1609
iii Andrew (Bordman), bapt. 13 Jan 1610/11 d. 28 Sep 1654
iv Thomas (Bordman), bapt. 29 Feb 1612/13
v William (Boardman), bapt. 6 Jan 1615/16
vi Stephen Day
vii Matthew Day" (1)
"(William Boardman) accompanied his mother and stepfather, Stephen Day, to New England in 1638, sailing in the John of London, and settled in Cambridge. About 1659 (ie. just after the death of Rebecca Wright, his mother) his stepfather Stephen Day, paid him a legacy of 50 pounds, left to him by his father, and acknowledged that it should have been "paid to him twenty-three years agone.""(2) It was only 40 pounds in his father's will. It makes you wonder about the stepfather relationship in this case.
"Within a year of his installation (as President of Harvard College), Henry Dunster had the good fortune to marry a wealthy widow, relict of Master Josse Glover, who providentially died on the voyage out. But the marriage brought new responsibilities: a rather turbulent family of step-sons, and a printing press. Josse Glover had procured a small hand press and a few fonts of type for the use of the colony, and brought over a Cambridge locksmith named Stephen Day, with his son Matthew, to manage it. The press was moved to a lean-to on the presidential premises, and began an intermittent production of psalm books, commencement programs, and almanacs; with occasionally a more ambitious work such as the Laws and Liberties and the Indian Bible, any copy of which is worth to-day as much as the entire equipment of Harvard College in 1640" (3)
"During its founding period the Bay Colony also established and subsidized . the first (and until 1675, the only) printing press in British America. Located at Harvard College, and worked by Stephen Day and his son Matthew, the press printed its first book in 1640: The Whole Book of Psalms, Faithfully Translanted into English Meter. Reflecting the saints' insistence on the "plain style", its motto was God's Alter needs our Polishings." That year the General Court ordered that Stephen Day, because he had been "the first that set upon printing," was to receive a 300-acre land grant from the Colony. Day and his successors Samuel Green and Marmaduke Johnson turned out an imposing list of publications at the Harvard press, including devotional literature, almanacs, the 1648 Lawes and Libertyes, and John Eliot's 1663 translation of the Bible into the Algonquin language." (4)
1) New England Historical & Genealogical Register October 1923 p. 310
2) Ibid. p. 311
3) Builders of the Bay Colony by Samuel Eliot Morison; Houghton Mifflin Company Boston; Sentry Edition 1964 p. 196
4) Creating the Commonwealth: The Economic Culture of Puritan New England by Stephen Innes; W.W. Norton & Company c. 1995 p. 154

[NI1381] "Frances ______, who was living 24 Aug 1688, when she was a passenger on a sloop in which Samuel Sewall returned from Salem to Boston. (Cf. Sewall's Diary)... (William Boardman) was admitted a freem
an in 1652, and with his wife Frances, joined the church in Cambridge." (1)
Born about 1618, Cambridge, England. (2)
1) New England Historical & Genealogical Register Oct. 1923 p. 311
2) Laurie Lightfoot

[NI1382] "The Bordman or Boardman family which forms the subject of this article apparently did not settle in the English Cambridge until the later years of the sixteenth century, for the surname is not of com
mon occurence in the records of that town or, indeed in those of the country. The family is probably of Lancashire origin, the surname is frequently found in the parish registers of Bolton, near Manc
hester, which, unfortunately do not begin until 1592, and in this family the Christian names of Andres and Giles are often used.
Rev. Andrew Boardman, who was born in Lancashire about 1550, was admitted a scholar of St. John's College, Cambridge, 9 Nov 1568 and matriculated there as a pensioner three days later (12 Nov.). He r
eceived the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1571/2, Master of Arts in 1575, Bachelor of Divinity in 1582 and Doctor of Divinity in 1594... He was the author of various religious works. There can be li
ttle doubt that the brothers Giles and Andrew Bordman, the testators respectively of 1604 and 1616/17, were closely related to Rev. Andrew Bordman, D.D. and perhaps they were his nephews. The younger
Andrew resided in the parish of St. Clement, Cambridge, a parish that adjoins St. John's College.
__________ Bordman, probably of Lancashire, England and perhaps a brother of the Rev. Andrew Boardman, D.D.
Children:
i Giles
ii Eleanor d. 1616/17
iii Andrew" (1)
"Giles Boardman. Born about 1550, Cambridge, England. Died Cambridge, England." (2)
1) New England Historical &Genealogical Register October 1923 p. 309
2) Laurie Lightfoot

[NI1385] "The will of Richard Wright of the parish of St. Edward, Cambridge, "skynner", dated 20 June, 3 James 1 (1605). To my eldest son John Wright, to my son Anthony Wright, and to my son Richard Wright, to each 40 pounds at the age of twenty-one years. To my eldest daughter Rebecca, and to my daughters Mary, Ann and Susan, to each 20 pounds at the age of twenty-one years or at marriage. To each godchild 5s. Residue to my wfe Mary. Witnesses: Robert Sparrowe, N.P., John Symondes, Walter Acteson. Proved 19 July 1605." (1)
1) New England Historical and Genealogical Register Oct. 1923 p. 311

[NI1387] "Abigail (Bacon); Parents, Andrew and Mehetable Bacon; When born, Feb. 8, 1713; Where born, Middletown (CT) (Handwritten)
Andrew, the sixth child of Nathaniel and Ann Bacon; When born, June 4, 1666; When married, Feb 12, 1691; To Whom Married, Mehetable Wetmore; No. of Sons, 6; No. of Daugh, 4; Date of Decease, June 1, 1723...
Nathaniel Bacon, eldest son of William Bacon; Where born, Stretton, Rutland Co., England; To Whom Married, Ann Miller (Surname handwritten); No. of Sons, 3; No of Daugh, 3; Date of Decease, Jan 27, 1706...
(Note) The first Nathaniel Bacon (of this line) that the compiler can learn anything of, was living in Middletown in 1655...
William Bacon; Where born, Supposed Stretton, Co of Rutland, England
(Note) In the Colonial Records of New Haven, page 297, is recorded the affidavit of John Fletcher and others of Milford, taken October 17th, 1661; made in the presence of Nathaniel Bacon at New Haven, stating their personal knowledge of Henry Bacon and William Bacon, both of Stretton, in the County of Rutland, and Realm of England... Also, that the Nathaniel Bacon then present, was the oldest son of said William Bacon." (1)
1)Bacon, Nathaniel A., A Table, showing the date and place of Birth; to whom and when married; number of sons and daughters; date of decease; age and place of burial, of Jabez Bacon, late of Woodbury, deceased; and his descendants bearing the name of Bacon, also, of his ancestors, so far as known, commencing with the latter. (New Haven 1845) p. 1-2
Possible reference:
Bacon and Allied Families, A Family Directory; pub. Murray and Gee, Inc. Culver City, CA 1958
New England Historical and Genealogical Register Vol. 54 pp 364-374
Bacon Genealogy; Thomas Baldwin
Bacon researchers:
Yvonne Clark (Poughkeepsie) (HHJS24B-Prodigy)
Joel Krueger (DCVT93A-Prodigy)
Marilyn Newman (CFTS13E@Prodigy.com))

[NI1388] "History of Brisbin
Until 1836 where now is Brisben, there was only a Wayside Tavern and a saw mill, both built by Selah Barnes, and a small still on the back part of his farm where home-made whiskey was made. His wife was Annice, daughter of Elder Nathaniel Kellogg, and their children were: Amelia, Caroline, Jerome, Nelson, and Nathaniel K. His second wife was Fanny Knickerbocker and they had seven children: Betsey, Reuben, Arvilla, William, Sarah, Mary and Jane." (1)
"List of Members of Brisbin Church - Up to 1837...
Fanny Knickerbocker, 2nd wife of Selah Barnes
Amelia Barnes, daughter of Selah and Annice Kellogg Barnes" (3)
"The hotel was built by David Finn Smith in 1846 on the site of the old Stump Tavern built by Selah Barnes." (2)
"Selah Barnes, s. of Asa Barnes b. March 4, 1769, m. Oct. 9, 1791, Nancy Cowls, who died April 7, 1831; m. Dec. 28, 1831, Ada Clark. He died Oct. 15, 1850; had 13 children.
Children - Charles C., b. Feb. 8, 1792, d. in 1813; Elihu, died young; Phebe, Laura, Martha, b. Jan.8, 1801, m. Rev. Charles Goodrich, missionary to Sandwich Islands; William, b. April 11, 1803, d. June 11, 1852, Amzi, b. Aug. 5, 1805, Nancy, Selah; Charles b. Oct. 30, 1813; Allen, b. June 23, 1816; Henry E., b. Oct. 31, 1832...
Asa Barnes, s. of Stephen Barnes (3), b. Aug. 24, 1745, m. Oct. 30, 1765, Phebe Atkins. He lived in S.W. part of Southington, Ct., kept tavern, gave a ball in honor of French Officers. Children- Allen, b. July 16, 1767; Naomi, Selah, Ruth; Martin, died young; Eli, b. May 21, 1775; Asa, b. July 22, 1777; Martin, died young; Ira, b. Nov. 15, 1781; Philo, b. March 2, 1782....
Stephen Barnes, s. of Stephen Barnes of Bra(n)ford, b. Jan. 2, 1704, m. Martha Wheadon; removed to Southington, Ct., located in S.W. part of town, d. March 27, 1777.
Children - Mary, Stephen, Jonathan, William, Nathan, Asa...
Stephen Barnes of Branford, Ct., probably s. of Samuel Barnes of Easthampton, b. at Southhampton, L.I., m. Mary Barnes, moved there about 1700, died at Branford; had a son, Stephen...
Samuel Barnes of Easthampton, L.I., s. of Joshua Barnes of Yarmouth, b. 1649...
Joshua Barnes of Yarmouth, England, came to New England in 1632; was one of the founders of the town of South Hampton, Long Island, in 1639; was one of the first settlers of East Hampton (Sag Harbor),
1649; was deputy to the Colonial Court in 1663; had Samuel b. 1649. - Winthrop's Journal, Gen. Dic. and American Ancestry." (4)
There is another possible connection. Selah Barnes, the son of Isaac Barnes b. about 5 Jan 1744 and Lucy Bronson b. 1 Nov 1751. (5)
In 1995, I visited the Brisbin Hotel that was built in 1846 on the site. It is being restored by a young couple.
In the 1840 N.Y. Census Index, Reuben, Selah and Seth Barnes are listed in Smithville. Reuben is listed there in the 1830 N.Y. Census Index.
"In 1793, Nathaniel Kellogg... settled at Brisbin;... He had only one child, a daughter, who married Selah Barnes." (5)
Possible source: Barnes, Frederick Wayne; Thomas Barnes of Hartford, Connecticut (Frederick W. Barnes, 794 Chestnut Drive, Fairfield, CA 94533-1465 $35.00 + 5%)
1) Cochrane, Echoes of the Past; c. 1971 p. 200
2) Cochrane, From Raft to Railroad p. 178
3) Ibid., p. 182
4) Barnes, Rev. Geo. N., Barnes Genealogies, Including a collection of Ancestral, Genealogical and Family Records and Biographical Sketches of Barnes People. c. 1903 pp.4, 188, 189, 190-191
5) Frederic Wayne Barnes, 794 Chestnut Drive, Fairfield, CA 94533-1465 He is on Prodigy.
6) Smith, James H.; History of Chenango and Madison Counties; (D.Mason, Syracuse, N.Y.; 1880) p. 196

[NI1390] "His first wife was Annice, daughter of Elder Nathaniel Kellogg... Above Barnes, on the Town line (with Oxford Township), lived Elder Nathaniel Kellogg, a Minute Man at the Battle of Lexington in 1775, who was later at the Battle of New York under General Israel Putnam, and at Saratoga at the surrender of Burgoyne on Oct. 17, 1777. One room of his house was in Oxford, the other room in Greene. He organized the Oxford-Greene Baptist Church and was its pastor for 30 years." (1)
"Nathaniel, S13597, Cont, MA & NY line, appl 30 Jul 1832 Chenango Co aged 74, he lived at Alford in Berkshire Co MA at enl & after the line between MA & NY was ran & his farm fell into what became Hillsdale in Columbia Co NY & soon after the Rev he moved to Green in Chenango Co NY" (7)
"In 1793 Nathaniel Kellogg, Daniel Tremain and Cornelius Hill settled in East Greene (Brisbin)." (2)
"The first Baptist Church organized in the town and county was that established by Elder Nathaniel Kellogg at East Greene (Brisben) in 1795. In 1827 there were 65 members and services were held in the Upper and Lower Schoolhouses, the former in the town of Oxford and the latter in the town of Greene (near Daniel Tremain's). In 1830 it was called the Oxford-Greene Baptist Church. In 1840 a more centrally located church was built on the present site. (3)
"Pastors of Oxford-Greene Baptist Church
Nathaniel Kellogg - 1795-1817
Nathaniel Kellogg - 1830-" (4)
"1197 Nathaniel, 7 son of Moses 6 (394), b. in Westfield, Mass., 24 Feb., 1758; m. (1) Palm Hawkins. She died. _________; he m. (2) Annice Gray, dau. of Joseph Gray.
After the revolution he became a Baptist preacher of some note, mention of whom is made in the old Baptist Church in Amenia, now Millerton, N.Y. (in the Northeast corner of Dutchess County), as having been present at an ordination council, 17 Dec., 1788, at which his father-in-law and his brother-in-law, Elder Jeduthan Gray, were present.
He was a revolutionary soldier and pensioner; served from 8 May, 1775, eight months in the army at Boston; had an order for a bounty coat. In his application for pension he stated that he was b. in Westfield Mass., 24 Feb., 1758; lived in Alford, when called into service; soon after the war he rem. to Greene, Chenango Co., N.Y. In April 1775, he went from Alford as a Minute man to Boston, where he served until the evacuation of the city, 17 Mar., 1776; he then marched to New York City; was with the army on the retreat from Long Island and New York City to Harlem, and to White Plains, where he was in the battle of that place, and later crossed into New Jersey. On the advance of Gen. Burgoyne and the call of Gen. Schuyler for aid, he joined the northern army; was stationed at Forts Edward, Miller and Ann, and was living in Jasper, Steuben Co., N.Y. (He may have come to know Henry Whiteman when he was in Dutchess County and later knew him in Jasper. He may also have met Silas Bartoo there and later moved with Jesse Luce Bartoo to Jasper.)
Child by his first wife.
3298 Trypena, b.__________
Child by his second wife.
3299 Elizabeth (Betsey), b. ________" (5)
"In 1793, Nathaniel Kellogg, Cornelius Hill and Daniel Tremain settled at Brisbin; Kellogg was a clergyman and organized there, in 1795, the first Baptist church in Chenango County. He settled on a farm now owned by ________ Lietch and removed to Steuben County about 1820. He had only one child, a daughter, who married Selah Barnes." (6)
"Kellogg, Nathaniel [buried] Old Five Corners Cem, Jasper, Steuben Co NY 1957" (8)
"Hiram [son of Jesse Bartoo #196 and brother of Jesse Luce Bartoo #98] and Laura Bates Bartoo had the following children:
1. George H., Oct. 14, 1820-Apr. 15, 1899. Married Mary I. Watson Sept. 30, 1863. "He was bitten by a dog supposed to be mad. He was taken to Elder Nathaniel Kellogg at Jasper, N.Y., who treated him with a 'Remedy for Hydrophobia' and no symptoms of ever appeared.["] No children." (9)
1) Cochrane, Echoes of the Past, c. 1971 p. 200
2) Cochrane, From Raft to Railroad, p. 22
3) Ibid., p. 180
4) Ibid., p. 181
5) Hopkins, Timothy; The Kelloggs in the Old World and the New; (Sunset Press, San Francisco 1903) pp. 250-1
6) History of Chenango and Madison Counties, New York by James H. Smith (D. Mason Syracuse 1880) p. 196
7) Abstracts of Rev. Pen. Files, p. 1912
8) Abstracts of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots found by DAR Vol. II, p. 221
9) "The Bartoo Family" in Foley, Janet Wethy; Early Settlers of New York State: Their Ancestors and Descendants, Vol. I (Genealogical Publishing Co., 1993) p. 55

[NI1391] "Josiah born 1709. He married Apr. 26, 1732 Abigail Bacon. They had 10 children. Their 6th child was Abijah born Mar 10, 1743, he is the one who married Mary Kellogg. Their 9th child was Benjamin born July 15, 1752." (1)
"337. Josiah Loomis, b. Windsor, Conn, 11 Mar 1708-09; m. 26 Apr 1732, Abigail Bacon, of Middletown, Conn. He removed to Simsbury, Conn., and from there to Egremont, Mass. A member of Episcopalian Church at Great Barrington in 1770. 10 children.
878. Elizabeth, b. 6 Mar 1733
879. Abigail, b. 27 Feb 1734/5
880. Josiah, b. 19 May 1737
881. Andrew, b. Egremont, 23 May 1739
882. Michael., b. 5 Sep 1741
883. Abijah, b. 10 Mar 1743/4
884. Sarah, b. 10 Oct 1748
885. Daniel, b. 4 Apr 1750
886. Benajah, b. 15 Jul 1752
887. Rachel, b. 11 Mar 1755" (2)
1) Jean McGowan (BFKJ13A-Prodigy)
2) Loomis Genealogy (see Abijah) p. 164

[NI1392] They had a child named Benjah, born Jan 1710/11. Information supplied by Jean McGowan (BFKJ13A-Prodigy).
"124. Josiah Loomis, b. 28 Nov 1684; m. Jan 22, 1707/8, Elizabeth Kelsey. He bought the land in Simsbury (Conn.) in 1713 and was living there in 1741. 6 children
337. Josiah, b. 11 Mar 1708/9
338. Benajah, b. 28 Jan 1710/11
339. Ebenezen, b. 9 Nov 1712
340. Thomas, b. 16 Jun 1717
341. Jacob, b. 26 Nov 1720
342. Francis, b. 12 Jun 1726" (1)
1) Loomis Genealogy (see Abijah) p. 145

[NI1393] "a Fyler descendant." (1)
"may be descendant from William Kelsey who married Bethia Hopkins in 1626 in Essex County, England. William came to Braintree, MA and in 1636 moved to Hartford, CT and in 1663 to Killingsworth, CT" (2)
"Elizabeth, born about 1689; died after 1726...
Elizabeth Kelsey, the widow, died Jan. 31, 1725/6... Return of Adminstrators, Apr. 7, 1726, Court orders Elizabeth Loomis... their single portions" (3)
"Elizabeth Kelsey, eldest child of Thomas and Elizabeth Kelsey, was probably born about 1689, at Windsor, died after 1726, probably at the same place. She married Jan. 22, 1707/8, Josiah Loomis, born Nov. 28, 1684, at Simsbury" (4)
1) Jean McGowan (BFJK13A-Prodigy). Marriage info supplied by her. She wrote a book on the Fylers.
2) P Armendinger (YPJT41A-Prodigy)
3) Claypool, Edward A. & Clizbee, Azalea, A Genealogy of the Descendants of William Kelsey; (1928) Vol. 1 p. 60-1
4) Ibid. p. 118
Kelsey researchers:
Susan Hummel (YNFC67A-Prodigy)
Bonnie Jacobsen (MQBE34A-Prodigy)

[NI1394] Info on marriage and children supplied by Jean McGowan (BFKJ13A-Prodigy).
"Joseph Loomis, the first of the name in America, is: Joseph born in 1590; Deacon John, born in 1622; Sergeant Daniel, born in 1657; Josiah, born in 1684" (1)
"25. Sergeant Daniel Loomis, b. Farmington, June 16, 1657; m. 1 Dec 23 1680, Mary, b. 7 May 1660, dau. of Sergeant Josiah and Elizabeth (Holcomb) Ellsworth; m. 2nd, 9 Jul 1713, widow Hannah Drake. (The Ellsworth homestead has become the home and Chapter House of the Abigail Wolcott Chapter of the Conn. Dau. of the Am. Revolution). He d. 5 Aug 1740... Windsor. 9 children
123. Daniel, b. Nov. 15, 1682
124. Josiah, b. 28 Nov 1684
125. Job, b. 21 Jan 1686/7
126. John, b. 11 Oct 1688
127. Mary, b. 15 Jan 1690/1
128. Isaac, b. 23 Aug, 1694
129. Abraham, b. 13 Dec 1696
130. Benjamin, b. 20 Jan 1701/2 d. 6 May 1702" (2)
"Loomis, Daniel Marriage Dec231680 WIN638:58
Wife Elsworth, Mary" (3)
1) Annals of Oxford, p. 44-45
2) Loomis Genealogy (see Abijah) p. 136
3) Holbrook; Windsor p. 165

[NI1396] Information on marriage and child supplied by Jean McGowan (BFKJ13A-Prodigy).
"(Sergeant Daniel Loomis... m. 23 Dec 1680, Mary, b. 7 May 1660, dau. of Sergt. Josiah and Elizabeth (Holcomb) Ellsworth" (1)
"Elsworth, Mary Birth 7May1660 CHS930:77" (2)
1) Loomis Genealogy (see Abijah) p. 136
2) Holbrook; Windsor p. 85
Possible Sources:
Siemiatkoski, Donna Holt; The Ancestors and Descendants of Oliver Ellsworth and Abigail Wolcott 1992

[NI1397] "Joseph's parents are John and Agnes (Lyngwood) Loomis of Shalford Parish, Messing, County Essex, England. Joseph married Mary Allgar there June 30, 1614. Her parents were Robert and Bridget White. Robert White's parents are unknown..l. Bridget (Allgar) White's father is William, buried Shalford Parish Aug 2, 1575... his wife and parents unknown." (1)
"I have information on your Joseph Loomis. His parents are John and Agnes (Lyngwood) Loomis. He married Mary White who is the daughter of Robert and Bridget (Allgar) White." (2)
I have followed the first reference for Joseph and Mary's ancestors, though I believe Joseph's wife's name, per the second note was Mary White, not Mary Allgar.
"Joseph Loomis, born Braintree, England, about 1590, died in Windsor, Ct., November 25, 1658. He was among the passengers on the "Susan and Ellen" from London to New England, September 19, 1635, and in 1639 took up land situated upon "The Island," so called, in Windsor, Ct., which has continued in the ownership and possession of his descendants from that day to this. He built his house fearless of what might befall, and it is believed to be the oldest homestead now standing in the United States. The place also has an added interest by reason of the fact that there is an available fund of $1,600,000 set aside to be used in converting it into and educational institute where girls and boys between the ages of twelve and twenty will be taught in all departments of learning. The fund represents the combined estates of the last five lineal descendants of Joseph Loomis, emigrant ancestor of the name in America. The coat of arms of the family bears the motto in Latin, "Do Not Yield to Evils." (3)
I note that Windsor is home to the Fyler House and Wilson Museum. This is, no doubt, how his descendants intermarried with the Fylers (per Jean McGowan-BFKJ13A-Prodigy).
"Joseph Loomis son of John Lummesys & Agnes Lyngwood/Lingwood; born 1590; woolen draper in Braintree, Essex, England; died 1658, Windsor, Connecticut; married 1614 in Shalford, Essex, England to Mary White (daughter of Robert White & Bridget/Bridgette Allgar/Algar/Alger, baptised 1590 in Shalford, England); known children:
1. Joseph Loomis Jr. b. 1615 Messing, Essex Co., m1 Sarah Hill, m2 Mary Chauncy
2. Sarah Loomis b. about 1617, m. Nicholas Olmstead
3. Elizabeth Loomis b. about 1619 Messing m. Josiah J. Hull
4. Mary Loomis b. about 1624 England m1 John Skinner m2 Owen Tudor
5. John Loomis b. 1622 England m. Elizabeth Scott
6. Thomas Loomis b. 1624 England m1 Mary Judd m2 Hannah Fox
7. Nathaniel Loomis b. about 1626 England m. Elizabeth Moore
8. Lt. Samuel Loomis b. about 1628/35 Essex Co., England m. Elizabeth Judd" (4)
"[Ancestor #]238 [of Millard Fillmore] Joseph Loomis of Braintree, Essex, England, d. Windsor, CT 25 Nov. 1658; m. Shalford, Essex, 30 June 1614" (5)
1)Richard Boell (TRGH72A-Prodigy)
2) Karen Cherry (AWYG81A-Prodigy)
3) Annals of Oxford, p. 44
4) Lynn Gleason (FCFV81A-Prodigy), 444 11th Ave. SE, Forest Lake, MN 55025
5) TAG, Vol. 63, #1, 1/1988, p. 54

[NI1398] "daughter of Robert White and Bridget/Bridgette Allgar/Algar/Alger, baptised 1590 in Shalford, England" (1)
Christened August 24, 1590 in Messing, Essex d. August 23, 1652 Windsor, CT m. June 30, 1614 in Messing, Essex Joseph Loomis per Nutmegger 6/1994 p. 2ff.
"[Ancestor #]239 [of Millard Fillmore] Mary White, b. Shalford 24 Aug. 1590, d. Windsor, CT 23 Aug. 1652" (2)
1) Lynn Gleason (FCFV81A-Prodigy)
2) TAG, Vol. 63, #1, 1/1988, p. 54

[NI1399] "John Loomis/Lummesys/Lummys son of John Lummyus & Kyrsten Pasfield/Jackson; bapt. 1562 Thaxted, Essex, England; d. 1619; m. Agnes Lyngwood/Lingwood... known children:
1. John Loomis;
2. Anna Lummesys
3. Sara (Lummesys) Burton
4. Elizabeth (Lummesys) Preston
5. Jane (Lummesys) Pengally
6. Geoffrey Lummesys m. Priscilla" (1)
I wonder why she did not include Joseph among the children?
His son Joseph was married in Shalford, Messing, Essex in 1614. He may have died there.
"[Ancestor #]476 [of Millard Fillmore] (prob.) John Lumace, bp. Thaxted, Essex, 29 Jan. 1562, d. Braintreee, Essex, 1619." (2)
1) Lynn Gleason (FCFV81A-Prodigy)
2) TAG, Vol. 63, #1, !/1988, p. 55


[NI1400] "Joseph Loomis son of John Lummesys & Agnes Lyngwood/Lingwood... m. 1614 in Shalford, Essex, England to Mary White... known children:...
5. John Loomis born 1622 England m. Elizabeth Scott" (1)
1) Lynn Gleason (FCFV81A-Prodigy)
From: Lynn Gleason >
To: JOHNEHOPE@prodigy.net t>
Subject: Re: Elizabeth Scott, wife of John Loomis
Date: Wednesday, March 04, 1998 10:21 AM
Hi, John! Good to hear from you again. I probably don't have a lot of new information for you. But this sure looks like a possibility, though there are some things that would have to be reconciled and checked. Here is what I have in my data at the present.... If you are able to prove this connection or get any further information I hope you will share it with me. I will do the same. Note my new e-mail address.
Thanks again, Lynn

3 Mar 1998 Family Group Sheet

Wife: Elizabeth Scott #11706
Born: -- ___ 1625 in: 1
Father: Thomas Scott #11707
Mother: Ann _____ #11708
"John Loomis md Elizabeth Scott d/o Thomas Scott and Ann. John and Elizabeth had 13 children. Elizabeth also md. John Brown..."(1)
"Elizabeth, dau. of Thomas Scott of Hartford...."(2)
"Elizabeth Scott b1625. Lived in Conn..."(3)
1. Cherie Logan, PMXP72A, 12/94
2. ANCESTRY OF JOHN BARBER WHITE
3. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95
Husband: John LOOMIS Deacon. #11700 died at age: 68
Married: 03 FEB 1648/49 in: Hartford her age: 23 his age: 28 2
Born: -- ___ 1620/22 in: Shalford, Essex, England 3
Died: 01 SEP 1688 in: 4
Ref: 13L Occupation: Deacon, Deputy 5
Father: JOSEPH LOOMIS #1560
Mother: MARY WHITE #1561
"John Looms md Elizabeth Scott d/o Thomas Scott and Ann. John and Elizabeth had 13 children, Elizabeth also md. John Brown..."(1) 12/94
"...in the records I have from Windsor ... located the marriage of John Loomis and Elizabeth Scott at Hartford 3 Feb 1648, a little more than one year prior to what appear to be the siblings of your Mary Loomis. The possiblity that John and Elizabeth are the parents you are looking for is enhanced by the fact that the only other daughter, b 8 May 1671 was named Elizabeth..."(2) 7/94
"John b. abt 1620 d 1688 m. Elizabeth Scott..."(3) 1/95
"1051. John Loomis, (2) b. in England, in 1622; m. Feb. 3, 1649, Elizabeth, dau. of Thomas Scott of Hartford. He was a Deacon many years, and Deputy to General Court 1666-67, also 1675-87. He d. Sept. 1, 1688...."(4) p.232
"I am related to Loomis family of "John Loomis" b1622 Braintree, England.
Sons Joseph b1649, John b1649, Thomas b1653, Samuel b1655, Danial b1682,James b1659, Timothy b1661, Nathanial b1663, David b1665, Samuel b1666 (2nd son w same name), Isaac 1668, Elizabeth b 166?, Mary b1673....The Loomis family link I have starts with "John" b1622, married to Elizabeth Scott
b1625. Lived in Conn...."(5) 4/95
"Possible Order of Children.... 5. John....born 1622....married 1648..Probably, however, the order was as follows:... 5. John, b 1622..."(6) pp. 125, 128
"5. John b. abt 1620 m. Feb 3, 1648/9 Elizabeth Scott. John d. Sept 1, 1688... "(6)
From: MR JOHN E HOPE
To: Gleason@prodigy.net
Subject: Loomis
Date: Thursday, January 30, 1997 1:20 PM
Dear Lynn, I also think they must be related, but have not been able to prove it. The father of Nehemiah Loomis was Samuel Loomis. The proof of this is in Holbrook, Jay Mack; Connecticut Colonists: Windsor 1635-1703 (Holbrook Research Institute, Oxford, Mass 1986) p. 175
"Loomys, Nehemia
Birth 15Jul1670 CHS930:50
Father Loomys, Samuel"
Daniel Loomis is the son of Deacon John Loomis born 1622 in Shalford, Essex. That information is from you!!!
Deacon John Loomis is the son of Joseph Loomis b. 1590 in Shalford, Essex. According to the famous genealogist Lynn Gleason, Joseph had a son Lt. Samuel Loomis b. about 1628/35 (?) m. Elizabeth Judd. This may be the same Samuel Loomis who is listed above as the father of Nehemiah, but I have no proof.
Perhaps we can find out some more about Samuel that would establish thelink.
John Hope
(1) Cherie Logan, PMXP72A@Prodigy.com
(2) Donald Schindler, NPRV40A@Prodigy.com
(3) Barbara Boell, TRGH72A@Prodigy.com, 15704 Pinecroft Lane, Bowie, MD 20716
(4) ANCESTRY OF JOHN BARBER WHITE
(5) Paul Miller, MHMWO0A@Prodigy.com
(6) DESCENDANTS OF JOSEPH LOOMIS IN AMERICA AND HIS ANTECEDENTS IN THE OLD WORLD, Elisha S. Loomis Ph.D. 1908
(7) John Hope, RXUS16A@prodigy.comm

M Child 1 Joseph LOOMIS #13257
Born: -- ___ 1649 in: 1
"Joseph b1649..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 2 John LOOMIS #13258
Born: -- ___ 1649 in: 1
"John b1649..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 3 Thomas LOOMIS #13259
Born: -- ___ 1653 in: 1
Spouse: Sarah White #13688
"Thomas b 1653..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 4 Samuel LOOMIS #13260
Born: -- ___ 1655 in: 1
"Samuel b 1655..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 5 Daniel LOOMIS Sgt. #13261 died at age: 83
Born: 16 Jun 1657 in: Farmington, Connecticut 6
Died: 25 Jun 1740 in: Windsor, Connecticutt 6
Spouse: Mary Ellsworth #13519
"Danial b 1682..."(1)

"Sergeant Daniel Loomis m. Mary Ellsworth
Josiah Loomis..."(2)

Date: Thursday, 21-Nov-96 12:15 PM
From: John Hope \ PRODIGY: (RXUS16A)
To: Lynn A. Gleason \ PRODIGY: (FCFV81A)
Subject:Loomis Family
Dear Lynn, I believe that I corresponded previously with you about the Loomis family. I am now trying to connect two of them that I believe must be related. The two are: Daniel Loomis b. June 16, 1657
Farmington, CT d. June 25, 1740 Windsor, CT. He married Mary Ellsworth.
Nehemiah Loomis, b. July 15, 1670 Windsor, CT. He married Thankful Weller.
Do you have any information that can help make that connection. John Hope (2)

Lynn Gleason
From: Terryros@aol.com
To: Gleason@prodigy.net;;
PMXP72A@prodigy.com; TRGH72A@prodigy.com; KCDA32B@prodigy.com Cc:Cc:
Terryros@aol.com
Subject: Re: Fw: Loomis
Date: Friday, January 31, 1997 10:38
PM Daniel Loomis b 1657 was a cousin of Nehemiah b 1670. Their fathers John and Samuel Loomis were brothers. Daniel is the son of Deacon John and Nehemiah is the son of Lt. Samuel Loomis. Hope this helps. Terry (3)
1)Paul Miller, MHMWO0A@Prodigy.com, 4/95
2)John Hope, RXUS16A@Prodigy.com, 420 E. 54th St., Apt 8G, New York, New York 10022-5150
3)Terry (Brown) Rostamo,Terryros@aol.com, 7117 Stonehaven Ct., Fort Worth, TX 76179-2941

M Child 6 James LOOMIS #13262
Born: -- ___ 1659 in: 1
"James b1659...(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 7 Timothy LOOMIS #13263
Born: -- ___ 1661 in: 1
"Timothy b 1661..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 8 Nathanial LOOMIS #13264
Born: -- ___ 1663 in: 1
"Nathanial b1663..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 9 David LOOMIS #13265
Born: -- ___ 1665 in: 1
"David b 1665..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 10 Samuel LOOMIS #13266
Born: -- ___ 1666 in: 1
"Samuel b1682 (2nd son w same name)..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 11 Isaac LOOMIS #13267
Born: -- ___ 1668 in: 1
"Isaac 1668..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

F Child 12 Elizabeth LOOMIS #13268
Born: -- ___ 166? in: 1
"Elizabeth b 166?..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

F Child 13 Mary LOOMIS #13269
Born: 07 AUG 1673 in: Windsor, Connecticutt 7
"Mary b1673..."(1)
"Checking the Windsor [CT] birth records I find a Mary Loomis daughter of John Loomis b 7 Aug. 1673,... The 1673 Mary appears to have at least 12 siblings from the record 11 brothers and 1 sister born from 1649 through 1673...."(2)
1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95
2. Donald Schindler, NPRV40A, 7/94
Husband: John Brown #11709
Elizabeth also married John Brown..."(1)
1. Cherie Logan, PMXP72A, 12/94
1 Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95
2 Donald Schindler, NPRV40A, 7/94
ANCESTRY OF JOHN BARBER WHITE
3 Barbara Boell, TRGH72A@Prodigy.com, 15704 Pinecroft Lane, Bowie, MD 20716;
DESCENDANTS OF JOSEPH LOOMIS IN AMERICA AND HIS ANTECEDENTS IN THE OLD WORLD, Elisha S. Loomis Ph.D. 1908; ANCESTRY OF JOHN BARBER WHITE
4 Barbara Boell, TRGH72A, 15704 Pinecroft Lane, Bowie, MD 20716; 9/94, 1/95
ANCESTRY OF JOHN BARBER WHITE
5 ANCESTRY OF JOHN BARBER WHITE
6 John Hope, RXUS16A@Prodigy.com, 420 E. 54th St., Apt 8G, New York, New York 10
7 Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95
Donald Schindler, NPRV40A, 7/94
Lynn (Brooks) Gleason
444 11th Ave SE, Forest Lake, MN 55025-1871
E-Mail: Gleason@prodigy.nett

[NI1401] "John Loomis... married Agnes Lyngwood/Lingwood born 1564 Braintree, Essex, England; daughter of John Lingwood and Jane Marler" (1)
"[Ancestor #]477 [of Millard Fillmore] (prob.) Agnes Lingwood, d. after 1619" (2)
1) Lynn Gleason (FCFV81A-Prodigy)
2) TAG, Vol. 63, #1, 1/1988, p. 55

[NI1402] "[Ancestor #]478 [of Millard Fillmore] Robert White, bur. Messing, Essex, 17 June 1617, Shalford; m. Essex 24 June 1585" (1)
1) TAG, Vol. 63, #1 Jan. 1988, p. 55

[NI1403] Robert White m. Bridget Allgar b. 3/11/1562 Shalford, Essex, England d. England per Nutmegger 6/1994 p. 2ff.
"[Ancestor #]479 [of Millard Fillmore] Bridget Algar, bp. Shalford, 11 March 1562, d. after 1617; dau. of William Algar" (1)
1) TAG, Vol. 63, #1 January 1988, p. 55

[NI1405] "From: Lynn Gleason >
To: JOHNEHOPE@prodigy.net t>
Subject: Re: Elizabeth Scott, wife of John Loomis
Date: Wednesday, March 04, 1998 10:21 AM
Hi, John! Good to hear from you again. I probably don't have a lot of new information for you. But this sure looks like a possibility, though there are some things that would have to be reconciled and checked. Here is what I have in my data at the present.... If you are able to prove this connection or get any further information I hope you will share it with me. I will do the same. Note my new e-mail address.
Thanks again, Lynn

3 Mar 1998 Family Group Sheet

Wife: Elizabeth Scott #11706
Born: -- ___ 1625 in:
Father: Thomas Scott #11707
Mother: Ann _____ #11708
"John Loomis md Elizabeth Scott d/o Thomas Scott and Ann. John and Elizabeth had 13 children. Elizabeth also md. John Brown..."(1)
"Elizabeth, dau. of Thomas Scott of Hartford...."(2)
"Elizabeth Scott b1625. Lived in Conn..."(3)
1. Cherie Logan, PMXP72A, 12/94
2. ANCESTRY OF JOHN BARBER WHITE
3. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

Husband: John LOOMIS Deacon. #11700 died at age: 68
Married: 03 FEB 1648/49 in: Hartford her age: 23 his age: 28
Born: -- ___ 1620/22 in: Shalford, Essex, England
Died: 01 SEP 1688 in:
Ref: 13L Occupation: Deacon, Deputy
Father: JOSEPH LOOMIS #1560
Mother: MARY WHITE #1561
"John Looms md Elizabeth Scott d/o Thomas Scott and Ann. John and Elizabeth had 13 children, Elizabeth also md. John Brown..."(1) 12/94

"...in the records I have from Windsor ... located the marriage of John Loomis and Elizabeth Scott at Hartford 3 Feb 1648, a little more than one year prior to what appear to be the siblings of your Mary Loomis. The possiblity that John and Elizabeth are the parents you are looking for is enhanced by the fact that the only other daughter, b 8 May 1671 was named Elizabeth..."(2) 7/94

"John b. abt 1620 d 1688 m. Elizabeth Scott..."(3) 1/95

"1051. John Loomis, (2) b. in England, in 1622; m. Feb. 3, 1649, Elizabeth, dau. of Thomas Scott of Hartford. He was a Deacon many years, and Deputy to General Court 1666-67, also 1675-87. He d. Sept. 1, 1688...."(4) p.232

"I am related to Loomis family of "John Loomis" b1622 Braintree, England. Sons Joseph b1649, John b1649, Thomas b1653, Samuel b1655, Daniel b1682, James b1659, Timothy b1661, Nathanial b1663, David b1665, Samuel b1666 (2nd son w same name), Isaac 1668, Elizabeth b 166?, Mary b1673....The Loomis family link I have starts with "John" b1622, married to Elizabeth Scott b1625. Lived in Conn...."(5) 4/95

"Possible Order of Children.... 5. John....born 1622....married 1648.. Probably, however, the order was as follows:... 5. John, b 1622..."(6) pp. 125, 128

"5. John b. abt 1620 m. Feb 3, 1648/9 Elizabeth Scott. John d. Sept 1, 1688... "(6)

From: MR JOHN E HOPE
To: Gleason@prodigy.net
Subject: Loomis
Date: Thursday, January 30, 1997 1:20 PM
Dear Lynn, I also think they must be related, but have not been able to prove it. The father of Nehemiah Loomis was Samuel Loomis. The proof of this is in Holbrook, Jay Mack; Connecticut Colonists: Windsor 1635-1703 (Holbrook Research Institute, Oxford, Mass 1986) p. 175
"Loomys, Nehemia
Birth 15Jul1670 CHS930:50
Father Loomys, Samuel"
Daniel Loomis is the son of Deacon John Loomis born 1622 in Shalford, Essex. That information is from you!!!
Deacon John Loomis is the son of Joseph Loomis b. 1590 in Shalford, Essex. According to the famous genealogist Lynn Gleason, Joseph had a son Lt. Samuel Loomis b. about 1628/35 (?) m. Elizabeth Judd. This may be the same Samuel Loomis who is listed above as the father of Nehemiah, but I have no proof. Perhaps we can find out some more about Samuel that would establish the link.
John Hope (7)

(1) Cherie Logan, PMXP72A@Prodigy.com
(2) Donald Schindler, NPRV40A@Prodigy.com
(3) Barbara Boell, TRGH72A@Prodigy.com, 15704 Pinecroft Lane, Bowie, MD 20716
(4) ANCESTRY OF JOHN BARBER WHITE
(5) Paul Miller, MHMWO0A@Prodigy.com
(6) DESCENDANTS OF JOSEPH LOOMIS IN AMERICA AND HIS ANTECEDENTS IN THE OLD WORLD, Elisha S. Loomis Ph.D. 1908
(7) John Hope, RXUS16A@prodigy.comm
M Child 1 Joseph LOOMIS #13257 Born: -- ___ 1649 in:
"Joseph b1649..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 2 John LOOMIS #13258
Born: -- ___ 1649 in: 1
"John b1649..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 3 Thomas LOOMIS #13259
Born: -- ___ 1653 in: 1
Spouse: Sarah White #13688
"Thomas b 1653..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 4 Samuel LOOMIS #13260
Born: -- ___ 1655 in: 1
"Samuel b 1655..."(1)

1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 5 Daniel LOOMIS Sgt. #13261 died at age: 83
Born: 16 Jun 1657 in: Farmington, Connecticut 6
Died: 25 Jun 1740 in: Windsor, Connecticutt 6
Spouse: Mary Ellsworth #13519
"Danial b 1682..."(1)

"Sergeant Daniel Loomis m. Mary Ellsworth
Josiah Loomis..."(2)

Date: Thursday, 21-Nov-96 12:15 PM
From: John Hope \ PRODIGY: (RXUS16A)
To: Lynn A. Gleason \ PRODIGY: (FCFV81A)
Subject:Loomis Family
Dear Lynn, I believe that I corresponded previously with you about the Loomis family. I am now trying to connect two of them that I believe must be related. The two are: Daniel Loomis b. June 16, 1657
Farmington, CT d. June 25, 1740 Windsor, CT. He married Mary Ellsworth. Nehemiah Loomis, b. July 15, 1670 Windsor, CT. He married Thankful Weller. Do you have any information that can help make that connection? John Hope(2)

Lynn Gleason
From: Terryros@aol.com
To: Gleason@prodigy.net;;
PMXP72A@prodigy.com; TRGH72A@prodigy.com; KCDA32B@prodigy.com Cc: : Terryros@aol.com
Subject: Re: Fw: Loomis
Date: Friday, January 31, 1997 10:38
PM Daniel Loomis b 1657 was a cousin of Nehemiah b 1670. Their fathers John and Samuel Loomis were brothers. Daniel is the son of Deacon John and Nehemiah is the son of Lt. Samuel Loomis. Hope this helps. Terry (3)

1)Paul Miller, MHMWO0A@Prodigy.com, 4/95
2)John Hope, RXUS16A@Prodigy.com, 420 E. 54th St., Apt 8G, New York, New York 10022-5150
3)Terry (Brown) Rostamo,Terryros@aol.com, 7117 Stonehaven Ct., Fort Worth, TX 76179-2941

M Child 6 James LOOMIS #13262
Born: -- ___ 1659 in: 1
"James b1659...(1)
1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 7 Timothy LOOMIS #13263
Born: -- ___ 1661 in: 1
"Timothy b 1661..."(1)
1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 8 Nathanial LOOMIS #13264
Born: -- ___ 1663 in: 1
"Nathanial b1663..."(1)
1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 9 David LOOMIS #13265
Born: -- ___ 1665 in: 1
"David b 1665..."(1)
1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 10 Samuel LOOMIS #13266
Born: -- ___ 1666 in: 1
"Samuel b1682 (2nd son w same name)..."(1)
1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

M Child 11 Isaac LOOMIS #13267
Born: -- ___ 1668 in: 1
"Isaac 1668..."(1)
1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

F Child 12 Elizabeth LOOMIS #13268
Born: -- ___ 166? in: 1
"Elizabeth b 166?..."(1)
1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95

F Child 13 Mary LOOMIS #13269
Born: 07 AUG 1673 in: Windsor, Connecticutt 7
"Mary b1673..."(1)
"Checking the Windsor [CT] birth records I find a Mary Loomis daughter of John Loomis b 7 Aug. 1673,... The 1673 Mary appears to have at least 12 siblings from the record 11 brothers and 1 sister born from 1649 through 1673...."(2)
1. Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95
2. Donald Schindler, NPRV40A, 7/94
Husband: John Brown #11709
Elizabeth also married John Brown..."(1)
1. Cherie Logan, PMXP72A, 12/94
1 Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95
2 Donald Schindler, NPRV40A, 7/94
ANCESTRY OF JOHN BARBER WHITE
3 Barbara Boell, TRGH72A@Prodigy.com, 15704 Pinecroft Lane, Bowie, MD 20716;
DESCENDANTS OF JOSEPH LOOMIS IN AMERICA AND HIS ANTECEDENTS IN THE OLD
WORLD, Elisha S. Loomis Ph.D. 1908; ANCESTRY OF JOHN BARBER WHITE
4 Barbara Boell, TRGH72A, 15704 Pinecroft Lane, Bowie, MD 20716; 9/94, 1/95
ANCESTRY OF JOHN BARBER WHITE
5 ANCESTRY OF JOHN BARBER WHITE
6 John Hope, RXUS16A@Prodigy.com, 420 E. 54th St., Apt 8G, New York, NewYork 10
7 Paul Miller, MHMWO0A, 4/95
Donald Schindler, NPRV40A, 7/94 " (A)
A) Lynn (Brooks) Gleason 444 11th Ave SE, Forest Lake, MN 55025-1871 E-Mail: Gleason@prodigy.nett

[NI1407] "Dutch Colonial Stone House
Built in 1669 by Tjerck Claesson de Witt
Willed to his first son Andries and occupied by a number of generations of De Witts.
It is still standing and known as the Suydam-Beatty Farm on the Road to Hurley, N.Y." (2)
"Children of Lucas De Witt and Catharine Roosa
Annatje, bapt. Oct. 5, 1729.
Evert, bapt. Nov. 25, 1733...
Marytje, bapt. March 7, 1736.
Jan L., bapt. (Kaatsbaan Ch. Rec.) May 4, 1736...
Lucas, bapt. Aug. 20, 1738...
Abraham, bapt. Feb. 15, 1741.
Jannetje, bapt. July 31, 1743.
Rachel, bapt. (Kaatsbaan Ch. Rec.) Aug. 22, 1745.
Catharine, bapt. (Kaatsbaan Ch. Rec.) Sept. 5, 1748.
Petrus, bapt. Nov. 2, 1755." (1)
1) Evans, Thomas G.; The De Witt Family of Ulster County, New York (NYG&BR October 1886 rep. New York 1886) p. 17
2) De Witt, Harold; Gasherie De Witt II 1822-1874: His Ancestors and Descendants (Ann Arbor 1948) p. 18
De Witt Researcher:
Mary Chipman (KCPH28A-Prodigy)

[NI1408] "Jacob Osterhout bt 27 Jan 1745 #5717[Kingston, Ulster Co., New York] m. Jannetie DeWitt 7 ch
(children)
535 DeWitt Osterhout b. 1767 m. Elizabeth Monks
536 Hendrick bapt. 29 Oct 1770 Ktsb
537 Cath. bapt. 5 May 1773 Ktsb
538 Maria bapt. 20 Feb 1776 Ktsb m. 24 Jan 1792 Roch.
539 Lucas b. 6 May 1778 bapt. Ascension Sunday, Loonenburg Luth m. 21 Aug 1800 Ktsb Jacomyntie Young
540 Jacob bapt. 25 Feb 1781 Ktsb (Katsbaan Dutch Reformed Church, Saugerties) m. Eunice Sharp
541 Martin bapt. 13 Aug 1784 Ktsb" (1)
1) Osterhout Genealogy (see Jan Jansen van Oosterhout)

[NI1409] "Hendrick bapt. 5 Feb 1716 #2375
m. 27 Feb 1743 # 981 Peternella Bosch -- 8 children
*** NYGBR 1887:18 disagrees
"NYGBR 1887:18 p. 18 The DeWitt Family of Ulster County, New York by Thomas G. Evans states:
"158. i. Johanna, (dau. of Tjerck de Witt (56) and Ariaantje Dekker) bapt. Jan. 10, 1721; m., Nov. 28, 1739, Hendrikus Osterhoudt (bapt. Feb 5, 1716), son of Teunis Osterhoudt and Ariaantje Roosa. (Tjerck's ancestors given in NYGBR 1886:17 p. 259)"
205 Marytie bapt. 6 Mar 1743 #5522
206 Jacob Osterhout bapt. 27 Jan 1745 #5717 m. Jannetie De Witt
207 Kryn Osterhout bapt. 2 Aug 1747 #5978
208 Annetie bapt 27 Nov 1748 #6011
209 Cath. bapt. 26 Apr 1752 m. Peter Helm
210 Hendrick II bapt. 24 Apr 1754 #6524
211 Marytie bapt. 19 Sep 1756 #6671
212 Jonathan b. 1765" (1)
1) Osterhout Genealogy (see Jan Jansen van Oosterhout)

[NI1410] AFN:FTLZ-N6 Pieternella Bos b. 1718 bap. 29 Jun 1718 Dutch Reformed Church, Kingston, Ulster, New York Father: Jacobus Bosch or (Bos, or V.D. Bosch) Mother: Eyke van der Mark Spouse: Hendrikus Oosterhoud Sources: Jon Stuart Wammack, 4360 Maple Ave., La Mesa, CA 91941 and Rebecca Bush McElhenny, 146 Baycliff Trail, Kill Devil Hills, NC 27948
"4. Pieternella was baptized on June 29, 1718 at the Old Reformed Dutch Church of Kingston, NY. Her sponsors were Niclaas and Eva Schoonhoven. Pieternelle Bosch and Hendrikus Oosterhoud registered their banns for marriage on February 20, 1743. They were given a certificate of marriage at the Old Dutch Reformed Church of Kingston, NY on February 27, 1743. The actual date of marriage was not recorded. At the time of their marriage they were both residing in "Brabant," a local name given to "a portion of the old town of Kingston, on the northern side of the present Esopus creek." (Baptismal & Marriage Registers of the Old DRC of Kingston) " (1)
1) David Jansen's Northeast United States Genealogy Page

[NI1411] "Teunis Osterhoudt bapt. 15 Oct 1668 #94 m. Ariaantie Roosa (dau. of Arie Roosa & Maria Pels) -- 12 children:
His will 14 June 1747 proved 2 July 1747 ae 79 y Roch(ester) Anjou I/130
Jan bapt. 3 Jun 1694 #768
Arian bapt. 26 Apr 1696 #907
Annetie bapt. 1 May 1698 #1020
Marytie bapt. 31 Dec 1699 #1143
Kryn bapt. 16 Mar 1701#1224
Aldert bapt. 31 Jan 1703 #1372
Maria bapt. 15 Apr 1705 #1495
Ariaantie bapt. 29 Sep 1706 #1590
Johannes bapt. 20 Jun 1708 #1715
Engletie bapt. 7 May 1710 #1851
Peter bapt. 2 Dec 1711 #1997
Hendrick bapt. 5 Feb 1716 #2375" (1)
"Teunis Jan Oosterhout bapt. 15 Oct 1668 Kingston and died in Rochester Feb. 1746. He married Ariaantje Roosa in 1692. See Probate Records by Anjou, Vol. I, p. 129 for his will dated 14 Jun 1739." (2)
1) Osterhout Genealogy (see Jan Jansen van Oosterhout)
2) Lorraine Luke (GKRU05A-Prodigy)

[NI1412] "Teunis Osterhoudt... married Ariaantie Roosa... (daughter of Arie Roosa & Maria Pels)" (1)
"Jan Jansen van Oosterhout ... came to America with the Roosa Family on the Spotted Cow (De Bonte Koe). Teunis Jan Oosterhout (son of Jan Jansen) married Ariaantje Roosa in 1692." (2)
1) Osterhout Genealogy (see Jan Jansen van Oosterhoudt)
2) Lorraine Luke (GKRU05A-Prodigy)

[NI1414] "The Pells family find their ancestor in Evert Pells. He came to Albany in 1642. He purchased lands in Esopus in 1654, and within a few years thereafter settled upon them. He married Jannatje Schep
moes." (1)
Jan Jansen Schepmoes was in New Amsterdam as early as 1638. He died in 1655. By his wife, Sarah Pietersen, he had eight children." (2)
"Arie Roosa, who married Maria Pels, daughter of Evert Pels and Jannetje Symens" (3)
I.D. #3277
1) Schoonmaker, Marius; The History of Kingston, New York (New York 1888) p. 485
2) Ibid., p. 487
3) January 1894 Old Deerpark Days p. 235

[NI1415] "Cutler, Cutlore,
He d. May 17, 1694, ae. about 88. Will dated Nov. 24, 1684, at Cambridge Farms, ae. 78, was prob. Aug 20, 1694. He mentions ch. and gr. ch. of his wife, formerly wife of Thomas King, viz. James, Thomas, John, John Collar, Richard Park's wife, John Parmenter's wife, Sarah Waite, Mary Johnson, Hannah Winter, Joanna, wife of Philip Russell, Jemimah, Samuel, Phebe." (1) p. 127
"3. Thomas Cutler (James1), born at Watertown about 1648, died 13 July 1722.
He was a subscriber for the erection of the first meeting-house in 1692, and in 1700 when the parish performed what was considered a very important duty, that of "seating the meeting house" David Russell, John Mason and Thomas "Cutteler" "ware plaft In ye fecond feat in ye front gallereye."
He was an assessor in 1694, a selectman in 1718, and was appointed a tythingman at the first town meeting after the town was incorporated. he was honored in the public records with the title of lieutenant.
He married Abigail ( ), who died 19 Feb. 1711, aged 65, g.s.
Children, v. and vi. baptized at Watertown, vii. at Cambridge Farms, the others born at Cambridge:
i. Abigail, b. 31 Oct. 1674; m. Robert Merriam.
ii. Thomas, b. 19 Feb. 1678; m. Tabitha Rice; d. at Sudbury 26 Mar. 1718....
iii. Mary...
iv. Hannah, b. 7 Mar. 1683; d. 25 Feb. 1704.
7. v. James, bapt. 9 Jan. 1687.
vi. Jonathan, bapt. 17 June 1688; m. at Watertown, 10 Apr. 1710, Abigail Bigelow...
8. vii. Benjamin, b. 4 July 1697." (2)
1) Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts, p. 127
2) Hudson, Charles; History of Lexington, Vol. II, p. 142-3

[NI1418] "Jan Jansen van Oosterhout... was b. 1630 at Oosterhout, North Brabant, Netherlands. He came to New Amsterdam.
He m. Annetie Hendricks 25 Oct 1653 in Dutch Reformed Church in New Amsterdam. (NYGBR Vol. 16/p82). They had two sons b. there, both named Hendrick. One Jan Jansen signed an agreement to form the village of Wiltwyck on 31 May 1658. With the original document lost, it is now impossible to determine whether it was Jan Jansen Van Oosterhout or Jan Jansen van Amersfoort. (Fried: Early History of Kingston: 1975/pg 162) The name Wiltwyck was changed to Kingston 25 Sept 1659. Jan owned a house there in 1660. There Jan m. Annetie Jellis 18 Feb 1663 (#6 DutchRefChRcds). She was from Zalt-Bommel/25 mi. E. of Dort in Gelderland, Neth. Jan sired 10 more children there in Kingston, Ulster Co., NY." (1)
1) The Osterhout Family, compiled by Walter D. Thomas, 952 N. Hobart Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90029 1 Apr 1981 Ulster County Genealogical Society p. 5
Osterhout Researchers:
Karen Luzzo MZST19A@prodigy.comm
Denise Lewis CXDN60B@prodigy.comm

[NI1432] "7. Martin, 2 son of Phillippe, 1 bap. in Great Leighs, 23 Nov 1595; m. in St. Michael's, Bishop's Stortford, County Hertford, 22 Oct 1621, Prudence Bird...
He died in Braintree, England, between 20 May 1671, when his will was made, and 20 Sep, same year when it was proved.
He was a weaver or cloth worker and res. in Great Leighs and Braintree. Although in the record of his marriage in 1621, he was called of Great Leighs, it may be that he did not reside in Great Leighs immediately after his marriage, as he had a son, John (the record of baptism has not been found), who had a son who was five years old in 1648, as appears in the Manorial Court Records. The last that is positively known of his being in Great Leighs was when his son, Daniel, was bap. 6 Feb 1630. On 22 May 1632, he and his wife received the surrender of a tenement in Braintree, as appears in the Court Rolls of the Manor of Braintree...
In 1637 he received the surrender of a parcel of land with a cottage called Masses as appears from the following extract from the same Court Rolls. Part of this cottage is still standing in what is "
Martin's Yard."...
On 3 Apr 1648 he surrendered a part of this tenement to his son John, as appears from the extract of the Court Rolls, shown in the account under his name.
It is found that he appeared in the Archbishop's Court at Braintree in 1639 and '40, in company with the Vicar, and it is probable that he was one of the church wardens. (He may have remained an Anglican, while his sons became Puritans.)
He was taxed in Braintree in 1666 for two hearths, as is shown in the Lay Subsidy returns for Braintree...
(From his will)
I giue & bequeath unto my sone Joseph Kellocke of new England twenty shillings to be paid unto him within two years of my decease... (He must have remained in contact with him.)
Children
15 John, 3
16 Nathaniel, 3 bap. in Great Leighs, 1 Apr 1624
17 Josef, 3
18 Sarah, 3 bap. in Great Leighs, 1 Feb 1628
19 Daniel, 3 bap. in Great Leighs, 6 Feb 1630; rem. to New England
20 Samuel, 3 bap. probably Braintree; rem. to New England
21 Martin, 3 probably b. Braintree;" (1)
"Martin Kellogg m. October 22, 1621, Prudence Bird, the daughter of John and Prudence Bird, St. Michael's, Bishop Stortford, Hertford County. He d. between May 20, 1671, when his will was made, and September 20, 1671, when it was proved." (2)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 15-16
2) Willard-Bradley, p. 84
See Willard-Bradley Memoirs p. 84-5 for more details and complete text of his will.

[NI1433] "(Martin Kellogg) m. in St. Michael's, Bishop's Stortford, County Hertford, 22 Oct 1621, Prudence Bird, dau. of John Bird, of Bishop's Stortford." (1)
"Prudence Bird, b. say 1599; m. Bishop's Stortford, 23 Oct. 1621, "Martyn Kellog of much Leighs in Essex & Prudens Bird"; she and her husband lived at Great (Much Leighs for several years and then moved to Braintree, Essex. When Martin Kellogg prepared his will in 1671, Prudence had already dies. Three of their sons settled in New England." (2)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 13
2) TAG April 1996 p. 92

[NI1434] "The will of John Burde of the hamlet of Hockrell, in the Parish of Bishop's Stortford, County of Hertford, yeoman, dated 31 Jan 1625, proven in the Commissary Court of London, Esses and Herts, 27 Feb., same year, directs that his body shall be buried in the churchyard of the same parish; gives 20 s. to the poor; "to Mr. Bendish, our minister, 10 s. for his pains to make a sermon on the day of my burial"; makes his wife, Prudence, his executrix and provides for her support during her lifetime; mentions his son John and wife, Frances; bequeaths to son William 10 pounds paid when he comes of age (a William Bird m. in Great Leighs, Amma, dau. of Thomas Kellogg); dau. Jane 30 pounds at the age of 22; dau. Susan 3 pounds at the age of 22; 3 pounds to dau. Mary (Thomas Waterman m. Mary Bird in 1624. In his will, 1628, he mentioned his deceased wife, Mary, and his brother-in-law, Martin Kellogg, of Much Leez, Essex, clothier, weaver), "which I give her in consideration of a gowne cloth which I promised her upon her marriage;" to dau. Prudence 20s." (1)
"John Bird was probably baptized at Thorley, Hertfordshire, on 18 February 1569/70. His father died when he was a baby, and his grandfather cared for him for four more years, then died also. From the 1575 will of his grandfather, he was to receive the legacy, at age 22, of a tenement in Hockerell, parish of Bishop's Stortford, Hertfordshire, neighboring Thorley. His grandfather requested that in the meantime he be reared by his uncle William Birde.
John married Prudence ______ around 1594, who died between 14 September and 2 October 1638, the dates that her will was executed and proved (below). The baptisms of their first four children have eluded discovery, but baptisms of three appear in 1603, 1606, and 1608 at Bishop's Stortford...
John died less than a week after the date of his will, and his 1625/6 burial entry in Bishop's Stortford parish registers reads: "John Birde yeoman of 60 yeares old was buried the sixth of February."...
Children of John and Prudence (_____) Bird:
John Bird, b. say 1595; m. Frances ___...
Elizabeth Bird, b. say 1597; named in the will of her father in 1625/6.
Prudence Bird...
Mary Bird, b. say 1601; m. Bishop's Stortford, 1 April 1624, Thomas Waterman of "much Lees"; named in her father's will.
William Bird, bp. Bishop's Stortford, 13 Nov. 1603...
Jane Bird, bp. Bishop's Stortford, 2 Feb 1605/6...
Susan Bird, bp. Bishop's Stortford, 10 Jan. 1607/8" (2)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 13
2) TAG April 1996 p. 90-2

[NI1435] "John [Bird] married Prudence _____ around 1594, who died between 14 September and 2 October 1638, the dates that her will was executed and proved...
Prudence lived as a widow for thirteen years. She remained in the parish of Bishop's Stortford, and in her will, dated 14 September 1638 and proved on 2 October 1638, gave to the poor people of the parish 6s. 8d. Next she named her son John Bird, to whom she gave "all my tubbs & oth(e)r houshould stuffe of myne w(hi)ch he hath now in his possession."
Most of her will pertains to her son William, her words giving the impression that he may have been perhaps somewhat irresponsible, or maybe mentally incapable of managing his own concerns. This situation was probably of long standing, as her husband, rather than giving him property, provided that son John would pay William a specified amount of money each year. "I will & devise," Prudence stipulated, "(t)hat my best gowne save one shalbe ripped, and one of my working day pettycotes to make my sonne Will(ia)m Bird a sute of Apparrell To be deliv(e)red to him w(i)thin Sixe moneths next after my decesse if he shall come & demand it... Ten shillings for hose & shoes & oth(e) necessaries for the said Will(ia)m if he shall come againe him selfe for the same to myne Executor... at thend of Two yeares next after my decesse lay out & disburse in apparrell for my sonne Will(ia)m if he come him selfe for it the sume of Fortie Shillings... son Will(ia)m shall have the use of a flockbed bolster a pillowe one blanckett & cov(e)ring and a p(ai)r of new sheets & a paire of old sheets, but not to have them deliv(e)red but when he shall come to Stortford to lodge in them at myne Executors house And I desire that myne Executro, according to his p(ro)mise will suffer my sonne Will(ia)m to lodge in his or their howse so longe as the said Will(ia)m shall keep him selfe unmaried & come thith(e)r & use him self orderly & quietly."
Prudence also bequethed "to my sonne in lawe Martin Kellog my new chest, a good p(ai)r of sheets & a flaxen smocke" (1)
1) TAG April 1996 p. 91-2

[NI1436] "1. Phillippe Kellogg, 1 probably son of Thomas and grandson of Nicholas, of Debden, was the first of the name, in England, from whom the Kelloggs of the New World can, with certainty trace their descent. He first appears in Bocking, Essex, a parish adjoining Braintree, 15 Sep 1583, when his son, Thomas, was baptized. Two years later he was found in Great Leighs, where his son, Robert, was baptisted in 1585. That the record of baptism of all of his children has not been found, is shown by the record of burial of his daughter, Annis, in Great Leighs, 25 May 1611...
(Annis Bartoo, wife of Jacob Henry Whiteman, kept this name alive until 1903.)
No record of his death has been found, and as the records of Great Leighs are quite full, it is probable that he did not die there. He may have removed to Braintree and had other children...
Children
2 Thomas, 2 bap. at Bocking, Essex, 15 Sep 1583
3 Annis, 2
4 Robert, 2 bap. Great Leighs, 14 Nov 1585
5 Mary, 2 bap. Great Leighs, 16 Feb 1588
6 Prudence, 2 bap. Great Leighs, 20 Mar 1588
7 Martyn, 2 bap. Great Leighs, 23 Nov 1595
8 Nathaniel, 2 b.________,... d. in New England
9 John, 2
10 Jane, 2
11 Rachel, 2" (1)
"Philippe Kellogg, probably grandson of Nicholas of Debden.
Children:
Thomas Kellogg bap. September 15, 1583 Bocking, Essex.
Robert Kellogg bap. 1585, Great Leighs.
Martin Kellogg bap. November 28, 1595 Great Leighs." (2)
1) The Kelloggs (see Nathaniel) p. 11-12
2) Willard-Bradley Memoirs, p. 84

[NI1437] " Somersetshire
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Ellsworth, Josiah Timberscomb Windsor Banks" (2)
"The Ellsworth homestead (in Farmington? or Windsor?) has become the home and Chapter House of the Abigail Wolcott Chapter of the Conn. Dau ot the Am. Revolution." (1)
For more information on Ellsworth ancestors and descendants see http://pages.prodigy.com/MN/negene.negene.html(3/22 not found, probably wrong URL)
1) Loomis Genealogy (see Abijah) p. 136
2) Topo. Dict. p. 145

[NI1438] "Thomas Holcomb and Elizabeth Ferguson married c. 1635. They settled in CT. My line is through son Joshua who married Ruth Sherwood in CT 1663." (1)
"I, too, am descended from Thomas and Elizabeth, but through son, Nathaniel." (2)
"Elizabeth, 1634-Sept. 18, 1712; m. Nov. 16, 1654, Josiah Ellsworth, who died Aug. 20, 1689.
Children:
Josias, b. 1655; Elizabeth, b. 1657; Mary, b. 1660; Thomas, b. 1665; Jonathan, 1669-1749; John, b. 1671; Job, b. 1674; Benjamin, b. 1676." (3)
Possible source: Thomas Holcombe and Other Simsbury, CT Settlers by Bowman, Deanna Holcomb, 14810 Herring Road, Colorado Springs, CO 80908 (as of 1990).
1) Catherine Douglas (YTMK24F-Prodigy)
2) Gary Holcomb (BVPT69B-Prodigy)
3) The "Mary and John" (see Thomas Holcomb) p. 44

[NI1446] "Jan Jansen married a second time to Annetjen Jellis in the Old Dutch Church of Kingston on 2-18-1663. She was born 1641 in (Zalt)-Bommel, Gelderland the daughter of Jelles Dowse and Hester Janse." (1)
"Annetie Jellis 18 Feb 1663 (#6 Dutch Reform Church Records, Kingston). She was from Zalt-Bommel/25 mi. E. of Dort in Gelderland, Netherlands." (2)
Jellis is obviously her patronymic, not her surname, since her father's name is Jelles. His surname also appears to be a patronymic as does the name of her mother.
1) Lorraine Luke (GKRU05A-Prodigy)
2) Osterhout Genealogy (see Jan Jansen van Oosterhout)

[NI1451] "Tradition says that two brothers, Sir George and John, came to this country in the early 1630's.
Sir George, a bachelor, was a government officer in Nova Scotia, and lived at Halifax. While on a voyage from Halifax to Massachusetts, supposedly to settle an estate on his brother, he was drowned...
That John Whitmore (called the lost brother) came to this country in the 1630's we know. In what part of the Colonies he first landed we do not know, but he appears on the records of Wethersfield, Connecticut, as early as 1638. His lot of 54 acres at that place was sold to Robert Treat. He removed to Stamford in 1641, and was one of its first founders and settlers. His name is on the second and third lists of the Colonists; was given in the first distribution of land ten acres; admitted Freeman, 1642; Deputy to General Court October 27, 1643; Representative to New Haven Assembly in 1647.
Was killed by the Indians in 1648...
John married in England. The name of his wife cannot be learned. He married, second, in this country, the widow Jessup, who brought him wealth. By his first wife he had born in England-
Thomas, 1615
Anne, 1621
Mary, 1623
Francis, 1625
John, 1627...
That this son (Francis, 1625) is the Francis of Cambridge there can be no doubt, as Francis of Cambridge, on affidavit, gives his age (birthdate) as 1625." (1)
1) Whitmore Genealogy (see Samuel Whitmore) p. vii-ix
GenForum Posting
Posted by Dean Whitmore on November 22, 1998 at 18:14:04:

In Reply to: Re: Francis Whitmore posted by Gil Wetmore on September 22, 1998 at 02:58:31:

He came into great fortune after marrige to Jessup. Killed by Mohegan Indians.The WHITMORE progenitor, JOHN WHITMORE (WETMORE-WHITTEMORE), born about 1589 in England,
died 1648 in CT. He married his 1st wife, name unknown, before 1615 in England. She was the mother of his 5 known children, who came to New England with their father about 1635: THOMAS WHITMORE 1615; ANNE WHITMORE 1621; MARY WHITMORE 1623; FRANCES WHITMORE 1625, JOHN WHITMORE 1627. He married 2nd MRS. JOANNA JESSUP, widow of JOHN JESSUP, after 1627.

His name first appears on the records of Wethersfield, CT early as 1639, where he took out a homelot, located east of the River landing now called Rocky Hill. He sold his house, barn , and 54 acres of land 6 Sept 1641to RICHARD TREAT. He joined a group led by PASTOR RICHARD DENTON and became one of the first settlers of Stamford in 1641. His name is on the 2nd and 3rd list of the Colonists. He was given 10 acres in the first distribution of land. In 1642 he was admitted a Freeman. He was Deputy to the General Court the 27 Oct 1643. He was Representative to New Haven Assembly in 1647. In 1648, John was murdered by Indians at Stamford, where he lived. An account of this episode: "(1649) The commission of New Haven informed the rest of the commissioners, that in or about Oct last, JOHN WHITMORE, one of the deputies of Stamford, a peaceable, inoffensive man, not apt to quarrel or provoke any of the Indians, going forth to seek his cattell, returned not according to expectations, nor could he be found by the English that sought him; but quickly after, the son of a Sogamore who lives near Stamford came to the town, and told the English that JOHN WHITMORE was murdered by one Torquatoes, had some of his cloths and particularly his shirt, made of cotten linen. Hereupon the English and some Indians went into the woods to take the murdered body for buriall; but, though they bestowed much time and labor, could not find it. Divers of the English at Stamford suspected Sangamore's son to be either the author or assessory of the murder, but had not satisfying grounds to seize and charge him. About 2 or 3 months after, Uncas coming to Stamford, calling the Indians thither, and inquiring after the murdered body, the fore-mentioned Songamore's son, and one Rohoron, another suspected Indian, led some of the English, and some of the Uncas men, to the place where the murdered body, or the relics of it lay. The carcase was brought to Stamford. The Sogamore's son and Rohoron fell on trembling, and thereby confirmed the suspicion in some of the Mohican Indians, so they said those two Indians were nought, meaning they were guilty".

[NI1453] "The following excerpt is taken from a letter written by William Paley Baildon, F.S.A., member of the Council of the Archaelogical Society of Yorkshire, England, and concerns the origin of the Belden Family. "There is only one family of Baildon; all persons bearing that name by inheritance must have sprung from the Yorkshire manor of that name. Richard Bayldon, son of Sir Francis Bayldon, of Kippax, baptized May 26, 1591, was the only Richard, so far as I know, would have had the money to spend in the purchase of lands as Richard of Wethersfield did."
The ancestral seat of the Bayldon family, as the English house from which the American Beldens sprung spell the name, was the manor of Baildon, in Kippax, Yorkshire, England, and the family was one of great antiquity, worth and importance. The pedigree of the Baildons of Kippax Manor extends from the end of the fifteenth century through five generations of the American immigrant, as follows: I. Walter Baildon, founder of the family. II. John Baildon, son and heir of Walter Baildon, died December 22, 1526. III. George Baildon, son of John Baildon, was born in 1520; he is mentioned in the records of Methby in 1567 and is recorded in Hardwick, in 1574. He was buried at Kippax in Yorkshire in 1588. IV. Sir Francis Baildon, son of George Baildon, was born at Kippax, Yorkshire, in 1560, and upon the death of his father, in 1588, became Reeve of Kippax. He was knighted on July 23, 1603. V. Richard Baildon, son of Sir Francis Baildon, was born at Kippax, and baptized there on May 26, 1591. He settled in the New England Colonies toward the middle of the seventeenth century. His descendants have consistently adhered to the spelling Belden; some branches use the form Belding.
1. Richard Belden, immigrant ancestor and progenitor of the American Beldens, was born in Kippax, Yorkshire, England, about the year 1591, the son of Sir Francis Baildon. He was baptized May 26, 1591, according to a document which he signed on March 26, 1613, as Richard Baylden, aged "19 years of age, born at Kippax, county Yorkshire." This document was signed when he took the oath of allegiance as a soldier of the King. He emigrated to America and settled in Wethersfield, Connecticut, where he became the owner of eight pieces of property, according to the town records, some of which the town gave him, and some of which he purchased from "Jonas Woode." During his lifetime he accumulated considerable real estate, which he left to his children, and laid the foundation of wealth of his progeny... His home lot was on the corner of Broad street and "The Waye leading into the Great playne." ... He held several town offices, and was prominent in local affairs. He died in 1655, and the inventory of his estate proved him to be a wealthy man according to the standards of the day... He brought with him to America his three sons: William, born about 1622, Samuel born about 1629; John, mentioned below." (1)
GenForum
Posted by Richard Belding Gilbert on April 18, 1998 at 21:17:19:
In Reply to: Daniel BELDEN/BELDING b. 1648 d. 1732 posted by Don Mellen on April 16, 1998 at 07:18:21:
While I can not, of course, verify that these people are your ancestors, I can tell you that there was a Daniel Belden who married Elizabeth Foote and had a daughter Hester (my source says "Esther") who married Ephraim Clarke.
Daniel was the son of William Belden (Baildon) and Thomasine Sherwood. William was the son of Richard Baildon and Margaret Ackrendon.
"Belding, Richard (?1591-1655) & _________; in Eng, b[ef] 1622; Wethersfield, CT" (2)

GenForum Posting
Posted by Deane E. Belden on January 09, 1999 at 05:10:03:
In Reply to: Baildon,England (our namesake) posted by jeff belden on January 08, 1999 at 20:18:30:
G.C. Belden in his book "The Belden/Belding Family Ancestry" says:
Baildon is a township in the Parish of Oakley, in the Wapentake of Skyrack, in the West Riding of the County of York. It is located about four miles north-west of Bradford. Baildon Hall is now a private social club and is happy to welcome any of the Belden's.
Mr. Belden's book is interesting and informative. Contact him at beldengc@aol.comm

1) Belden and Allied Families; American Illustrated, Fourth Quarter, 1919 Vol. XIII p. 393-4
2) Torrey, Clarence Almon; New England Marriages Prior to 1700 (Genealogical Publishing Co., Balt. 1985) p. 60
Other sources: Baildon and the Baildons: A History of a Yorkshire Manor and Family Vol. 1, by W. Paley Baildon
Some Belding Genealogy, Being some of the Descendants of Richard Belding of Staffordshire, England, One of the Earliest Settlers of Wethersfield, Conn.; by Charles C. Whitney

[NI1455] "Sir Francis Baildon, son of George Baildon, was born at Kippax, Yorkshire in 1560, and upon the death of his father, in 1588, became the Reeve of Kippax. He was knighted on July 23, 1603." (1)
"The line sent to me by one of my husband's cousins and goes back to 1066. I do not have the source(s) used and would be interested in the titles of the books with the Belden/Belding lines.
I was given that Richard Belding was Chr. 26 May 1591 in Kippax, Yorkshire, England and died 22 Aug. 1655 in Wethersfield, Hartford, CT, having immigrated 1641. The wife given is Ann b. about 1602 in
Kippax, England. It is their son Samuel Belding b. 1629 that my husband's line comes down from.
Yes, the father of Richard is given as Sir Francis Baildon b. 1560 in Kippax, England married 1588, died 20 Jun 1622 Monk Fristone (Yorkshire) England. His wife is given as Margaret Goodrich b. 1564
Ribston Manor (Yorkshire) Eng. d. 22 Sep 1598." (2)
"both Sir Francis and his second wife, Margaret, (daughter of Richard Goodrich, sheriff of York, and his second wife Clare Conyers alias Norton) have royal pedigrees, their son Richard assumes ancestral status in the eyes of many of the descendants of Richard Belding of Wethersfield, Conn. Donald Lines Jacobus in the American Genealogist, 10:51, doubts that identity, and in the Belden note (ibid., :191-2) states 'the proper verdict is unproved; somewhat improbable, just possibly true." (3)
1) Belden and Allied Families (see Richard Belden)
2) Harriet Lytle (Prodigy-HGNE65A)
3) Deb Lyddon (YAPX58B-Prodigy)

[NI1459] "Andrew, the sixth child of Nathaniel and Ann Bacon; when born, June 4, 1666; When married, Feb 12, 1691; To whom Married, Mehetable Wetmore; No. of Sons, 6; No. of Daugh., 4; Date of Decease, June 1, 1723..." (1)
1) see Abigail Bacon

[NI1460] "Thomas, 1615. Married Sarah Hall. Lived in Middletown, Connecticut. He changed the name to Wetmore, and is the ancestor of that family, who have retained the name as Wetmore." (1)
"Mahitable, b. in M(iddletown), June 10 (17?), 1669; m. 12 Feb 1691-2, Andrew, son of Nathaniel and Ann Bacon of Middletown...
had, I Andrew, b. Nov.21, 1692; II Ann, b. Jan. 30, 1694; III Nathaniel, b. July 10, 1697; IV Josiah b. Sept. 27, 1699; V Daniel, b. March 5, 1702; VI Mehitable, b. Feb, 1704; Vii Joseph, b. April 20, 1706; Vii John b. Oct. 30, 1708; IX Esther, b. Oct. 9, 1711; X Abigail, b. Feb. 5, 1713." (2)
1) Whitmore, Francis; Whitmore Genealogy, (1907) p. 8 (see Francis Whitmore)
2) Wetmore, James Carnahan; The Wetmore Family of America (Albany 1861) p. 35

[NI1462] " Rutland
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref.
Bacon,
Andrew Stretton Hartford Savage
Nathaniel Stretton Barnstable Banks
Middletown" (2)
"Nathaniel Bacon, eldest son of William Bacon; Where born, Stretton, Rutland Co., England; To whom Married, Ann Miller (Surname handwritten); No. of Sons, 3; No of Daugh, 3; Date of Decease, Jan 27, 1706...
(Note) The first Nathaniel Bacon (of this line) that the compiler can learn anything of, was living in Middletown in 1655...
(Note) In the Colonial Records of New Haven, page 297, is recorded the affidavit of John Fletcher and others of Milford, taken October 17th, 1661; made in the presence of Nathaniel Bacon at New Haven, stating their personal knowledge of Henry Bacon and William Bacon, both of Stretton, in the County of Rutland, and Realm of England... Also, that the Nathaniel Bacon then present, was the oldest son of said William Bacon." (1)
"A good deal of attention has been focussed on Nathaniel Bacon, who lived out his life in Barnstable, while Samuel moved to New Jersey. The fact that there was another Nathaniel Bacon in Middletown, Conn., has confused the issue of the English origin of the family, and although this should have been settled by Donald Lines Jacobus's definitive article in TAG 22:187 on "The Two Nathaniel Bacons," confusion persists among descendants and researchers. It seems well, therefore, to reiterate Mr. Jacobus's point referring the reader to the Records of the Colony of New Haven edited by Charles J. Hoadley and printed 1858, vol. 2:427 f.
On 17 Oct 1661, depositions were given by John Ward and John and Mary (Ward) Fletcher of Milford, Conn., formerly of the County of Rutland, England, concerning the Bacon family whom they had known there. They stated that there were two brothers, Henry and William, who had no other brothers, who dwelt in Stretton, and that Henry had removed to the parish of Clipsham. They declared that Henry had had only one son, Thomas, who had gone to Barbados and died there. William Bacon, the other brother, had a "sone called Nathaniel Bacon, whoe was his eldest sone, whoe now lieueth in New England" and who was present at this testimony.
Because these depositions were taken in New Haven, it was assumed by many, including Hinman, that the Nathaniel involved must have been the Connecticut man. Mr. Jacobus disposed of that possibility by pointing out that, among other inconsistencies, the Connecticut Nathaniel had an uncle Andrew and therefore did not fit the description." (3)
1) See Abigail Bacon
2) Topographical Dict.; p. 136
3) Fiske, Jane Fletcher; Elizabeth, Nathaniel, and Samuel Bacon of Barnstable, Mass. TAG p. 104-5
Bacon Researchers:
Marilyn Newman (CFTS13E@prodigy.com))
Nancy Schott >

[NI1463] "Nathaniel Bacon... To Whom Married, Ann Miller (Surname handwritten in the NYPL copy)" (1)
"206. Benjamin Miller, b. Middletown, Conn. 10 July 1672 (Middletown VRs, I-Z vol., p. 307); d. there ca. 1746 (NYGBR 73:165); m. (1) 18 Sept. 1695 Mary Johnson (ibid.); m. (2) after 15 Dec. 1709 (Middletown VRs, I-Z Vol., p. 313, 308)" An ancestor of Winston Churchill. (2) He may be a brother or cousin of Ann.
1) See Abigail Bacon
2) NEHGS Nexus, Vol. XIV, No. 2 p. 67

[NI1465] (Francis Baildon's) is given as Margaret Goodrich b. 1564 Ribston Manor (Yorkshire) Eng. d. 22 Sep 1598." (1)
"both Sir Francis and his second wife, Margaret, (daughter of Richard Goodrich, sheriff of York, and his second wife Clare Conyers alias Norton)" (2)
1) Harriet Lytle (Prodigy-HGNE65A)
2) Deb Lyddon (YAPX58B-Prodigy)

[NI1477] "Among the men who came at the Permanent Settlement [of Deerfield, Massachusetts in 1682] were older and more experienced pioneers than John Sheldon... The next year came John Hawks, followed before 1688 by... Daniel Belding" (1)
"It was late one day in September [of 1696] when Daniel Belding, an influential man of the town, returned home from the field with a load of corn. In that home was Elizabeth, his wife, and eight of his children, and the heart of Daniel Belding grew warm and glad at the sight of them. As silent as the moving cloud the Indians drew near. In less than fifteen minutes, his wife and three children were dead; he and two children were captives in the hands of the savages, one boy tomahawked and left for dead, one girl shot in the arm while fleeing to the fort, and all that was left was Sarah hidden away in a chamber." (2)
"2. Daniel, s. of William (1), b. 1648; of Hart. 1671; of Dfd. 1686; lived on No. 10; Sept. 16, 1696, a great part of his family were k. or cap. by Indians; (see ante, p. 254.) he was a leading man of the town and d. Aug. 14, 1731. He was m. Nov. 10, 1670, Elizabeth, dau. Nath'l Foote of Weth.; she was k. Sept. 16, 1696; (2) Feb. 17, 1699, Hepzibah, (Buel) wid. of Lieut. Thomas Wells; she was cap. Feb. 29, 1704 and k. on the route to Canada, ae. 54; (3) Sarah, dau. John Hawks, wid. of Philip Mattoon; she d. Sept. 17, 1751, ae. 94.
Ch.: William, Dec. 26, 1671["Belding, William & Margaret Arms (1683- ); 2 May 1700; Deerfield/Norwalk, CT" - Torrey, p. 60] (3)
Richard, ______ 29, 1672.
Elizabeth, Oct. 8, 1673; m. Ebenezer Brooks.
Nathaniel, Jan. 26, 1675; cap. Sept. 16, 1696; d. Aug. 21, 1714.
Mary, Nov. 17, 1677; m. 1698, James Trowbridge.
Daniel, Sept. 1, 1680; k. Sept. 16, 1696.
Sarah, Mar. 15, 1682; m. Mar. 27, 1702, Benj. Burt; cap. 1704.
Hester, Sept. 29, 1683; cap. Sept. 16, 1696, not after heard from.
Abigail, Mar. 10, 1686; d. June 25, 1686.
Samuel, Apr. 10, 1687; wounded 1696 (4).
John, June 24, 1689; d. the next day.
Abigail, Aug. 18, 1690; wounded 1696; d. bef. 1732.
John, Feb. 28, 1693; k. 1696.
Thankful, Dec. 21, 1695; k. 1696." (3)
"Belding, Daniel (1648-1732) & 1/wf Elizabeth Foote (ca 1654-1696); 10 Nov 1670; Hatfield/Wethersfield, CT/Deerfield
Belding, Daniel... & 2/wf Hepzibah (Buell) Wells (1649-1704, w thomas; 17 Feb 1698/9; Deerfield" (4)
"GenForum
Posted by Richard Belding Gilbert on April 18, 1998 at 21:17:19:
In Reply to: Daniel BELDEN/BELDING b. 1648 d. 1732 posted by Don Mellen on April 16, 1998 at 07:18:21:
While I can not, of course, verify that these people are your ancestors, I can tell you that there was a Daniel Belden who married Elizabeth Foote and had a daughter Hester (my source says "Esther") who married Ephraim Clarke.
Daniel was the son of William Belden (Baildon) and Thomasine Sherwood. William was the son of Richard Baildon and Margaret Ackrendon."
E-mail of September 19, 1998 from Richard B. Gilbert <76702.1567@compuserve.com>>
Sources for Esther (Hester? Belding) and Ephraim Clarke:
1. Broderbund World Family Tree, Volume 4, Pedigree #0187
2. Boltwood, Lucius M., Genealogies of Hadley Families, p. 10, "Hester, b.
Sept 29, 1683, m. _______ Clark;".
Sources for Daniel Belding/Belden:
1. Broderbund. . . .
2. Boltwood. . . .
3. Henry R. Stiles, The History of Ancient Wethersfield, Vol. 2, (Hartford,
Conn.: The Grafton Press, 1904. (Reproduction by Higginson Book Co.)),
p. 77.
Sources for William Belding/Belden/Baildon/etc and Thomasine Sherwood:
3. Stiles. . . .
4. Broderbund World Family Tree Volume 4, Pedigree # 0513
As for Margaret Ackrendon, I found that while I was still too new and excited to record my sources. Sorry about that. I think it will be found many times in Broderbund's World Family Tree and likewise at various web sites.
Where did you find "Ann"? This question is serious as it bears on one of the great doubts about most of the Belden/Belding/Baildon ancestry. There is no satisfactory proof that Richard Baildon of Wethersfield is the same individual as Richard Baildon, son of Sir Francis Baildon and Margaret Goodrich, merely a lot of speculation. There are, I believe, English records documenting the marriage of Richard and Margaret Ackrendon in Heptonstall, Yorkshire, England. There is speculation that Richard of Wethersfield is the son of Lawrence Baildon of Heptonstall, although there is no record that Lawrence had a son named Richard but Lawrence did reside in Heptonstall. . . .
1) Sheldon, Jennie Arms; John Sheldon and the Old Indian House Homestead (reproduced by the Genealogical Committee of the Sheldon Family Association) p. 2-3
2) Ibid., p. 11
3) Sheldon, History of Deerfield, Vol. 2, p. 81
4) Torrey, Clarence Almon; New England Marriages Prior to 1700 (Genealogical Publishing Co., Balt. 1985) p. 60

[NI1478] Possible birth date May 20, 1654 in Wethersfield. (1)
"11. Elizabeth Foote (3.Nathaniel2 , 1.Nathaniel1 ) b. 1654, Wethersfield, Ct, m. 16 Nov 1670, Daniel Belden, b. 30 Nov 1648, Wethersfield, Ct, (son of William Belden and Thomasine) d. 14 Aug
1731, Deerfield, Ma. Elizabeth died 16 Sep 1696, Deerfield, Ma. Elizabeth and 3 of her children, Daniel, John and Thankful were killed by the Indians in a raid on Deerfield, Ma. Children:
45. i William Belden b. 1671, Hatfield
46. ii Richard Belden b. 1672, Hatfield
47. iii Elizabeth Belden b. 8 Oct 1673, Hatfield
48. iv Nathaniel Belden b. 26 Jun 1675, Hatfield
49. v Mary Belden b. 17 Nov 1677, Hatfield
50. vi Daniel Belden b. 1 Sep 1680, Hatfield, Ma, ref: Killed by Indians, d. 16 Sep 1696, Deerfield, Ma.
51. vii Sarah Belden b. 15 Mar 1681/82, Hatfield, Ma, m. Benjamin Burt, b. ABT. 1662, (son of David Burt and Mary Holton).
52. viii Esther Belden b. 29 Sep 1683, Hatfield, Ma.
53. ix Abigail Belden b. 1686, Hatfield, Ma, d. Hatfield, Ma.
54. x Samuel Belden b. 10 Apr 1687, Hatfield, Ma.
55. xi John Belden b. 24 Jun 1689, Deerfield, Ma, d. Deerfield, Ma.
56. xii Abigail Belden b. 18 Aug 1690, Deerfield, Ma.
57. xiii John Belden b. 28 Feb 1692/93, Deerfield, Ma, ref: Killed by Indians, d. 16 Sep 1696, Deerfield, Ma.
58. xiv Thankful Belden b. 21 Dec 1695, Deerfield, Ma, ref: Killed by Indians, d. 16 Sep 1696, Deerfield, Ma." (2)
1) Terri e-mail of 11/11/98 >
2) Foote Family, Descendants of Nathaniel Foote

[NI1493] "Thomas and Elizabeth Holcomb(e) was probably from Hull, County of Devon, England and was born around 1597. He is a descendant of Walter de Holcombe, who was Lord of Holcombe in County Devon, England by A.D. 1301. Walter was a great-great grandson of Sir John de Holcombe of Dorchester, England, who was knighted and granted the Manor of Holcombe for heroic action in battle in Palestine in the 3rd Crusade.
Thomas Holcombe was in a company of 140 Puritans and Dissenters who sailed on the Mary and John from Plymouth, County Devon, England in 1630 and landed at Nantasked, Mass. on May 30, 1630." (1)
"Thomas Holcomb was born about 1601, and is believed to have been the son of Gilbert and Ann Holcomb. He married Elizabeth Ferguson probably after arriving in America, though it has been claimed that they married in England before embarking on the "Mary and John." The National Society of Founders and Patriots, Vol. VII, p. 13, published in 1919, gives their marriage date as May 14, 1634. Elizabeth Holcomb's birth date is also given as 1634, but inasmuch as the year at that time began on the first of March, instead of the first of January, this is possible.
Thomas Holcomb went to Windsor in 1636, having sold his property in Dorchester to Richard Jones. Later in 1639 he moved to Poquonock, Hartford Co., four miles west of Windsor, where he engaged in farming. He was Representative from Windsor in the Convention that framed the famous constitution of the Connecticut Colony. He was also Deputy and a member of the Connecticut Militia. Thomas Holcomb died Sept. 7, 1657. His grave is located in an old cemetery near the homestead at Poquonock. His widow married Aug. 5, 1658, James Eno. She died 1679.
Children:
1. Elizabeth, 1634-Sept. 18, 1712; m. Nov. 16, 1654, Josiah Ellsworth, who died Aug. 20, 1689.
Children: Josias, b. 1655; Elizabeth, b. 1657; Mary, b. 1660; Thomas, b. 1665; Jonathan, 1669-1749; John, b. 1671; Job, b. 1674; Benjamin, b. 1676
2. Mary, 1636-1708; m. Oct. 3, 1655, George Griswold, 1633-1704
3. Abigail, 1638-Aug. 17, 1688; m. June 11, 1658, Samuel, 1636-May 17, 1698, son of John Bissel.
4. Joshua, 1640-died at Simsbury, Dec. 1, 1690; m. June 4, 1663, Ruth Sherwood, who d. Sept. 10, 1699.
5. Sarah, 1642-1654.
6. Benajah, 1644-1736; m. 1667, Sarah, 1649-1732, dau. James Eno.
7. Deborah, b. 1646, d. y.
8. Nathaniel, b. Nov. 4, 1648, a farmer at Simsbury; m. Feb. 27, 1670, Mary, b. Sept. 23, 1651, dau. of Nathaniel Bliss." (2)
"Several months ago I corresponded with someone that had proven that Thomas Holcombe b. 1601 Pembroke, Wales, d. 7 Sep 1657 Windsor, CT, m. 14 May 1634 Elizabeth Ferguson was the son of Gilbert Holcombe b. abt. 1565 Hull, England, d. Pembroke, Wales and Anne Courtney." (3)
1) Turner Jones III (VPLM78A-Prodigy)
2) Kuhns, Maude Pinney; The "Mary and John": A Story of the Founding of Dorchester, Mass., 1630 (Tuttle Pub., Rutland, Vermont 1943) p. 42-45
3) Earl Roberts TSRZ21A@prodigy.comm
Possible reference:
Thomas Holcombe and Other Simsbury, CT Settlers by Deanna Holcomb Bowman, 14810 Herring Road, Colorado Springs, CO 80908
Seaver, Jesse; The Holcomb Genealogy, 1925, The American Genealogical Society, Philadelphia, Pa.
Holcombe Researchers:
Penny Brown (GSAQ02A@prodigy.com))
C. Filiputti (AXXT52A@prodigy.com))

[NI1496] "she was Elizabeth -------, widow of -------- Ferguson, m: 2.) Thomas Holcombe, and 3.) Jacques Eno. At least that's the way I've always found it. There was quite a bit of research done on her, but they've never found out who she was or which Ferguson she married first." (1)
"Noone has ever been able to confirm, as yet, whether Ferguson was her maiden name or a first married name. According to the medical journal of John Winthrop she was listed as being 52 in 1669, therefore being b. in 1616. It would have made her 17 at her dau. Elizabeth's b. in 1634 and allowing for an error of up to a year and 9 months for the pregnancy, she would have not been more than 16 when m. to Thos. Holcombe, so if she was m. 1st to Ferguson, it would have been at age 16 (quite common back then) but of very short duration. She m. 3rd, Jacques/James Eno on 05 Aug 1658. She d. 07 Oct. 1679." (2)
1) Bonnie Jacobsen MQBE34A@prodigy.comm
2) C Filiputti AXXT52A@prodigy.comm

[NI1497] "Record of Marriages...
Nvr... AD 1782...
24... Ralph Swarthout & Lois Halsteed" (6)
"Written for Yates Co. Chronicle - About 1793, Ralph Swarthout settled in Ovid (Lodi) about three miles southwest of Lodi village. His wife as a maiden was Lois Halsted. They had previously lived in Orange Co. from where they had moved among the Alleganies in Pennsylvania and back again to Goshen during the Revolutionary troubles. Several of their children were born before they drifted into Lake Country. Their 11 children were Polly, Benjamin, James A., William, Betsey, Patty, Lois, Anthony, Raphael, Sophia and Sally Ann." (1)
"From Swartwout Chronicles, page 233: "...Tradition relates that Roeloff, son of Anthony and Mary Armstrong Swartwout, born in town of Goshen, Orange County on January 1, 1764, as at the time of making of a chain [during the Revolutionary War] to cross the Hudson River too young to enter the service, but he was pressed into service then as a teamster and was employed in hauling sections of the chain from the furnace to Windsor. Ralph Swartwout moved with his family from Goshen, Orange County to a farm on west branch of the Susquehannah River and occupied it about one year and then settled about 1796 in the town of Ovid, Seneca Co., NY." (2)
"Seneca County Historian's Office: Ralph Swarthout in 1799 was collector and constable for town of Ovid. Ralph built first cider mill in Ovid.
1810 Census, Seneca Co., Ovid
Ralph 31010 (2)0110
Following received from Dick Apolant, 2232 Hudson Avenue, Rochester, NY 14617 on 4/19/1993...
"Any Swarthout in Yates Co. are descendend from Ralph and Lois is in definite minority. His brother, Anthony, Jr., who also lived there had a family of 12, reported 108 grandchildren and descendants generally dominate the scene.
Born in Goshen, Orange Co., Ralph had an itchy foot. He took his family among the Indians of Pennsylvania and returned to Goshen after a couple of years due to danger from unfriendly natives. About 1793, along with Anthony, Sr., Anthony, Jr. and their families, Ralph moved to Seneca Co., NY where he settled near Lodi." (3)
They were taking part in a major emigration from New England and the Hudson River Valley to the lands of the Iroquois opened after their defeat in the American Revolution. The area where they had lived previously (Orange Co.) was repeatedly attacked by Joseph Brandt and his Iroquois and Tory followers.
"Seneca County Land Records, Waterloo, NY:
Indenture made 23rd day of Nov in 1811 between Jabesh Havens and his wife, Esther, from Ovid, Seneca Co. part of the first part and Ralph Swarthout and Benjamin Swarthout from the same town for sum $1000 for land being part of lot 77 in town of Ovid beginning at northwest corner of said lot running so far east that a line drawn south to Benjamin Swarthout's land then west to the lake north along the lake to the place of beginning containing 80 acres of land.
Indenture made 25th day of Sept 1815 between Anthony Swarthout of Ovid and Ralph Swarthout and Barna Swarthout for sum of $1000 for certain parcel of land lying and being in town of Romulus in the county of Seneca being part of lot 94 in Romulus lying nearly as a square on the northwest corner of said lot bounded on west by the Seneca Lake; on the south by the north line of the village of Lancaster in said town on the east by land in the possession of Jonathan Swarthout and on the north by lands belonging to Benjamin Sutton; it being likewise the north line of said lot 94 containing 140 acres of land... the same more or less excepting and running out of the same two acres of land situated and lying at or near the dwelling house of the said Anthony Swarthout. Deed signed with X, the mark of Anthony Swarthout, Sr..." (4)
"Lois Halstead, had married Ralph Swarthout, a son of Anthony Swarthout, on November 24, 1782. Also, Mary Halstead, another daughter of Benjamin and Ruth Halstead, had married Barnabus Swarthout, a brother of Ralph Swarthout, in 1789. Both Lois Halstead Swarthout and Mary Halstead Swarthout went with their respective husbands to live in what became known on March 8, 1794, as Cayuga County. The close relationship between the Swarthout family and the Halstead family resulted in five of the eight sons and daughters of Benjamin and Ruth Halstead leaving Orange and becoming residents of Cayuga County prior to May 1801." (9)
"Newspaper in Seneca Co. historian's office: Ralph Swarthout of Ovid died 12/11/1843. Heirs:
Ralph, Ovid
Mary Covert (married Abram Covert, see Lois Halsted)
Sally Ann, wife of John Knight, Lodi
Elizabeth, wife of John Bodine, Wayne
Sophia, wife of Stephen Coshon, Chili, NY
James, son of Yates Co.
William, son of Ovid, Michigan
Anthony R., Saginaw, Michigan
Martha, wife of James Voorheis, Ypsilanti, Michigan
Lois, wife of Peter Van Vleet, Tecumseh, Michigan
Grandchildren being children of Benjamin, deceased...
Book of Wills, Seneca Co., NY -- Ralph Swarthout of Ovid, proven 2/29/1844; made 5/30/1838. Wife, Lois. Daughters: Martha, Lois, Sophia, Sally Ann. Sons Ralph, Benjamin, James, William, Anthony
In 1801 Ralph and Anthony Swarthout (probably his brother) were constables in Ovid. In 1811 Ralph was Commissioner of the Gospel Lot in Ovid. Charles Sanford Johnston... purchased the farm of Ralph Swarthout on Military Lot No. 28.(5)
"Ralph Swarthout of Ovid, Seneca Co., NY
b. 1 January 1764, Orange Co., NY
d. 11 December 1843, Seneca Co., NY
Will proven 29 February 1844; made 30 May 1828 (sic - probably 1838)
Wife: Lois
Heirs: Ralph of Ovid
Mary of Covert (sic - probably Mary Covert)
Sally Ann, wife of John Knight, Lodi
Elizabeth, wife of John Bodine, Wayne, NY
Sophia, wife of Stephen Coshon, Chili, NY
James, Yates Co.
William, Ovid, Mich.
Anthony R., Saginaw, Mich.
Martha, wife of James Vorhees, Ypsilanti, Mich.
Lois, wife of Peter P. Van Fleet, Tecumseh, Mich.
Grandchildren being children of Benjamin, deceased:
Joseph, John, Barna, Lois Bond, Benjamin, Phebe Ann, Elmira, Fanny Jane, Peter and Judy, all of Lodi, NY.
Great(?) grandchildren, being children of Catherine, wife of John Lamoreaux, a deceased daughter:
William, Elsworth, Loisa, Margaret and Ralph all of Lodi.
from information provided to John Bond by Mrs. Betty Auten, 20 Clark Street, Waterloo, NY 13165
[Note: info probably from Town & Village of Ovid]" (7)
New York Swarthout, Ralph R 10343
State of New York)
Seneca County) ss
Personally appeared before the subscriber a Justice of Peace in and for said County
Ralph Swarthout a Revolutionary Soldier, and being duly sworn according to law deposeth and saith that he was born in Orange County, New York on the first day of January 1764 agreeable to the records of his age, and that he was pressed as a teamster in October 1779 in the service of the Revolution and was placed under Capt. John Whitney and Genl. Harrison the former had command of the teams that this deponent and the squad with him to Easton Pennsylvania and teamed to and from Easton two months hauling cannon and other necessaries for the benefit of the Army of the Revolution, that he served two months in the said service of the Revolution at this time, and that he was again pressed as a teamster and where as such in July 1780 went to New Windsor and was engaged in hauling cannon and other articles, went to Warwick and got a load or two and was engaged at this time in providing and helping the war of the Revolution one month.
This deponent further deposeth and Saith that he enlisted in April 1782 in the nine months service in the war of the Revolution under Capt. Abraham Westfall and Col. McClockery (or Clochey) marched to DeWitts Fort near pene pack [Penepack] and not far from the Delaware River where he was stationed with his associates as a frontier guard. This place was their head quarters. This deponent was called out about once a week on scouting parties to help defend the white inhabitants and keep back the Indians, and in these scouting parties and marches marched frequently thirty miles from their head quarters, that this deponent served seven months when he was called home on account of the sickness of his father, but during his short absence he procured a man a(s) a substitute to supply his place, and that he soon returned to the army and served out the remainder of the nine months for which he enlisted and received a good and honorable discharge for the nine months service in the War of the Revolution from the officer under whom he served, That the deponent has served in all in the War of the Revolution upwards of one year, that he is the identical Ralph Swarthout who served in the War of the Revolution under that name.
Ralph Swarthout
Subscribed Sworn before me
this 21st day of December 1839
Richard B. Ellison
Justice of the Peace" (8)
"Subject: Ralph
> Date: Sun, 06 Dec 1998 21:19:50 -0500
> From: Julia Childress >
> To: JOHNEHOPE@prodigyy
>
> Hi John,
>
> I have read through your information. I have the Swartwout Chronicles, and I have also read through that information. In the Swartwout Chronicles on page 605 The Swartwout Lineage the children of Ralph (Roeloff) and Louis Halstead are listed. There is a Ralph born on 1807. You said you don't have a birthday for your Ralph.
This is what the Chronicles have.
Ralph (Roeloff), son of Anthony and Mary Armstrong Swarthout (Swartwout), born in the town of Goshen, Orange County, province of New York, on January 1, 1764, married on November 24, 1782, Lois Halstead, born in Orange County, on October 1 1767, and died in Ovid, Seneca County, N. Y. on December 28, 1848. He died there on December 11, 1843.
Children:
323. Mary, born in the town of Goshen, Orange County, N. Y. December 27, 1783
324. Benjamin, born in the town of Goshen, Orange County N. Y. April 8, 1786
325. James, born in the town of Goshen, Orange County, N. Y. August 31, 1788
326. William, born in the town of Gosen, Orange County, N. Y. February 15, 1792
327. Elisabeth, born in the town of Goshen, Orange County, N. Y. January 14, 1793
328. Anthony, born in the town of Ovid, Onondaga County, N. Y. September 28, 1796
329. Martha, born in the town of Ovid, Cayuga County, N. Y. May 28, 1799
330. Lois, born in the town of Ovid, Cayuga County, N. Y. February 5, 1802
331. Sophia, born in the town of Ovid, Seneca County, N. Y. May 28, 1804
332. Ralph, born in the town of Ovid, Seneca County, N. Y. January 4, 1807
333. Sarah Ann, born in thr town of Ovid, Seneca Coounty, N. Y. April 23, 1811

My Ralph came to Michigan in 1836 or 37 and bought land here. He had all of his of his children before he came here to Michigan. I will send the information I have recieved about my Ralph if you are interested. If the Ralph I have is from this branch then the birthday in the Chronicles is wrong. I guess thats what makes genealogy so interesting isn't it. I know I would like it to be wrong, because then I have the information I need to make the connection I have been trying to make.
Another thought about Ralph is that he is mentioned as one of the first heirs, not once, but twice. He is also mentioned first in the newspaper. It seems that quite a few of the children of Ralph and Louis
Halstead came to Michigan to settle.
If we can nail down the birthday of my Ralph I think we can settle the matter.
I have also been in touch with a descendant of James Swarthout son of Ralph and Lois Halstead. He and his wife travled to Michigan, and New York this fall to do research on the family, and was happy to find what he needed.
I have also found one of Ralph's children's decendants here in Michigan, although he only had the information on Clarissa. I am also sending you the information I have on Ralph's children, maybe you can find some information on them there since they were all born in N.Y.
Sally Ann Swarthout, b. 2 Sept. 1807
Clarissa Swarthout b. 10 May 1809 in Tyrone, Steuben, N. Y. d. 1 Jan. 1891 in Portland, Ionia, Mich. Married Robert Huey 22 Dec 1831 After Robert's death Clarissa moved to Michighan.
Nancy Swarthout b. 26 May 1811 d. 1847 Married Lorenzo Jordan 1840
Justus Swarthout b. 30 July 1813 in N.Y. d. 1847 Married Adeline Winter Munger in 1841. (My branch.)
John Swarthout b. 24 Feb. 1816 Married Louisa Green 1841
Betsy Swarthout b. 22 March 1818 d. 1871 Married Herman Hause 1840
Infant son b. 22 Feb. 1820 d. 24 Feb 1820
Temperance b. 8 mar 1821 Married Gersham Bennett
Gersham Swarthout b. 31 Oct 1823 d. 27 March 1912 Married Fanny Baker b. 1821 d. 1901
I have extensive information on Clarissa, Justus, and Gersham. These births also indicate that my Ralph had to be born sooner than the record of birth reported in the Chronicles. Either that or my Ralph is from someone else. I think this is as close as I have come to getting the information to connect him.
I hope I haven't confused you with my information. If you send me your address I will be glad to send you all the documentation I have on Ralph. I'm pretty sure most of my information is correct. I hope to
hear from you soon." (10)
1) Ruth Thoden (ruththoden@delphi.com))
2) Ibid.
3) Ibid.
4) Ibid.
5) Morrison, Wayne E.; Town & Village of Ovid, Seneca Co., N.Y. (1890 rep. 1981) p. 163, 167, 286
6) Coleman Charles C.; The Early Records of the First Presbyterian Church at Goshen, New York from 1767 to 1885 (Goshen 1934 rep. Baltimore 1990) p. 14
7) Note from John Bond (descendant of Benjamin (?)), 7407 Hennessy Road, Jacksonville, FL 32210 in the Orange County Genealogical Society
8) Typescript from John R. Bond, 7407 Hennessy Road, Jacksonville, FL 32210 found in the Orange Genealogical Society
9) Harrold p. 62

[NI1498] "From Foley's "History of Early Settlers in New York State, " page 6: Benjamin Halsted died 5/10/1801 and left no will. Later his farm was sold and the following names appear as heirs in the deed tr
ansaction: Wilmot Halsted and wife, Mary; Sarah Halsted and Joseph Blain and wife, all of Cayuga Co.; Cynthia Halsted; James Armstrong of Minisink, Lois wife of Ralph Swartout; Benjamin Halsted; Eli
and Cynthia Patterson." (1)
"Seneca Co. Historian Records: Lois Swarthout, wife R.D. died 10/28/1848 at 81-2-27 at Abram Covert farm." (2)
"Lois Halstead b. 1767, m. 1782 Ralph Swarthout (1764-1845), prnt of 11 children. Family migrated before 1801 from Orange County to what is now Seneca county, New York." (3)
1) Ruth Thoden (ruththoden@delphi.com) 402 Main St., Boonville, New York 13309 Tel. 315-942-2053
2) Ibid.
3) Harrold, John W.; One Halstead Family - A Root of Our Family Tree (1975 Century Litho Co. Largo, Florida) p. 34

[NI1499] "Samuel Merry... son of Joseph & second wife: Elizabeth (Parkhurst) Hilliard." (1)
"A biographical sketch of Joseph Merry the ancestor of this family, may be found in Vol. II, Annals of West Tisbury, pp. 58-60, and nothing has since been found to add further knowledge of him or his antecedents. (Note: He was related to Phillip Wollidge of Salisbury, Mass. whom he called "nephew" and possibly to Henry Monday of the same town, who also called Woollidge his nephew. Henry Smith of London, gent. in his will 1647 made a bequest to his "nephew" Henry Mundy. These relationships may be clues to Joseph Merry's antecedents.) The name is very rarely found in English records of his time except in the southwest counties, particularly in Gloucestershire, but no connection has been established between him and his home in England prior to migration. He m. (1) Mary __________, who d. 4 Apr 1657; (2) Mrs. Elizabeth (Parkhurst) Hilliard of Hampton, N.H. dau. of George and Phebe Parkhurst of Ipswich, England, where she was bapt. 18 May 1628. The date of her death is unknown. He d. a centenarian 15 Apr 1710 being, as his gravestone states, "103 years old." and it further amplifies his advanced years by the following legend: "That being verified in him Psalm 92, v.14: They shall bring forth fruit in old age," which is not an exact quotation, nor is the reference correct."
Martha, b. (1647?); m. (1) Andrew Rankin; (2) Philip Frost...
Joseph, b. 19 Dec 1654. (No further record)
By Second Wife
Hannah, b. 29 Nov 1660; m. Benjamin Skiff
Abigail, b. 19 Oct 1662; m. John Pease
Bathsheba, b. 16 Jun 1665; m. Thomas Pease
Samuel, b. 16 Nov 1669"(2)
"Joseph MERRY , Sr.
b. abt 1607
occ.
edu.
rel.
d. 15 Apr 1710, West Tisbury, Dukes, MA
br.
res. of Tisbury/Hampton, Rockingham, NH
[married]
Mary (?)
. b. ?
occ.
edu.
rel.
d. 4 Apr 1657, Hampton, Rockingham, NH
br.
res.
ChildrenMartha MERRY
Joseph MERRY , Jr. " (3)
GenForum Posting
Posted by Jill Bhar on September 04, 1998 at 11:57:11:

In Reply to: MERRY origins posted by David Sylvester on July 18, 1997 at 00:17:12:

To David, and others seeking origins of Joseph Merry, born c.1607.
I have today received some interesting information from one of my 'Merry Times" readers which might help with the origins of Joseph.
To quote briefly from her letter:
"...I was intrigued by the item in the Fall 1997 issue about Joseph Merry (b.1607?) of Massachusetts, particularly as three of his daughters were Bathsheba, Abigail and Hannah. In all the thousands of Merrys I have noted, I have only come across one other Bathsheba, and she too had sisters Hannah and Abigail...
See the enclosed details of Merrys in Cherington, Gloucestershire. The parish registers for 1603-1613 are very incomplete. Could Joseph possibly be another sibling???"
I am very busy preparing the next issue for publication and will include the full text of her letter in it.
Maybe this is the break you and many others have been looking for.
Jill Bhar, editor, "Merry Times"

"JOSEPH MERRY.


This prominent pioneer of Tisbury is first found as a resident of Haverhill, Mass., in 1640, where he lived with a wife named Mary until about 1654, when he removed to Hampton, N. H. There his wife died April 4, 1657, having given birth to one child of record, Joseph, b. Dec. 19, 1654. The father, Joseph, was a carpenter by trade and plied his craft in Hampton as he had done before in Haverhill. Shortly after his wife's death he bought a house and ten acres of upland in Hampton, of Thomas Coleman, Sept. 29, 1657, and at the age of 47 years found himself a widower, with possibly a child to care for in his new home. But this was not long to remain so. Emanuel Hilliard of that town was drowned shortly after this in October, 1657, leaving a widow Elizabeth, daughter of John and Phebe Parkhurst of Ipswich, England, and sister of George Parkhurst of Watertown, Mass. The young widow was then about 29 years old, and before two years had passed she entered into a marriage covenant with Joseph Merry, who was then 21 years her senior. In this agreement he gave her the house and ten acres he had recently acquired, and sometime about Dec. 13, 1659, when the covenant was dated, they set up housekeeping, and four children were born to them in rapid succession, who later spent their days on the Vineyard. This explains the curious epitaph on the gravestone of Joseph in the West Tisbury cemetery "That being verified in him Psalms 92 14 They shall bring forth fruit in old age," a reference to his second marriage after middle life and the raising of a family.

Joseph Merry and his young family, consisting of Hannah, Abigail, Bathsheba and Samuel, born between 1660 and 1669 in Hampton, continued residence there till 1670, when in some way he became attracted to the Vineyard. If we are to credit the tradition that Governor Mayhew's first wife was a Parkhurst, possibly the sister of George of Watertown, it will be seen that Elizabeth Merry was related by marriage to the proprietor of Martha's Vineyard and thus the family connection is responsible for Merry's migration. However that be, almost as soon as the new township of Tisbury had been bought by Pabodie and his partners, Merry bought of Benjamin Church, on Nov. 19, 1669, the grist mill and its privileges "uppon the westermost Brook of Takemmy" with one eighth part of the propriety, or two shares, in the new settlement. The purchase price was £90 and Merry paid for it in whole or in part with his Hampton property, the homestead, an island of salt marsh and two shares in cow and ox commons in that town. The deeds finally passed Dec. 2, 1670, (Mrs. Merry and Nathaniel Batchelor acting as his attorneys by previous appointment), and from this it is presumed that Merry was already at the Vineyard attending to his new purchase and preparing the new home for his little family. The property purchased consisted, as laid out, of the mill on the New Mill river so long operated by the Looks, with land adjoining on the west side of the road, and about eighteen acres on the east side of the road, bounded by the river. This last lot is still known as "Merry's Field" after a lapse of two and a half centuries, though the property did not remain in the family beyond 1705. After operating the mill for five years, Joseph Merry sold that part of his estate to Tristram Coffin of Nantucket, and being then about three-score-and- ten years of age it is presumed that he devoted the rest of his life to his trade and tilling the soil. There is no record as to the location of his house, but in all probability it was in his "Field." His public services were few. He was constable in 1675, road surveyor in 1678 and 1687, and was chosen to divide common lands in 1689 and 1690. On March 2, 1677-8, the grand jury presented him "for contempt of authoritie in not obeying the summons in his Majesties Name to give in testimony" and for this he was mulcted in the sum of five shillings. In 1681 he sued Simon Athearn in the sum of £20 "for non payment of a frame of an house," but the two compromised on £7 and divided the costs. On July 12, 1689, being then about 82 years of age, he gave his homestead by deed of gift to his only son Samuel, then just entering his 21st year, and from that date on until 1701 his name appears but once in the records, when he gave some "information" about the ancient bounds of a town lot, being then in his 84th year. He passed the century mark in 1707 and died April 5, 1710, at the remarkable age of 103, undoubtedly the oldest person who has ever lived in the town. It is not known whether he survived his wife Elizabeth, as there is no record of her death nor a stone at her grave. If she survived she was 82 when her husband died. Of his children further evidences of longevity are noticeable. His daughter Abigail Pease died in her 80th year and Hannah Skiffe at 97 years. " (4)
I found his gravestone still standing in the West Tisbury Cemetery.
1) Luce Genealogy p. 17
2) Banks, History of Martha's Vineyard Vol. II p. 331
3)
4) Banks, Charles; Sketches of the Early Settlers of West Tisbury: The History of Martha's Vineyard by Dr. Charles Banks: Volume II, Annals of West Tisbury: pp. 25 - 65
A picture of his tombstone is at West Tisbury Village Cemetery .

[NI1500] "Joseph Merry & 2nd wife: Elizabeth (Parkhurst) Hilliard. Elizabeth, daughter of George Parkhurst & Phebe ---, of Ipswich, Eng. Residence for family: West Tisbury, MA." (1)
"Joseph Merry... m... (2) Mrs. Elizabeth (Parkhurst) Hilliard about 1659 (wid. of Emanuel) Hilliard of Hampton, N.H. dau. of George and Phebe Parkhurst of Ipswich, England, where she was bapt. 18 May 1628. The date of her death is unknown." (2)
"During that period he married, about 1619, and family traditions and a record of some antiquity brings down to us the name of the bride of his youth as Abigail Parkus. Further particularization has been given to this tradition by making her a daughter of that Parkhurst family, of which George Parkhurst of Watertown, Mass., 1643, was the first New England representative. George was the son of John Parkhurst of Ipswich, England, a clothier, and his sisters (daughters?) Deborah and Elizabeth, came to this country with him, and were later residents of the Vineyard, the former as wife of John Smith and the latter of Joseph Merry." (3)
"Emanuel HILLIARD or HILLARD
b. bef 1634
occ.
edu.
rel.
d. 20 Oct 1657, at sea, near Hampton, Rockingham, NH
br.
res. of Hampton, NH
m. 1643/1644, Hampton, Rockingham, NH
Elizabeth PARKHURST
. b. bef 18 May 1628, (bapt) Ipswich, Suffolk, England
occ.
edu.
rel.
d. aft 1669, , Dukes, MA
br.
res. of Hampton, NH
.
spouses: 1, 2

ChildrenTimothy HILLIARD
John HILLIARD
Benjamin HILLIARD
Elizabeth HILLIARD" (4)
"Joseph MERRY , Sr.
b. abt 1607
occ.
edu.
rel.
d. 15 Apr 1710, West Tisbury, Dukes, MA
br.
res. of Tisbury/Hampton, Rockingham, NH
m. 13 Dec 1659, Hampton, Rockingham, NH
Elizabeth PARKHURST
. b. bef 18 May 1628, (bapt) Ipswich, Suffolk, England
occ.
edu.
rel.
d. aft 1669, , Dukes, MA
br.
res. of Hampton, NH
Children
Hannah MERRY
Abigail MERRY
Bathsheba MERRY
Samuel MERRY " (5)
1) Luce Genealogy p. 17
2) Banks, History of Martha's Vineyard Vol. II p. 330
3) Ibid., Vol. I, p. 115
4)
5)

[NI1520] Vital statistics from Kuykendall Genealogy (see Sarah) p. 26.
"Stijntje was the daughter of Douwe Wiggersz and Agniete Coensen of Enkhuisen, North Holland...
Stijntje had two more daughters and possibly another son in New Netherland...
Stijntje had married Claes Tuenissen by 1658 and they had relocated the family to Wiltwyck (Kingston) by 1665. We do not know how long she lived but it was after 1682 for she and Claes were witnesses at her grandaughter Stijntje's baptism that year." (1)
1) Kuykendall Genealogy (see Sarah) p. 24-5

[NI1525] "Zachariah Ferris m. 11/17/1673 Sarah Blood/Bloud was an early settler of Charlestown, Mass. where he was made a freeman 3 May 1676. He was admitted to full communion in the First Church there 23 Jan 1676, and about thirty years later, 19 Sept. 1705, was admitted to the church in Stratfield, Conn. by letter from Charlestown. He served in King Phillip's War in 1676, and in the expedition against Port Royal in 1711, where he was killed. His will, dated 14 Aug 1710 and proved 16 April 1711, mentioned his wife, Sarah; sons, Zachariah and Samuel; daughter Sarah... His widow, Sarah Ferris, swore to the inventory 16 April, 1711. He m. at Charlestown, Mass., 17 Nov 1673, Sarah "Blouds", identified as Sarah, dau. of Richard and Isabel Blood, born in Lynn, Mass. in the 4th month, 1648. Isabel Blood was called 'cousin' by Henry Wilkenson of England, and while her maiden name has not been ascertained, she may have been a dau. of the widow Isabel Wilkerson of Cambridge, Mass.--- Harriet Scofield...
Removed to a place in Conn. called "Pequonnock" (later known as Stratfield, now the City of Bridgeport)... In 1710 he enlisted in the expedition against Port Royal (Queen Anne's War) from which he did not return. His will is on file and his signature may be seen in Fairfield, Conn. The will is in part as follows: "I, Zachariah Ferris Sen of Stratfield in the County of Fairfield, Colony of Conn. in New England being by divine providence goint forth in the present expedition against the common enemy att Port Royall, etc." Ferris Ancestry by Sarah Louise Austin 1896...
Zachariah Ferriss, from Reading, England, was of Charlestown, Mass. in 1645 and in Stratford as early 1655. With his wife, Sarah, was one of the first settlers of New Milford, CT. The tradition in the family is that he was the son of Samuel of Stratford, and that his mother was Jerusha Reed, but of this we have no certainty." History of New Milford, Conn. [The author of the genealogy doubts this.]
Children:
Zachariah b. 1674
Sarah...
Richard b. 30 Jan 1679 Charlestown, Mass
Hannah b. 18 May 1680 Charlestown, Mass
Mary
Samuel b. Sep 1682"(1)
"Ferris, Zechariah. Served in K. Philip's War, 1676.
Married at Charlestown, Mass., 17 Nov. 1673, Sarah Blouds.
Admitted at Stratfield Church by letter from Charlestown, 19 Sept. 1705.
Will of Zechariah, Sr., 14 Aug. 1710, proved 16 Apr. 1711; wife; sons Zechariah and Samuel; dau. Sarah; friend Capt. David Sherman and Benjamin Fairweather, Exec'rs and overseers. Widow Sarah swore to Inv.
Children, recorded at Charlestown:
Zechariah, b. 24 Sept. 1674, bapt. 6 Feb. 1675/6; m. abt. 1699, Sarah _____. Admitted to full communion, Stratfield, 23 May 1708, dismissed to New Milford, 18 Nov. 1716.
Sarah...
Richard, b. 30 Mar. 1679, bapt. at Boston, 6 Apr. 1679, d. 23 July 1679.
Hannah, bapt. 18 July 1680, d.y.
Samuel, b. (no record), d. at Newtown, abt. 1764; will 7 Sept. 1764; m. abt. 1710, Martha _______. Martha renewed Covenant, Stratfield, 21 Oct. 1711; living 1764." (2)
"ZACHARIAH FERRISS I

The few documents that relate to the life of Zachariah Ferriss I leave many questions un-
answered, the first of these being the date and place of his birth. Even the name of his mother is
unknown, but some sources give her name as Jerusha Reed and say that her father was of a
plantation called Thomgrove, town of Olney or Olley in Dorsetshire, England. The date of the
birth of Zachariah's wife, Sarah Blood, is known: Spring, 1648. Sarah was bom in Lynn, Mass.,
the daughter of Richard and Isobel (Wilkerson) Blood. Therefore, the questioned date that we
are assigning to Zachariah (1645) is probably not too far off the mark. One of his brothers, a
younger brother, Benjamin, was bom in Beverly, Yorkshire, England in 1654, and this might also
be the birthplace of Zachariah, but no information about this has been found to date...

One relic of that joumey remains: a sea chest which belonged to Zachariah, and which has been
faithfully handed down, father to son, generation by generation, until it now belongs to Henry R.
Ferriss, of E1 Cajon, Califomia. Because Zachariah had so many descendants who became artists
or who had strong artistic tendencies, it is possible to imagine that on the long ocean crossing
Zachariah busied himself with whittling, or doodling on any available materials. It was probably
the only time in his life in which he would have had any leisure.

Zachariah was in Chariestown (long since assimilated into the City of Boston) by 1673, when he
married Sarah Blood (bom April or June 1648) on November 17th. He was made a freeman in
Chariestown May 3, 1676. On September 19, 1705, he was admitted to the church at Stratfield,
Connecticut by letter fro!la Chariestown. He served in King Philip's War (1676) and on the Expedition to Port Royal (now Annapolis Royal) in 1710, losing his life at that time. (Annapolis Royal is in eastern Canada near the Bay of Fundy - not Jamaica.)

Upon their marriage in 1673, Zachariah & Sarah settled in Chariestown. As has been mentioned,
Sarah was the daughter of Richard Blood (1617-1683). Here is a good place to devote some
space to him, because, contrary to what is the case with so many of the existing records of the
early colonists, it is possible to see much of the character and personality of the man from those
records. (The source is The Story of the Bloods by Roger D. Harris.)" (3)
"Zachariah I: We don't know his date of birth nor place. Professional research done in England indicates he was not born in Reading, though the tradition seems to persist. He died in 1710, not 1711. I researched this expedition myself, and it occurred in 1710. The reason for the "1711" date is that that was the year his will was probated...
Zach's death was at Port Royal, Nova Scotia. It is now called Annapolis Royal." (4)
1) Ferris Genealogy Vol. 5 p. Z-1 and previous
2) Jacobus, Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 200
3) Letter from Phyllis S. Kitson, 711 Kensington Avenue, Flint, MI 48503 dated February 1999 also editor of Zachariah Ferriss Chronicles
4) Letter from Phyllis S. Kitson dated March 12, 1999.
GenForum Posting
Higginson Books carries a book by Harriet Scofield "Genealogy of the Ferris family: descendants of Zachariah Ferris" This book gives a very good detail on this line.
http://www.higginsonbooks.com/f.htm

[NI1526] "His widow, Sarah Ferris, swore to the inventory 16 April, 1711. He m. at Charlestown, Mass., 17 Nov 1673, Sarah "Blouds", identified as Sarah, dau. of Richard and Isabel Blood, born in Lynn, Mass. in the 4th month, 1648. Isabel Blood was called 'cousin' by Henry Wilkenson of England, and while her maiden name has not been ascertained, she may have been a dau. of the widow Isabel Wilkerson of Cambridge, Mass.--- Harriet Scofield..."
Harriet Scofield "Genealogy of the Ferris family: descendants of Zachariah Ferris" Higginson Books

[NI1618] "Descendants of Pieter Pietersz Winne, Jr.

Generation No. 1

1. Pieter Pietersz3 Winne , Jr. (Pieter2, Franciscus1) was born Abt. 1643 in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, West Indies1, and died Bet. 1703 - 1763 in Albany County, NY2. He married Jannetie Arents Pier Aft. January 05, 1681/82 in Kingston, Ulster, NY3, daughter of Arent Teunissen and Geesie Jans.

More About Pieter Pietersz Winne , Jr.:
Ancestral File Number: 45QG-ZN
Immigration: 1676, New York State4

More About Jannetie Arents Pier:
Date born 2: Abt. 1663, Esopus, Ulster, NY5
Ancestral File Number 1: 77JF-S9
Ancestral File Number 2: 77J4-NC
Baptism: July 12, 1664, Kingston, Ulster, NY6
Baptism Minister: Domine Hermannus Blom of Kingston, NY7
Baptism Witnesses: Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh, Barber Jans, Lowies Duboey8
Religion: Dutch Reformed8

Children of Pieter Winne and Jannetie Pier are:
2 i. Aegje4 Winne, born Bef. July 22, 1683 in Kingston, Ulster, NY9; died Bef. January 25, 1717/1810. She married Johannes Trophagen October 10, 1708 in Albany County, NY11.
More About Aegje Winne:
Baptism: July 22, 1683, Kingston, Ulster, NY12
Baptism Minister: Domine Johannes Weecksteen of Kingston, NY13
Baptism Witnesses: Arent Teunisz Pier, Geesje Jans14
Religion: Dutch Reformed14
3 ii. Gessie Winne, born Bef. March 21, 1685/86 in Kingston, Ulster, NY15.
More About Gessie Winne:
Baptism: March 21, 1685/86, Kingston, Ulster, NY15
4 iii. Goetje Winne, born Bef. September 23, 1688 in Kingston, Ulster, NY16.
More About Goetje Winne:
Baptism: September 23, 1688, Kingston, Ulster, NY16
Baptism Minister: Domine Laurentius Van Den Bosck of Kingston, NY17
Baptism Witnesses: Henderick Alderts, Wilhelmus De Mayer, Gepje Aerents18
Religion: Dutch Reformed18
5 iv. Peter Winne..
6 v. Rachel Winne, born Bef. June 03, 1694 in Kingston, Ulster, NY23.
More About Rachel Winne:
Baptism: June 03, 1694, Kingston, Ulster, NY23
Baptism Minister: Domine Godefridus Dellius of Albany, NY24
Baptism Witnesses: Pieter Pietersen, Rachel Winne, Rebecca Trophagen25
Religion: Dutch Reformed25
7 vi. Cathrijntje Winne, born Bef. March 07, 1696/97 in Kingston, Ulster, NY26.
More About Cathrijntje Winne:
Baptism: March 07, 1696/97, Kingston, Ulster, NY26
Baptism Minister: Domine Johannes Petrus Nucella of Kingston, NY27
Baptism Witnesses: Hendrick Alderssen, Tryntje Alderssen, Wiliiam De Meyer28
Religion: Dutch Reformed28
8 vii. Arent Winne, born Bef. December 24, 1699 in Kingston, Ulster, NY29.
More About Arent Winne:
Baptism: December 24, 1699, Kingston, Ulster, NY29
Baptism Minister: Domine Johannes Petrus Nucella of Kingston, NY30
Baptism Witnesses: Willem Trephag, Hilletje Burhans31
Religion: Dutch Reformed31
9 viii. Gepje Winne, born Bef. January 02, 1703/04 in Kingston, Ulster, NY32. She married Hendrick Kort November 06, 1724 in Kingston, Ulster, NY33.
More About Gepje Winne:
Baptism: January 02, 1703/04, Kingston, Ulster, NY34
Baptism Minister: Domine Johannes Petrus Nucella of Kingston, NY35
Baptism Witnesses: Pieter Oostrande, Egbert Cornelisse, Hendrickse Cornelisse36
Religion: Dutch Reformed36
Descendants of Pieter Pietersz Winne, Jr.

Endnotes

1. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): International Genealogical Index (R), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1994), "CD-ROM."
2. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree, pre-1600 to Present, (Novato, CA: Broderbund Software, Inc., 1995-1997), "CD-ROM," vol. 9, no. 3864.
3. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 506, no. 51.
4. Filby, P. William, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, (Detroit, MI: Gale, 1981-present), 1982 suppl., p. 925.
5. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree, pre-1600 to Present, (Novato, CA: Broderbund Software, Inc., 1995-1997), "CD-ROM," vol. 14, no. 907.
6. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 3, no. 39.
7. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 3.
8. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 3, no. 39.
9. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 19, no. 316.
10. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 534, no. 382.
11. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree, pre-1600 to Present, (Novato, CA: Broderbund Software, Inc., 1995-1997), "CD-ROM," vol. 9, no. 3864.
12. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 19, no. 316.
13. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 19.
14. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 19, no. 316.
15. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): Ancestral File (TM), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1992), "CD-ROM."
16. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 32, no. 589.
17. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 32.
18. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 32, no. 589.
19. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): Ancestral File (TM), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1992), "CD-ROM."
20. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 538, p. 442.
21. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): Ancestral File (TM), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1992), "CD-ROM."
22. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree, pre-1600 to Present, (Novato, CA: Broderbund Software, Inc., 1995-1997), "CD-ROM," vol. 14, no. 907.
23. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 41, no. 782.
24. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 41.
25. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 41, no. 782.
26. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 49, no. 949.
27. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 49.
28. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 49, no. 949.
29. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 57, no. 1141.
30. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 57.
31. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 57, no. 1141.
32. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 71, no. 1440.
33. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 546, no. 540.
34. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 71, no. 1440.
35. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 71.
36. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 71, no. 1440." (1)
1) Ancestors of John O. Bailey

[NI1626] "Have you ever been in contact with either "Bureau voor Historisch Onderzoek, Zutphen" or "rijksarchief in Gelderland"? One of our Canadian cousins did, and sent me a photocopy of stuff they sent her in Dutch and Old Dutch... the Roosa name appears often and dates in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries. The earliest date that appears on a page along with the Roosa name is 1440." (3)
"(Jan Jansen van Oosterhout) came to America with the Roosa Family on the Spotted Cow (De Bonte Koe) (as did the Ostranders)" (4)
"'Esopus was then without any local government, and, in fact a dependency of Fort Orange. The People were dissatisfied with such a dependent position, and wanted a government of their own...
In pursuance of such a plan, they passed an order appointing Roeloff Swartwout, Schout of Esopus, his jurisdiction embracing the powers of sheriff and the duties of prosecuting attorney in criminal proceedings."
Pursuant to the directions of Their Lords High Mightinesses of Holland, Governor Stuyvesant and his Council, at New Amsterdam on May 16, 1661, granted a charter to organize a civil government at Wiltwyck.
The order was in Dutch and it is recorded in the Wiltwyck records. The following is a translation thereof:
"May 16, 1661. Director General Petrus Stuyvesant, delegated and authorized in all matters of government relating to the public welfare of all the county of New Netherland, by power and commission from the noble Lord Directors of the privileged West India Company, observing the situation and condition of a place called the Esopus, which hath now been inhabited and settled six or seven years; hath, in consideration of the situation and population thereof, erected the locality into a village and given it the name of Wiltwyck, whereby it shall be called now and henceforward...
By this Charter Evert Pels, Cornelis Barentsen Slecht and Elbert Heymans Roose were appointed the first three Schepens, or Magistrates, who with the presiding Schout, Roeloff Swartwout completed "the Organization of the first village and first judicial tribunal in this section of the State.
In 1661 Roosa was appointed one of the three Commissioners to enclose the New Village at Esopus, called Hurley...
In 1662 a schedule of the old and newly surveyed lots in Wiltwyck with the names of their owners, was made out, and in the "List of old lots, before the place was laid out," appear the names of Evert Pels, owner of lot 2, and Jan Broersen (Dekker) owner of lot 11. In the list of lots newly laid out," Albert Heymansen (Roosa) appears as the owner of lot 24 and Juriaen Westvael as owning lot 25...
At the destruction of the village of Hurley, on June 7, 1663, by the Indians, two of the children of Roosa, with 43 others, women and children, were taken captive. The story of the rescue of these captives by the colonial forces under the command of Captain Martin Kregier, is one of the most interesting of the episodes in the history of Early New York. It may be found in Documents, etc., page 256 et seq. and page 323 et seq.; Doc. Hist. N.Y., Vol. 4, page 39 et seq., and in Bi-Centenary Re-union of the Descendants of Louis and Jaques Du Bois...
In September, 1665, soon after New Netherland had become a Province of Great Britain, the English Governor, Richard Nicholls, visited Kingston and placed Captain Daniel Brodhead in command at that place. Owing to that officer's tyrannical conduct, and many acts of oppression and cruelty by the English soldiers under his command, the inhabitants rose in open hostility in 1667.
In their petition to Governor Nicholls for redress, the inhabitants set forth numerous deeds of cruelty by the soldiers;...
6. Albert Heymans Roos, going with his plouw yron towards the Smits, was assaulted by five souldrs. whoe wounded him very much, whereupon
7. The souldiers said the sd. Albert Heymans going wifhout any Reason brought him to Imprisonment was most grieviously wounded by Richard Hamer...
Governor Nicholls on April 16, 1667, appointed a Commission to enquire into their troubles, and in this letter of instructions, he says:
"Albert Heymans and Anthony D. Elba (Delva?) have spoken most malicious words, and I look upon them as great incendiaries and disaffected persons; if their words be proved they shall not be suffered to live in this government; if they have been actors in..." (1)
"Governor Francis Lovelace restored Roosa to favor, and in 1669 appointed him and Louis DuBois two of the Overseers for Hurley, called New Dorp, or New Village. "In 1673 he was confirmed as one of the officers at Esopus by Governor Anthony Colve, and described as "Captain Albert Heymans, who had been prominent in the riot of 1667."
The records state that in 1669 "Albert Heymensen peticond to sett up a Brewhouse and tanffatts in Hurley," and an order was made granting permission.
His name appears with that of son Arien Albertson Roosa and those of Jacob Jansen Van Etten, Tho. Quick, Roeloff Swartwout, Mattys Blanchan, Louys Du Bois and others, to the petition to Sir Edmund Andros, Governor of New York, praying that he would assist them in procuring a minister for Esopus "that can preache bothe Inglish and Dutche, wch. will bee most fitting for this place, it being in its Minority."...
Albert Heymans Roosa served in the military forces of the Colony as mustering officer and in other capacities, and on April 5, 1670, at the military rendezvous held at Marbletown, he was present as Sergeant of Captain Henry Pawling's Company at which also appeared his son Arie Roosa as private, and in 1673 Albert was Captain of a company recruited Hurley and Marbletown...
Albert Heymans Roosa died at Hurley on February 27, 1679. In 1685 his widow, Wyntje Allard secured a grant of 320 acres in Hurley.
He had the following children, viz:
Arie or Aria, born in Holland; married at Kingston, Maria Pels, daughter of the Schepen Evert Pels.
Heyman, married Magriet Rosevelt.
Jan, married Hellegond Williams.
Ikee, married Roeloff Kierstede.
Maritje, married Laurens Jansen Low. (Handwritten)
Neeltien, married Hendric Paeldin, 1676. Banns, Nov. 3
Jannetje, married Matys Ten Eyck, Nov. 16, 1679.
Aert.
Annatje.
Guert, died June 15, 1664. The record reads as follows, viz.: "Hic filius obiit ante baptismum." (2)
"Gomez family history detailed
In your Sunday magazine supplement of May 19, you ran an article on the Gomez House in Orange County. Named after one of the earliest settlers in the Newburgh area, Luis (not Louis) Moses Gomez, this building and mill is the oldest known Jewish settlement in the United States. Unfortunately, there were several errors in this long-overdue tale of early New York history.
First, Gomez was not a Spanish immigrant; he was a citizen of Holland, as were many of his co-religionists in the Hudson Valley, men such as Emmanuel Gonsaulus (the earliest known settler's grave in Sullivan County), the Fonsecas in the Poughkeepsie area and the Roosas, a rabbinical family.
These people did not come from Iberia (the peninsula that contains Spain and Portugal) because they had all been driven out of that country by the year 1492...
So these people suffering for their religious beliefs, scattered to the wind. The Kingdom of Genoa took in some, Denmark never knew the philosophy of hate, but brave little Holland took many of these unfortunates. And, in 1654, nearly two hundred later, a group of Spanish-Portuguese Jews landed in New Amsterdam and settled down in that Dutch village and the nearby Hudson Valley...
Bert S. Feldman of Mongaup Valley is deputy historian for Sullivan County, historian for the town of Bethel and teaches Sullivan County history at Sullivan County Community College." (5)
"The Roosa (Rosa, Rose) family came from Herwynen, Gelderland; sailing from Holland to this country in the ship "Bonte-Koe" April 15, 1660. There were Albert Heymans Roosa, his wife Weilke de Jonge [sic], and 8 children between the ages of 2 and 17. Directly on arrival they went to Esopus, N.Y., with friends, where he took up land. They united with the Dutch Ch., where two years later he became Elder... He had 3 sons, Heyman, b 1643; Arien, b 1645; jan, b 1651; also 4 daus: Ilke, who m Roslof Kierstad; Mary, m Laurens Jensen, of Harlem; Neeltie, m Henry Pawling, and Jannetie, who m Matthys Ten Eyck of New York." (6)
1) NYG&BR July 1900 p. 165
2) NYG&BR October 1900 p. 235-6
3) Frederic Rosa (CLFB67A-Prodigy)
4) Lorraine Luke (GKRU05A-Prodigy) Lorraine Luke is preparing a Roosa manuscript for future publication through the Ulster Co. Genealogical Society.
5) Goshen Sunday Record, June 2, 1996, p. 31
6) Quick Genealogy, p. 108

[NI1627] "(Albert Heymanse Roosa) appears with... his son Arien Albertson Roosa and (others in a) petition to Sir Edmund Andros, Governor of New York, praying that he would assist them in procuring a minister for Esopus...
(Albert Heymanse Roosa) was present as Sergeant of Captain Henry Pawling's Company at which also appeared his son Arie Roosa as private...
Arie or Aria, born in Holland; married at Kingston, Maria Pels, daughter of Schepen Evert Pels.
The proofs of this marriage are found in the records of the old Dutch Church of Kingston...
Arie Roosa came from Holland with his father Albert Heymans Roosa and mother Wyntje Allard on the "Spotted Cow."
His name, spelled Arrie Roos, is found on "A Rool of the Names and Surnames of them that haue takin the oath of allegiance in ye County of Vlstr. by ordr. of His Excely: Ye Governor; ye ffirst day of Septembr Anno Qe: Domini 1689:" and also upon "A List of the ffreeholders within the County of Ulster, 1728."...
The "New York Army List for 1700" embraces the following, viz.;
Province of New York
List of ye present officers of ye Militia in his Matys. Province of New York in America Commissioned by his Excel. Richd. Earle of Bellmont. Capt. Generall & Govr. in Chief in & over his Matys. said Province &c. vizt.
Of the regiment of Militia in ye Counties of Ulster & Dutchess. Jacob Rutsen Lieut. Col.
Of another Foot Compa. in ye said Countys; Aria Rose, Captain; John Rose, Lieut.; Aria Gerrutse, Ensigne...
In 1686 Arie Roosa, Jan Eltinge, Gerrit Aartsen, Hendrik Kip and Jacob Kip were granted a large tract of land in Dutchess County. This grant is called the "Arie Roosa Patent," and it embraced about one thousand and five hundred acres, opposite Roundout Creek, near Kingston and extending along the bank of the Hudson river.
Arie Roosa settled upon this grant and lived there his remaining life, and many of his descendants are now found in Dutchess County, prosperous farmers and merchants.
By his wife Maria Pels he had the following children, viz:
Jannetje Roosa, born about 1670...
Evert, baptized October 26, 1679.
Weyntie, baptized June 4, 1682.
Engeltie, baptized Sep. 3, 1685.
Annetje, baptized Dec. 22, 1687.
Arien, baptized June 3, 1694.
Mary, baptized Aug. 28, 1698." (1)
"Antjen Roosa was bapt. Dec. 22, 1687, daughter of Arian Roosa Albertson and Maria Pels, (Kingston Baptisms 544)" (2)
Also I.D. #3276
"Professors unravel land buys in 17th century N. Dutchess
By Harvey Auster
Rhinebeck -- On a June day 300 years ago, three settlers from the Wiltwyck (Kingston) area made a deal with some Indians for land on the east shore of the Hudson River across from Rondout Creek.
Their rationale seems strangely modern to people who have watched land values in the Hudson Valley skyrocket in recent years.
The three, Gerrit Artsen and Jan Elton [Elting], together with a Portuguese Jew named Arie Roosa, purchased the land from the Indians as speculators hoping to cash in on future development, according to two professors whose field of expertise is the Indians of New York.
State University College at New Paltz history professor Laurence Hauptman and Ohio University anthropology professor Robert Grumet agreed that both the Europeans and the three members of the Esopus tribe lived on the west side of the river principally.
The Indians are listed on the deed as Aran Kee, Kreme Much and Korra Kee.
Aran Kee, known on other deeds as Ankony, was really armed Aramuchtan, said Grumet. He was part of a clan or group of Esopus Indians in the Wiltwyck area who owned land on what is now the Rhinecliff side of the Hudson River.
Kreme Much, he said, was probably Pemmryawech, husband-consort to the female sachem (chief) Mamanuchqua, said Grumet, who is in the area working on a book on the Hudson Valley Indians of the 17th and 18th century.
Grumet said he does not know about Korra Kee.
At the time, the Mid-Hudson Valley was in a land rush squeeze, caught between people coming up from New York, down from Albany, and even west from New England.
Land was the major form of wealth and anyone who wanted become wealthy speculated in land. Grumet explained, "Everyone who could was seeking to buy up all the Indian land he could."
Grumet and Hauptman pointed to "the Livingston landgrab" in what is now northern Dutchess southern Columbia counties as a classic example. [The Whitemans acted as agents for the Livingstons in the next century.]
They recalled that in 1685, Robert Livingston bought up strategically placed points of land from the Indians. He then applied to the English crown for a patent that not only covered those pieces of land, but the land between the areas he had purchased.
"The Indians flipped out," said Grumet.
"It was a clear attempt to cheat the Indians and other settlers who wanted the land," Hauptmann agreed.
Eventually, Livingston had to buy the Indians out.
But as for Artsen, Roosa and Elton, "they probably kept the land for speculative purposes," rather than settling on it. [NYG&BR contradicts this, saying that Arie Roosa settled on the new purchase.]" (3)
1)NYG&BR Oct. 1900 p. 235-6
2) Baptismal and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, p. 504
3) Poughkeepsie Journal, August 6, 1986, p. 8B

[NI1629] "Jannetie Arents Pier: chr: 12 Jul 1664 Kingston, Ulster, NY; d: aft 2 Jan 1702/3; md: aft 5 Jan 1681/2 to Pieter Pietersz Winne, Jr. " (1)
"[Pieter Winne] married Jannetie Arents Pier Aft. January 05, 1681/82 in Kingston, Ulster, NY3, daughter of Arent Teunissen and Geesie Jans.

More About Jannetie Arents Pier:
Date born 2: Abt. 1663, Esopus, Ulster, NY5
Ancestral File Number 1: 77JF-S9
Ancestral File Number 2: 77J4-NC
Baptism: July 12, 1664, Kingston, Ulster, NY6
Baptism Minister: Domine Hermannus Blom of Kingston, NY7
Baptism Witnesses: Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh, Barber Jans, Lowies Duboey8
Religion: Dutch Reformed8" (2)
1) Olive Tree Genealogy, 17th Century Immigrants to New York
2) Ancestors of John O. Bailey

[NI1670] "Egbert Hendricksz, b. Albany c 1658; m. bns. Kingston RDC 10-13-1683 Anneke Berry, dau. of Samuel Berry of New York City.
[Children]
Deborah 1684 Hendrick 1686 Eltje 1687 Samuel 1692
Anneken 1694 Johannes 1696 Cathryna 1698 Sarah 1699
Rachel 1700
He was probably named in honor of his grandmother's second husband, Egbert Wouterszen. On 1-31-1692 he bought from Mattys Van Keuren, a house and lot in Kingston next door to Louis DuBois. In 1700 he was captain of a troop of horse in the Ulster County Militia commanded by Jacob Rutsen." (1)
"Appendix A.
List of the Parents of Spouses Recorded in Charts...
Schoonmaker, Johannes bp. 15 Mar 1696 bur. 8 May 1730 at Papsknee Is. Parents: Egbert Hendricksen Schoonmaker and Annetje Berry m. Annetje VanVechten
Schoonmaker, Sarah b. ca. 1699 Parents: Egbert Hendricksen Schoonmaker and Annetje Bery m. Petrus Bogardus" (2)
"<2. Egbert b. 1658 He was the rank of Capt. in the 1700 NY Army Militia in the Counties of Ulster and Dutchess of the troop of horses.>" (3)

"The Descendants of Egbert Hendricksen Schoonmaker
Egbert was probably named after his mother's step-father, Egbert Wouterszen. He was born in Albany sometime between 1658 and 1662. He married on October 13, 1683 to Annatje, a daughter of Samuel Berry of New York City. On January 31, 1692, Egbert bought a house and a lot of land from Mattys Mattysen Van Keuren. This lot of land was next door to Louis DuBois. In 1700, he was captain of the Ulster County regiment's troop of horses commanded by Jacob Rutsen. Egbert and Annatje had nine children.

The children of Egbert and Annatje are:

1. Deborah was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston, Ulster Co., NY on September 14, 1684. Her sponsors were Paulus Berry and Elsie Jans. Deborah died about 1767. Deborah married (1st) Jacob Vernooy, the son of Cornelius C. Vernooy and Annetje Cornelis. Jacob was baptized at the Kingston Church on February 10, 1684. Deborah married (2nd) on September 30, 1723 to Hendrick Vroom. She married (3rd) on October 17, 1739 to Tjerck DeWitt, the eldest son of Andries DeWitt and Jannetje Egbertsen. Deborah survived all of her husbands.
2. Hendrick was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston, Ulster Co., NY on June 6, 1686. His sponsors were Hendrick Hendricz and Adriana Bayaard. "Hendrik Schoonmaker, j.m. (unmarried man), and Hannah (Henna) Wittiker, j.d. (unmarried woman), both parties born and residing under the jurisdiction of Ulters (Ulster) Co. Married on the presentation of a license" on December 10, 1726 at the Old Dutch Reformed Church of Kingston. Hannah was the daughter of Edward Whitaker and Hilletje Burhans. She was baptized at the Kingston Church on November 29, 1702. They had eight children:

I. Anneken was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston on June 15, 1729. She probably died young.
II. Egbert was born in 1731. The baptism records of Kingston for that year are missing.
III. Anneken was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston on May 6, 1733.
IV. Edwart (Edward) was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston on September 14, 1735.
V. Hilletjen was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston on July 17, 1737.
VI. Maria was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston on December 25, 1739.
VII. Debora was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston on January 10, 1742.
VIII. Margriet was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston on November 6, 1743.
IX.Hendrik was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston on June 1, 1746.
X. Elizabeth was born about 1747 or 1748.
XI. Sarah was born in 1749.

3. Eltje...
4. Samuel was born on March 8, 1692. He was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston, Ulster Co., NY on April 17, 1692. His sponsors were Johannes Wynkoop and Judik Wynkoop. "Samuel Schoonmaker, j.m., and Eleanor Tfeny (Finney), j.d., both residing in Kingstown (Kingston)" were married on November 28, 1718 at Kingston "on the presentation of a license." Eleanor ("Nelly") was baptized on March 27, 1696. She was the daughter of John Finney and Sarah Hardenberg. Samuel died on January 11, 1778. They had seven children:

I. Zara was baptized on August 23, 1719. She married Hendricus Osterhout, a widower, on September 21, 1753 at Saugerties, NY.
II. Egbert was baptized on September 15, 1723. He married on January 15, 1752 to Geertruy Schoonmaker, the daughter of Tjerck Schoonmaker and Theodotia Whitaker. Tjerck was the son of Hendrick Hendricksz Schoonmaker and Geertruy De Witt. Egbert made out his will on May 7, 1798.
III. Johannes was baptized on November 6, 1726. He married Catharine Du Bois.
IV. Anneke was baptized on July 1, 1733. She married Abraham Post.
V. Maria was born in 1735. She married Jan Post.
VI. Catherine was baptized on December 26, 1736.
VII. Deborah was baptized on May 31, 1741. She married Peter Post, the son of Abraham Post and Maria Schut.

5. Anneken was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston, Ulster Co., NY on June 3, 1694. Her sponsors were Jan Heermans and Cornelia Ten Broek. Anneken died on August 9, 1780. On November 28, 1724 at the Kingston Church, "Hendrik Jansz, j.m., and Anneken Schoonmaker, j.d., both residents under the jurisdiction of Kingstown" (Kingston), were married "on the presentation of a license." Hendrick Jansen was baptized at the Kingston Church on April 6, 1679*. He was the son of Jan Mattysen and Magdalena Blanjan (Blanchan). Hendrick owned land that was given to him by his grandmother's second husband, Thomas Chambers.
6. Johannes was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston, Ulster Co., NY on March 15, 1696. His sponsors were Jacob Rutser and Marritje Hansse. He was buried at "Papsknie Island" (Albany, NY) on May 8, 1730. Johannes married at Albany, NY to Annetje (Johanna) Van Veghten. Their banns were published on June 5, 1722. Annetje was born on November 4, 1699, and she was baptized at Albany on January 5, 1700. She was the daughter of Johannes Van Veghten and Maria Bogardus. After Johannes' death, Annetje married on September 6, 1735 at Albany to William Teller. William was baptized at Albany on October 4, 1695, and died in 1757. Johannes and Annetje had two children:

I. Johannes Van Veghten Schoonmaker was baptized at Kingston on December 8, 1723. He died on August 13, 1729.
II. Egbert Schoonmaker was baptized at Kingston on May 12, 1728. He is probably the Egbert Schoonmaker who moved to Saugerties, NY.

7. Cathryna was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston, Ulster Co., NY on May 8, 1698. Her sponsors were William de Meyer and Catharina de Meyer. She married on November 12, 1726 to Jacobus Delamater. Jacobus was baptized at Kingston on May 18, 1699. He was the son of Jacobus la Maeter (Delamater) and Geertje Martissen Ysselstein.
8. Sarah was born about 1699. No baptism record for her could be found in Kingston. She married at Kingston on September 13, 1718 to Petrus Bogardus. Petrus was born on March 19, 1691, and was baptized at the New Amsterdam (New York) Reformed Dutch Church on April 30, 1691. He died about 1770.
9. Rachel was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston, Ulster Co., NY on August 18, 1700. Her sponsors were Johannes Hardenberg and Catharina Rutse. She married at Kingston on October 18, 1729 to Johannes de Mon (Du Mond). Both were residents under the jurisdiction of Kingston. Johannes was baptized at Kingston on October 12, 1701. He was the son of Walraan (Walrand) du Mon (Dumond), Jr., and Cathryn ter Bos. Walraan, who was baptized at Kingston on November 13, 1667, married Cathryn, who was born in New York City, on March 24, 1688 at Kingston. Walraan's father, Wallarand Du Mont, was born in Coomen, Flanders, and came to this country from Amsterdam in 1657. Wallarand married at Esopus (Kingston, NY) on January 13, 1664 to Margaret (Greytie) Hendricks, of Wie, near Swol. She was the widow of Jan Arentsen.

* "The Schoonmaker Family: Descendants of Hendrick Jochemsz Schoonmaker 1624-1683" and The January 1888 issue of the "New York Genealogical and Biographical Record" both claim that Hendrick Jansen was baptized on May 11, 1679. The Schoonmaker Family book claims that he was born on April 6, 1679. The book "Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, 1660-1809" gives Hendrick's date of baptism as April 6, 1679. It says nothing about him being born on that date, nor does it say anything about him being baptized on May 11. " (4)
1) Heidgerd, Ruth P.; The Schoonmaker Family, p. 10
2) Bogardus, William Brower; Dear Cousin p. 151
3) The Olive Tree Genealogy: 17th Century Immigrants to New York http://www.rootsweb.com/~ote/17th/dny_7.htm
4) David R. Jansen's Northeast United States Genealogy Home Page

[NI1673] "Pieter Winne was bap. at Kingston 4 Oct. 1691, m. at Kingston 25 Nov 1720 Antjen Merkel, b. in Germany. He was the son of

"Descendants of Peter Winne
Generation No. 1

1. Peter4 Winne (Pieter Pietersz3, Pieter2, Franciscus1) was born Bef. October 04, 1691 in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, West Indies1. He married (1) Anna Barbara Muller. He married (2) Annatje Merckel November 25, 1720 in Kingston, Ulster, NY2, daughter of Friedrich Merckel and Anna Barbara.
More About Peter Winne:
Ancestral File Number 1: 77J4-CS
Ancestral File Number 2: G41W-JB
Baptism: October 04, 1691, Brookhaven, Buffalo, NY3 [Impossible!!!]
More About Anna Barbara Muller:
Ancestral File Number 1: DXQT-BR
Ancestral File Number 2: 77J4-CS
Notes for Annatje Merckel:
Ancestral File 4.17 reports Annatje Merckel (77J4-DO) born about 1698 in Katsbaan, Ulster, NY.
More About Annatje Merckel:
Date born 2: 1698, Katsbaan, Ulster, NY4
Ancestral File Number: 77J4-D0
Children of Peter Winne and Annatje Merckel are:
2 i. Peter5 Winne, born Bef. September 10, 1721 in Kingston, Ulster, NY5; died September 18, 1796 in Ulster County, NY6. He married Ariantje Van Etten January 20, 1748/49 in Kingston, Ulster, NY7.
More About Peter Winne:
Ancestral File Number: 2QW5-2D
Baptism: September 10, 1721, Kingston, Ulster, NY8
Baptism Minister: Domine Petrus Vas of Kingston, NY9
Baptism Witnesses: Dirk Wynkoop, Rachel Winne10
Religion: Dutch Reformed10
3 ii. Frederick Winne, born September 22, 1723 in Kingston, Ulster, NY11; died Abt. 175812. He married Anna Mereitje DeWitt November 30, 1749 in Kingston, Ulster, NY13.
More About Frederick Winne:
Ancestral File Number: 77J5-MB
Baptism: September 22, 1723, Kingston, Ulster, NY14
Baptism Minister: Domine Petrus Vas of Kingston, NY15
Baptism Witnesses: Jan Oosterhoud, junior; Catrina Winne16
Religion: Dutch Reformed16
4 iii. Arend Winne...
5 iv. Louwerens Winne, born Bef. June 04, 1727 in Kingston, Ulster, NY22. He married Catharine Bakker December 27, 1756 in Kingston, Ulster, NY23.
More About Louwerens Winne:
Ancestral File Number: 77J5-PN
Baptism: June 04, 1727, Kingston, Ulster, NY24
Baptism Minister: Domine Petrus Vas of Kingston, NY25
Baptism Witnesses: Louwerens Merkel, Marytjen Merkel26
Religion: Dutch Reformed26
6 v. Johannes Winne, born Bef. May 18, 1729 in Kingston, Ulster, NY27. He married Rachel Hendricksen February 26, 1753 in Rhinebeck, Dutchess, NY28.
More About Johannes Winne:
Ancestral File Number: 77J5-QT
Baptism: May 18, 1729, Kingston, Ulster, NY29
Baptism Witnesses: Willem Traphagen, Jannetjen Traphagen29
Religion: Dutch Reformed29
7 vi. Annaatjen Winnen, born Bef. September 23, 1733 in Kingston, Ulster, NY30. She married Cornelis Brink March 17, 1750/51 in Katsbaan, Ulster, NY31.
More About Annaatjen Winnen:
Ancestral File Number: 77J4-74
Baptism: September 23, 1733, Kingston, Ulster, NY32
Baptism Witnesses: Marytjen Merkel32
Religion: Dutch Reformed33
More About Cornelis Brink:
Date born 2: Bef. January 25, 1729/30, Kingston, Ulster, NY34
Ancestral File Number: 77J4-6X
Baptism 1: April 18, 1731, Kingston, Ulster, NY
Baptism 2: January 25, 1729/30, Kingston, Ulster, NY34
Enlistment: Abt. 1776, 1st Ulster (NY) Militia35
Religion: Dutch Reformed36
8 vii. Christiaan Winne, born Bef. October 12, 1735 in Kingston, Ulster, NY37. He married Maria DeWitt April 10, 1757 in Katsbaan, Ulster, NY38.
More About Christiaan Winne:
Ancestral File Number: 77J5-R1
Baptism: October 12, 1735, Kingston, Ulster, NY39
Baptism Witnesses: Christiaan Meyer, Geertruy Stefanus [surname not given]39
Religion: Dutch Reformed39
9 viii. Mattheus Winne, born 1739 in Ulster County, NY40. He married Margrietje Rachel Henrickse November 22, 1754 in Rhinebeck, Dutchess, NY41.
More About Mattheus Winne:
Ancestral File Number: 77J5-S6
Baptism: 1739, Ulster County, NY42
10 ix. Jannetje Winne, born 1742 in Ulster County, NY43.
Descendants of Peter Winne

Endnotes

1. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): Ancestral File (TM), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1992), "CD-ROM."
2. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 538, p. 442.
3. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): Ancestral File (TM), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1992), "CD-ROM."
4. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree, pre-1600 to Present, (Novato, CA: Broderbund Software, Inc., 1995-1997), "CD-ROM," vol. 14, no. 907.
5. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 137, no. 2906.
6. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): Ancestral File (TM), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1992), "CD-ROM."
7. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 597, no. 1121.
8. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 137, no. 2906.
9. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 137.
10. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 137, no. 2906.
11. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 148, no. 3155.
12. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree, pre-1600 to Present, (Novato, CA: Broderbund Software, Inc., 1995-1997), "CD-ROM," vol. 9, no. 3864.
13. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 600, no. 1150.
14. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 148, no. 3155.
15. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 149.
16. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 148, no. 3155.
17. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 158, no. 3374.
18. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 606, no. 1227.
19. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 158, no. 3374.
20. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 158.
21. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 158, no. 3374.
22. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 169, no. 3619.
23. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 611, no. 1292.
24. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 169, no. 3619.
25. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 169.
26. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 169, no. 3619.
27. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 181, no. 3884.
28. Kelly, Arthur, Marriage Records of Four Reformed Congregations of Old Rhinebeck, (1971).
29. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 181, no. 3884.
30. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 198, no. 4256.
31. Powell, Laurel, Brink Book, A, (Provo, UT: Powell-Shanafelt Family History Books, 1996), p. 197.
32. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 198, no. 4256.
33. Worden, Jean D., Katsbaan and Saugerties Reformed Church, (Franklin, OH: J. D. Worden, 1982).
34. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): Ancestral File (TM), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1992), "CD-ROM."
35. Heidgerd, Ruth P., Ulster County in the Revolution: A Guide to Those Who Served, (New Paltz, NY: Huguenot Historical Society, 1997), pp. 20-21.
36. Worden, Jean D., Katsbaan and Saugerties Reformed Church, (Franklin, OH: J. D. Worden, 1982).
37. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 213, no. 4534.
38. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): International Genealogical Index (R), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1994), "CD-ROM."
39. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 213, no. 4534.
40. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): International Genealogical Index (R), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1994), "CD-ROM."
41. Kelly, Arthur, Marriage Records of Four Reformed Congregations of Old Rhinebeck, (1971).
42. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): International Genealogical Index (R), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1994), "CD-ROM."
43. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree, pre-1600 to Present, (Novato, CA: Broderbund Software, Inc., 1995-1997), "CD-ROM," vol. 9, no. 3864. " (1)
"iii) Anna, bpt. 14 Oct 1739 - sp.: Pieter Wenne [#820] and Antje Merkel [#821] (Kingston Ref. Chbk.)." (2)
1) Ancestors of John O. Bailey
2) Jones, Hank Z.; Palatine Families in New York, p. 619

[NI1756] "Date: Thu Jan 2 08:05:05 1997Name: D. MullenE- mail: N/AAddress:
Surname of Immigrant: Schoonmaker Given name(s) of Immigrant: Hendrick Jochemse
Origin of Immigrant: 1624, Hamburg, GermanyName of Ship: ?
Arrival Date: about 1655
Immigrant's Date & Place of Birth: 1624, Hamburg, Germany
Immigrant's Date & Place of Death: 1682, Kingston, NY
Immigrant's Spouse: Elsie Janse Van Breestede
Source of Information: Schoonmaher Family Ass. and NYS Library
Immigrant's Children:
<1. Jochem B. 1655 M. Anna Hossy. They had 7 children. Their child Jochem, his sponsors were Augustus Jay and his wife and Maria Bayards. Their grandson was John Jay the 1st. Chief Justice of the U.S. The father Jochem was of the rank of Captain in the 1700 NY Army Militia in the counties of Ulster and Dutchess in a Foot Company.>
<2. Egbert b. 1658 He was the rank of Capt. in the 1700 NY Army Militia in the Counties of Ulster and Dutchess of the troop of horses.>
<3. Engeltje B. 1663. She married Nicolaes Antoni.>
<4. Hendrick B.May 17, 1665. He married Gertruy De Witt Mar. 24, 1687. This is my line.>
<5. Volckerte B.May 17, 1665.>
Notes: Hendrick Jochemse Schoonmaker, a native of Hamburg, Germany who came to America in the military service of Holland, settling in Albany about 1655, where he kept an inn. He was a man of considerable social and financial standing, purchased a great deal of property and loaned money to
Gov. Peter Stuyvesant " in time of need". A lieutenant in the command of his Noble Honor, the Director General, he defended Esopus from the Indians in 1659 and later moved there, disposing of his Albany property. He continued to be prominent in military affairs, and though wounded, fought bravely and well in the Indian outbreak of June 7, 1663. He also lead the Dutch burgers in their mutiny against the English garrison. He died about 1681." (1)

"Hendrick Jochemsz Schoonmaker, the Common Ancestor of
the Schoonmaker Family of Ulster County, New York

Hendrick Jochemsz, the progenitor of the Schoonmaker family, was born about 1624 in Hamburg, Germany. He came to this country in the military service of the Dutch West India Company. The first record of him in this country is found in the "Minutes of the Court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck" (Albany, NY) in the preceedings dated April 29, 1653. This record says that Hendrick was given the garden previously owned by Dirrick Bensinck on the condition that he carts bricks for the construction of the palisades surrounding the fort.
Hendrick was married prior to October 14, 1653 when a Court Record states that Lourens Jansz was wounded "on account of assault in Hendrick Jochems' house and beating Hendrick Jochems' wife." The date of his marriage is unknown, but we do know that he married Elsie Janse, a daughter of Jan Jansz van Breestede and Engeltje Janse (who was the widow of Ariaen Pieterse van Alcmaer prior to her marriage to Jan). Elsie was born in Breestede, Schleswig, Denmark. She and Hendrick both died in Kingston, Ulster County, NY. Elsie's date of death is unknown. Hendrick died about 1681 or 1682.

Although the Albany Dutch Reformed Church records can not be found before 1683, a Court Record gives the year that Hendrick and Elsie's first child was born. This record, dated November 9, 1653, states that Hendrick, who was an innkeeper, was accused of "smuggling a half barrel of good beer laid in last Saturday." Hendrick acknowledged the crime, but only because of "the inconvenience of his wife being in childbed." The Court overlooked the matter, but warned him not to repeat the offense. There are no records stating that he ever did, but he was found guilty of entertaining company at his inn on Sunday on two seperate occasions. There were also several occasions in which quarrels broke out among the patrons of his inn. In April of 1655, Hendrick purchased "the sign of Steven Janse Coninck, innkeeper" for three florins at Fort Orange.

The Deacon's accounts of the Albany Reformed Church show that Hendrick Jochemsz buried a child on January 17, 1654. He also buried a second child on January 23, 1655. On Tuesday February 2, 1655, "At the funeral of the (second) child of Hendrick Jochemsz, Claes Gerritsz said that Cornelis Vos had given the houses the (nick) names that are in circulation, which Hendrick Jochemsz overheard in the presence of Jacob Hap..." Several settlers were named along with the unflattering names that Vos gave their homes.

On June 23, 1654, "the Honorable General" Petrus Stuyvesant complained "of the scarcity of money in the treasury" which was needed to make repairs on the palisades at Manhattan. Stuyvesant requested "that the most prosperous burghers here lend a helping hand and that this court would be pleased to negotiate a loan of money, on the condition that it be returned within a year, either in duties or otherwise." The "most prosperous and loyal citizens" were summoned by the Court to assist the Honorable General. Hendrick Jochemsz was eighth on the list of 29 persons. He made a contribution of fl. 100 in seawan. On May 9, 1655, "A petition was read of Hendrick Jochemsz, requesting restitution of the one hundred guilders which he advanced to the Hon. General and the honorable members of the Supreme Council." Hendrick also requested "permission to build a room as an extension to his house."

A Fort Orange Court record dated on August 15, 1657 states that "drunken savages committed many acts of insolence" during Church services on Sunday the 12th of August, 1657. The settlers found a Maqua Indian named "Kamgeragae" who "declared that he knew a house where the savages obtained the brandy and offered, if we gave him a beaver, to get brandy in the said house." On the 13th, Officer Johannes LaMontagne, Philip Pietersen Schuyler and Jan Tomassen, magistrates, together with "Henderick Jochimsem, lieutenant of the burgher gaurd" went with the Indian "to the south side of the boundary line, having in his hand an empty kettle... and with this empty kettle went into the house of Martin Bierkaecker (Hendricksen)." Bierkaecker was entertaining guests at the time, and did not give the Indian any brandy at that time. "About three quarters of an hour later the said Indian again went into the said house and came back to us having in his kettle about three pints of brandy and sugar, which he had obtained for the beaver which we had given him." The four men then accused Bierkaecker of selling alcohol to the Indians which was a crime.

Unwise treatment of the Indians on the part of the Dutch West India Companies officials, especially during Willem Kieft's term (1638-1647), caused many problems for the settlers later on. One notable example of this was at the newer colony of Esopus (Kingston, NY). The Indian tribes there joined together in 1655 and attacked this colony, forcing the settlers to flee for their lives. Stuyvesant sent his troops there, and took many prisoners. By the Autumn of that year, peace had been made temporarily with the Indians, and the settlers returned. Early in 1658 another minor incident with the Indians occured. Director-General Petrus Stuyvesant ordered the settlers to congregate in order to create a village. Prior to this, the settlers had been spread throughout the area. Stuyvesant ordered that they build a fort there, and he named it Wiltwyck. On May 2, 1658, Thomas Chambers, who started the first settlement there in 1652, asked Director-General Petrus Stuyvesant to send troops to protect the village.

Hendrick Jochemsz came from Fort Orange to help build the stockade around the village. His name first appears in the records there on March 28, 1660. This Company of troops disbanded shortly after, but Hendrick was no doubt attracted to the beauty and fertility of Wiltwyck. Petrus Stuyvesant did not force the soldiers to remain there, but promised them land grants if they promised to settle there. Hendrick sold his Albany property, and, by October 24, 1661, he was a permanent resident there paying an excise tax of 75 florins. In 1661, the first of the "New Lots" was assigned to him. On November 12, 1661, he was assessed 12 guilders toward the construction of the new parsonage. He was later assessed at 75.7 guilders.

Following the first Indian outbreak at Wiltwyck, Director-General Petrus Stuyvesant made the mistake of not returning the captive Indians home. He sent them to the island of Curaçoa where they remained as slaves. This had a lasting impression on the minds of the Esopus Indians. Also, the settlers at Wiltwyck had begun to relax their fears of the Indians, and had started a "New Village" (now Hurley, NY) outside of the protection of Fort Wiltwyck. This "New Village" was built on lands that the Indians still claimed was theirs. The settlers of the "New Village" took no precautions against attack, and even sold rum to the Indians, one of the things that caused the first Indian uprising. On June 5, 1663, Petrus Stuyvesant sent a message to the Indian chiefs that he would shortly visit them to renew the peace treaty made a year earlier. Two days later war began.

On June 7, 1663, about noon, the settlers went out to their fields as normal leaving the women and children at home. The Indians first attacked the "New Village," killing three men as they tried to return to the village. Eight women and twenty six children were taken hostage. The Indians then made their way to Wiltwyck where they used a different approach. They entered the village carrying maise and beans to sell, and spread out through the fort pretending to be peaceful. A number of men on horseback came through the mill-gate shouting "The Indians have destroyed the New Village!" The Indians made their attack with swiftness. They burned twelve houses and carried women and children off into the forest. Many were injured, including Hendrick Jochemsz who was wounded twice. After the attack, a company of men went to find the captives. In doing so, they discovered what would later become the settlement of New Paltz. Hendrick Jochemsz later appeared as a witness to the Indian Deed of New Paltz on September 15, 1677.

Following the massacre of Wiltwyck, the military began to dictate every action of the village's inhabitants. Hendrick was one of 26 people who were fined on September 18, 1663 for being out in the fields without permission. He replied that they were making repairs on a bridge, "but being unable to work because of a lame hand," he acted as a sentry for the other workers. The following month on October 10, 1663, Hendrick complained to the Court that his home was being used as a gaurdhouse for the militia. On September 6, 1664, James, the Duke of York and brother of King Charles II, took over the rulership of New Netherlands, which they renamed New York. Wiltwyck was renamed Kingston. Three years later, Hendrick's friend Cornelis Barentsen Sleght, a schepen and brewer, was arrested and imprisoned by the English. Hendrick led a revolt against the English garrison that year. Hendrick Jochemsz also served with the board of magistrates as a "schepen" (an assistant to the burghermasters who had a voice on the council board) four times between 1666 and 1671.

On March 4, 1682, Hendrick Jochemsz made out his will which described him as "being at present sick in bed, though in full possession of his mental faculies, considering the certainty of death though the hour of its coming be uncertain." In this will, Elsie Jans was referred to simply as "his lawful wife." Also mentioned in the will was "The wife's two children from a former marriage, viz: Jannetje and Sytje." The heirs who received equal portions were "Jochem Hendrix, Engeltje Hendrix, Hendrick Hendrix, and Pieter Adriansen," Elsie's son from her previous marriage, "who in everything shall share as much and as well as the others without exception because his share of his father has remained in the estate and has improved the estate. All these above named children shall share equally."
Write to the
Schoonmaker Family Association
Huguenot Historical Society
P. O. Box 121
New Paltz, NY 12561
Resources
"The Schoonmaker Family: Descendants of Hendrick Jochemsz Schoonmaker 1624-1683," compiled by Ruth P. Heidgerd, 1974
The January 1888 issue of the "New York Genealogical and Biographical Record," pages 22-26
"History of the Huguenot Emigration to America," by Charles W. Baird, D.D., 1966, pages 190-200
"Dear `Cousin': A Charted Genealogy of the Descendants of Anneke Jans Bogardus (1605-1663) to the 5th Generation" by William Brower Bogardus and Peter D. Béla Mérey, 1996
"Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, 1660-1809" by Roswell R. Hoes, 1891 (Reprinted in 1997)" (2)
1) The Olive Tree Genealogy: 17th Century Immigrants to New York http://www.rootsweb.com/~ote/17th/dny_7.htm
2) David Jansen's Northeast United States Genealogy Home Page

[NI1757] "Hendrick was married prior to October 14, 1653 when a Court Record states that Lourens Jansz was wounded "on account of assault in Hendrick Jochems' house and beating Hendrick Jochems' wife." The date of his marriage is unknown, but we do know that he married Elsie Janse, a daughter of Jan Jansz van Breestede and Engeltje Janse (who was the widow of Ariaen Pieterse van Alcmaer prior to her marriage to Jan). Elsie was born in Breestede, Schleswig, Denmark. She and Hendrick both died in Kingston, Ulster County, NY. Elsie's date of death is unknown. Hendrick died about 1681 or 1682...

Elsie Jans Van Breestede

Elsie Jans, the daughter of Jan Jansz van Breestede, was mentioned several times in the Court records of New Netherlands. One of the earliest times that she was mentioned was on September 11, 1642 when Cornelis Melyn of Staten Island brought a suit against Elsie's step-father, Egbert Wouterszen, the husband and gaurdian of Elsie's mother, Engeltje Jans. Elsie had been in the service of Cornelis Melyn, but she had gotten engaged before her term of service was up. Elsie testified that her mother and a friend had brought a young man to Staten Island for her to marry, but she refused. She later changed her mind, and decided to married the young man, Adriaen Pietersen of Alcmaer. Adriaen was in Manhattan by February 3, 1640. Elsie presented to the Court the pocket handkerchief that she had received as a marriage present. On October 16, 1642, Elsie informed the Court that she had sent for Adriaen Pietersen. Upon his arrival, she accompanied him on his yawl. A week later, Melyn had Pietersen brought before the Court where he charged him with the abduction of Elsie Jans. Pietersen was forced to bring her back to Melyn, and was told that he could receive her again once he paid for her release. Adriaen Pietersen finally married Elsie Jans Van Breestede on May 17, 1643. They had four children.

Following Adriaen Pietersen's death, Elsie remarried Hendrick Jochemsz Schoonmaker sometime prior to October 14, 1653 at Fort Orange (Albany, NY). Elsie was described as "being in childbed" on November 9, 1653. Hendrick and Elsie were probably married in 1652. They had eight children, only four of which survived to adulthood.

The children of Elsie Jans Van Breestede:
(By her first husband, Adriaen Pietersen)
1. Jannetje married Jan Barnetsen Kunst. She was mentioned in the will of her step-father, Hendrick Jochemsz Schoonmaker.
2. Sytje married Jacob Abramsz Santvort. She was mentioned in the will of her step-father, Hendrick Jochemsz Schoonmaker.
3. Lysbeth died young.
4. Pieter was brought up by Hendrick Jochemsz Schoonmaker after his father's death. He shared Hendrick's estate equally with his three surviving step-brothers and his step-sister.

(by her second husband Hendrick Jochemsz Schoonmaker)
5. An unnamed child who died at or shortly after birth. A Court record says that Hendrick's wife was "in childbed" with this child on November 9, 1653. The Deacon's accounts of the Albany Reformed Church show that Hendrick buried this child on January 17, 1654.
6. An unnamed child who died at or shortly after birth. The Deacon's accounts of the Albany Reformed Church show that Hendrick buried this child on January 23, 1655. Hendrick had a funeral for this child on Tuesday February 2, 1655.
7. Jochem Hendricksen was born at Albany sometime between 1656 and 1658. He married twice.
8. Egbert Hendricksen was born at Albany sometime between 1658 and 1662. He married on October 13, 1683 to Annatje, a daughter of Samuel Berry. Egbert and Annatje had nine children.
9. Engeltjen was baptized on March 18, 1663 at the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, NY. Her sponsors were Engeltjen (surname not given), Jakemyntje Cornelis, and Toomes (Thomas) Chambers. Engeltjen married (1st) Nicholas Anthony (baptized at New York City on January 28, 1657), the son of Allard Anthony and Henrica Wessels. Nicholas was the sheriff of Ulster County in 1693, and was also on Stuyvesant's "Nine Men" advisory council in 1653. He also held other important offices. Nicholas died about 1696. Engeltjen married (2nd) on April 30, 1699 to Stephen Gasherie. Stephen was a native of Marrenne, France. Engletjen had six children with Nicholas Anthony and two children with Stephen Gasherie.
10. Hendrick Hendricksen was the twin brother of Volkert Hendricksen. They were baptized on May 17, 1665 at the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, NY. Their sponsors were Jan Jansen van Breestee, Volchert Jansen (Douw), Rut Jacobsen, Sytje Ariaensen, and Marretje Andriessen. Hendrick Hendricksen married on March 24, 1688 to Gertruy De Witt (baptized at Kingston on October 15, 1668), the daughter of Tjerck Claessen De Witt and Barbara Andriessen. Hendrick was a resident of Rochester, Ulster Co. where he died in January or February of 1712. Hendrick had a son named Tjerck who married Theodotia Whitaker at Kingston on November 21, 1729 (Banns registered on November 2, 1729). Both Tjerck and Theodotia were born and residing in Kingston at the time of their marriage.
11. Volkert Hendricksen was the twin brother of Hendrick Hendricksen. They were baptized on May 17, 1665 at the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, NY. He had the same sponsors as his brother. Volckert was named after his uncle, Volckert Jansen Douw. Volckert Hendricksen probably died young.
12. Hillitje was baptized on October 20, 1669 at the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, NY. Her sponsors were Jacob Abraham and Grietie Rutsen. Hillitje probably died young.

Click here to visit the Schoonmaker Family Genealogy Forum
Write to the
Schoonmaker Family Association
Huguenot Historical Society
P. O. Box 121
New Paltz, NY 12561

Resources

"The Schoonmaker Family: Descendants of Hendrick Jochemsz Schoonmaker 1624-1683," compiled by Ruth P. Heidgerd, 1974
The January 1888 issue of the "New York Genealogical and Biographical Record," pages 22-26
"History of the Huguenot Emigration to America," by Charles W. Baird, D.D., 1966, pages 190-200
"Dear `Cousin': A Charted Genealogy of the Descendants of Anneke Jans Bogardus (1605-1663) to the 5th Generation" by William Brower Bogardus and Peter D. Béla Mérey, 1996
"Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, 1660-1809" by Roswell R. Hoes, 1891 (Reprinted in 1997)" (1)
1) David Jansen's Northeast United States Genealogy Home Page

[NI1759] "Martinus Schoonmaker [b. March 1737], was a descendant of Joachim Schoonmaker and Lydia, who resided in the town of Rochester, in Ulster County, N.Y. Joachim and Lydia had children: Daniel John, Jacobus, Martinus, and Helena." (1)
"Posted by John Schoonmaker [jschoonmaker@hotmail.com] on July 31, 1998 at 23:22:06:
In Reply to: Hudson Valley SCHOONMAKERS posted by Nancy Schoonmaker [nschoonmaker@ibm.net] on July 21, 1998 at 17:04:49::
Contact the Schoonmaker Family History Society in New Paltz. They've got a library just across the corner from the Reformed church, and the whole history documented back to Jochem in 1682 (??--or about that...), in any case, I'm afraid, long after Henry & Co. went home. I seem to remember hearing that Jochem was a soldier in the employ of the Dutch East India Company..." (2)
Website:Website Description:--------------------------------------------------
1) The Bergen Family, p. 112
2) Genforum Posting

Huguenot Historical Society
P.O. Box 339
New Paltz, NY 12561
Office: (914) 255-1660
Fax: (914) 255-0376
Hours: 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Monday-Friday
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Director: John H. Braunline
-- or email me at: Huguenothistoricalsociety@worldnet.att.net
Note: As we do not yet have the resources or personnel to handle the volume of email we are getting, PLEASE include your snail-mail address in any online correspondence. Thank you!
President: Dr. Dale A. BeVier
1st Vice President: Peter Fairweather
2nd Vice President: Ester Deyo Aldridge
Secretary: Barbara Bevier Sacks
Treasurer: Kenneth Schoonmaker
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Founded in 1894 "To record the virtues and to perpetuate the memory of the Huguenot patentees of New Paltz and of the early settlers upon the patent", the 5000 member organization owns and operates the National Historic landmark Huguenot Street, a collection of stone house museums with construction dates ranging from 1690 - 1894.
The settlement was originally the focus of a 39,683 acre royal patent granted to the French refugees on 26 May 1677. Included at the site are 5 colonial-era stone houses, a Federal period house, a late Victorian-era house, a French church & cemetery, the carriage museum, Schoonmaker Library, Grimm Gallery & Museum, Deyo Hall Visitors Center & Gift Shop, The Huguenot Trail, and Harcourt Wildlife Sanctuary.
The Society owns and operates a state Historic Landmark - Locust Lawn - a 1814 Federal Mansion, the 1738 Terwilliger Homestead, and Little Wings Bird Sanctuary located in Gardiner, NY as well as the 1818 Friends Meeting House in Plattekill, NY. The Jacob Elting Burying Ground and the Put Corners Ground are owned by the Society. The Huguenot Historical Society and Locust Lawn are members of the National Trust.
The Huguenot Historical Society is chartered by the New York State Board of Regents and is supported in part by its 11 Family Associations: Bevier-Elting, Crispell, Deyo, Dubois, Freer-Low, Gerow, Hasbrouck, LeFevre, Magny, Schoonmaker, and Terwilliger Family Associations.

[NI1784] "Friderich Merckel (Hunter Lists #496)
The ancestral home of this family was at 6733 Hassloch (7 km. e. of Neustadt a. d. Weinstrasse [and about 10 km. w. of Speyer and the Rhine River]; Chbks. begin 1700, Ref.)...
With his first wife Anna Barbara in Germany, the children of Friederich Merckel were:
1) Anna (HJ), md. 6 April 1720 Peter Winne (Kingston Ref. Chbk.)...
2) Lorentz...
3) Anna Maria, bpt. 21 Dec 1701...
4) Johann Matthias...
iii) Anna, bpt. 14 Oct 1739 - sp.: Pieter Wenne and Antje Merkel (Kingston Ref. Chbk.)." (1)
1) Jones, Jr., Hank Z.; Palatine Emigrants to New York, pp. 617-619

[NI1810] "Descendants of Pieter Winne
Generation No. 1

1. Pieter2 Winne (Franciscus1) was born Bef. April 14, 1609 in Ghent, East Flanders, Belgium1,2, and died 1693 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY3. He married (1) Jennetjie Albertsz. He married (2) Aechie Jans Van Schaick 1642 in Beverwyck, Albany, NY3, daughter of Nicolaus Albertsz and Rebecca. He married (3) Tannatje Adams 1658 in Albany, Albany, NY.

More About Pieter Winne:
Ancestral File Number 1: 45QF-V1
Ancestral File Number 2: 11QK-6NV
Ancestral File Number 3: 77JF-9P
Baptism: April 14, 1609, St. Bavon's Cathedral, Ghent, East Flanders, Belgium3
Immigration: Bet. 1620 - 1664, New Netherlands4
Occupation: Magistrate5
Religion: Christian6
Will: July 06, 1684, Bethlehem, Albany, NY7

More About Aechie Jans Van Schaick:
Ancestral File Number 1: 45QF-XC
Ancestral File Number 2: 11QK-6FF
Ancestral File Number 3: 77JF-BJ

More About Tannatje Adams:
Ancestral File Number 1: 45QF-XC
Ancestral File Number 2: 45QF-W6
Ancestral File Number 3: 77JF-BV

Child of Pieter Winne and Aechie Van Schaick is:
2 i. Pieter Pietersz3 Winne , Jr., born Abt. 1643 in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, West Indies8; died Bet. 1703 - 1763 in Albany County, NY9. He married Jannetie Arents Pier Aft. January 05, 1681/82 in Kingston, Ulster, NY10.
More About Pieter Pietersz Winne , Jr.:
Ancestral File Number: 45QG-ZN
Immigration: 1676, New York State11

More About Jannetie Arents Pier:
Date born 2: Abt. 1663, Esopus, Ulster, NY12
Ancestral File Number 1: 77JF-S9
Ancestral File Number 2: 77J4-NC
Baptism: July 12, 1664, Kingston, Ulster, NY13
Baptism Minister: Domine Hermannus Blom of Kingston, NY14
Baptism Witnesses: Jan Willemsen Hoochteylingh, Barber Jans, Lowies Duboey15
Religion: Dutch Reformed15

Children of Pieter Winne and Tannatje Adams are:
3 i. Lavinus Van Schaik3 Winne, born 1647 in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles, West Indies; died November 15, 1706 in Albany, Albany, NY. He married (1) Willemtje Schermerhorn. He married (2) Teuntje Martens. He married (3) Willemptje Viele. He married (4) Teuntje Van Buren 1682 in Albany, Albany, NY.
4 ii. Jacobus Winne, born 1659 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY; died September 25, 1706. He married Marietje Bronk October 07, 1696 in Albany, Albany, NY16.
5 iii. Frans Pietersen Winne, born Abt. 1660 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY. He married Elsje Gansevoort May 12, 1689 in Albany, Albany, NY.
6 iv. Pieter Winnen , Jr., born November 20, 1661 in Kingston, Ulster, NY. He married Jane Albery 1682 in Puracas16.
7 v. Allette Winne, born Abt. 1662 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY. She married Caspar Leendertse Conyn Bef. July 06, 1684.
8 vi. Adam Winne, born Abt. 1663 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY; died Aft. July 06, 1684. He married Anna Loockermans August 08, 1683 in Albany, Albany, NY16.
9 vii. Daniel Winne, born 1663 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY; died 1757 in Albany County, NY. He married Dirkje Van Nes March 16, 1697/98 in Albany County, NY.
10 viii. Killiaen Winne, born Abt. 1664 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY; died Aft. July 06, 1684. He married Antonia Goesor Hoes.
11 ix. Tomas Winne, born Abt. 1666 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY; died Bef. October 20, 1705. He married Teuntje Janse Goes October 20, 1689 in Albany County, NY.
12 x. Catalyntje Winne, born Abt. 1668 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY; died Bef. August 28, 1707. She married Hendrick Janse Witbeck Bet. 1682 - 1690 in Claverack, Columbia, NY16.
More About Hendrick Janse Witbeck:
Baptism: July 02, 1653, Reformed Church, New Amsterdam, New Netherlands16
Religion: Dutch Reformed16
13 xi. Marten Pietersen Winne, born Abt. 1671 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY; died July 08, 1737 in Bergen, Essex, NJ. He married Margarita Symonse Van Winckel October 30, 1697 in Hackensack, Bergen, NJ.
14 xii. Rachel Winne, born Abt. 1673 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY; died June 10, 1727 in Schenectady, Schenectady, NY. She married Jellis Adam Fonda December 11, 1695 in Albany, Albany, NY.
15 xiii. Eva Winne, born Abt. 1675 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY; died Abt. 1703. She married John Woodard December 07, 1697 in New York16.

Descendants of Pieter Winne

Endnotes
1. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree, pre-1600 to Present, (Novato, CA: Broderbund Software, Inc., 1995-1997), "CD-ROM," vol. 2, no. 0560.
2. Van Laer, A., Early Records of the City and County of Albany and Colony of Rennselaerswyck, (Albany, NY: University of the State of New York, 1919), vol. 4.
3. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): Ancestral File (TM), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1992), "CD-ROM."
4. Filby, P. William, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, (Detroit, MI: Gale, 1981-present), vol. 1.
5. Van Laer, A., Early Records of the City and County of Albany and Colony of Rennselaerswyck, (Albany, NY: University of the State of New York, 1919), vol. 4.
6. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): Ancestral File (TM), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1992), "CD-ROM."
7. Van Laer, A., Early Records of the City and County of Albany and Colony of Rennselaerswyck, (Albany, NY: University of the State of New York, 1919), vol. 4.
8. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Family Search (R): International Genealogical Index (R), (Salt Lake City, UT: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1994), "CD-ROM."
9. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree, pre-1600 to Present, (Novato, CA: Broderbund Software, Inc., 1995-1997), "CD-ROM," vol. 9, no. 3864.
10. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 506, no. 51.
11. Filby, P. William, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, (Detroit, MI: Gale, 1981-present), 1982 suppl., p. 925.
12. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree, pre-1600 to Present, (Novato, CA: Broderbund Software, Inc., 1995-1997), "CD-ROM," vol. 14, no. 907.
13. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 3, no. 39.
14. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 3.
15. Hoes, Roswell R., Baptism and Marriage Records of the Old Dutch Church, Kingston, NY, (New York, NY: Vinne Press, 1891 - Reprint: Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1997), p. 3, no. 39.
16. Broderbund Software, Inc., World Family Tree, pre-1600 to Present, (Novato, CA: Broderbund Software, Inc., 1995-1997), "CD-ROM," vol. 9, no. 3864. " (1)
1) Ancestors of John O. Bailey

[NI1811] "1. Pieter2 Winne (Franciscus1) was born Bef. April 14, 1609 in Ghent, East Flanders, Belgium1,2, and died 1693 in Bethlehem, Albany, NY3. He married (1) Jennetjie Albertsz. He married (2) Aechie Jans Van Schaick 1642 in Beverwyck, Albany, NY3, daughter of Nicolaus Albertsz and Rebecca. [PROBLEM: FROM HER PATRONYMIC HER FATHER WAS NAMED JANS. Source is the Ancestral File!] He married (3) Tannatje Adams 1658 in Albany, Albany, NY." (1)
1) Ancestors of John O. Bailey

[NI1812] "PIER FAMILY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY
by Lorine McGinnis Schulze >
This article may be freely linked to but not duplicated in any fashion without my written consent.

THEUNIS JANSZ. PIER was born ca 1600 in Deventer, Overijsel, Netherlands. He married Jannettie Arentsdr. on September 14, 1624 in Amsterdam Netherlands. Theunis Jansz's sons Jan and Arent, were the immigrant ancestors of the PIER family in America.

JAN THEUNISSEN from Amsterdam was listed on board the St. Jan Baptiste , with two children ages 1 1/2 and 4 years old on 9 May 1661 sailing from Netherlands to New Netherland. His brother Arent Teunissen with wife and two children 7 and 4 years old was also with him on this voyage.

Jan Theunis and his wife Maritie Jans had the following chilren:

Rachel Jans Pier b ca 1657/59 Netherlands m1 ca 1697 Arle Franssen De Lange m2 April 17, 1699 Albert Hendrickszen Ploeg
unknown child b. ca 1657/59 Netherlands
Teunis Jansen Pier bpt March 5, 1663/64 New Amsterdam NY m 6 Oct. 1684 Bergen NY Catrina Tomasse Cadmus

A quote from "The Lost Palatine" 16:10 states that Jan Theunissen and wife had two daughters on board De St. Jan Baptiste in 1661. I am not familiar with this book, and the children are not given a gender on the transcribed passenger list but this is very important to solving the puzzle of who is Jan Pier who married Tryntie Pieterse Ostrander b ca 1658!
ARENT THEUNISSEN from Amsterdam was also listed on board the St. Jan Baptiste, with two children ages 7 and 4 years old on 9 May 1661 sailing from Netherlands to New Netherland.
[Ancestral Files give a marriage date of October 31, 1660 in Amsterdam. Either this is a second marriage for Arent or wht information is wrong.]
Arent Theunissen and his wife Geesjie Jans had the following children:

unknown child b. ca 1653 Netherlands
unknown child b. ca 1657 Netherlands
Harmen Arends Pier bpt August 10, 1661 NY
Jannetie Arends Pier bpt July 12, 1664 m 1681/82 Pieter Pietersen Winne
Gepie Arends Pier bpt March 25, 1668 Kingston NY m1. Hendrick Adriaanz m2 1699 Willem Traphagen
Teunis Arends Pier b ca 1670 m. 1702 Margaret (Grietje) Du Foe/Dufour/Devoor


I welcome any and all information on the PIER~PEER~PEAR surname in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ill inois and Ontario! I will gladly share my extensive files on this surname. " (1)
1)

[NI1863] "FRIDERICH MERCKEL (Hunter Lists #496)
[GEN 1: Johann Fredrich Merckel b 1663 Habloch, Germany m Anna Barbara unk. ] (2)
The ancestral home of this family was at 6733 Hassloch (7 km. e. of Neustadt a.d. Weinstrasse [Hassloch is in southern Rhineland-Palatinate about 10 km. w. of Speyer and the Rhine and 20 km. sw. of Ludwigshafen.]; Chbks. begin 1700, Ref.). The name of the 1st w/o Friederich Merckel was Anna Barbara, according to the Hassloch registers.

Friderich Merckel made his first entry on the Hunter Lists July 1710 with 3 pers. over 10 yrs. and 2 under 10. The notation for 4 Aug 1710 mentions the same number in the household, and then
records a special entry for his wife, the Wid. Mayin; the Ledger section adds Christoph May's Widdow md. with Frederic Merckel. The family showed 4 over 10 and 2 under 10 4 Oct 1710; they were entered next to Philipp Helmer on this date, and Helmer originated near Hassloch at Neustadt a.d. Weinstrasse (HJ). The household was noted with 5 pers. over 10 and 2 under 10 on 31 Dec 1710, over 10 and 1 under 10 yrs. on 24 June 1711, with 7 over 10 yrs. on 29 Sept 1711, with 7 over 10 and 1 under 10 on 24 Dec 1711, and finally with 6 pers. over 10 yrs. and 1 pers. under 10 yrs 13 Sept 1712. Fredk Mirckle, 1 man, 2 lads aged 9 - 15 yrs., 1 woman, 3 maids aged 9 - 15 yrs., were in Ulster Co. in 1710/11 (West Camp Census). Fredk Markel was nat. 8 and 9 Sept 1715 (Kingston Nats.). Friederich ... (some translations give "M..ue..") and Anna Barbara, with 6 oh. were at Beckmansland ca. 1716/17 (Simmendinger Register). Ffredrick Markel was taxed £10 in Kingston in 1718/19, and £12 there in 1720/21 (Ulster Co. Tax Lists). Frederik Merkel was a freeholder of Kingston in 1728 (Ulster Co. Freeholders). The Kingston Trustees Records mention him in Book I, Part B, pp. 96 & 97, and in Book II, pp. 13 & 14. With his 1st wife Anna Barbara in Germany, the ch. of Friederich Merckel were:
1) Anna (HJ), md. 25 Nov 1720 Peter Winne (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
2) Lorentz (HJ), md. 6 April 1724 Sibylla Catharina Kehl (Kingston Ref.. Chbk.). The Kingston Trustees Records mention Lowrens Merkel in Book I, Part C, pp. 118 & 119. Lowrens Merkell was a freeholder of Kingston in 1728 (Ulster Co. Freeholders). The ch. of Lorentz were:...
i) Marias, bpt. 14 Feb 1725 - sp.: Manus Hommel and Marytjen Markel (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
ii) Gertrauds, bpt. 26 June 1726 - sp., Jury Keel and Geertruy Wenne (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
iii) Elisabetha, bpt. 21 April 1728 - sp.: Mathys Merkel [uncle Johann Matthias] and Elisabeth Keel (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
3) Anna Maria, bpt. 21 Dec 1701 - sp., Anna Maria - d/o Jacob Rumlin the carpenter here (HaBloch Chbk.). A Maria Merckel md. Johann Michael Planck 20 Nov 1738 (Katsbaan Ref. Chbk.).
4) Johann Matthias, bpt. 20 June 1703 - sp., Joh. Mathes Loffler (?) - Gemeinsmann and butcher here (Hassloch Chbk.). Mattys Merkell was in the foot Company of the Kingston, Ulster Co. Militia in 1738 (Report of the State Historian, Vol. I, p. 604). Martininus Marckell was nat. Oct 1740, and called a farmer of Ulster Co. at his nat. (Denizations, Naturalizations, & Oaths of Allegiance in Colonial N.Y., by Kenneth Scott and Kenn Stryker-Rodda, p. 44). He md. Margaretha Kehl (HJ) and had issue:
i) Friederich bpt. 30 June 1734 - sp., Coenraat Regtmeyer and Barbara Alman [mother-in- law] (Kingston Ref. Chbk.). A Friederich Merckel md. Lea Schmidt (HJ), and they had issue bpt. at Kingston Ref. and Marbletown Ref. Churches; perhaps this man was Friederichs, s/o Johann Matthias, or perhaps the man who md. Lea was a Friederichm Jr., s/o the emigrant Friederich (HJ).
ii) Wilhelms, bpt. 30 May 1737 - sp.: Barent Markel [uncle Bernhardt Merckel] and Saartje Nieukirk (KatsbaanRef. Chbk.). He probably md. Rachel Becker and had issue bpt. at Katsbaan Ref. Church (HJ).
iii) Anna, bpt. 14 Oct 1739 - sp.: Pieter Wenne [#820] and Antje Merkel [#821] (Kingston Ref. Chbk.). She md. Henrich Hendrixen 26 Nov 1756 (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
iv) Gertraud, bpt. 20 June 1742 - sp.: Peter Wenne Jr. [s/o #820] and Geertje Langedyk [d/o #822] (Kingston Ref. Chbk.). She md. Valentin Schramm 28 Dec 1761 (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
v) Johannes, bpt. 10 Sept 1744 - sp., Jan Wulfin and wife Grietje Miller (Katsbaan Ref. Chbk.). A Johannes Merckel md. Jantje Wennie 29 Nov 1775 (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
vi) Mattheus, bpt. 22 Nov 1747 - sp.: Frederich Wenne [s/o 820] and Jannetje Kort (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
vii) Margaretha, bpt. 25 June 1750 - sp.: Arend Winne [#410] and Annaatje Winne [#411?] (Katsbaan Ref. Chbk.).
viii) Maria, bpt. 14 Oct 1752 sp.: Laurents Wenne [s/o #820] and Marretje Osterhout (Katsbaan Ref. Chbk.).
ix) Lorentz, bpt. 19 April 1756 - sp., Willem Regtmeyer and wife Antje Hommel (Katsbaan Ref. Chbk.).
5) Elisabetha, bpt. 24 Dec 1704 - sp.: Elisab. - w/o Ludwig Wurth (Hassloch Chbk.).
6) Johann Andreas, bpt. 5 Sept 1706 - sp., Joh. Andr. Schabebauer here (Hassloch Chbk.).
7) Margaretha Philippina, bpt. 23 Dec 1708 (Hassloch. Chbk.).
By his 2nd wife Anna Barbara Alman wid/o Christoph May, the ch. of Friederich Merckel were:
8) Johann Adam, b. 10 Dec 1711 - sp.: Johann Adam Friderich and wife Regina (West Camp Luth. Chbk.).
9) Marta Elisabetha, b. 16 Feb 1713 - sp.: Maria Elisabetha Straub (West Camp Luth. Chbk.). She md. Jacob Brink 22 Dec 1732 (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
10) Bernhardt, bpt. as Barent 5 June 1715 - sp.: Barent Burhans and Margriet Jansz (Kingston Ref. Chbk.). The case of Barent Merkelmvs. Jurjan Tappan was recorded in of Common Pleas at Kingston in 1741. Barnet, Wilhelmus, Petrus, Benj'n, and, William Mercle were all on the roll of Capt. Stephen Nottingham in 1758 (Report of the State Historian, Vol. I, pp. 836 - 838). Barent md. 1st Cornelia Van Der Merken, and md. 2nd Barbara Van Der Merken 13 Sept 1747 (both Klngston Ref. Chbk.). By his lst wife Cornelia he had issue:
i) Benjamin, bpt. 14 Oct 1739 - sp., Joh, Van Wagening and Rachel Van Der Merken (Kingston Ref. Chbk.). A Benjamin Merkel md. Margaretha Neukirch (HJ). Papers in the estate of Benjamin Merkle, late of Rochester, were issued 19 June 1789 (Ulster Co. Administrations Book A). He is mentioned in Ulster Co. in the Revolution, p. 155).
ii) Elias, bpt. 17 Oct 1742 - sp., Wilhelmus Merkel and Barbara Van Der Merken (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
iii) Catharina, bpt. 23 June 1745 - sp., Hans Vandermerken and Susanna Bosch (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
11) Eva, b. 21 Dec 1716 - sp., Eva Mueller (West Camp Luth. Chbk.). She md. Jeremias Kittel 16 Sept 1739 (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
12) Elisabetha, b. 16 Feb 1719 - sp., Johann Klein and wife (West Camp Luth. Chbk.). She md. Thomas Bosch 9 March 1739 (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
13) Johannes, bpt. 25 Sept 1720 - sp., Christoffel Mouwel and Annetjen Mouwel (Kingston Ref. Chbk.). A Johannes Merckel, single man b. Kingston and lives at Smithsfield, md. Anna Elisabetha Schnaub, single woman b. Punstadt, Germany, 10 Sept 1746 (Walpsck Ref. Chbk.).
14) Wilhelmus, bpt. 22 July 1722 - sp., Wilhelmus Brandouw and Elisabeth Brandouw (Kingston Ref. Chbk.). He md. Sarah Koch (Kok) 4 April 1752 (Kingston Ref. Chbk.). They had
issue:
i) James, bpt. 22 Jan 1753 - sp., James Scot and Susanna Bettis (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
ii) Wilhelmus, bpt. 22 Jan 1754 - sp.: Barent Merkel and Grietje Hoffman (Marbletown Ref. Chbk.).
iii) Johannes bpt. 17 0ct. 1755 - sp., Samuell Kock and Marritje Kock (Marbletown Ref. Chbk.).
iv) Friederich, bpt. 19 Dec 1756 - sp.: Jacob Nottingham and Magdalena Kok (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
v) Petrus, bpt. 29 Oct 1758 - sp.: Petrus Markel and his wife Sara West Broek (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
vi) Sarah, bpt. 24:Nov 1761 - sp., Cornelius Coole and wife Maria Schoonmaker (Marbletown Ref. Chbk.).
vii) Alexander, bpt. 17 July 1763 - sp., Johannis Schomaker and Cathrina Schomaker (Marbletown Ref. Chbk.).
viii) Benjamin, bpt. 16 Dec 1764 - sp.: Benjamin Markel and Barbara Bosch (K!ngston Ref. Chbk.).
ix) Jacobs, bpt. 21 Sept 1766 - sp.: Frederick Busch and wife Jane (Marbletown Ref. Chbk.).
x) Gerrebraggie, bpt. 30 Oct 1768 (Marbletown Ref. Chbk.).
xi) Abraham, bpt. 26 Dec 1770 (Marbletown Ref. Chbk).
15) Petrus, bpt. 14 Feb 1725 - sp., Pieter 0verbag and Maria Overbag (Kingston Ref. Chbk.)
16) Petrus, bpt. 25 Sept 1726 - sp., Marius Hommel and Grietjen Snyder (Kingston Ref. Chbk.). He md. Sarah Westbrook (HJ), and they had ch.
i) Johannes, bpt. 27 Jan 1760 - sp., Thomas Bosch (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
ii) Catharina, bpt. 11 April 1762 - sp., Johannes Van Wagenen and wife Lena Kittel (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
iii) Jacob, bpt. 1764 - sp., Jacob Keator Jr. and.Sara Ennist (Marbletown Ref. Chbk.).
iv) Elisabetha, bpt. 3 June 1766 -sp.: Jacobus Bos and Maria Bos (Kingston Ref. Chbk.)
v) Lea, bpt. 10 Oct 1770 (Kingston Ref. Chbk.).
vi) Friederich, bpt. 26 Dec 1772 (Marbletown Ref. Chbk.).
17) Anna, bpt. 18 May 1729 - sp., Zacharias Bakker and Maria Merkel (Kingston Rsf. Chbk.). She probably md Jacobus Bosch Jr. 13 Oct 1745 (Kingston Ref. Chbk.)." (1)
1) The Palatine Families of New York - by Henry Z. Jones Jr. 1985, pp. 617-621
2) Lorine McGinnis Schulze; The Olive Tree Genealogy; My Palatine Ancestors

[NI1892] Since his son was named Jan Jansen van Oosterhout, he must have been Jan, probably also of Oosterhout.

[NI1962] Information on this person and his children comes from a group sheet prepared by an unknown person, which I found at the Portsmouth Library.
"Samuel Burt who died in Scioto Co. 1808, is suspected to be the father of Benjamin, as both Benjamin and Christopher are listed on the will. There are also 2 Samuel's on this will.
There is Samuel B. Burt (Ben's son) and a Samuel J. Burt (most probably Ben's brother), besides Abigail and Christopher, there was a sister Hannah, and another brother John.
The following are * christening dates from the Church of Christ in Salem, Westchester Co. N.Y.
Father Samuel;
Children; Samuel * Oct.9,1757
Hannah * May 1,1763
Benjamin * Apr.18,1762 ** Mar.10,1761
John * Feb.17,1765
Christopher * Apr.5,1767 **Jan.1,1768
Abigail * Aug.20,1769 ** 1769

** Dates we have as birth dates, The dates, and names of Benjamin, Christopher, and Abigail, are just too close, for this not to be the family of our Benjamin Burt.
We also suspect that the father of this family Samuel Burt, is the son Samuel of Christopher Burt and Joanna St. John who raised their family in Ridgefield, Fairfield Co., Ct., a mere 10 miles from Salem, N.Y. And Christopher's parents were Benjamin Burt and Sarah Belden, Benjamins father, David Burt, David's father Henry Burt and Eulalia Marche. There is a Henry Burt Book, but our line is not there it is documented to the son Samuel, who we suspect is Ben's father." (1)
"Samuel6 Burt (3748), b. 17 Jan 1733/34 Fairfield, Fairffield Co, CT, d. 01 Sep 1808 Scioto Co, OH
+Martha6 TBD (3749), b. circa 1730, m. before 1757 Westchester Co, NY, d. circa 1814 Scioto Co, OH
Samuel B7 Burt (3763), b. circa Oct 1757 Salem, Westchester Co, NY
Benjamin F7 Burt (1249), b. 10 Mar 1761 Salem, Westchester Co, NY, d. 28 Feb 1849 Scioto Co, OH
Benjamin F7 Burt..." (2)
1) 10/5/98 e-mail from Larry Hindley >
2) Charles Mercer chart received 10/16/988

[NI1969] Information on Christopher Burt, his wife, children and parents, comes from a family group sheet by an unknown person, which I found in the Portsmouth, Ohio Library.
"Christopher5 Burt (10376), b. 14 Apr 1704 Chamble, Quebec, Canada, d. after 08 Sep 1742 Ridgefield, Fairfield Co, CT
+Johanna5 St John (10378), b. circa 1707 Norwalk, Fairfield Co, CT, m. circa 1727, d. Ridgefield, Fairfield Co, CT
John6 Burt (10379), b. 14 Aug 1729 Ridgefield, Fairfield Co, CT
Abigail6 Burt (10380), b. 14 Apr 1732 Fairfield Co, CT
Sarah6 Burt (10381), b. 14 Apr 1732 Fairfield Co, CT
Samuel6 Burt (3748), b. 17 Jan 1733/34 Fairfield, Fairffield Co, CT, d. 01 Sep 1808 Scioto Co, OH
+Martha6 TBD (3749), b. circa 1730, m. before 1757 Westchester Co, NY, d. circa 1814 Scioto Co, OH" (1)
"I believe that the correct birth place for Christopher Burt is Chambly, Quebec, Canada. This is currently Fort Chambly Historic National Historic Park on the Richelieu River, ten miles east of Montreal. According to another of the Deerfield captives, Rev. John Williams, the captives and their captors arrived in Chambly on April 15. My sources give his birth date as April 14. That would have been a day when they were traveling by canoe on the Richelieu River towards Chambly. It seems likely that the birth took place there and not Varennes to where they must have moved later.
There are two in-print sources on this incredible saga:
Demos, John; The Unredeemed Captive (Vintage Books, New York 1994)
Stiles, T.J.; In Their Own Words: The Colonizers (Berkeley Publishing Group, New York, 1998)
I recommend them both.
John Hope" Reply to Terri >
1) Charles Mercer chart received 10/16/988

[NI1970] "According to Orline's book, Joanna, born 170?, married to Christopher Burt, December 21, 1727. Christopher Burt was born April 14, 1704. They had 6 children, John, Abigail, Sarah, Samuel, Mary, and Joseph. Joanna was the daughter of Captain Samuel St. John and Rebecca Olmstead. I don't know which Mark you are referring to, as I am not familiar with Jocobus. There are several Marks mentioned in Orline's book." (1)
1) Dave St. John (DWRN89A@Prodigy.com))

[NI1974] "Benjamin, b. November 17, 1680, m. October 19, 1702, Sarah Belden. Both taken captives by the French and Indians on the burning of Deerfield, February 29, 1704 and taken to Canada. Returned a year later and he settled in Ridgefield, Conn." (1)
"There are some curious - and tantalizing - details [of the capture of the survivors of the Deerfield massacre]. Among the captured were Benjamin Burt "& wife great with child." (Six weeks later, in Canada, Sarah Burt would be safely delivered of a son; but imagine her experience en route.)" (2)
"Benjamin Burt, the son of Jonathan Burt [not according to Henry M. Burt] and grandson of Henry Burt, was indeed married to Sarah Belden on Oct. 19, 1702. Both settled at Deerfield, Mass and survived the Deerfield Massacre. They had at least nine children: Christopher, Seaborn, Benjamin, Abigail, John, Sarah, Daniel, Thankful, Mary." (3)
"My wife is a direct descendant of Henry Burt and Ulalia Marche who arrived in the Massaschusetts Bay Colony from England in the 1630's. They first settled in Roxbury and then Springfield, MA where he died in 1662. Their children were: Abigail, Jonathan, Elizabeth, David, Mary, Nathaniel, Dorcas, Hannah, Patience, and Mary. My wife is descended from Jonathan (b. 1630) who fathered Benjamin (1680). Benjamin married Sarah Belden and lived in Deerfield, MA. This family eventually relocated to Norwalk and then Ridgefield, Conn. where Benjamin died in 1759 or 1760.
His son, also named Benjamin, (b. 1707) eventually settled in Warwick NY where his descendants still own the family farm and one wrote a book about the Burt family. The line goes on through to Chemung County NY, and Potter County, PA (where Burtville is located.) " (4)
"Benjamin4 Burt (10382), b. 17 Nov 1680 Northampton, Hampshire Co., MA, d. 20 May 1759, Ridgefield, Fairfield, CT" (5)
1) Burt, Henry M.; The First Century of the History of Springfield (Springfield 1899) Vol. II p. 541
2) Demos, John; The Unredeemed Captive (Vintage Books, New York 1994) p. 24
3) GenForum posting June 21, 1998 by Roger Carver >
4) GenForum posting March 12, 1998 by Roger Carver >
5) Charles Mercer chart received 10/16/988

[NI1978] "Samuel's parents were Matthias and Rachel Bouton." (1)
"21 September 1976 359 C632
Samuel St. John = Rebecca Olmsted
Captain Samuel St. John, the son of Matthias St. John and his unknown first wife, was born in Norwalk, Connecticut, probably in the early or mid 1680s. He came from Norwalk with his father and his brother Matthew and was an original proprietor of Ridgefield, Conn., in September 1708 when 24 persons bought the land from the Indians. In 1709 the proprietors took possession of this tract of 20,000 acres and divided it into lots, of which number 1 fell to Capt. St. John. This lot is located on the east side of the south end of Main street. In 1712 he is referred to as "Serjeant St. John." In 1718 he is termed Lt. St. John, and in May 1727 he was commissioned Captain of the train band of Ridgefield. In 1718 he was chosen a townsman; in 1720 fence viewer; and in 1729 surveyor and moderator of the town meeting.
Sometime between 1729 and 1741 he moved to Cortlandt Manor in Westchester County, New York. He is last mentioned in the records on 7 September 1742 when he sold land; in the deed he describes himself as "late of Ridgefield, now living on Cortland Manor in ye County Westchester." He died before 1756 as his son Noah disposed of some of his father's lands in Ridgefield in that year.
He married Rebecca Olmsted, the daughter of John Olmsted and Mary Benedict. Rebecca Olmsted was born in 1681 in Norwalk, Conn. They were married about 1701 or 1702. She was a member of the
South Salem, N.Y. Church before 21 July 1752. Perhaps her husband had died by then and she was then living with one of her sons at South Salem.
Children:
Samuel born ca. 1703, died 9 November 1777, married thrice
Joanna married 21 December 1727 Christopher Burt
Jane married 27 August 1730 in Ridgefield Ebenezer Brooks
Perigrina married 27 August 1730 Nathan Northrop
Abigail died 28 April 1720 in Ridgefield
Abigail (?) Supposed to have married in 1724 John Marvin, Jr. (Reference 2)
Rebecca married 26 December 1722, Samuel Lobdell
Noah born in 1713, died 5 October 1778, married Jane Smith who died in 1778
Daniel married Sarah ---, lived at South Salem, N.Y.
Job married Sarah ---, their descent is continued
Ebenezer lived in South Salem, N.Y. in 1754, moved with Job to Marlborough, Ulster County
References:
1. 'The St. John Genealogy', Orline St. John Alexander, 1907,
pages 58--59
2. 'The Marvin Genealogy', page 332" (2)
1) Dave St. John (DWRN89A@prodigy.com))
2) Churchyard, James Nohl, (1694 Santa Margarita Drive, Fallbrook, CA 92028-1639 Tel. (760) 731-7280); St. John Genealogy, available from Henry Churchyard, University of Texas, churchyard@ccwf.cc.utexas.edu; Churchyard/Orr Genealogy: http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~church/genealogy.html

[NI2035] According to Bernardine Smith Kay in Jehial Bennett, the will of Thaddeus Bennett, Sr. gave fifty dollars to his"grandson... Gashum" (Gershom) Bennett.
The same source says that he had four sons by his first wife Eunice Bentley, Joseph, Thaddeus, Benjamin and Jehial. I assume that Thaddeus Sr. would not give money to a grandson, if the son were still living. Thaddeus and Jehial are not mentioned in the will, so I assume that that they were dead at that time (1834). The article about Jehial Bennett makes no further mention of Gershom Bennett, so I assume that he was the son of Thaddeus Jr. The other grandchild mentioned in the will, Mahitable Bennett, may also be the child of Thaddeus. (1)
"Now [1794] the family consisted of sons Thaddeus, Jr., Benjamin, Jehial, and Joseph, and daughters Mary, Mehitable, Eunice, Rhoda and Sarah. I cannot give the order birth as the only dates I have are for Joseph and Benjamin (1988)...
Thaddeus, Jr., wed Abigail Wait." (2)
"Bennett (Benight), Thaddeus & Abigail Wait. 2 Apr. 1820. M[arriage] A[ffidavits], [original] R[eturns], [Volume] A- [page] 52" (3)
"7E. Abigail WAITE b. 3 Jul 1803, Waitsfield, VT,
m. 2 Apr 1820 Thad BENIGHT." (4)
1) Jehial Bennett (see Gershom Bennett)
2) Ibid., p. 10-11
3) Shoemaker, Caryn R. Fuller & Rudity, Betty J. Sisler; Scioto County Marriages (August 1986) p. 9
4) Bruce Etterling's Web Page

[NI2064] "[William Bentley and Bathsheba Noyes Greene] had five children:... Greene M., born 23 Mar 1741 in Richmond" (6)
"[Children of William Bentley]
12. Greene, [born] 1741, Mar. 23." (3)
"There is still another tradition which comes from E.T. Bentley of Ithaca, N.Y., who says: "About 1716 three brothers John, William and Joseph Bentley came from Scotland and settled in Rhode Island... When the boundary line was run between Rhode Island and Connecticut, it brought William into Connecticut... My grandfather was a son of William... My grandfather, Greene, (son of William) was born in Connecticut about 1730 (really March 23, 1741.) At the outbreak of the Revolutionary War he enlisted and served seven years, and died in Chemung County, N.Y., 1820. My father Benjamin was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, in 1772 and died at Tioga, Pa., 1854... They were nearly all Baptists, and my grandfather was driven out of Connecticut because he would not pay tithes to the Church of England."
This tradition may be true but my impression is that the John Bentley mentioned was the oldest son of William Bentley, Jr., and the half-brother of Greene Bentley, as will appear farther on in the family record of William Bentley, Jr., of R.I. All of the traditions given have a family resemblance and may be based upon the substantial fact that there were two brothers and that John Bentley was the brother of Wm. Bentley, Sr., of Rhode Island. Greene Bentley, however, was evidently the son of William Bentley, Jr., of Rhode Island, as his name appears in the chart of Rhode Island Bentleys, printed as an appendix to this pamphlet. [see above note 3] (Note: The facts I have given in regard to Greene and John Bentley were obtained from E.T. Bentley of Ithaca, N.Y. (now deceased) with whom I had correspondence in 1885. In addition he said that his grandfather, Greene Bentley, married Dianah Greene about 1755, and that they had nine children, seven girls and two boys. The family moved from Connecticut to the west branch of the Susquehanna, in Pennsylvania, and then to Chemung County, N.Y. Three of the daughters married and went west.]" (4)
"Ephraim, Jr., married Hannah Bentley, daughter of Green Bentley, 1781 in Goshen. Since there were only two years between Thad and Ephraim, I feel that Thad probably married about the same time, especially since he married Eunice Bentley (by family knowledge) also believed to have been a daughter of Green Bentley...
[Thaddeus Bennett] was with the Bentley-Bennett party which left Rhode Island in 1775, heading for Wyoming Valley (in present Pennsylvania). Stopping over in Orange Co., New York...
Hannah was a sister of Green Bentley, Jr...
In 1785 the Bennett and Bentley families left Goshen, N.Y. and continued on their way to the Wyoming Valley." (1)
"The History of Tioga, Chemung, Tompkins & Schuyler Cos., N.Y. (Pierce & Hurd, 1879) records that in 1775 a party of several families from Rhode Island... headed by Green Bentley, set out to settle in the Wyoming Valley, "being induced to this removal by friends and relatives already there."...
The Bentley-Bennett party stopped in Orange County, New York. Before they resumed their journey there were severe Indian uprisings in the Wyoming Valley, and fearing further difficulties there, the pioneers remained in Orange County, Township of Goshen, in and near the village of Warwick...
At the outbreak of the Revolution many men joined the Continental Army and served through that long struggle. Green Bentley became an officer...
When the Revolutionary War was over, Bentley and those who emigrated with him from Rhode Island, moved to the Wyoming Valley, settling near the present site of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania...
Thus, in 1788, after three years in the Wyoming Valley, Green Bentley, Ephraim Bennett, and about twenty other families, built a boat upon which they placed their effects and pushed and poled up the Susquehanna and Chemung Rivers... After a tiring journey of thirty days they reached a site on the south side of the Chemung River, in the northeastern part of (now) Ashland Township, Chemung Co., now known as Wellsburg, New York.
This site, Wellsburg, is among the earliest settled spots in the county and Green Bentley, having located thereon in the year 1788, is considered the first pioneer settler." (2)
"Bentley, Green [buried] Greene Cemetery, Millport, Veteran, Chemung Co NY 1978" (5)
"Bentley...
Green: b 3-23-1735 RI d 1823 NY m Dinah Straight Pvt NY" (7)
"9. GREENE SR.5 BENTLEY (WILLIAM JR.4, WILLIAM SR.3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1) was born March 23, 1740/41 in Richmond, RI, and died Bef. September 06, 1823 in Veteran (now Millport) Tioga county, NY. He married DINAH STRAIT STRAIGHT 1759-1760 in Westerly, RI, daughter of THOMAS STRAIGHT and HERODIAS GARDINER.

Notes for GREENE SR. BENTLEY:
DAR # 62370
Much of the following is excerpted from an article by H. A. Wisby Jr.
Greene Bentley Sr. is credited with being among the first settlers in what is now the town of Veteran, New York. The name of the town commemorates his and other settlers Revolutionary War service.
Prior to the War of Independence, Greene moved his family to Warwick, Orange County, New York. He is listed in a roster of state troops in New York archives as: 'Green Bently' , Private, Wisner Regiment, Baly Company. D.A.R. records indicate he was in the 4th Regiment of the Orange County Militia. Whatever active military service Greene or his unit may have seen is unreported. There were battles fought in the area of Orange county (at Tappen on December 07, 1776 and September 28, 1778. Also at Tarrytown August 30, 1779 and July 15, 1781).
He (evidently) never made a claim for a pension or bounty land but this does not mean he was not entitled to these benefits.
His service was probably typical of that of most soldiers who were not members of the regular Continental Army but who fought for short periods, not far from there homes as the tide of war ebbed and flowed across the Colonies.
After the war he moved to the Wyoming Valley of Pennsylvania, scene of a prolonged and bitter dispute between the governments of Pennsylvania and Connecticut called the Pennamite Wars. While searching FTM's Web site for Bennetts, we came across of link to "Brigette's Home Page". She very kindly had submitted information regarding inhabitants of Union and Northumberland counties, Pennsylvania. Listed at Buffalo Twp. 1784 were some Bennetts and Green Bently. Another listing between 1785 and 1786 for Washington Twp. showed some additional Bennett's and Green Bently. Unsettled conditions during another flare-up of the Pennamite conflict caused Greene to bring his family back to New York, arriving near the present city of Wellsburg, in about 1788. The Bentley family shared this unhappy experience with members of the Bennett family, who also returned to New York.
The first Federal census of 1790 records Greene living in the town of Chemung, Montgomery County, with one son over age 16, one son under 16 and two daughters. His land included a stream which is still (at least at the time this article was written) known as Bentley Creek. In 1789 he helped organize the Chemung Baptist Church, lately known as the Wellsburg Baptist Church.
Incomplete records make it impossible to know why or when he moved to what became the town of Veteran. The date was probably between 1796 and 1798, when he built of log cabin west of Catherine Creek in the present city of Millport, Tioga County. One of his holdings was a 123 acre plot, bought in November, 1803. In March 1822 he deeded this same land to Olive Bentley, widow of Greene Bentley Jr., and their five sons.
Greene Sr. died prior to September 06, 1823 when land from his estate was transferred by a deed. He was buried in the family cemetery north of Millport, site of a State Historical marker.
8-98 ...
Children of GREENE BENTLEY and DINAH STRAIGHT are:
10. i. EUNICE6 BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1761, Richmond, RI; d. Abt. 1834.
ii. DIANA BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1763, Richmond, RI.
11. iii. HANNAH BENTLEY, b. 1765, Richmond, RI; d. 1840, Tioga county, PA.
iv. ELZABETH BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1767.
12. v. BENJAMIN BENTLEY, b. September 24, 1772, Kent Twp., Litchfield, CT; d. 1854, Tioga county, PA.
13. vi. HERODIAS BENTLEY, b. January 02, 1774, Litchfield, CT; d. January 02, 1837, Oakland, MI.
vii. SARAH BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1776.
14. viii. GREENE JR. BENTLEY, b. January 08, 1778, Warwick, Orange county, NY; d. November 11, 1820, Tioga County, NY. " (8)
1) Jehial Bennett (see Gershom Bennett) p. 9
2) Ibid., p. 3-4
3) Brinkerhoff, General Roeliff; The Bentley Family (Mansfield, Ohio 1897) p. 20
4) Ibid., p. 5-6
5) Abstract of Graves of Revolutionary Patriots found by DAR Vol. I, p. 76
6) Wright; Ancestors and Descendants of William Browning and Mary Greene, p. 371
7) DAR Patriot Index - Centennial Edition, Part I, p. 236
8) A Bentley Family Tree William Bentley of Kingstown, RI - To rectify some old errors.
Elaine C Cowan
1712 Van Epps Dr
Carson City, NV 89701
United States
>

[NI2067] "EPHRAIM
Ephraim was born in 1725 in Rhode Island. He was a soldier in the French and Indian Wars 1756, and was taken prisoner in General Johnson's flight. He was held several years and upon his release he married a Mary Stafford. The exact date of the marriage is unknown but their firstborn was Ephraim, Jr., born 1762, and followed thereafter by James, Thaddeus, Thomas, Abraham, David and Joseph (or Jonathan).
The History of Tioga, Chemung, Tompkins & Schuyler Cos., N.Y., (Pierce& Hurd, 1879) records that in 1775 a party of several families from Rhode Island, including Ephraim Bennett and his sons and daughters, headed by Green Bentley, set out to settle in the Wyoming Valley, being induced to this removal by friends and relatives already there." I have been unable to learn how many daughters Ephraim had or their names...
The Bentley-Bennett party stopped in Orange County, New York. Before they resumed their journey there were severe Indian uprisings in the Wyoming Valley, and fearing further difficulties there, the pioneers remained in Orange County, Township of Goshen, in and near the Village of Warwick.
Ephraim Bennett, and his sons, Ephraim, Jr., James, Thaddeus, Thomas, Abraham and David, were all in the Orange County Militia under Col. John Hathorne, Capt. David McCalmly. At the outbreak of the Revolution many men joined the Continental Army and served through that long struggle. Green Bentley became an officer, as did Ephraim Bennett - the same Ephraim who had been taken prisoner in the French - Indian Wars; Thaddeus served under Col. John Hathorne, Capt. Wm. Blain; and Jonathan under Col. Brinckerhof, Capt. Brown.
When the Revolutionary War was over, Bentley and those who had emigrated with him from Rhode Island, moved to the Wyoming Valley, settling near the present site of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.
Pierce and Hurd, in their History of Tioga, Chemung, Tompkins & Schuyler Cos. say that "some seven to eight miles below Elmira, N.Y., is the Hogback, scene of the Battle of Newtown in 1779. Because of numerous Indian raids, and the long distance to be traveled with wives and children, no settlements were made in this area until about 1786 when William Buck, his son Elijah, a Joseph Bennett, and four others came up the Susquehanna and Chemung Rivers in canoes and Durham boats...
Thus in 1788, after three years in the Wyoming Valley, Green Bentley, Ephraim Bennett, and about twenty other families, built a boat upon which they placed their effects and pushed and poled up the Susquehanna and Chemung Rivers. All men not engaged in propelling the boat, and children old enough to walk, drove the livestock along the river banks. Ephraim's grandsons Samuel age 8 and Thomas age 6 (sons of Ephraim, Jr.) took their turns at this chore. (It is believed Thaddeus and his family were with this group inasmuch as families generally travelled in groups.) After a tiring journey of thirty days they reached a site on the south side of the Chemung River, in the northeastern part of (now) Ashland Township, Chemung Co., now known as Wellsburg, New York.
This site, Wellsburg, is among the earliest settled spots in the county and Green Bentley, having located thereon in the year 1788, is considered the first settler. He was immediately followed by Ebenezer Green, Abner Wells, Abijah Batterson, Samuel Westbrook, Abraham Bennett, Thomas Keeney, Asa Burnham and Abiel Fry, all of whom settled at or near the present village...
This was the first church west of Binghamton, N.Y. Although organized in 1789, the Wellsburg Baptist Church did not commence a record until on 3rd of February, 1791, at which time Elder Roswell Goff was recommended by the Baptist Church of Christ at Pittstown (Pittston, Pa.)...
"In 1794, Ephraim Bennett, an officer in the Revolution, located his farm on the Hogback battleground between Wellsburg and Elmira, where he remained for some time. In May, 1795, Ephraim Bennett and his wife, Mary, deeded to Thomas Baldwin of Newton, Tioga Co., N.Y., 74 acres of land in the town of Chemung for the sum of 80 pounds. The December, 1799, assessment roll for Chemung County, lists an Ephraim Bennett with a personal estate of $30.00, no real estate...
Sometime in the early 1800's Ephraim, Sr. went to live with his son, David at Howard, Town of Dix, Steuben Co., New York. [This may be incorrect. An Ephraim Bennett, Sr. was buried in Howard, Steuben Co., NY, according to the Graves of Revolutionary War Patriots. However, Ephraim's son, born 1762, applied for his pension as a resident of Veteran, Chemung Co., NY. This is next to a Dix Township and a Montour Township in Schuyler County, where an Ephraim Jr. and and Ephraim Sr. are buried. See below.] Numerous letters to county, town, and organization officials, have failed to learn any more about Ephraim or his wife, Mary." (1)
"D 20 Mary 1690 E46 Ephraim Bennett ((1710)) Mary Stafford E 97"(2)
"Bennett...
Ephraim Sr: b 4-30-1732 NJ [sic] d 10-20-1813 NY m Mary Stafford Sgt NY
Ephraim Jr: b 5-1-1762 NY d 10-26-1845 NY m Hannah Bentley Pvt NY PNSR" (3)
"Bennitt...
Ephriam or Ephraim Bennett S23120 NY Line, appl 7 Mar 1833 Tioga Cty NY a res of Veteran NY, sol was b May 1, 1762 at Warwick in Orange Cty NY & enl there" (4)
"Bennett, Ephraim Jr Dix Twp Cem, Montour Falls, Schuyler Co NY 71
Bennett, Ephraim Sr Howard, Steuben Co NY 57
Bennett, Ephraim Sr Montour Falls Cem, Montour, Chemung NY 84" (5)
"Early Church Records
Old School Baptist Church, Warwick, Orange Co., N.Y... [admission dates]
X [early member] Bennett, Deborus;
1775 [Bennett], Elizabeth
1769 " Ephraim, D[ismissed] 1788; [when he went to Chemung]
1791 " Esther, mentioned as wife of John;
1771 " Gershom; ["Wanted - Data on Gershom Bennett, Orange Co., N.Y., Wilkesbarre, PA, settled Elmira -next to Chemung- in 1805, and Sarah, his wife -see below- members of Warwick Baptist Church. C.B. California" Foley, Vol. I, p. 96 "Matthew and Moses Bennett may have come from CT or RI in 1765 to Orange County. The census of 1790 gives Matthew in Warwick County, and Moses in -Wilkes-Barre- Luzerne County, PA. The 1800 census shows Matthew and Moses both in Luzerne County, PA. The younger Bennetts, Gershom and Matthew moved to Elmira, Tioga [actually Chemung] County, about 1805 and in 1816 to [Rochester?] Orleans County. E.L.B. in CA" Ibid., p. 196]
X [Bennett], Jerusha, d 1809 and Rhoda;
1775 " Jestes;
1774 " Marah;
1769 " Sarah; [If this the wife of Gershom the date seems to mean he arrived the same time as Ephraim.]
1774 " Thomas, D Jan. 1791, and Thomas, Jr., d[ied or dismissed?] 1790" (6)
"Descendants of Ephraim Bennett


Generation No. 1

1. EPHRAIM5 BENNETT (SAMUEL4, SAMUEL3, SAMUEL2, EDWARD1) was born April 30, 1732 in Massachusetts, and died October 26, 1813 in Millport, NY. He married MARY STAFFORD Abt. 1761.

Children of EPHRAIM BENNETT and MARY STAFFORD are:
2. i. EPHRAIM6 BENNETT, b. May 01, 1762, Kent, Warwick, RI; d. October 26, 1843, Montour Falls, Schuler Co., NY.
ii. JAMES BENNETT, b. Abt. 1763, RI.

Notes for JAMES BENNETT:
Renowned as a great Indian Fighter

iii. THADDEUS BENNETT, b. August 23, 1764, RI; d. January 08, 1834, Porter Township, Scioto Co., Ohio; m. EUNICE BENTLEY.
iv. THOMAS BENNETT.
v. ABRAHAM BENNETT.
vi. DAVID BENNETT.
vii. JONATHAN JOSEPH BENNETT.

Notes for JONATHAN JOSEPH BENNETT:
Hard shell Baptist Minister


Generation No. 2

2. EPHRAIM6 BENNETT (EPHRAIM5, SAMUEL4, SAMUEL3, SAMUEL2, EDWARD1) was born May 01, 1762 in Kent, Warwick, RI, and died October 26, 1843 in Montour Falls, Schuler Co., NY. He married HANNAH HUMILITY BENTLEY February 07, 1781 in Goshen, NY, daughter of GREENE BENTLEY and DIANA STRAIT.

Children of EPHRAIM BENNETT and HANNAH BENTLEY are:
i. SAMUEL7 BENNETT, b. November 27, 1781, Goshen, Orange Co., NY; m. SALLY VANGORDER.
3. ii. THOMAS STRAIT BENNETT, b. August 02, 1783, Chemung, Chemung Co., NY.
iii. SUSANNAH BENNETT, b. September 11, 1785, Chemung, Chemung Co., NY; m. GEORGE DAVID CORYELL.
iv. PEGGY MARGARET BENNETT, b. December 15, 1787, Chemung, Chemung Co., NY; m. (1) BRANT CATLIN; m. (2) CHARLES CURTIS.
v. ELIZABETH BENNETT, b. November 04, 1789, Chemung, Chemung Co., NY; d. 1843; m. THOMAS MILLS.
vi. POLLY BENNETT, b. December 15, 1791; d. 1794.
vii. ABNER KNOX BENNETT, b. January 11, 1795, Chemung, Chemung Co., NY; d. December 02, 1865; m. SARAH LATTIN.
viii. SALLY SARAH BENNETT, b. November 27, 1795, Chemung, Chemung Co., NY; d. 1834; m. WILLIAM MCCLURE.
ix. GREEN BENTLY BENNETT, b. November 30, 1797, Wellsburg, NY; d. 1879; m. (1) CYNTHIA MCCLURE; m. (2) ANNA BEERS TYLER.
x. MILLY AMELIA BENNETT, b. February 28, 1801, Wellsburg, NY; d. 1879; m. JAMES PARKS.
4. xi. HARRY BENNITT, b. September 07, 1802, Millport, Chemung Co., NY; d. March 21, 1879, Decatur Co., Indiana.
xii. BRENT BENNETT, b. August 28, 1805; d. April 20, 1807.
xiii. CHARLES M. BENNETT, b. May 11, 1807, Millport, Chemung Co., NY; m. LOUISA CANFIELD.


Generation No. 3

3. THOMAS STRAIT7 BENNETT (EPHRAIM6, EPHRAIM5, SAMUEL4, SAMUEL3, SAMUEL2, EDWARD1) was born August 02, 1783 in Chemung, Chemung Co., NY. He married MARY ANN DICKINSON.

Child of THOMAS BENNETT and MARY DICKINSON is:
5. i. GEORGE W.8 BENNETT, b. January 03, 1835, Cincinnati, Ohio; d. October 21, 1914, Monterey.

4. HARRY7 BENNITT (EPHRAIM6 BENNETT, EPHRAIM5, SAMUEL4, SAMUEL3, SAMUEL2, EDWARD1) was born September 07, 1802 in Millport, Chemung Co., NY, and died March 21, 1879 in Decatur Co., Indiana. He married MARY MCCLURE, daughter of JOHN MCCLURE and SALLY.

Children of HARRY BENNITT and MARY MCCLURE are:
6. i. CALVIN8 BENNITT, b. October 24, 1822, Orange Co., NY; d. Olive Township, St Joseph Co., New Carlisle.
7. ii. ORIN BENNITT, b. October 03, 1824, Orange Co., NY; d. May 28, 1894, Olive Township, St Joseph Co., New Carlisle.
iii. LAVINA BENNITT, b. December 22, 1825.
iv. ADELINE BENNITT, b. October 15, 1826, NY.
v. CAROLINE BENNITT, b. February 14, 1831, Orange Co., NY; d. March 30, 1902, Olive Township, St Joseph Co., New Carlisle; m. EPHERAM MAFFIT.
8. vi. LAVERNE D. BENNITT, b. April 01, 1833, Tioga Co., NY; d. September 19, 1915, Maysville, DeKalb, Missouri.
9. vii. CYNTHIA BENNITT, b. May 01, 1835, Orange Co., NY; d. August 09, 1895, Olive Township, St. Joseph Co., New Carlisle.
viii. ABIGAIL BENNITT, b. 1839.
ix. MARY D. BENNITT, b. June 23, 1840, Decatur Co., Indiana; d. February 05, 1935, Missouri; m. ABLE HATFIELD, August 17, 1858, La Porte, Indiana.
x. HARRY JR. BENNITT, b. December 09, 1842, Marion, Indiana; d. October 18, 1916, Indiana; m. AUGUSTA CUNNINGHAM, 1860.
xi. SHERMAR BENNITT, b. October 20, 1845, Marion, Indiana; d. January 27, 1917, Olive Township, St Joseph Co., New Carlisle; m. LYDIA VAN DUSEN." (7)
1) Jehial Bennett (see Gershom Bennett) p. 4-6
2) Stafford Index Generation 5 p. 12
3) DAR Patriot Index - Centennial Edition, Part I, p. 230
4) Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files, p. 240
5) Graves of Revolutionary War Patriots, p. ?
6) Foley, Jane Wythe; Early Settlers of New York; Vol. II, pp. 731-732
7) E-Mail of April 4, 1999 from Richelle Lightfoot >

[NI2068] "E 97.4 Mary 1750 Ephraim Bennett E46" (1)
Something is wrong here. If Mary was born in 1750, she would have been eleven when she married Ephraim Bennett and twelve when her first child was born.
"1. Mary Stafford was born on 4 Oct 1750 in Coventry, Kent Co., RI. (1)
1)Descendants of Thomas Stafford by R.J. Curfman." (2)
1) Stafford Index Generation 5 p. 13
2) Re: Staffords; e-mail from Michael H. Stafford dated January 15, 19988

[NI2074] "SAMUEL III
This Samuel, son of Samuel, Jr. and Sarah Forsman Bennett, was born September 24, 1690 in Rhode Island. On July 15, 1716, he married Mary Stafford, daughter of Amos Stafford.
He is known to have had two sons, Ephraim and Thomas, but there is no further information available on his life." (1)
"Samuel, [b.] 1690, Sep. 14" (2)
It seems curious that both he and his son Ephraim married a Mary Stafford.
1) Jehial Bennett (Gershom Bennett) p. 2-3
2) Austin, Gen. Dict. of RI, p. 18

[NI2075] "On July 15, 1716, [Samuel Bennett] married Mary Stafford, daughter of Amos Stafford." (1)
"D 20 Mary 1690 E 46 Ephriam Bennett (1710) Mary Stafford E97
Samuel Bennett III" (2)
1) Jehiel Bennett (see Gershom Bennett) p. 2-3
2) Stafford Index - Generation 5, p.12

[NI2076] "C 9 Amos 1665 D 20 Mary 1690 Samuel Bennett
m Mary Burlingame D 21 Samuel 1692 Hannah Bennett
D 22 Mercy 1694 Joseph Arnold
D 23 "Capt Amos Jr 1702 1 Catherine Carder
2 Experience Spaulding
D 24 Stukeley 1704
D 25 Patience 1707 died young
D 26 Freelove 1709 Rowland Barton " (1)
"II. Amos b. 1665, Nov. 8 Warwick, R.I.
d. 1760
m. 1689, Dec. 19.
Mary Burlingame b.
d. 1760 [dau.] of Roger & Mary ( ) Burlingame
1702. He gave 6s., toward building Quaker Meeting house at Mashapaug.
1708-21. Deputy.
1753, Mar. 24. Will -- proved 1760, Oct. 20. Exs. wife Mary and son Amos. To wife, half of house and lands, all household goods, 5 cows, all young cattle and sheep, half of horsekind, and negro boy called London. To son Amos, farm number nine in Coventry and lands in Warwick. To daughter Mary Bennett, a farm in Coventry, &c. To daughter Mercy Arnold, lot number thirty-four in Coventry. To daughter Freelove Barton, lot number twenty-four in Warwick. To grandsons Amos and Stukely Stafford and Stukely Arnold, three lots in Warwick. To grandson Amos Arnold, a house lot. To grandson Thomas Stafford, son of Samuel deceased, the rest and residue of real estate. To grandchildren Thomas Stafford, Mary Greene, Hannah Tillinghast, Patience, Mercy and Sarah Stafford, all children of son Samuel, deceased, the residue of personal estate.
Inventory, #2547, 7s. [Very Large]...
1760, Dec. 8. Inventory, #1704, 2s. Widow Mary...
[Children]
1. Mary 1690, Sep. 16.
2. Samuel, 1692, Sep. 24.
3. Mercy, 1694, Sep. 21.
4. Amos, 1702, Apr. 24.
5. Stukely, 1704, Nov. 7.
6. Patience, 1707, Apr. 21.
7. Freelove, 1709, Oct. 14." (2)
1) Stafford Index, p. 7
2) Austin, Gen. Dict. of RI, p. 387

[NI2078] "SAMUEL, Jr.
Samuel, Jr. was a carpenter and lived in Coventry, Rhode Island, where died in 1745. Highlights of his life were: in 1684 made a Freeman; in 1688 he was a juryman; in 1690 he was a deputy in the general assembly; in 1690 he was a lieutenant in the general assembly.
'In 1711 Samuel and his wife, Rachel, deed for love, etc., to my son Samuel 10 acres.' She concurred in separate statement by naming Samuel, 'my son-in-law', which expression at that time, indicated he was her husband's son.
Samuel Jr. was married three times; first to his stepsister, Sarah Forsman, in 1689, and had three children: Samuel III in 1690, Sarah in 1693, and Hannah 1697, (National Society of the Daughters of the Revolution Colonists Lineage, Book 7, 1946, page 330).
Sarah having died in 1697, Samuel married Desire Berry, and their children were: Elizabeth born 1699, Benjamin born 1701, John born 1703, William born 1706, Priscilla born 1708. Desire died 1708 or 1709.
By 1711 Samuel had married Rachel ----- and fathered Mary, born in that year and Desire born in 1713, making a total of ten children from his three marriages." (1)
"III. Samuel [Bennett] b. East Greenwich, Coventry, R.I.
d. 1745, Apr. 15
m. (1) Sarah Forman 1689, Jan.2
b.
d.
m. (2) Desire Berry 1699, Apr. 25
b.
d. 1714, Mar. 9
m. (3) Rachel 1715
b.
d.
He was a carpenter.
1685. Freeman.
1688. Grand Jury.
1690. Deputy.
1690. Lieutenant.
1703, Feb. 23. He and wife Desire, sold Thomas Fry, for #68, my now dwelling house, orchard, &c., 20 acres.
1715, Dec. 21. He deeded son Samuel, for love, &c., 10 acres. His wife Rachel, joined in deed, calling Samuel, Jr., her son-in-law, (i.e. stepson)
[Children]
1. Samuel, 1690, Sep. 14
2. Sarah, 1693, Jan. 31
3. Hannah, 1697, Apr. 27
4. Elizabeth, 1699, Nov. 19 [Probably a child of Desire Berry and not Sarah Forsman since Samuel married Desire on April 25, 1699 -- see above.]
(2d wife.)
5. Benjamin, 1701, Nov. 7
6. John, 1704, Oct. 15
7. William, 1706, May 15
8. Priscilla, 1708, Oct. 7
9. Mary, 1711, Apr. 2
10. Desire, 1713, Feb. 12" (2)
1) Jehial Bennett (see Gershom Bennett) p. 2
2) Austin, Gen. Dict. of RI, p. 18

[NI2079] "Bennett (Samuel). 2d column. III. Samuel. His 1st wife was daughter of Moses and Hannah ( ) Forman." (1)
1) Austin, Gen. Dict. of RI, p. 18

[NI2092] "SAMUEL I
Edward's eldest son, Samuel was born in 1628 in England. As he grew older he became a cooper and resided in Greenwich, Rhode Island. The records there indicate that in 1652 he purchased land; in 1655 he was made a Freeman; in 1656 he was made a sergeant of Militia "for which he received 20 pounds"; in 1678 he [was] voted 100 acres of public lands; in 1682 he sold 34 acres; and in 1684 his will was proved and by the terms of this will Samuel, Jr. received 60 acres of land.
Samuel's wife was Anna and they had four children:
Edward III (born 1654, died 1735), Elizabeth (died 1721), Samuel, Jr., and William. After Samuel's death in 1684, Anna married Moses Forsman." (1)
"Samuel [Bennett] b. Providence, East Greenwich, R.I.
d. 1684, Sep. 4
m. Anna b.
d. 1705 +
(She m. (2) Moses Forman.)
He was a cooper.
1652. General Sergeant.
1652, May 12. He bought of Stukeley Westcott (#6922), his house and lot, orchard, meadow, &c. [in Warwick]
1655. Freeman.
1656, May 7. He was awarded 24s. for a calf, which Mr. Foote's dogs were proved to have killed (the suit being brought against Henry Fowler, administrator of Henry Foote).
1657. Commissioner.
1660, Oct. 27. He sold certain land to William Carpenter [son of #6936?].
1661. Grand Jury.
1666, May 31. He took oath of allegiance.
1668-74-78. Deputy.
1678, May 1. East Greenwich. He was granted 100 acres at East Greenwich, by the Assembly; and was to have in the first division of 5,000 acres, if any will relinquish a right, if not, then in the next township of 5,000 acres to be laid out.
1682, Nov. 20. He and wife, Anna confirmed to heirs of Richard Everden, land sold in Everden's lifetime, viz: 34 acres upland and a share of meadow, &c., in Providence, near Solitary Hill.
1684, Aug. 25. Will -- proved 1684, Oct. 23. Exx. wife Anna. Overseers, Thomas Olney and John Whipple, Jr. to son Edward, 70 acres at Providence. To son Samuel, 60 acres and meadow at World's End, Providence. To sons William and Benjamin, certain land at East Greenwich, equally, at age. To wife Anna, homestead land and buildings, at East Greenwich, for her use while widow, and the next day after her marriage, or at her decease, to go to son William. To sons William and Benjamin, all rights of common at East Greenwich, and to them cooper's and carpenter's tools (except a plane to Samuel). To daughter Priscilla, #5 at twenty-one or marriage. To wife, all debts, goods, chattels, &c.
Inventory, #62, 10s., viz: 2 guns, 2 spinning wheels, carpenter's and cooper's tools, churn, 3 cows, 2 yearlings, steer calf, horse, 8 swine, 5 shoats, &c...
[Children]
I. Edward...
II. Elizabeth, b.
d. 1721 +
m. Edward Inman b. 1654
d. 1735, Jun.
III. Samuel...
IV. William b. 1673 East Greenwich, R.I.
d. 1753, Jul. 29.
m. Rachel Weaver abt 1693
(w. of Clement) b.
d. bef 1753...
V. Benjamin b. Portsmouth, (Prudence Island) R.I.
d...
VI. Priscilla b.
d. 1754, Apr. 9
m. Stukeley Westcott 1693, Dec. 21
[grandson of #6922] b. 1672, Oct.
d. 1750, May 25." (2)
1) Jehial Bennet (see Gershom Bennett) p. 2
2) Austin, Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, p. 18-9
Possible sources: TAG, Vol. 21, p. 206-207
Bowen's Providence Oath of Allegiance, 1651-2, c. 1943; p. 3, 63-5

[NI2093] "Anna b.
d. 1705 +
(She m. (2) Moses Forman.)...
1705, Jun. 19. Anna Foreman and her husband Moses Foreman, sold Josiah Westcott, land in right of former husband, Samuel Bennett." (1)
1) Austin, Gen. Dict. of RI, p. 18

[NI2097] "Near the close of the Sixteenth Century, two Bennett brothers moved from Berkshire to London, England. One was an adherent to the Crown, but the other, Edward I, desiring greater liberty, took his wife and four children (Samuel I, John, Priscilla, Edward II) to Weymouth and set sail for America.
EDWARD I
It is not known when Edward I arrived in Massachusetts, but he was made a Freeman in 1636, at Weymouth, Mass., and later became a proprietor and helped found Rehoboth, Mass. He died in 1645 or 1646 and is buried in the Proprietors Cemetery at Rehoboth." (1)
1) Jehial Bennett (see Gershom Bennett) p. 1
Possible Source:
Bennett, Stephen Beers; The Bennett, Bentley and Beers Families (1899 Pittston, PA)

[NI2214] See Everton Family Group Sheet #11712.
"Nicholas DE WITT
BIRTH: WFT Est 1569-1613
DEATH: WFT Est 1609-1693
Family 1: Taatje VAN LEUVEN

Tjerch Claessen DE WITT " (1)
GenForum Posting
Posted by Kathy Bessmer on December 07, 1998 at 22:44:25:

In Reply to: JACKPOT on Tjerck Claessen DeWitt posted by Kathy Bessmer on December 07, 1998 at 20:59:37:

Like I prom. the following historical data comes from the following sources. ( this would be a lot easier if I was a better typist:) but here I go.
"the Documentary History of New York State"; "The De Witt Family of Ulster County, N.Y."; The Year Books of the Holland Society of New York; Schoonmaker's History of Kingston, N.Y.; "The Harvey Book"; Dutch Church records in N.Y.C. and Ulster Co.; Olde Ulster Magazine; family bibles and records kept by Gasherie and Jennie De Witt; William C. De Witt City Historisn of Kingston; F. Farris, Librarian of the Genealogical Dept. of the Syracuse Public LIbrary... and o ton of other resources I may list as needed.
Extract from records of Louis Hasbrouck Van Schaler, Van Dusen Lodge-- searching the Ulster Co. Clerk's Office, I found the was impression of a seal, on pg.397, of bookAA, the first volume of the so called English records (in Dutch). These records are the settlement of Tjerck's estate dated 2/30/1716-17 was stamped with the engraved seal which bares the Coat of arms of Jan De Witt, the Grand Pensionary of Holland, which was reported to have been brought over with him and used on several of his documents.
Jan and Cornelius fathers brother was
Dr. Nicholas De Witt who accompanied Hendrick Hudson to America on the "Half Moon" in 1609.
Documents show that this man was marr. to no other than Tjerck Corneliz.
Three of their children emigrated to New Amsterdam now New York, these three children;
Tjerck Classen De Witt
Jan Claessen " "
Emmerentie De Witt

Jan died unmarried in 1699
Tjerck married:
Barbara Andriessen Von Amaterdam
According to the "TROUW BOECK" or Register of Marriages of the Reformed Collegiate Dutch Church of N.Y.C., where his parents are listed as above.
Emmerentie married Martinus Hoffman (the Roosevelt family traces their line through this line)
Tjerck's will in the book of Deeds, pg. 252
lists his property value at "1475 pounds, curant monny of New Yorke", a considerable fortune back then.
All so just to note that there are several varriations on the spelling of Nicholas wife's from records here and Holland, where it is spelled Tjaatjek Kornelis and was reported to be a cousen.
Now as far as we can make out from the Dutch records
Nicholas's father was Andries De Witt
marr. to ????????
Andries' father was Cornelius De Witt
marr. to Johanna Heymans
Cornelius's father was Franz De Wittt
marr. to Lidaut Van Severen
Franz's Father was ..... I'm tired, if you want more info. e-mail me:)

1) http://users.ids.net/~reveritt/d0002/g0000014.htm#I0224

[NI2219] "The fact that Rebecca and Sara [Ennes] each had an eldest daughter named Rachel suggested that their mother was named Rachel. And since Geesje Barents had a sister named Rachel Barents, baptized in Amsterdam in 1635, living in 1663, (Note: Harry Macy, Jr., "Origins of Some New Netherlands Families: Barents-Bradt-Lewis," NYG&B Record 60:131-42, 245-54), it seemed like a good possibility that Rebecca and Sara Ennes were daughters of this Rachel Barents -- and thus nieces of Geesje Barents, wife of Thomas Lewis...
Further research, as outlined below, confirmed that Rebecca and Sara were indeed the daughters of that couple. As a result, Geesje Barents, wife of Thomas Lewis, was their aunt, and Annetje Barents, wife of Albert Andriessen Bradt, was their great-aunt, as given in Record at 123:17-19." (1)
1) Lyon, Elva Kathleen; Origins of Some New Netherland Families NYG&BR 127:202

[NI2233] Information on him and his family taken from Everton Family Group Sheet #8508 submitted by John E. Foote, 9810 E. Pomona, Baton Rouge, LA 70815 April 16, 1983.
See father; he may have been born in Colchester, Essex.
Foote researcher:
R. Gillespie-Stein (MURY71A@prodigy.com))
" 60. Nathaniel Foote of Wethersfield, Conn. was dead by 23 Sept. 1655, when his estate was inventoried by Richard Treat, Samuel Smith [#7342], and Nathaniel Dickinson [#16076]. The document identifies four children, Nathaniel, aged 7; Samuel, aged 5; Daniel, aged 4; and Elizabeth, aged 3 (Manwaring, Digest (note 29), 1:113). The son Nathaniel gave receipt to his "father," William Gull of Hatfield, for his portion of the estate, 19 Jan. 1686 (Hampshire County Probate, 1:213-14 (FHL microfilm 879,184))." (1)
"3. Nathaniel Foote (1.Nathaniel1 ) b. 1620, England, m. 1646, Elizabeth Smith, b. 1627, Hadleigh, Suffolk, England, bapt: 28 Jan 1626/27, Hadleigh, Suffolk, England, (daughter of Samuel Smith and
Elizabeth Smith) d. AFT. 1701. Nathaniel died 1655, Wethersfield, Ct.
Children:
+ 8. i Nathaniel Foote b. 10 Jan 1647.
+ 9. ii Samuel Foote b. 1 May 1649.
10. iii Daniel Foote b. 1652, Wethersfield, Ct, d. Stratford, Ct.
+ 11. iv Elizabeth Foote b. 1654." (2)
1) NEH&GR, Vol. 152, April 1998, p. 176
2) Foote Family, Descendants of Nathaniel Foote

[NI2234] "William Gull... died at Hatfield, Massachusetts, between 12 April and 18 December 1701, the dates of the execution and probate of his will. William married, perhaps about 1656, Elizabeth (Smith) Foote, widow of Nathaniel Foote, who died in 1655, (60) and daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Smith) Smith of Wethersfield and Hadley. (61) Elizabeth died after 5 January 1701/2, when she swore to the inventory of William Gull's estate." (1)
"Elizabeth Smith, b. 1627, Hadleigh, Suffolk, England, bapt: 28 Jan 1626/27, Hadleigh, Suffolk, England, (daughter of Samuel Smith and Elizabeth Smith) d. AFT. 1701." (2)
1) NEH&GR, Vol. 152, April 1998, p. 175-178

[NI2236] " Essex
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Foote, Nathaniel Shalford Hartford Noyes Gilman Anc.
London
Foote, Nathaniel St. Mary Bothaw Hartford College of Arms" (1)
Information on him and his family taken from Everton Family Group Sheet #8509 submitted by John E. Foote.
"Nathaniel was son of Robert Foote b.c. 1533 m. Joane Broke" (2)
"Col. Leonard H. Smith, Jr., 1660 Harmony Drive, Clearwater, FL 33516, calls attention to an error in TAG 53:205-206, where it is stated by me that the baptisms of the two eldest children of Nathaniel Foote and his wife Elizabeth (Deming?) are found in the church of St. James, Shalford, Essex. The parish at Shalford is not St. James's but St. Andrew's,... St. James's is a parish in Colchester and it is in that parish that Col. Smith has found the baptism of the two children in question. The record is at the County Record Office at Chelmsford." (3)
TAG, Vol. 72, #1, pp. 54-5 chart called "Foote Connections" shows the following:
Nathaniel Foote (adult immigrant to New England) d. 1644 m. Elizibeth (Deming?) Wethersfield, CT
"1. Nathaniel Foote b. 21 Sep 1592, Shalford, Essex, England, m. 1615, in England, Elizabeth Deming, b. ABT. 1595, Shalford, Colchester, England, (daughter of John Deming and Elizabeth Gilbert) d. 28 Jul 1683, Wethersfield, Ct. Nathaniel died 1644, Wethersfield, Ct. Several Generations of ancestors have been determined for Nathaniel Foote, with Pedigree Charts and Coat of Arms prepared by the College of Arms in London, may be seen at the State Library in Hartford, Ct. Children:
2. i Elizabeth Foote b. 1616, England, m. Josiah Churchill, b. 1615, England, d. 1680, Wethersfield, Ct. Elizabeth died 1700, Wethersfield, Ct.
+3. ii Nathaniel Foote b. 1620.
4. iii Mary Foote b. 1623, England, m. (1) 1642, John Stoddard, b. abt 1620, d. 1664, m. (2) 1674, John Goodrich, b. abt 1620, d. Mar 1680, m. (3) aft 1683, Thomas Tracy, b. abt 1620, d. Norwich, Ct.
+5. iv Robert Foote b. 1627.
+6. v Frances Foote b. 1630.
+7. vi Rebecca Foote b. 1634." (3)
1) Topo. Dict. pp 51 & 102
2) Rosemary Avita (DBHR32A@prodigy.com))
3) Foote Family, Descendants of Nathaniel Foote
Foote researcher:
R. Gillespie-Stein (MURY71A@prodigy.com))
Possible Source: Foote Family, comprising the Genealogy and History of Nathaniel Foote of Wethersfield, Conn. and his Descendants, Vol. I, by Abram W. Foote. Originally printed in Burlington, Vermont, 1932. Reprinted 1981 by Laura Belle Foote Beekman and Clarence William Beekman, 5236 Geer Rd., Hughson, CA 95326. Gateway Press, Inc., Baltimore, 1981.

[NI2237] "Elizabeth Deming was the daughter of Jonathan Deming of Shalford, Colchester, Eng and Elizabeth Gilbert b: abt 1578 same place. Elizabeth's father was Josiah Gilbert. The Deminge family was supposedly from Picardy, France, originally. Elizabeth Deming had a brother, John (a Sgt) b: abt 1595 Eng and d: in Wethersfield, CT. He married Honor Treat. Elizabeth Deming married Nathaniel Foote and later (Gov) Thomas Welles." (1)
1) R Gillespie-Stein MURY71A@prodigy.comm

[NI2244] " Suffolk
Name Parish Ship N.E. Town Ref
Smith, Samuel Elmsett Elizabeth Watertown Banks
Wethersfield" (1)
According to a family group sheet submitted by John Foote, his daughter Elizabeth was born in Hadleigh, Suffolk.
"Samuel Smith (1) b. abt. 1602, d. 1680 m. Elizabeth ? (2) Ipswich, England April 30, 1634; landed at Boston on June 1634. They settled in Watertown and then moved to Wethersfield, CT.
children:
3. Samuel b. abt. 1625 prob removed to New London, CT and then to VA.
4. Elizabeth b. abt. 1627 m. Nathaniel Foote m. (2) William Gull
5. Mary b. abt. 1630 m. John Groves d. 12-16-1668
6. Philip b. abt. 1633
7. Chieab (?) b. abt. 1635
8. John m. Mary Partridge 11-12-1663 Slain by Indians at Hatfield 5-30-1676." (2)
"Samuel Smith with wife and four children arrived (1634) in Boston from Ipswich, England; in 1638, he moved to Wethersfield, Connecticut, the new "Hesperia of Puritanism"; in 1659 he removed with sixty "Withdrawers or Separatists" to Hadley, Massachusetts. His wife Elizabeth d. March 16, 1686, aged 84 years." (3)
"61. Elizabeth Gull is identified in will of her father, Samuel Smith of Hadley, 23 June 1680, proved 29 March 1681 (Hampshire County Probate, 1:213-14 (FHL microfilm 879,184))." (4)
1) Topo. Dict. p. 153
2) Lisa Herdahl THZQ38A@prodigy.comm
3) Willard-Bradley, p. 90
4)) NEH&GR, Vol. 152, April 1998, p. 175

[NI2252] "Elizabeth Deming was the daughter of Jonathan Deming of Shalford, Colchester, Eng and Elizabeth Gilbert b. abt. 1578 same place... Elizabeth's father was Josiah Gilbert. The Deminge family was supposedly from Picardy, France originally. Elizabeth Deming had a brother, John (a Sgt.) b. abt 1595 Eng and d in Wethersfield, CT. He married Honor Treat. Elizabeth Deming married Nathaniel Foote and later (Gov) Thomas Welles." (1)
"According to Stiles, Jonathan deming whose father was John Deming who married 4 women m. Eliz. gilbert who was the dau. of josiah gilbert. The Eliz. that they had married richard beckley... I show four children for Jonathan by his first marriage, 8 by his second. eliz. was a product of his second marriage. his first wife was sarah (possibly) graves." (2)
1) R. Gillespie-Stein (MURY71A@prodigy.com))
2) Gary Murray (SJJA18A@prodigy.com))

[NI2253] "I have an Elizabeth Gilbert bn 1578 Shalford, Colchester, Essex, England as the mother of Elizabeth Deming, bn Oct 1595/97 Shalford." (1)
Possible source: Homer Worthington Brainard, Harold Simeon Gilbert, and Clarence Almon Torrey, The Gilbert Family (New Haven, 1953)
1) Nancy Curran MBFH73A@prodigy.comm

[NI2398] "Thomas Wheeler "the elder" was buried at Cranfield, Bedfordshire, England in 1634. Of his twelve children by two marriages, the following seven came to New England in the 1630's: Thomas, Elizabeth, Timothy, Susanna, Joseph, Ephraim, and Thomas (by second wife). Of these, both of the brothers Thomas and their brother Ephraim moved to Fairfield, Connecticut while the others remained in Concord, Massachusetts, except for the daughter Elizabeth, who settled in Lynn, Massachusetts, with her husband Allen Breed." Review of "The Wheeler Family of Cranfield, England and Concord, Massachusetts and some Descendants of Sgt. Thomas Wheeler of Concord" by M. Wheeler Molyneaux (M. Wheeler Molyneaux, 4701 East Ocean Blvd., Long Beach, CA 90803-3113 $47.5) Nutmegger June 1993 p. 85

[NI2399] " Nottinghamshire
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Blood, Robert Ruddington Lynn, Mass. Essex
Concord Deeds1/24" (1)
"Upon their marriage in 1673, Zachariah & Sarah settled in Chariestown. As has been mentioned, Sarah was the daughter of Richard Blood (1617-1683). Here is a good place to devote some space to him, because, contrary to what is the case with so many of the existing records of the early colonists, it is possible to see much of the character and personality of the man from those records. (The source is The Story of the Bloods by Roger D. Harris.)

Richard Blood was bom about 1617 (he claimed to be 43 in 1660), quite possibly in Nottinghamshire, where some of his relatives have been located. In 1642 (when he was mentioned in the will of one of his wife's kinsmen) at the age of 25, he was married to a woman named Isobel Wilkerson, and had come to New England, and was probably living at Lynn, Massachusetts. The Bloods, already the parents of 2 sons (Joseph and James), had a daughter, Sarah, born at Lynn in 1648. The first iron foundry in America was established at Lynn on the Saugus River in the early 1640's, and it appears likely that Richard Blood was employed there. He lived near there, and he was involved in a fight in the forge on September 25, 1657, when Daniel Salmon, a deputy marshal at Salem, was attempting to serve a writ to attach a parcel of bar iron. Salmon was "violently resisted" by Richard Blood and 2 other men, who took the iron away from him. In 1654 Richard served on a jury at Salem, and he was a constable at Lynn. Richard & Isobel became the parents of 3 more children: Nathaniel (1650), Mary (1662) and Hannah (1664). In 1655 Blood was second of 10 signers of a petition for a grant to establish a plantation northwest of Concord, to be named Groton. The General Court granted them 8 square miles of land. It is believed that it was 1660 before the Blood family arrived at Groton, although Richard had previously made improvements on the land there. Both Richard and Robert Blood had land at Nod, a mile northwest of Groton., where Richard remained throughout his life. That he was a prominent man there is attested to by the fact that his name always appears second in the listing of townspeople.

In June, 1668, some trouble came to Groton, related in a letter to Matthew Farnsworth, constable: "Two days since some Indians committed outrages in town, robbed one house, killed and eaten 2 beeves and driven away 4 more and wounded another four..." The letter is endorsed, "About Killing of Blood's cattle & robbing a house in Groton," and goes on to say, "A few days later a writ was issued against Richard Blood to appear for selling liquor to the Indians, contrary to law." The evidence was the testimony of John Wonotto of Chelmsford, Indian. He testified that the Wednesday night before Blood's cattle were killed, that he had bought liquor of Blood and his son Joseph, and he said that others had been in the habit of trading beaver for rum, etc.

Then in 1676, during King Philip's War, further mention is made of Blood: "King Philip's War was a war for survival on both sides, a war of terror, with no quarter given to men, women or children by either adversary. Indian's would sweep down, bum a town, and massacre its inhabitants. The Colonists retaliated by annihilating the Indians wherever they could be found.
The war began around Narragansett Bay, but soon all of New England was involved. Groton was one of the towns that was virtually wiped out. It was attacked on March 2, 1676, and fighting continued until March 13th, when the last surviving inhabitants evacuated the town and fought their way to safety. Those buildings still remaining were then burned by the Indians. One notable escape is mentioned in the diary of the eminent Boston clergyman, Increase Mather: "March 12, 1676... This week one that was taken captive at Groton made an escape out of the enemy's hands. His name is Blood, a troublesome man of that place! I wish the return of such a man to us may not be ominous for a return of Blood!" Unfortunately, we cannot be certain to which person of that name the reference was made--Richard, or his son, most likely. (Mather's use of the word TROUBLESOME could probably be re-defined today as NON-CONFORMING.)

Richard was into his 60's in 1678 when he again got himself into trouble with the authorities, this time for a dramatic and rather perplexing reason. From Volume 3:23, County Court Record: "December 18, 1678: Richard Blood of Grotton, being bound over to this court to answer for letting his daughter Hannah escape, who was accused of haveing a Bastard & making it away Secretly, was ordered to pay costs. The constable Bills allowed them to be paid as followeth: Concord Constable: 20 shillings; Grotton Constable, 42 shillings."

This brief entry raises a lot of questions. If daughter Hannah was born in 1664, she must have been around 14 at the time of the incident. Just how and to what place did she escape? And what is behind the phrase "making it away secretly"? It would seem that these words could not imply the death of the infant, or Richard's fine would have been much more than 62 shillings. Possibly Hannah, with her father's contrivance, went to some other locality and gave her child away.

Richard lived for another 5 years, dying December 7, 1683 in Groton, leaving no will. Administration of the estate was granted to the widow and his 3 sons. The widow gave bond July 8, 1684, with Zachariah Ferriss I (her son-in-law) and Joseph Parker (who had married Hannah) as sureties. If Richard got himself into any further hot water, no record of it has been found. The few bits and pieces that have been touched on here, however, give indication of a colorful personality--a man who conformed enough to attain a degree of prominence in colonial settlements, but who, when circumstances seemed to warrant it, took matters into his own hands and did as he saw fit. He's not just a paper ancestor; he becomes a whole person, and one almost feels that he would have been more at home in the modern world than in the colonial world." (2)
1)Topo. Dict. p. 133
2) Letter from Phyllis S. Kitson, 711 Kensington Avenue, Flint, MI 48503 dated February 1999 also editor of Zachariah Ferriss Chronicles

[NI2438] "
Name Parish N.E. Town Ref
Stafford, Thomas Warwickshire Warwick, R.I. Genealogical
Dictionary of Rhode
Island 384" (1)
"[270] William Vaughan do Testefy.
Newport Octo. the 4th 1671.
...William Vaughan do Testefy, when Richard Tew did Exchaing the land with mr John Clarke: the land that said Richard bought of Thomas Stafford,... ten acres Eastward of the mill and a percell of Marsh lying in the fresh Pond neer mr Clarkes farme...
(271) John Warner to Thomas Stafford.
...John Warner... of Warwick... Have... sold... unto Thomas Stafford (of the Town... aforesaid)... two shares of Medow ground... within the Township of Warwick, at or neer the place Called Taskeunke, the... shares did Origonally belong to Richard Townsend and Christopher Haukshurst, and since Purchassed by me upon Exchainge of Land with mr Anthony Low... 28th of February 1684-85
John Warner...
Thomas Stafford to John Warner.
... Thomas Stafford... of Warwick... have... Sold... unto John Warner of the same Town... my house lott Scittuate... in... Warwick neer the dwelling of Leiutent. John Low bounded on the front by the street, and parted with a passage of water or Brook from the Land of John Low, and on the other side bounded with the land of Joseph Carder, and on the other bounded by a hie way devideing it from the ox pasture,... with Orchard fenceing building... as it was given unto me by the will of my deceassed Father Thomas Stafford senior... 28th of February 1684-85.
Thomas Stafford" (2)
"Thomas the emigrant... came from Warwickshire, England to Plymouth, Mass., in 1626, lived a few years in Newport and Providence, R.I., thence to Warwick in 1652; died 1677... Thomas Stafford, the emigrant ancestor, was a millwright, and it is claimed that the mill he built at Plymouth was the first mill built in this country for grinding corn by water. He constructed another at Providence, near what is called Millbridge, and still another on his own place at Warwick, the site of which is still recognizable.
The Staffords claim descent from the noble house of Stafford, of whom the founder was Robert, appointed by William the Conqueror as governor of the Castle of Stafford... (Stafford Family, by Henry M. Benedict, p. 4)" (4)
"A 1 Thomas Stafford b Warwickshire, Eng. 1605 Wife - Elizabeth
came to Plymouth 1626, settled Warwick, R.I.
B 1 Thomas Jr. (1634) m Joanne Dodge m2 Sarah Norton
B 2 Samuel...
B 3 Hannah (1640) m Luke Bromley m2 Vamson Packer
B 4 Sarah (1646) m Amos Westcott
B 6 Deborah (1651) m Amos Westcott also
B 5 Joseph 1648 m Sarah Holden" (3)
"Thomas b. 1605 Warwickshire, Eng., Newport, R.I., Warwick, R.I.
d. 1677
m.
Elizabeth b.
d. 1677+
He was a miller.
1626. Plymouth, Mass. He is said to have been there thus early, and it is claimed built the first mill in the country for grinding corn by water.
1638, May 20. His name was in the list of inhabitants admitted to Newport after this date, and he soon received a grant of 17 acres there, being spoken of at this time in the employ of Nicholas Easton.
1647, Mar. 18. He was a witness to will of John Walker, of Portsmouth.
1652, Jun. 7. Warwick. It was ordered by Town Council "that whereas Thomas Stafford hath bought a house of Christopher Unthank, which was formerly given to Mr. Walter Todd, by the town, and hath subscribed, the town hath likewise received him into vote, and so he is become a townsman."
1653, Mar. 1. He bought of Christopher Unthank, a house that the latter had bought of George Baldwin, and the house lot therewith, also a 6 acre lot, for satisfaction in hand recieved.
1655. Freeman.
1657, Apr. 16. He bought a house, &c., in Warwick, of Thomas Lawton of Portsmouth.
1657. He had action of trespass brought against him by James Greene and Randall Holden...
1659, Mar. 2. He sold the estate that he had bought six years before of Christopher Unthank, to Henry Knowles, including in addition some meadow land. At the same date he sold his interest in Potawomut meadow being half a share, to Anthony Low.
1662. He was granted a lot in division of Potawomut meadow, and also one in division of Toseunk.
1673. Deputy.
1677, Nov. 4. Will -- proved 1678, Apr. 27...
[Children]
I. Thomas b. Warwick, R.I.
d. 1723, Jan. 26
m. 1) 1671, Dec. 28
Jane Dodge b.
d.
m. 2)
Sarah b.
d...
II. Samuel...
III. Hannah b.
d. 1692 (-)
m.
Luke Bromley...
IV. Sarah b.
d. 1669.
m. 1667, Jul. 13
Amos Westcott...
V. Joseph b. 1648, Mar. 21. Warwick, R.I.
d. 1697+
m.
Sarah Holden b. 1658, Feb.
d. 1731...." (5)
"16. Thomas Stafford died in Nov 1677 in Warwick, Kent Co., RI. 11 ... He was buried in Old Stafford Cem, Conabicut Pt., RI... In Gary Boyd Robert's "Genealogies of Rhode Island Families" quotes two other genealogy works that Thomas and his brother John arrived in the New World in a vessel of their own. I have not been able to find any other trace of John. It also states the Thomas and John were the sons of Lord Stafford of Staffordshire...
17. Elizabeth was born in Warwick, Kent Co., RI. 22 She died in Warwick, Kent Co., RI. She died in Warwick, Kent Co., RI. Thomas Stafford and Elizabeth had the following children:...
vi. Deborah Stafford was born in Warwick, Kent Co., RI. 14...
14. IGI-LDS" (6)
1) Topo. Dict. p. 176
2) Rhode Island Land Evidences, Vol. 1; 1648-1696 (Genealogical Publishing Co., c. 1970) p. 180-2
3) An Index to the Stafford Families of New England and Their Descendants c. 1968? p. 5
4) Clarke, Louise Brownell; The Greenes of Rhode Island (1903 New York) p. 108-9
5) Austin, Gen. Dict. of RI, p. 384, 386
6) Re: Staffords; e-mail from Michael H. Stafford dated January 15, 1998
Possible References:
One Hundred Sixty Allied Families, p. 218 FHL Microfilm 22259
NEH&GR 122:242

[NI2507] He succeeded to the family estates in 1577 due to the death of

[NI2510] "of Upper Upham & Swindon, Wiltshire, England"

Will made in 1614.
"3. RICHARD GODDARD of Upham, in the county of Wilts, eldest son and heir of Thomas Goddard, by his wife Ann Gifford, m. Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Walrond Esq. of Albourn, and had issue.
I. Thomas, eldest son.
II. EDWARD, second son. Of whom hereafter.(4)" (1)
1) Goddard, Malcolm; My ancestral pedigree from The Goddard's of North Wiltshire, England, U.K. c. 1500-1997

[NI2712] "Date: Wed Dec 25 22:41:19 1996
Name: Susan Larson
E- mail: slarson@techline.com
Address: 1319 Bel Aire Aberdeen WA 98520-1824
Surname of Immigrant: van Etten
Given name(s) of Immigrant: Jacob Jansen
Origin of Immigrant: Etten, North Brabant, Holland
Name of Ship: ?
Arrival Date: bef 1664

Immigrant's Date & Place of Birth: 1632 Etten, North Brabant, Holland
Immigrant's Date & Place of Death: 1693 Hurley, Ulster, NY
Immigrant's Spouse: Annetje Adrians Cam
Source of Information: Old Dutch Church of Kingston, NY pg 501 #16
Immigrant's Children:
1. Jan van Etten b. Marbletown, NY ch. 3 JAN 1666 Kingston, NY d. Ulster County, NY m. Jannetjen Roosa 1692
2. Sytje Jacobz van Etten ch. 25 MAR 1668 Kingston, NY m. Jan Evertz Terwilliger 23 APR 1685 Kingston, NY
3. Adriaen van Etten ch. 26 JUN 1670 Kingston, NY d. 1702 Ulster, NY m. Catherine Crom 1694 Kingston, NY
4. Pieter van Etten b. 1675 Hurley, NY m. Eva de Hooges 12 OCT 1697 Kingston, NY
5. Petronella van Etten b. 1675 Hurley, NY m. Albert Roosa 21 JUN 1696 Kingston, NY
6. Heiltie van Etten b. Marbletown, NY ch. 21 APR 1679 Marbletown, NY m. 12 NOV 1699 Kingston, NY
7. Emanuel van Etten ch. 29 DEC 1681 Kingston, NY m. Antje de Hooges 10 May 1702 Kingston, NY
8. Tietie van Etten b. Marbletown, NY ch. 24 FEB 1684 Kingston, NY m Evert Roosa 10 MAY 1702
9. Jacobus van Etten b. Marbletown, NY ch. 2 MAY 1686 Kingston, NY d. 31 DEC 1759 Rhineback, Duchess, NY m. Catrina Kool 27 NOV 1719 Kingston, NY
10. Geesje van Etten b. Hurley, NY ch. 25 DEC 1688 Kingston, NY m. Jacob Jacobse Decker 25 Nov 1704 Kingston, NY

Notes: Jacob Jansen van Etten AKA de Lang. Annetje Adriens AKA van Amsterdam she was married (1) Aaert Pietersen Tak who disappeared after an indian attack.
Website:
Website Description: slarson@techline.com" (1))
1) Olive Tree Genealogy, 17th Century Immigrants to New York

[NI2805] "Weller, Nathaniel Birth 15Jul1648 WEL898:39
Father Weller, Richard
Weller, Richard Marriage 17Sep1640 WIN638:62
Wife Wilson, Ann
Weller, Richard's wife Death 1648" (1)
1)Holbrook; Windsor p. 269-70

[NI2807] Richard Weller b. abt. 1615 d. 7/10/1655 Windsor CT m. there 9/17/1640 Ann Wilson b. abt. 1619 per Nutmegger 6/1994 p. 2ff
"Weller, Eleazer Birth 20 Nov 1650 WIN538:37
Father Weller, Richard
Weller, Eleazer Baptism 20 Nov 1650 WEL898:39
Father Weller, Richard...
Weller, John Birth 9 Aug 1645 WIN 638:38
Father Weller, Richard
Weller, John Baptism 10 Aug 1645 CHS930:70
Father Weller, Richard...
Weller, Nathaniel Birth 15 Jul 1648 CHS930:70
Father Weller, Richard...
Weller, Rebeca Birth 10 May 1641 CHS930:70
Father Weller, Richard
Weller, Rebecca Baptism 16 May 1641 WEL898:39
Father Weller, Richard...
Weller, Richard Marriage 17 Sep 1640 WIN638:62
Wife Wilson, Ann
Weller, Richard Marriage 17 Sep 1640 CHS930:70
Wife Wilson, Ann
Weller, Richard Children Born 6 1677 CHS930:93
Weller, Richard614 Land Owner 1640 STI891:168
Weller, Richard614 Land Owner 1653 MAN904:85
Spelling Weller, Rich
Weller, Richard614 Church Rate - Pence = 72 1660 STI891:179
Weller, Richard's wife Death 1648 CHS930:81
Weller, Sara Birth 10 Apr 1643 CHS930:70
Father Weller, Richard
Weller, Sarah Baptism 16 Apr 1643 WIN638:37
Father Weller, Richard...
Weller, Thomas Birth 10 Apr 1653 WEL898:39
Father Weller, Richard
Weller, Wife Death 10 Jul 1655 WEL898:43
Husband Weller, Richard" (1)
1) Holbrook, Jay Mack; Connecticut Colonists Windsor 1635-1703 (Holbrook Research Inst., Oxford, MA 1986) p. 269-270
From the above, and from information on Thankful Weller, we can conclude:
Richard Weller, b. abt. 1615 England d. aft. 1677
m. (1) Ann Wilson September 16, 1640 Windsor, CT. She born abt. 1620 England, d. 1648 (probably in childbirth) Windsor, CT.
Children (born in Windsor):
1. Rebecca Weller b. May 10, 1641 (bapt. May 16, 1641)
2. Sara Weller b. April 10, 1643 (bapt. April 16, 1643)
3. John Weller b. August 9, 1645 (bapt. August 10, 1645)
4. Nathaniel Weller b. July 15, 1648
m. (2) Unknown abt. 1649 She d. July 10, 1655, possibly in childbirth.
5. Eleazer Weller b. November 20, 1650
6. Thomas Weller b. April 10, 1653
Holbrook states that Richard Weller had 6 children in 1677.

[NI2817] "Susannah's father Richard Smith died 1670 at age 80 in Wethersfield, CT. Two pretty good articles about this man that I have found so far." (1)
"Dr. Roderick Bissell Jones published an article setting out facts which tend to show that Richard Smith was a grandson of Alderman William Smith of Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire, England, and his wife, sister of the Bishop of Winchester (Register, 128(1974):136-39). He identified the Richard of Wethersfield as probably the Richard Smith baptized 16 November 1595 at Stratford, son of the ironmonger John Smith by his wife Alice Walker, sister of Henry Walker, Shakespeare's friend...
several circumstances have been reviewed which initially raised doubts about the proposed English parentage of Richard Smith of Wethersfield. However, they could be explained away until the incidental discovery of two specific, contemporary age records which, together or separately, force the definite conclusion that Richard Smith was not the son of the ironmonger John Smith of Stratford-on-Avon. Nevertheless, it should be observed that these records do not disprove Dr. Jones's underlying conjecture that Smith may have been one of Gov. Wyllys's employees in 1636, although by that time he was about 53 years old. Also, they do not rull out a possibility that he belonged in some way to the Smith families in or near Stratford. Jones also mentioned the ironmonger's younger brother, Thomas Smith, who had a son Richard baptized in 1583/4. The date agrees with the new information about the age of Wethersfield's Richard Smith. Nothing is known about Thomas's son...
Richard Smith, born about 1583, place and parentage unknown, was living at Wethersfield, Connecticut, during 1669. On 17 August 1658 Richard Smith Sr. and his wife, Rebeccah, were among the eleven Wethersfield church members who signed a petition for Rev. John Russell's removal. Their sons Richard Smith Jr., Joseph Smith, Jonathan Smith, and sons-in-law Thomas Standish and Matthias Treat [relative of Honor Treat, wife of John Deming?] signed as non-members (Stiles, 1:161)... Richard Smith Sr. was in Wethersfield by 1646; and possibly, according to Dr. Jones's conjecture, he had arrived as one of Gov. Wyllys's advance men in 1636.
Children:
i. Richard, b. ca. 1617 (aged 67 in September 1684); d. June 1690, probably in present Glastonbury, m. Mary Weed, who d. at Glastonbury 7 May 1704, sister of John Weed, b. ca. 1618, of Salisbury, Mass. Six children.
ii. Susannah...
iii. Joseph, b. ca. 1626 (aged 41 in August 1667); d. at Wethersfield (Rocky Hill) before 28 Aug. 1673, the date of his inventory; m. by 1654 Lydia Wright (Thomas1) of Wethersfield...
iv. Mary, b. ca. 1627; m. ca. 1648 Matthias Treat who d. at Wethersfield 8 July 1662; m. (2) before 3 Aug 1666, Anthony Wright who d. 1679; m. (3) John Smith...
v. Abigail, b. "say 1632"; m. (1) at Easttown, Westchester Co., N.Y., 1 Sept. 1657, John2 Adams (Jeremiah1) (...The Gilbert Family...)[see Elizabeth Gilbert #14683], who d. at Hartford 6 Sept. 1670; m. (2) 13 March 1673 John Betts of Wethersfield with whom she moved to Huntington, Long Island, N.Y...
vi. Jonathan, b. ca. 1635 (aged 22 in April 1658, and 23 in August 1659); living during 1711; m. (1) between 22 Aug. 1658 and 18 Aug. 1659, Hannah Adams (Jeremiah1), b. ca. 1640 (aged "17 or 18 y" when treated 22 Aug. 1658 by Winthrop) and living 29 Nov. 1660...
Jonathan m. (2) 1 Jan. 1663/4 (?or 1 Nov. 1663) Martha Bushnell, b. ca. 1634, daughter of Francis Bushnell (Francis1) of Guilford" (2)
2) Gale Ion Harris; The Doubtful English Ancestry of Richard Smith of Wethersfield, CT (NEHGR 7/1989, Vol. 143:244-246)
1) Gary Murray (SJJA18A@prodigy.com))

[NI3013] "Elizabeth (Foote) Jennings of County Essex, England
Sister of Nathaniel Foote of Wethersfield, Connecticut, and Joshua Foote of Providence, Rhode Island
By Henry B. Hoff, C.G., F.A.S.G.
The English ancestry and relatives of Nathaniel Foote of Wethersfield, Connecticut, and of his brother, Joshua Foote of Providence, Rhode Island, have been well covered in a series of articles in TAG. [Note: George E. McCracken, "Nathaniel Foote's English Relatives" TAG 53 (1977):193-206; Janis Greene Valore, Myrtle Stevens Hyde, and Glade Ian Nelson, "The Brookes of London: Maternal Ancestors of Nathaniel and Joshua Foote," TAG 55 (1979):193-206; Myrtle Stevens Hyde and Paul L. Child, "Child-Foote-Goddard Connections," TAG 63(1988):17-28.] The first article notes that Nathaniel and Joshua had a sister Elizabeth, living in 1608, but nothing further was discovered about her.
In reviewing English Origins of American Colonists from the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, I happened to notice an abstract of the will of Elizabeth Jennings, widow, with commentary identifying her brother as Joshua Foote...
While the will provides no startling revelations, it does indicate her marriage, and names a hitherto-unknown nephew and two nieces: Daniel Foote, Mary Foote and Hannah Foote...
Elizabeth Foote and Thomas Jennings were married at St. James, Clerkenwell, Middlesex, on 17 July 1617." (1)
"Ancestors of Nathaniel Foote -- Warren Line
By Myrtle Stevens Hyde
Several articles about the English ancestry of Nathaniel Foote of Wethersfield, Connecticut, have recently been published in TAG: 53:193-206, 54:99-101 and 55:193-206. The second of these shows that the identity of Nathaniel's grandfather was John Foote of Royston, Hertfordshire, rather than Robert Foote, and that John's wife was Helen or Ellen Warren." (2)
TAG, Vol. 72, #1, pp. 54-5 shows:
Robert Foote, Shalford, Essex & London, England, d. 1608/9 m. Joan Brooke
Robert Foote, London, d. 1646; m. Dionis ______, d. 1630
John Foote
Samuel Foote
Samuel Foote
Elizabeth Foote
m. Elizabeth Child (#3379)
Benjamin Foote
Robert Foote
Robert Foote
Benjamin Foote
James Foote
Daniel Foote, Cambridge & London
Nathaniel Foote (d. 1644) (#7340) m. Elizabeth (Deming?) (#7341)
Joshua Foote (adult immigrant to New England) m. Elizabeth, Providence, RI
Francis Foote m. Thomas Jennings (Hatfield Broad Oak, Essex, d. 1657/8)
Elizabeth Foote, d. 1658-60
Joseph Foote, Shalford, Essex d. 1639, m. Anna
Mary Foote m. John Hewes, Royston, d. 1621
Joshua Hewes (Adult immigrant)
Elizabeth Hewes "
Ann Hewes "
Phebe Hewes " all Roxbury
1) TAG, July 1996 p. 149-150
2) TAG, Date (?) p. 165

[NI3040] "Elizabeth van Benschoten... m. 5-7-1738 Johannes Ostrander, bp. 9-11-1715, son of Arent Ostrander & Gertruy van Bloemendaal" (1)
"Ostrander, Gertrude bap. June 27, 1742 Kingston dau. of Johannes Ostrander and Elizabeth van Benschoten m. May 10, 1770 Linlithgo Reformed Church, Columbia Co., NY" (2)
"1133 Johannes m. Elizabeth Van Bunschoten
Solomon no record
Petrus m. Antje Denemercken-6 child.
Eggert no record
Geertruy no record
Elsjen m. Nicholas Van Wagenen-?
Jacobus m. Maria De Witt
Egbert m. Elizabeth Buys-5 child.
Elias m. Rachel Van Etten-11 child.
Geertruy no record
Annecke m. John Miller [PROBLEM HERE. ANNEKEN MARRIED ZACHARIAS WEYDMANN. SEE ANNEKEN FOR DISCUSSION.]
Johannes m. Catharine Whetsel
Teunis no record" (3)
1) Schoonmaker Genealogy (see Anneken Ostrander) p. 43
2) Dear Cousins
3) De Bonte Koe (The Ostrander Family Association Newsletter), Vol. III, No. 1 found at http://home.earthlink.net/~ostrander/dbkv03n1.html#cont12

[NI3041] "C-126 Elizabeth VanBenschoten m. Johannes Ostrander
Egbert-Eltjen
D-379 Solomon Ostrander, bp. Kingston RDC 10-22-1738
D-380 Petrus Ostrander, bp. 1-28-1739; m. Lower Red Hook 2-3-1765 Antje denemercken, b. Kingston 5-17-1738
D-381 Egbert Ostrander, bp. 1-11-1741, d.y.

[NI3042] "Fourth Generation...
Arent Ostrander and Gertruy Maasen van Bloemendaal: (1) Petrus 7 Oct 1711 (2) Maas 11 Apr 1714 (3) Johannes... (4) Jacobus 18 Nov 1716 (5) Willem 9 Nov 1718 (6) Jacomyntjen 20 Dec 1719 (7) Cornelius 16 Apr 1721 (8) Rebecca 15 Sept 1723 (9) Petrus 10 Oct 1725 (10) Catrina 12 Oct 1729 (11) Leah ca 1730 (12) Maria 26 Jan 1735" (1)
"To all Christian people to whom this present writing shalt or may come Arien Gerretse Jacob Du Bois Gerre Nukerck Jacob Ruste Cornelis Wynkoop Arent Ostrander & Albert Roosa the present trustees of the township of Hurley In the County of Ulster and province of Newyork in America Sends greeting Now know yee that the said trustees for Divers good causes them there unto moveing But move & Especially for & in consideration of three pounds current lawfull money of the said providence to them or one of them the use of said township in hand paid before the ensealing and Delivery of these presents By Janetie Nukerck Widow of Cornelis Gerrese late of Hurley aforesaid Deceased the Receipt Where of they the said Trustees Do here by acknowledge and here of & therefrom and of & from Every part and percell thereof to be fully Sattisfied Contented and paid Have given granted bargined and sold Released Ratified & confirmed and by these presents Do for themselves their heirs & successors freely and Clearly given grant Bargin & sell Release Rattifie and confirme Unto the said Jannetie Nukerck her heirs and Assigns for Ever all that Certain tract or percell of upland scituate lying and being within the limit and bounds of Hurley a foresaid Beginning at the West corner of a tract of upland Containing Nineteen acres three Rood & thirty perch which this same day is conveyed unto the said Jacob DuBois and upon the line of a tract of upland formerly pattented by Gerret Cornelisse Containing twenty acres and now in the possesion & occupation of his heirs, and from thence it Runs by the line if said pattented land South twenty Six Degrees west five Chains & two perch to a waggon road which leads from the house of Cornelis Kool into the woods then south Sixty two degrees East ten Chains then North Sixty five Degrees East three Chains & Sixty five Links and thence North fifty degrees thirty minues West twelve Chains & three perch to the first station Containing four acres Three Roods & twenty two perches Being bounded to the North West by the aforesaid Land to the South West by the above mentioned waggon Rode to the South East by the Commons of hurley and to the North East by the land of said Jacob Du Bois To Have and to Hold the said tract or percell of upland with all and singular the premifsed & appartenances there unto belonging or in any wise appurtaining unto hem the said Janneie Nukerck her heirs & assigns for Ever to the sole and onely proper use Benefit and behoofe of her the said Jannetie Nukerk her heirs and assigns for Ever it is Reserved that all the Inhabitans of hurley shall cutt break and carry away wood & store so long as the same land

Back side of Document
Remains unfenced In Wittness Where of the Said Arien Gerretse Jacob Dubois Cornelius Wynkoop Jacob Ruste Gerre Nukerk Arent Ostrander and Albert Roosa have unto putt their hands and seal in hurley this 16th of March anno Domini 1724

Signed Sealed & Delivered In presence of us Jacob Rusen Jun, Jan Van Duese, Isaac Du Bois, Jannetie Nukerck, Arien Gerretse*, Jacob Dubois*, Jacob Rutse*, Gerrit Nukerck*, Cornelis Wynkoop*, Arent Oostrander*, Albert Roosa*

In the power of me Hardenberg Justice of the peace

* equals Red wax seals " (2)
"FIFTH GENERATION FAMILIES OF ARENT OSTRANDER
1 Pieter Pietersen and Tryntje
11 Pieter P. Oostrander and Rebecca Traphagen
113 Arent Ostrander and Geertruy M. Van Bloomendahl
1131 Petrus no record
1132 Maas m. Jennetz Swartmount (Swartwout)
Jacobus no record
Cornelius m. Mary Brinkerhoff-8 child.
Thomas no record
Elizabeth m. Mattheus Valentyne-1 child.
Henry m. Martha Nicholson (Nichols)-9 chld
1133 Johannes m. Elizabeth Van Bunschoten
Solomon no record
Petrus m. Antje Denemercken-6 child.
Eggert no record
Geertruy no record
Elsjen m. Nicholas Van Wagenen-?
Jacobus m. Maria De Witt
Egbert m. Elizabeth Buys-5 child.
Elias m. Rachel Van Etten-11 child.
Geertruy no record
Annecke m. John Miller [PROBLEM HERE. ANNEKEN MARRIED ZACHARIAS WEYDMANN. SEE ANNEKEN FOR DISCUSSION.]
Johannes m. Catharine Whetsel
Teunis no record
1134 Jacobus m. Margriet Heermans
Cornelius m. Annatje Schot
Hendricus m. Marytje Phillips-11 child.
Arent m. Gertrude Holsapple-11 child.
Wilhelmus m. Elizabeth Graet-7 child.
Gertrug m. Abraham Schott
Antje no record
Antje no record
Catrina no record
Phillip Terwilliger m. Annatje Phillip-8 child.
Jannetje no record
Margriet Terwilliger no record
Jannetje no record
Sena (Lena) no record
1135 Willem m. Convert Bock
Jan
Jonothan
Catharina
Andonius
1136 Jacomyntje m. Jacob Ostrander
7 Children See Jacob Ostrander
1137 Cornelius m. Jannetje Heermans
Annatie
Andres
Arend
Geertruy
Henricus
1138 Rebekka m. Maas Bloomendal
Rebecca m. John Maases
Geertruy m. Ephraim Bennet
Jacomyntje m. Hendrick Crammel
Lea (Leah) m. Jacob Elmendorf
Marytje m. Wm. R. Hooghtaling
1139 Petrus no record
113A Catrina no record
113B Leah no record
113C Maria m. Albartus Bloemendalyn" (3)

1)Ostrander "From the East Bank"' Ostrander Family Association
2) De Bonte Koe (The Ostrander Family Association Newsletter), Vol. XIV, No. 3 found at http://home.earthlink.net/~ostrander/dbkv14n3.html#cont1
3) De Bonte Koe (The Ostrander Family Association Newsletter), Vol. III, No. 1 found at http://home.earthlink.net/~ostrander/dbkv03n1.html#cont12

[NI3043] "Geertruy is the granddaughter of Cornelis Maessen Van Buren who came to New Netherlands from Buren, Holland in 1631 on the ship Endracht and settled on a farm at Tapsickenekes, below Fort Orange (Albany area). He returned to Holland and married Catalyntje Martense Van Alstyne in 1635.
Children:
Marten Cornelisse
b. 1636 in Houton, Utrecht, Holland
m. Maritje Quakenborch in 1662, 9 children.
m. Tanneke Adams in 1693
d. 13 Nov 1703
Note. from this line down through Pieter Martense Van Buren, Marten Van Buren, Abraham Van Buren, to Martin Van Buren the 8th President of the United States. b. 5 Dec 1782 at Kinderhook, Columbia, NY. d. 24 Jul 1862.

Hendrick Cornelisse
b. 30 Jan 1637 on board the ship Rensselaerwyck returning to America.
He married Elizabeth Van Slyck and they had 5 children.

Maes Cornelisse later took the name Van Bloemdaal, probably from his place of birth which they defined as Bloemdaal, or Blooming Valley.
m. Jacomyntje Gardenier in 1682 at Kinderhook, NY. 6 children
d. 27 Nov 1704 in Albany.
Children:
Cornelis Maase bp 6 Feb 1684 at RDC Albany (#35).
Jan Maase m. Rebecca Fonda
Jacob bp. 19 Feb 1688 at RDC Albany (#302) died young.
Geertruy Maase bp. 22 Jun 1689 at RDC Albany, NY (#376). m. Arent Ostrander 1710
Jacomyntje No record found.

Jacob Massen m. Sara Gardenier.
Styntji (Christina). b 1645, m.1665 to Dirk Wesselsen Ten Broeck. d. 26 Nov 1729. 11 children.

Tobias Cornelisse No records." (1)
1) De Bonte Koe (The Ostrander Family Association Newsletter), Vol. XIV, No. 3 found at http://home.earthlink.net/~ostrander/dbkv14n3.html#cont6

[NI3045] "Pieter Pieterzen born ca 1652 in The Netherlands m. Rebecca Traphagen 19 Jan 1679 in Kingston NY...
[Children]
Pieter b. ca 1680 m Rachel Dingman 4 June 1704
Willem bapt. 24 Sept 1682 m Maritje de Hooges ca 1705
Arent...
Catrina bapt. 5 Sept 1686
Johannes bapt. 23 Sept 1688 m Elizabeth Van den Berg 22 Feb 1713
Theunis bapt. 16 Jan 1691 m Maritje Suiland 21 Mar 1718
Hendrick bapt. 18 Sept 1693 m Elizabeth Van Bommel 12 May 1724
Harmanus bapt. 10 Nov 1695 m Lena Lanshing
Leah bapt. 1 May 1698
Rachel bapt. 1 May 1698 m Solomon Terwilliger 8 July 1720
Geestje bapt. 19 May 1700 m Ary Roosa 9 Feb 1722
Rebekka b. ca 1702 m Johannes de Hooges Van Etten
Jacob bapt. 13 Jan 1706 m Maritje Roosa 11 Nov 1726" (1)
"If Pieter, Jr., and his sisters, Tryntje and Geestje, were orphans, they would have been among the several children taken in and raised by Dutch families in Wiltwyck. At age eleven, Pieter was old enough to work in the fields and was never educated. His signature was an X beside his name which was written for him by another person.
In the year following the Indian attack, the Dutch surrendered their colony to an English fleet. The name Nieuw Nederland was changed to New York, Wiltwyck to Kingston, Nieuw Dorp to Hurley. At the turn of the century, conforming to the English naming system, the family adopted the surname Ostrander - from the east bank, possibly referring to origins in Holland. But, in their way of life -- in their speech, manner, dress and religion - the family remained Dutch through and through. In their first hundred years in America, the progeny of Pieter Pieterzen and Tryntje married into more than a hundred other Dutch families.
The future of the Ostrander male line depended on Pieter Pieterzen(2), but it was not until 1679, at age twenty-seven or so, that he married. His bride was Rebecca Traphagen, sixteen years old, the daughter of Willem Jenzen Traphagen and his third wife, Joostge Willems Nooltruyck. The two families were neighbors on farmland called Westquansengh, an Indian name, near Hurley. A new Dutch Reformed stone church would be finished in Kingston within the year, but their marriage in January probably took place in the old log church which had replaced the first log church burned by the Indians in 1663.
Early documents give us an occasional glimpse of the family. In 1680 Pieter Pieterzen(2) was one of the petitioners asking for a minister that can preache bothe Inglish and Dutche to be assigned to the Kingston church. In 1680 he purchased a two-acre house lot in Hurley. A list of Ulster County freeholders in 1714 shows that Pieter Oostrander, Sr. was the owner of land assessed for tax purposes at eight-five pounds sterling. In 1724 when peter oosterander was cited by the board of supervisors for non-payment of taxes, his son, Arent, paid for him. In 1728 when Ulster County listed forty-two freeholders (land owners most were tenants), five were Pieter, and four of his sons.
In their long life together, 13 January 1706 must have been a festive day for Pieter(2) and Rebecca Traphagen. They were at the home of Adam Dingman and his wife Aeltie Jacobse Gardenier in Kinderhook. The Dutch Reformed Domine Johannes Lydius had come over from the First Church in Albany across the river, and no doubt many well wishers, friends and families were present. The occasion was a double christening - Pieter(2) and Rebecca Traphagen baptized their thirteenth child, Jacob , and their son Pieter(3) and Rachel Dingman baptized their first child, Rebecca.
The double ceremony was a family milestone of sorts, the infant Jacob(3) representing the last of the third generation and the infant Rebecca(4) marking the beginning of the fourth, with the promise of more to come. Today the lines of descent from Pieter Pieterzen(1) and Tryntje can be traced through fifteen generations and many thousands of known descendants with unknown thousands more still untraced.

Collin Ostrander
Charlottesville, VA "(2)
1)Ostrander (see Arent Ostrander)
2) De Bonte Koe (The Ostrander Family Association Newsletter), Vol. XIV, No. 3 found at http://home.earthlink.net/~ostrander/dbkv11ns.html#cont2

[NI3046] "The future of the Ostrander male line depended on Pieter Pieterzen(2), but it was not until 1679, at age twenty-seven or so, that he married. His bride was Rebecca Traphagen, sixteen years old, the daughter of Willem Jenzen Traphagen and his third wife, Joostge Willems Nooltruyck. The two families were neighbors on farmland called Westquansengh, an Indian name, near Hurley. A new Dutch Reformed stone church would be finished in Kingston within the year, but their marriage in January probably took place in the old log church which had replaced the first log church burned by the Indians in 1663. " (1)
"Rebecca Traphagen 1662 - ca 1730
Rebecca Traphagen was born at Bushwick, Kings County, New York and baptized February 19, 1662 in Brooklyn DC. She married Pieter Pietersen Ostrander January 19, 1679 in Kingston DC, both residing in Westquansengh. Peter was baptized in the Amsterdam Lutheran Kerke July 3, 1657, the son of Pieter and Geesje (Jans) Karstensen "van Nortstrant".
Peter was a farmer at Hurley and purchased a 2 acres house lot there in 1699. He was listed on the 1714 list of freeholders of Hurley, being assessed £85. In 1724 he was one of four men cited by the Board of Supervisors for nonpayment of taxes. His son Arent Ostrander came forward to pay due to the advanced age of said Ostrander.
Peter Pietersen and Rebecca Traphagen witnessed the baptism March 31, 1738 of Helena, daughter of Jacob Ostrander in the Kingston Reformed Dutch Church. This is the last mention of either in public records. They probably died after this time in Hurley, New York. Neither Pieter nor Rebecca left a will.
Children of Pieter Pietersen and Rebecca (Traphagen) Ostrander, all born at Hurley:

Pieter, b. ca 1680, m. June 4, 1704, KDC Rachel Dingman.
Willem, bap. September 24, 1682 KDC; m. Maria de Hooges.
Arent, bap. October 5, 1684 KDC, m. Geertruy Maase Van Bloomendaal.
Tryntje\Catrina, bap. September 5, 1686 KDC; d. before 1700 in Hurley, Ulster County, New York.
Johannes, bap. September 23, 1688 KDC; m. Elizabeth Van Den Berg February 22, 1715 in the KDC.
Teunis, b. January 16, 1690; m. March 21, 1718 KDC, Marytjen Suyland.
Hendrick, bap. September 18, 1693 KDC; m. May 12, 1724, KDC, Elizabeth Wamboom.
Hermanus, bap. November 10, 1695 KDC; m. Lena Lansing.
Lea (twin), bap. May 1, 1698 in KDC.
Rachel (twin), bap. May 1, 1698 in KDC; m. July 8, 1720 KDC, Zaloman Terwilliger.
Geesje, bp. May 19, 1700 KDRC; m. February 9, 1722 KDC, Ary Roosa. [Probably the son of #2916]
Rebecca, b. about 1702.
Jacob, bap. January 13, 1706 Albany DC, m. November 11, 1726 KDC, Marytjen Roosa. [Probably the daughter of #2916]
Descendants of this couple have been very numerous. See the Ostrander Family Association for more information on this couples descendants.
SOURCES:
Kingston Reformed Dutch Church.
Wills of Ulster County, New York.
Kingston Papers.
Doopen Register, Amsterdam Oude Lutheran Kerke. " (2)
1) De Bonte Koe (The Ostrander Family Association Newsletter), Vol. XIV, No. 3 found at http://home.earthlink.net/~ostrander/dbkv11ns.html#cont2
2) Rebecca Traphagen by Chris Brooks

[NI3047] "Pieter Pieterzen, a Dutch Army cadet, arrived in Nieuw Amsterdam with wife Tryntje and children Pieter, 8 years old, Tryntje, 4, and Geestje, 2, on board the ship De Bonte Koe, in mid-June 1660. The family name was changed to Oostrander about 1700.
Caprain Pieter Lucasz, commander of the Dutch ship De Bonte Koe ("The Spotted Cow"), kept an account book showing the fares collected from his passengers upon departing Holland 16 April, 1660 for North America. Among the entries:
Pieter Pieters from Amsterdam
---10 ---29 ---13:38 Adelborst
with his wife and children of 8, 4, and 2 years.
Adelborst, in English a cadet, was a title given a gentleman volunteer in the Army, usually a younger son who, barred by primogeniture from inheriting the family estate, entered the service of his country as a means of making living...
[Children]
Pieter Pieterzen...
Tryntje b. ca 1656 m Hendrik Albertse Ploeg 10 children
Geestje b. ca 1658 m Jan Pier Several children" (1)
"An account book survives to witness to posterity the names of the passengers on board the Dutch ship De Bonte Koe (the Spotted Cow), commanded by Captain Pieter Lucasz, which departed Amsterdam 16 April 1660 and two months later anchored off Nieuw Amsterdam, the Dutch colonial capital on Manhattan Island in North America. Among the names was that of Pieter Pieters, from Amsterdam, an adelborst or junior officer in the Army of the Dutch West Indies Company, with his wife Tryntje, their son Pieter, eight years old, and daughters Tryntje and Geestge, four and two years old. Pieter Pieterzen, as the name is more commonly written, was the progenitor of the American family named Ostrander.
By 1660, Nieuw Amsterdam, the Dutch administration and shipping center in North America, was a thriving community of fifteen hundred inhabitants. Another few hundred Dutchmen manned Fort Orange (later Albany), a fur trading and military post a hundred and fifty miles upriver on the Hudson. In between these two, alongside Esopus Creek where it emptied into the Hudson, lay a little farm community of sixty or seventy colonists. To the first settlers here, the Esopus meadow was an exceedingly beautiful land, free of trees and ready for the plow, with a rich soil that could produce food enough for the entire colonial establishment up and down the Hudson.
But life was far from secure on the Esopus. The local Indians, a clan of the Leni Lenape people who had once controlled a vast area, felt that the Dutch governor general, Peter Stuyvesant, had not lived up to his many promises to them. When young braves got their hands on the white mans firewater, their resentment turned to threats and insolence. One day a settlers house, barn and pigsty were burned by Indians; and then, holding firebrands to roofs of other dwellings, they compelled Dutch men to plow for them. An angry letter went off to the Governor's Council saying that if sending forty or fifty men for the farmers protection was not worth the trouble and expense, then we will all leave at your Honors discretion.
In the autumn of 1659 the Indians attacked. Thirteen Dutch men were taken prisoner and for three weeks the survivors were under siege in their stockade. In the following year De Bonte Koe, with Pieter Pieterzen and his family on board, was one of five ships sent with settlers and soldiers to bolster the Esopus settlement, then known as Wiltwyck. In the following year, a few of the newly arrived settlers pushed on westward, about three miles, to open a farm settlement they called Nieuw Dorp -- New Town.
In June of 1663 the Indians once again attacked, this time achieving complete surprise. Nieuw Dorp, the first to be hit, was overrun and completely destroyed except for an uncovered barn and a hay rick. At Wiltwyck, Indian warriors were already within the stockade, ostensibly to barter for supplies, when a rider from Nieuw Dorp sounded the alarm. House-to-house fighting erupted as farmers rushed home from their fields. Twelve homes went up in flames and the whole settlement might have burned but for a sudden shift of wind. In a few hours on that day, twenty-one Dutch settlers were killed, nine were wounded and forty-five women and children were taken away by the Indians.
What happened to Pieter Pieterzen and Tryntje is not known. Their names are not listed among the casualties and his name is not listed among the soldiers sent off in pursuit. It would appear that the official lists pertain only to Wiltwyck, not to Nieuw Dorp where three men, unnamed, were later reported killed. One early researcher was willing to rely on tradition, word handed down orally from generation to generation: Tradition says the family fell victim to Indians.
If Pieter, Jr., and his sisters, Tryntje and Geestje, were orphans, they would have been among the several children taken in and raised by Dutch families in Wiltwyck. At age eleven, Pieter was old enough to work in the fields and was never educated. His signature was an X beside his name which was written for him by another person.
In the year following the Indian attack, the Dutch surrendered their colony to an English fleet. The name Nieuw Nederland was changed to New York, Wiltwyck to Kingston, Nieuw Dorp to Hurley. At the turn of the century, conforming to the English naming system, the family adopted the surname Ostrander - from the east bank, possibly referring to origins in Holland. But, in their way of life -- in their speech, manner, dress and religion - the family remained Dutch through and through. In their first hundred years in America, the progeny of Pieter Pieterzen and Tryntje married into more than a hundred other Dutch families.
The future of the Ostrander male line depended on Pieter Pieterzen(2), but it was not until 1679, at age twenty-seven or so, that he married. His bride was Rebecca Traphagen, sixteen years old, the daughter of Willem Jenzen Traphagen and his third wife, Joostge Willems Nooltruyck. The two families were neighbors on farmland called Westquansengh, an Indian name, near Hurley. A new Dutch Reformed stone church would be finished in Kingston within the year, but their marriage in January probably took place in the old log church which had replaced the first log church burned by the Indians in 1663.
Early documents give us an occasional glimpse of the family. In 1680 Pieter Pieterzen(2) was one of the petitioners asking for a minister that can preache bothe Inglish and Dutche to be assigned to the Kingston church. In 1680 he purchased a two-acre house lot in Hurley. A list of Ulster County freeholders in 1714 shows that Pieter Oostrander, Sr. was the owner of land assessed for tax purposes at eight-five pounds sterling. In 1724 when peter oosterander was cited by the board of supervisors for non-payment of taxes, his son, Arent, paid for him. In 1728 when Ulster County listed forty-two freeholders (land owners most were tenants), five were Pieter, and four of his sons.
In their long life together, 13 January 1706 must have been a festive day for Pieter(2) and Rebecca Traphagen. They were at the home of Adam Dingman and his wife Aeltie Jacobse Gardenier in Kinderhook. The Dutch Reformed Domine Johannes Lydius had come over from the First Church in Albany across the river, and no doubt many well wishers, friends and families were present. The occasion was a double christening - Pieter(2) and Rebecca Traphagen baptized their thirteenth child, Jacob , and their son Pieter(3) and Rachel Dingman baptized their first child, Rebecca.
The double ceremony was a family milestone of sorts, the infant Jacob(3) representing the last of the third generation and the infant Rebecca(4) marking the beginning of the fourth, with the promise of more to come. Today the lines of descent from Pieter Pieterzen(1) and Tryntje can be traced through fifteen generations and many thousands of known descendants with unknown thousands more still untraced.

Collin Ostrander
Charlottesville, VA "(2)

1) Ostrander (see Arent)
2) De Bonte Koe (The Ostrander Family Association Newsletter), Vol. XIV, No. 3 found at http://home.earthlink.net/~ostrander/dbkv11ns.html#cont2

[NI3052] "3. Eltje was baptized at the Old Dutch Reformed Chuch of Kingston, Ulster Co., NY on April 1, 1688. Her sponsors were Jacob Rutz, Klaes Rosevelt, and Helletje Kunst. She married Solomon Van Benschoten (Buntschooten) on December 17, 1715 at Kingston were they both resided. Solomon was probably the son of Teunis Van Benschoten and Gerritje Gerrits. " (1)
1) David R. Jansen's Northeast United States Genealogy Home Page

[NI3053] "B-19 Eltje Schoonmaker, bp. 4-1-1688; m. 12-17-1715 Solomon van Benschoten, son of Theunis van Benschotten & Gerritje Gerrits. Res. Kingston
[Children]
C-124 Theunis 1716 C-130 Elsje 1725
C-125 Egbert H. 1717 C-130 Gerritjen 1727
C-126 Elizabeth... C-132 Zara 1728
C-127 Anneken 1718 C-133 Johannes
C-128 Maria 1721 C-134 Solomon
C-129 Catrina 1722 C-135 Jacob
His will in Dutch 11-14-1737, pr. Ulster Co. 6-7-1754 (Anjou I/133):" (1)
1) Schoonmaker Genealogy p. 23

[NI3057] "Date: Tue Nov 19 13:56:46 1996
Name: Cindy Torres Owens
E- mail: cindyo@staffnet.com
Address:
Surname of Immigrant: Hussey
Given name(s) of Immigrant: Frederick
Origin of Immigrant: England
Name of Ship: ?
Arrival Date: abt 1664

Immigrant's Date & Place of Birth: c1643 England
Immigrant's Date & Place of Death: bef 1689 Ulster Co.,NY
Immigrant's Spouse: Margaret Bos
Source of Information: Pearson First Settlers of Albany, Anjou Probate Records
Immigrant's Children:
1. Elizabeth b:Nov 15, 1665
2. Judith b:Oct 9, 1667 married Jan Van Vliet
3. Anna B:1670 married to Jochem H. Schoonmaker (my line)
4. James b:Jun 29, 1679 married a Miss Nottingham. What happened to them??
Notes: Frederick was a soldier for the Duke of York. " (1)
GenForum Posting
Posted by Lorine Schulze on September 27, 1998 at 14:06:57:

In Reply to: FREDERICK HUSSEY-1600'S, ENGLAND-NY posted by Jim Miller on July 02, 1998 at 13:38:12:

Children bpt at Kingston DRC [note the variations in spelling!!]

Elisabeth bp 15 Nov 1665 to Fredrick Hussei and Margriet Hussei [no witnesses]
Judich bp 9 Oct 1667 to Freric horsjes and Margriet Horsjes witness Lysbet Hall
unamed child (Anna?) bpt 27 June 1670 to Fredrick Hussy [wife not named] m Jochem Hendrickse Schoonmaker
James bp 29 June 1679 to Fredrick Hodje and Margriet Hodje. Sponsor Mrs Nottingham
1) The Olive Tree Genealogy: 17th Century Immigrants to New York http://www.rootsweb.com/~ote/17th/dny_4.htm

[NI3089] "Thankslord Perkins, Wife of Ralph Shepard of Dedham, Massachusetts
A footnote in The Shepard Families of New England points out that Sarah, daughter of Ralph and Thanks (or Thanks-ye-Lord) Shepard of Dedham, Mass., was baptized at Stepney, co. Middlesex, England, on 6 Aug. 1633 (Gerald F. Shepard and Donald Lines Jacobus [New Haven, Conn., 1971-73] 1:2). The following is the long-sought marriage record of the immigrants:
Ralph Sheaphearde married Thankslorde Perkins on 21 May 1632 in the parish church of St. Bride on Fleet Street in London, England (1988 IGI and the original parish register, Family History Library film #380,154).
Penny G. Douglass, P.O. Box 23, Newton, UT 84327" (1)
1) TAG, Vol. 67, #1, January 1992, p. 29

[NI3191] "Olmstead, Richard.
Son of James and Jane (Bristow), bapt. at Great Leighs, Co. Essex, Eng., 22 Mar. 1579, buried at Fairsted, co. Essex, 16 Nov. 1641. He m. Frances Slany, buried 10 Sept. 1630, sister of Thomas Slany of London, haberdasher, whose will, proved 28 July 1638, gave legacies to Joseph, his sister Holmested's youngest son, to his niece Sarah Holmestead, and to his nephew Ralph Holmestead. Thomas Slany also gave legacies to the three children of his sister Bazie, one of whom was doubtless John Bazie of Hartford, who was called cousin in the will of Capt. Richard Olmstead of Norwalk.
Children:
Richard, bapt. 20 Feb 1612 (#6796)
Mary, bapt. 6 July 1615.
John, bapt. 16 Feb. 1617.
Sarah, bapt. 2 Nov. 1620.
Rebecca...
Joseph, bapt. 2 Dec. 1627." (1)
1) Jacobus, Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 451

[NI3192] "[Richard Olmstead] m. Frances Slany, buried 10 Sept. 1630 [at Fairstead, Essex, England], sister of Thomas Slany of London." (1)
1) Jacobus, Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 451

[NI3194] The standard genealogy for the Olmstead family is Henry King Olmsted and Geo. K. Ware, Genealogy of the Olmstead Family.
"[Ancestor #]118 [of Millard Fillmore] Nicholas Olmstead, bp. Fairstead, Essex, 15 Feb. 1612, d. Hartford CT 31 Aug. 1684; m. (1) ca. 1640 (The Olmsteads and Loomises (#119) appear in Dawes-Gates 2:611-17, 567-71. See as well TAG 60:27-32 (Roger D. Joslyn on Elizabeth Olmstead wife of Samuel Butler); Henry K. Olmsted and George K. Ward, Genealogy of the Olmsted Family in Aamerica (New York 1912) pp. x-xv, 5-15, 17; Elisha S. Loomis, Descendants of Joseph Loomis in America, 2nd ed. (1909), pp. 53-114, 121-22, 126-28;; The Utah Genealogical and Historical Magazine 20:56-61 (especially for probable English ancestors of Joseph Loomis); and Frank F. Starr, Various Ancestral Lines of James Goodwin and Lucy (Morgan) Goodwin of Hartford, Connecticut, (Hartford 1915) 2:395-99 (on the Whites of Shalford and Messing, Essex.)
119 Sarah Loomis...
236 James Olmstead...
237 Joyce Cornish...
[Ancestor #]472 [of Millard Fillmore] James Olmstead of Great Waltham, Essex, b. ca. 1550, bur. Great Leighs 2 Dec. 1595; son of James and Alice (Hawkins or Sorrell) Olmstead; m. Great Leighs 12 Aug. 1576
[Ancestor #]473 [of Millard Fillmore] Jane Bristow" (1)
1) TAG, Vol. 63, #1, 1/1988, p. 52-5

[NI3237] "Rebecca [Olmstead], b. abt. 1681; m. Samuel St. John." (1)
1) Jacobus, Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 454

[NI3243] "Loomys, Samuel Children Born 5 1677 CHS930:92
Loomys, Samuel Estate in Pounds = 1 1677 GRA677:4" (1)
"Loomis, Samuel 626 Church Member 1661 CHS930:11
Loomis, Samuel 626 Freeman 1669 TRU852:519
Loomis, Samuel 626 Household Size 7 7Mar1670 WYL924:194" (2)
1) Holbrook; Windsor p. 176
2) Ibid., p. 171

[NI3268] "Matthias, b. abt. 1667, d. at Wilton, 17 Aug. 1748; m. abt. 1690, Rachel Bouton, b. 16 Dec. 1667." (1)
"21 September 1997 406 C1264.1
Matthias St. John = ---
Matthias St. John, the son of Matthias St. John II and his wife Elizabeth ---, was born in Norwalk, Connecticut. According to Reference 1 he was born in 1667 or 1668. He died, "aged 80," on 17 August 1748, in Wilton, Conn., says Reference 1 quoting Mr. D. H. Van Hoosear of Wilton.
However, according to Reference 2 he "was about ten years old at the time of the public child registration in 1672" and so born about 1661 or 1662. This is confirmed by recollections of Bela St. John of Wilton given in Reference 3, page 304. There he says Matthias St. John died in 1740, aged about 80, and was born about 1660. Bela's "father used to say that he had been to school down town (Norwalk), when his grandfather, Matthias, was living." Bela's father was the son John (born 1735) of the son John (born 1785) below -- their lives overlapped by only five years.
If Van Hoosear read the death date from a tombstone it would be very easy to read 1740, the more nearly correct date - as 1748. Unfortunately, the early Norwalk church records "were gnawed and eaten through and through by rats, and quite destroyed." (Ref. 3, p. 16)
On 21 February 1700/01 he was appointed "To beat ye drum (he or his son) on Sabbath days." So he had a son of age sufficient for this task at that time. In 1701 he deeded land to his son Samuel, who presumably would have been of age and so born before 1681.
In the town accounts of 30 December 1701 is the record of payments to Matthias of 1 pound, 2 shillings, 6 pence for beating the drum and an additional 3 shillings for a drum cord. This is the most expensive item on the list -- the next most expensive is the payment of 10 shillings for the use of a horse to Hartford. His compensation works out to 6 pence per week for 45 weeks.
He was one of the first proprietors of Ridgefield, CT, and moved there in 1709. He was granted home-lot No. 16 in Ridgefield which was recorded there on 28 June 1712. From the various deeds
recorded in Norwalk and Ridgefield he owned several tracts of land in the vicinity of those two towns.
The name of his first wife is not known. She bore, probably, the first four of his children.
He married, secondly, about 1690 Rachel Bouton, the daughter of John Bouton and Abigail Marvin. She was born in Norwalk on 16 December 1667. The date of her death is not known. Reference 1
shows only the second marriage and does not explain how they had four children before their marriage! Matthias and Rachel St. John were members of the Norwalk Congregational Church in 1725.
Children by unknown first wife:
Ebenezer deeded land to his brother Benjamin in 1730, no further mention
John born 2 April 1685, died March 1773, married 1st, Eunice Hayes 29 April 1724, 2nd, Sarah Scribner in 1749
Matthew born in 1686, died 3 August 1755, married Anne Whitney 13 October 1709
Samuel born ca. 1690 (Ref 1) but probably of age in 1701, and so born about 1680, died before 1756, married Rebecca Olmsted (born ca. 1681), their descent is continued.
Children by Rachel Bouton:
Nathan born in 1692, married Hannah Seymour on 7 June 1721. On 13 April 1740 he, with 24 others, obtained a patent of 50,000 acres in the Oblong (the disputed area between New York and Connecticut) near South Salem, New York.
Matthias born 1695, married Elizabeth Trowbridge
Benjamin born ca. 1700, married in 1729 Mary ---, married 2nd Elizabeth, widow of Richard Everett
Rachel born ca. 1700, married 27 April 1721 John Marvin
Hannah born ca. 1700, died in Sharon, CT 5 February 1774, married in 1721 Ebenezer Carter, b. 1697, who was captured by the Indians in 1704 from Deerfield and redeemed in 1707 by payment of #24. [Christopher Burt #848 (as a fetus) and his mother were also abducted in that raid.]
Elizabeth born ca. 1717, married Ezra Hickok
References:
1. The St. John Genealogy, Orline St. J. Alexander, 1907, pp. 29-32
2. Norwalk, Rev. Charles M. Selleck, published by the author, Norwalk, CT, 1897, p. 334
3. The Ancient Historical Records of Norwalk, Connecticut, with a Plan of the Ancient Settlement, and of the Town in 1847, Edwin Hall, 1847, reprinted by Heritage Books, 1997, pp. 96, 304
1) Jacobus, Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 514
2) St. John Genealogy, see Samuel St. John

[NI3270] "St. John, Matthias, s. of Matthias.
Born abt. 1630, d. at Norwalk in Dec. 1728; m. Elizabeth _______. Adm'n granted to widow Elizabeth, 5 Sept. 1732.
Children:
Mary, m. 10 Nov. 1677, Thomas Hyatt.
Ebenezer, b. abt. 1660; m. Elizabeth Comstock, b. 7 Oct. 1674.
Matthias...
James, b. abt. 1674, d. at Norwalk in 1754; will 27 Oct. 1750, proved 28 June 1754; m. 18 Dec. 1693, Mary Comstock, b. 19 Feb 1671/2, d. 17 Oct. 1749." (1)
"21 September 1997 445 C2528.1
Matthias St. John = Elizabeth ----
Matthias St. John, the son of the immigrant Matthias St. John and his wife Mary Tinker, was baptized 30 November 1628 at New Windsor, Berkshire, England. He came with his parents to New England in 1633 or 1634. His home lot in Norwalk, Connecticut, was number 25 near the cove. His ear-mark was a "slippe cut off of the inside of the neer (ear) and a slitt right downe off the oft eare" as recorded on 30 May 1655.
In 1665 his lands and accommodations were valued at #150. He was a selectman of Norwalk. At a town meeting on 5 October 1667 he and other trained soldiers were selected to drive the cattle to the fields. He owned land at "stickey plain" which is now in Bedford, Westchester Co., New York.
He was the second tavern-keeper in Norwalk. He was authorized by the selectmen on 17 December 1678 "to keep an ordinary for the entertayning of strangers."
He was still an inn-keeper in 1704 when Sarah Knight, a school teacher from Boston stayed one night at his inn. She wrote the following uncomplimentary description of the inn, Matthew Sention, and the town in general.
About 9 at night we came to Norwalk, having crept over a timber of a broken bridge about 30 feet long and perhaps 50 to ye water. I was exceedingly tired out and cold when we came to our inn and could get nothing there but poor entertainment and the impertinent babble of one of the worst of men, among many others, of which our host made one, who, had he been one degree impudenter, would have outdone his grandfather, and this I think is the most perplexed night I have yet had. From hence, Saturday, December 23, a very cold and windy day, after an intolerable night's lodging, we hasted forward, only observing in our way the town to be situated on a navigable river, with indifferent buildings and people more refined than in some of the country towns wee had passed tho' vicious enough, the church and tavern being next neighbors.
(Presumably the "grandfather" in the above passage is a euphemism for the "devil.")
He died in December 1728, slightly more than 100 years old. His wife's name was Elizabeth, no surname or parentage known.
Children:
Ebenezer born ca. 1660, died in 1723/4, married Elizabeth Com stock who was born 7 October 1674
Matthias born in Norwalk ca. 1660, died in Wilton, CT, ca. 1740, married (2ndly) ca. 1690 Rachel Boughton. Descent through the first wife is continued.
Mary alive in 1698, married 10 November 1677 Thomas Hyatt, a soldier in King Philip's war
James born in 1674, died in June 1754, married Mary Comstock who was born 19 February 1721/2, died 17 October 1749
Note: Both the Comstock women above were daughters of Christopher Comstock, the first tavern keeper of Norwalk. His wife was Hannah Platt, a daughter of Richard Platt of Milford. They were
married 6 October 1664. He died 23 December 1702. He was authorized to keep an ordinary at the town meeting of 9 February 1671. With two brothers marrying two sisters it is obvious the families
of the two tavern keepers were on excellent terms with each other!
The "church and tavern being next neighbors" had more to do with desire of the church leaders to keep a close watch on activities in the tavern. And they especially wanted to ensure that no one kept to the tavern during meeting!
References:
1. 'The St. John Genealogy', Orline St. John Alexander, pages 17--18
2. 'The Ancient Historical Records of Norwalk, Conn.,' Edwin Hall, 1847, page 70
3. 'The Romance of Norwalk,' Elsie Nicholas Danenberg, The States History Publishing Co., pages 80 - 81
4. "The English Ancestry of the Merwin and Tinker Families of New England," Douglas Richardson, 'The New England Historical and Genealogical Register,' Vol. CXLIX, October 1995, pp. 410 - 411 (2)
1) Jacobus, Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 513-4
2) Churchyard, St. John Genealogy (see Samuel St. John)

[NI3272] "St. John, Matthias. (Surname spelled Sention usually before 1700.)
Came to Dorchester, Mass., about 1632; freeman, 3 Sept. 1634. Removed to Windsor about 1640, and in 1654 to Norwalk, where he d. abt. Jan. 1669/70.
Will 19 Oct. 1669; youngest son James; my wife, his mother; sons Samuel Sention and Ephraim Lockwood; residue double portion to son Matthias, one part to son Mark, and the other two parts to son Samuel Sention and Ephraim. Inv. Jan. 1669/70.
Children:
Matthias...
Mark, b. abt. 1634.
Samuel, b. abt. 1639.
Mercy, d. in 1694; m. 8 June 1665, Ephraim Lockwood.
James, b. abt. 1649." (1)
"21 September 1997 492 C5056.1
Matthias St. John = Mary Tinker
Matthias St. John, the immigrant, was born in England, perhaps about 1605. His parentage is unknown, though possibly he was a descendant of the ancient Norman St. John family. A great deal
of time and effort has been expended trying to find any such connection.
It should be noted that the name was originally spelled Sension, Sention, or Senchon in the early records of this family in England and Massachusetts. Only in the 1700's did the spelling St. John become common.
Mary Tinker was baptized at New Windsor, Berkshire, England, on 6 August 1606. She was the daughter of Robert Tinker and his second wife Mary Merwin. The parish of New Windsor is in the town
of Windsor, famous as the residence of the monarchs of Britain. Matthias and Mary were married at New Windsor on 1 November 1627.
Two men named Matthias Sension have been found in the London parish records in the early 1600's. Ours was the one who lived in the parish of St. Nicholas Cole Abbey with his wife Mary. A James
Sension lived in this same parish with his wife Anne. Both of these men were chandlers. Matthias disappears from the records after 1633. James is mentioned as late as 1652. One speculation
is that James Sension was a brother of Matthias.
This couple migrated to Massachusetts between June 1633 (baptism of Mark) and September 1634. He was made a freeman (citizen) of Dorchester on 3 September 1634. He received a grant of 20 acres there on 14 January 1635. Dorchester is about four miles south of Boston and on the Bay.
The family moved to Windsor, Connecticut, in 1640, where he acquired several parcels of land. Windsor is about six miles upriver from Hartford. Hartford is on the Connecticut river and about in the middle of state. A good many other related people (Tinkers and Merwins) from New Windsor parish, Berks., settled there also, whence the name. He was a member of the grand jury on 19 November 1643 and in December 1644.
By 1648 they moved to Wethersfield, about three miles south of Hartford. In 1649 he is mentioned as "Sentyon the baker" of Wethersfield. Several plots of land are mentioned as formerly belonging to him in the land records.
About 1654 they removed to Norwalk, Connecticut, on the coast. He appears on a list of the freemen of that town taken 11 October 1669. His will was dated 19 October 1669, and he died in Norwalk in October or November of that same year. His estate was inventoried on 31 January 1669/70. His will mentions his wife, but not by name. His estate was valued at #300 4d.
Children:
Matthias baptized at New Windsor, Berks., 30 November 1628, died in December 1728 at Norwalk, CT, married Elizabeth ---- and their descent is continued
Thomas baptized at St. Nicholas Cole Abbey on 24 October 1631, no further mention
Mark baptized at St. Nicholas Cole Abbey on 10 June 1633, died 12 August 1693, married firstly Elizabeth Stanley, secondly Dorothy Smith
Samuel born in 1637-40, died 14 January 1685, married Elizabeth Hoite, who died in 1706
Mercy married 8 June 1665 Ephraim Lockwood, the son of Robert Lockwood and his wife Susannah
James born in Windsor, Connecticut, in 1649, married Rebecca Pickett, but died without issue on 9 May 1684
References:
1. 'The St. John Genealogy', Orline St. John Alexander, 1907, pp. 3--13
2. "Two Contemporaries named Matthias Sension,' Robert Leigh Ward, 'The American Genealogist,' Volume 33, number 4, whole number 212, October 1977, pages 241 - 243
3. "The English Ancestry of the Merwin and Tinker Families of New England," Douglas Richardson, 'The New England Historical and Genealogical Register,' Vol. CXLIX, October 1995, pp. 410 - 411" (2)
1) Jacobus, Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 513
2) Churchyard, St. John Genealogy (see Samuel St. John)
For an exhaustive discussion of the ancestry of Matthias St. John see Data (Mostly Negative) on the
English Origins of Matthias St. John 21 September 1997

[NI3318] "Olmstead, John, s. of Richard. Ens., Norwalk Trainband, May 1674; Lt., May 1691. Selectman, 1699, 1703.
Bapt. at Hartford, 30 Dec. 1649, d. at Norwalk in 1704.
Married (1) at Norwalk, 17 July 1673, Mary Benedict, dau. of Thomas.
Married (2) Elizabeth, widow of Thomas Gregory, and dau. of George Pardee, b. at New Haven, 10 June 1660.
Inv. 22 Dec. 1704/5 (sic). Children... Richard 17 (Samuel Sension [#1698] guardian)... Thomas Read, Samuel Sension, and Benjamin Wilson, sons-in-law to Lt. John Olmstead, Adm'rs...
Distribution 17 Apr. 1705: Widow;... Samuel St. John...
Children (by first wife):
Mary, b. abt 1675; m. at Norwalk, 9 May 1694, Thomas Read.
Jane, b. abt. 1677; m. abt. 1700, Benjamin Wilson.
Sarah, b. abt. 1679; m. at Norwalk, 5 June 1696, Jonathan Abbott.
Rebecca...
Elizabeth, b. abt. 1683; m. at Norwalk, 14 June 1710, Henry Whitney.
Daniel, b. abt. 1685; m. (rec. Ridgefield) 22 Apr. 1714, Mary Betts, dau. of Samuel and Judity of Norwalk.
Eunice, b. abt. 1689
Deborah, b. abt. 1693.
Children (by second wife):
Abigail, b. abt. 1696.
Anna, b. abt. 1698, m. in 1720, Robert Andrus.
John, b. abt. 1700; m. (1) abt. 1726 Abigail Sherwood, dau. of Benjamin, b. 8 Sept. 1696; m. (2) ______." (1)
"Lieut. John Olmstead, perhaps born at Fairfield about 1650, married first, July 17, 1673, Mary, daughter of Thomas Benedict of Norwalk; and married second, Elizabeth, widow of Thomas Gregory. Nor record of his marriages, the death of his first wife, or births of his children, has been found. It is probable that his first wife died soon after the birth of hsi daughter Eunice, and that Elizabeth was the first child of his second wife. He died in Dec., 1704. His will does not appear on record, but an inventory of his estate was presented by the widow Elizabeth, Dec. 22, 1704, and in this inventory the names of the children appear with approximate ages; but the ages as given are not correct, as for example, the age of Mary is stated as about 18 years, while the records show that she had been married eight years at the time the inventory was made. The ages undoubtedly do indicate, however, the order of birth. The record of distribution, in Fairfield Probate Records, dated Apr. 17, 1705, shows that the widow Elizabeth was formerly the wife of Thomas Gregory. The others sharing in the estate were Daniel Olmstead, eldest son, Thomas Reed, Benjamin Wilson, Anna Olmstead, Jonathan Abbot, Samuel St. John, Richard Olmstead, John Olmstead, Elizabeth Olmstead, Eunice Olmstead, Deborah Olmstead, and Abigail Olmstead. A Joseph is mentioned, but whether Joseph St. John or not does not fully appear, as the language is rather ambiguous.
Children by first wife:
Mary, b. about 1675.
Jane, b. about 1677; probably m. Benjamin Wilson.
Sarah, b. about 1679.
Rebecca, b. about 1681; probably m. Samuel St. John.
Daniel, b. about 1683.
Richard, b. about 1685.
Eunice, b. about 1687; probably m. Joseph St. John.
Children by second wife:
Elizabeth, b. about 1690.
Deborah, b. about 1693.
Abigail, b. about 1696.
Anna, b. about 1698.
John, b. about 1700." (2)
1) Jacobus, Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 454-5
2) Descendants of Captain Richard (see Richard) p. 673-4

[NI3319] "[Olmstead, John] Married (1) at Norwalk, 17 July 1673, Mary Benedict, dau. of Thomas." (1)
"Mary, b. 16__, Southold, L.I.; m. John Olmsted, "Lieut. Olmstede," Norwalk, Ct., July 17, 1673." (2)
1) Jacobus, Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 454
2) Benedict, Henry Marvin; The Genealogy of the Benedicts in America (Albany 1870) p. 24

[NI3326] "Olmstead, Richard, s. of Richard. Served in the Pequot War, 1637, for which he received lot in Soldier's Field, Hartford, and in 1669 a colonial grant of 60 acres. Sergt., Norwalk Trainband, May 1653; Sergt., Conn. Col. Troop, same date; Lt., Norwalk Trainband, May 1659; Capt. of same, Oct. 1680; Muster Master, Fairfield County, Nov. 1673. Deputy (Norwalk) to Conn. Leg., May 1653, Sept. 1654, May 1658, Oct. 1660, May 1661, May 1662, May and Oct. 1663, May and Oct. 1664, Oct. 1665, May and Oct. 1666, May 1667, may and Oct. 1668, May 1669, May 1671, and May 1679; Commissioner for Norwalk, 1678-85.
Bapt. at Fairsted, co. Essex, Eng., 20 Feb. 1612, d. at Norwalk early in 1687.
Brought to America by his uncle James, in 1632, he settled in Cambridge, Mass., and in 1636 removed to Hartford. In 1646 he was Constable, and fence-viewer in 1649. About 1650 he removed to Norwalk.
He m. (1) ________; (2) _______, prob. wid. of Thomas Smith.
Will 30 Sept. 1684; aged 76 yrs. or thereabout; son John, dwelling-house;... Inv. of Capt. Richard, 23 Feb. 1686 (1686/7).
Children (by first wife):
James.
John...
Daughter, d. unm." (1)
Capt. Richard Olmstead was born in England, perhaps at Fairstead, Co. Essex in 1608. His parentage has not been learned, but his "cousin" Nicholas Olmstead, who is mentioned in his will, was a son of James Olmstead, of Cambridge, Mass, and Hartford, Conn., and was baptized at Fairstead, Feb. 15, 1612.
Richard Olmstead came to Fairfield about 1639, and probably settled in that part of the town which was incorporated into the town of Norwalk, in 1651...
So far as is known, Capt. Richard had but two children, James and John, but with him came one Nehemiah Olmstead, presumed to have been his brother, who died leaving an only daughter, Sarah. James Olmstead, of Cambridge and Hartford, also had a son named Nehemiah.
No record of the marriage of Capt. Richard has been found. He had large grants of land in Fairfield, which then embraced a considerable territory, and some of his lands were included in what were known as the "Long lots," which were narrow strips of land running from the coast line back some six or seven miles. The north line of these lots was in about the centre of the present town of Redding, and thus his heirs came into possession of lands at Chestnut Hill and Buckingham Ridge. He also had large grants in Norwalk after its incorporation, the record of his first grant being found on page i. of Vol. 1, Norwalk Land Records.
The original of his will, dated Sept. 5, 1684, is on file at Fairfield, but the seal is so nearly obliterated that no copy of it can be made. It is also recorded in Book III, page 217, Fairfield Probate Records. The following is an abstract:
I Richard Olmstead, of the towne of Norwake in ye County of ffairfield in ye Collony of Connecticut, aged Seventy-six years or thereabouts.
Unto my sonn John my present dwelling-house, houseing, barne, hom lott, orchard, to be to him... unless my sonn James shall acord to a writing underhand make exchange of ye present house and homestead with ye sd John within a year and one day.
To my eldest son James Olmstead my fruitfull springlott of meddow, to be to him and his heirs,... also my cowlott of upland, also three acres of plowing land at Sacatuke Plaine, to be added to ye side of what he ther already possessed of, moreover one acre of my fruitfull springlott of upland next my pasture lott.
To my sonn John Olmstead one acre of land in my fruitfull springlott to be added to that which is now his and also ye lott called pine hill lott, also ye remainder of Sacatuche lott after James hath received his three acres...
To my two sons James and John my meddow lott on ye other side of Norwake River, which shall be equally divided croswise,... and to my sons James and John all my meddow lying in ye great marsh, to each of them an equal share as near as it can be divided... Moreover unto my sons James and John my lott called Agratuity lott, lying upon ye hill on ye other side of ye river by the land of Thomas Benedict Senr. [#6798 and father-in-law of son John], also my lott at Stickly Playne and my lott yt lyeth above ye Sawmill, some sixty acres of land granted me by ye Genell Court, also, my right of lands at Pequoiag...
No record of his death or of the birth of his sons is found at Fairfield.
Children:
James, b. about 1645-8.
John, b. about 1650." (2)
1) Jacobus, Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 452-3
2) Hammond, Frederick Stam; The Descendants of Captain Richard Olmstead, of Fairfield, Conn.; in Genealogies of Connecticut Families, Ge-O p. 672-3

[NI3336] GenForum posting
Posted by Fred Merrick on December 30, 1998 at 12:07:29:

In Reply to: Jos. MERRIAM, Concord MA, 1650 posted by Dave Sharp on October 08, 1998 at 09:06:15:

According to the History of Concord, 1835 by Lemuel Shattuck, Joseph Merriam who married Sarah Stow 1653 was the son of Joseph Merriam who died Jan 1, 1641 in Concord. Three brothers, Robert, Joseph and George were among the first settlers of Concord, and were sons of William Merriam who died in Hadlow, Kent, November 1635.

[NI3360] "Benedict, Thomas. Magistrate, Jamaica, 1663; Lt., Dec. 1663. Commissioner for Jamaica [Long Island], 1664 (Conn. Col. appointment). Deputy to Hempstead Convention, 1665; Lt., Foot Company, Jamaica, Apr. 1665. Deputy (Norwalk) to Conn. Leg., May 1670, May 1675. Town Clerk, Norwalk; Selectman, 17 terms. One of committee to plant Danbury, 1684.
Son of William of co. Nottingham, he was born about 1617; came to New England abt. 1638, settled in Southold, L.I., lived in Huntington and Jamaica, L.I.; rem. 1665 to Norwalk, where he d. early in 1690. Deacon of church.
Married Mary Bridgum.
Will 28 Feb. 1689/90; wife Mary; sons Daniel and John Benedict; grandchild Thomas son of dau. of Elizabeth Slawson; son James Benedict; gr. child Elizabeth Slawson; gr. child Thomas Benedict; gr. child Samuel Benedict; gr. child John, eldest son of son John; Joanna Benedict (mentions her grandmother); dau. Rebecca Wood; dau. Sarah; gr. child Mary Olmstead [#3399]; gr. child Hannah Benedict; sons John and Samuel Benedict, overseers. Inv. 18 Mar. 1689/90.
Children:
Thomas
John
Samuel
Daniel
Elizabeth m. John Slawson, of Stamford
Mary...
Sarah, m. at Norwalk, 19 Dec. 1679, James Beebe.
Rebecca m. Dr. Samuel Wood, of Danbury." (1)
"IV. Suffolk County Sessions, 1669-1684 Liber I, P. #39 Ct. of Sessions, Southhampton, March 5,6,7 days Mar. 1672-3
Thomas Benedict and Henry Whitney against Richard Smith of Nessaqueaks, defendant in an action of Defamation. this jury finds for plaintiffs of suit that the defendant should make public acknowledgement that he hath done Goodman Benedict and Whitney wrong in saying that they were purgered persons or to pay the said Benedict and Whitney 50 pounds. The place where the acknowledgement is to be made will leave to the Court.
The Court give judgement accordingly and the place of acknowledgement to be in open court, and the acknowledgement to stand on record. Whereas I Richard Smith of Nesseaquack have spoken words to several persons and in several places tending much to the defamation of Mr. Benedict and Whitney saying that they were forwarned or perjured persons and this fully evidenced against me in court. I do acknowledge my great error therein desiring the parties whom I have thus wronged to forgive me, hoping it shall be a warning to me hereafter of offending in ye like nature." (2)
"VI. Note on Bridgham and Thomas Benedict of Norwalk, by John Insley Coddington of Bordentown, New Jersey
Note on Bridgham and Thomas Benedict of Norwalk: In the preceding article, mention was made of a reference in the Boyd Marriage Index of Suffolk at the Society of Genealogist's Library in London to the marriage in 1629 between John Bridgham and Elizabeth "Benedick" at Woolpit in Suffolk. The entry in the original Parish Register of Woolpit reads:
'1629. 8th September. John Bridgham & Elizabeth Benedict widow (came both out of Norfolke.") (This is the only Bridgham or Benedict entry at Woolpit.) We have here, I think, a clue to the true parentage and county of birth of Thomas Benedict, who was born in England in 1617, came to New England about 1638...
According to family tradition, set down in his old age by Deacon James Benedict of Ridgefield, Conn... the Benedict family came from the county of Nottingham, and Thomas was the son, grandson, and great-grandson of men named William Benedict. Deacon james Benedict further averred that Thomas's mother died, and his father married "the widow Bridgum," who by a previous marriage had had a daughter, Mary, who later became Thomas Benedict's wife...
No evidence has been found that a man named Benedict married a widow Bridgham (Bridgum) as the Deacon spelled it, but in the Parish Registers of Woolpit we have found the marriage of John Bridgham to Elizabeth... It seems very likely indeed that we have here the record of marriage of the widowed father of Mary 'Bridgum' to the widowed mother of Thomas Benedict. The additional note in the marriage record, "came both out of Norfolke,' is further confirmation to our identification, for Norfolke and London are the only two localities in England where the very rare name of Benedict (probably continental in origin) is to be found in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries." (3)
"Be it remembered that one William Benedict, about the beginning of the 15th century [Note: Probably meaning the year 1500] who lived in Nottinghamshire, in England, had a son born unto him whom he called William, after his own name (as only son); and this William, the 2d of that name, had also an only son whom he called William; and this 3d William had in the year 1617 one only child whom he called Thomas; and this Thomas's mother dying, his father married the widow Bridgum.
Now this Thomas was put out an apprentice to a weaver, who afterwards, in the 21st year of his age, came over into New-England, together with his sister-in-law, Mary Bridgum. Afterwards said Thomas was joined in marriage with Mary Bridgum. After they had lived some time in the Bay parts, they removed to Southhold on Long Island, where were born unto them five sons and four daughters, whose names were Thomas, John, Samuel, James, Daniel, Betty, Mary, Sarah and Rebeccah. From thence they removed to a farm belonging to the town, called Hassamamac, where they lived for some time. From thence they removed to Huntingtown, where they lived some years. Then they removed to Jamaica on said Island, where Thomas, their eldest son took to wife Mary Messenger, of that town. And last of all, they removed to Norwalk, in Fairfield county, Connecticut, with all their family, where they were all married." (4)
"It is said of Thomas Benedict, that he was born in 1617; that he was an only son, that the name had been confined to only sons in the family for more than a hundred years; and that, at the time he left England, he did not know of another living person of the name; whence, it is assumed, that his father was not living. His mother he lost early, his father marrying, for his second wife, a widow, whose daughter, Mary Bridgum, came to New England in 1638, in the same vessel with Thomas, then in his twenty-first year. Soon after their arrival they were married, and finding the society and institutions of Massachusetts Bay congenial, they resided in that colony for a time...
In the statement of his wife,...she names Southold as his place of residence and birthplace of their five sons and four daughters. It is certain, that in June, 1657, he was a resident of Huntington, which leaves little doubt that he was, early, an inhabitant of Southold, which was settled in 1640. In conjunction with three others, in 1649, he purchased a tract of land belonging to the town of Southold, called Hashamomack, and this interest he conveyed, in 1659, describing himself in the deed as then of the town of Huntington...
[he] must have attained some prominence as a citizen, for we find that when Uncas, the celebrated Sachem of the Mohegans, complained to the commissioners of the United Colonies in New England, because the Mohansick Sachem of Long Island, had killed some and bewitched others of Uncas's men, and even Uncas himself, that body, at Hartford, Sept. 5th, 1650, referred the matter, with large powers, to the famous "Captaine Mason" and others, and to Thomas Benedict, of Southold, to be adjusted...
There are traces of his presence in Jamaica as early as Dec. 12, 1662, when, in conjunction with two others, he was appointed to lay out "the south meadows."... March 20, 1663, he was appointed a magistrate by the Dutch Governor Stuyvesant... September 29, 1663, we find him, with other inhabitants of towns on the west end of Long Island, petitioning the General Court of Connecticut to be... annexed to that colony.
December 3, 1663, he was appointed lieutenant of the town. March 7, 1664, a petition from "Crafford alias Jemaico" asks for "help of your (Conn.) authority for the settling of peace amongst us and the killing and quelling of mutenous and facsious sperits." Except the signature of his colleague, this document is in the handwriting of Thomas Benedict, and is signed by him... He held the office of commissioner when the Dutch Governor Stuyvesant surrendered New York and its dependencies to the English, under Colonel Richard Nichols.
8th February, 1665... a General Meeting... at Hempstead." The delegates from Jamaica were Daniel Denton and Thomas Benedict. This is thought to be the first English legislative body convened in New York. He was appointed, by Governor Nichols, lieutenant of "the Foot Company of Jamaica; his commission bearing date at "Fort James, in New York," the 7th April, 1665.
The fact that, in this same year, he is recorded as having been chosen town clerk of Norwalk, Ct., gives color to the supposition that some confusion of dates was occasion about this time by the introduction, into the possessions acquired from the Dutch, of the style in use in England, then, and for many years afterward, and also from the practice of double dating... he was the especial enemy of Captain John Scott and his party; for "the killing and quelling" of whom he had, indeed, in 1663, invoked the authority of Connecticut...
He was continued as Town Clerk until 1674; and after an interval of three years, was again appointed... His service as Selectman covers seventeen years, closing with 1688... He was the representative of Norwalk in the General Assembly in 1670, and again in 1675... In May, 1684, the General Court appointed him and three others to plant a town "above Norwalke or Fayrefeild," at Paquiage; and in the fall of that year and the spring of 1685, Samuel and James, sons of Thomas, and six others, with their families settled there, the land having been purchased from the Indians. The parties most interested asked that their settlement might be named "Swanfeild"; but, in 1687, the General Court denied their request and called it Danbury...
No record can be found that indicates the day of his death; one, of his Will, is extant, which states that he was "weak of body;" "aged about 73 years;" and his Will was executed the "eight and twentieth feb.r. ano dominy 1689-90." An Inventory of his Estate, in which he is described as "late deceased," was taken on the 18th of March in the same year...
His son Daniel, in 1677, received a grant of land, from the town of Norwalk, for his services in the "direful swamp fight" of Dec. 19, 1675." (5)
1) Jacobus, Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 61
2) Benedict Genealogy, Vol. II Introduction IV.
3) Benedict Genealogy, Vol. II Introduction VI.
4) Benedict Genealogy, Vol. I, p. 2 Note Testimony of James Benedict, grandson of Thomas, dated March 14, 1755
5) Ibid., pp.1-22
Sources: Benedict Family History News Queries Editor: Roberta Pierson rbpierson@prodigy.com BFHN Treasurer: Sheila Benedict, C.G.R.S., P.O. Box 1867, Santa Ynez, CA 93460-1867 cost $12 per year payable to Benedict Family History News

[NI3361] "Benedict, Thomas... Married Bridgum.
Will 28 Feb. 1689/90; wife Mary" (1)
[Thomas Benedict's] mother he had lost early, his father marrying, for a second wife, a widow, whose daughter, Mary Bridgum, came to New England in 1638, in the same vessel with Thomas, then in his twenty-first year. Soon after their arrival they were married... These facts in the history of Thomas Benedict are verified by the testimony of Mary Bridgum herself, who lived to the age of one hundred years, and in her life-time communicated them to her grandson, Deacon James Benedict" (2)
1) Jacobus, Fairfield, Vol. I, p. 61
2) Benedict Genealogy Vol. I, p. 1-2

[NI3407] IGI Dianna Strait m. 1763 Litchfield, Litchfield, Connecticut
Dianna Strait b. abt 1745 East Greenwich, Kent County, Rhode Island
Father: Thomas Straight
Mother: Herodias Gardiner
"E.T. Bentley of Ithaca, N.Y... said that his grandfather, Greene Bentley, married Dianah Greene about 1755" (1)
"12) Greene.
m. Diana Straight." (2)
"Bentley...
Green: b 3-23-1735 RI d 1823 NY m Dinah Straight Pvt NY" (3)
"Early Church Records
Old School Baptist Chruch, Warwick, Orange Co., N.Y...
1775 Bentle, Dinah" (4)
I believe that this is Dianah/Dinah Straight, under her married name Bentley. The timing is right. No other Bentley is shown in the record. See also the DAR entry above.
"Notes for DINAH STRAIT STRAIGHT:
Children of Greene Sr. and Dinah:
Eunice m. Thaddeus Bennett about 1782
Hannah m. Ephriam Bennett Jr. February 07, 1781. She d. in 1840
Herodias (Rhoda) m. Jacob Teeples about 1790
Benjamin m. 1st Mary Keney in 1791. 2nd m. Jane Otterson in 1816. He d. 1854
Sarah m. Daniel Coryell. She d. in 1794

Dinah is named in her father's - Thomas Straight/Strait - will dated 1749
One of her grandson's was named Thomas Straight Bennett
In 1775 'Dinah Bentle' is listed as a member of the Old School Baptist Church, Warwick, Orange County, New York (Bbund CD# 183 "Early Settlers of New York")
Also named as members are: 1769 Ephraim Bennett D. 1788
1769 Sarah Bennett " (5)
1) The Bentley Family (see Greene) p. 6
2) Clevenger, Anna Belle Bentley; Alvah Bentley and Zora Belle Dodson: Their Ancestors and Descendants (c. 1984; 1625 N.W. 27th, Lawton, OK 73505), p. 397
3) DAR Patriot Index - Centennial Edition, Part I, p. 236
4) Foley, Jane Wythe; Early Settlers of New York Vol. II, p. 731-2
5) A Bentley Family Tree William Bentley of Kingstown, RI - To rectify some old errors.
Elaine C Cowan
1712 Van Epps Dr
Carson City, NV 89701
United States
>

[NI3408] "i. William.
b. 1677.
m. (1) 21 April 1703 at Stonington, Connecticut to Mary Eliot.
m. (2) 1 August 1734 to Bathsheba Green Lewis (widow of Israel Lewis).
d. 1760.
1) John.
m. Elizabeth Gardner
2) George.
m. Ruth Barber.
3) Caleb.
m. Tabitha Gould.
4) Ezekiel.
m. Dorcas Gould.
5) Elizabeth.
m. Nathaniel Potter.
6) Tabitha.
m. Thomas Sweet.
7) Ruhama.
m. James James.
8) Mary.
9) William.
10) Thomas.
11) James.
12) Greene.
m. Diana Straight
13) Benjamin." (3)
"William b. Kings Town, Westerly, Richmond, R I d. 1760 m. (1) April 21, 1703 Mary Eliot m. (2) August 1, 1734 Bathsheba Lewis (w. of Israel)
He married his first wife at Stonington, Conn.
1712 Freeman.
August 18, 1748. Will proved August 12, 1760. (by Governor after petition May 1760). Executrix wife Bathsheba. The oldest son John, 5s., he having had already, and like amount to sons George, Caleb and Ezekiel, eldest daughter Elizabeth Potter, daughters Tabitha Sweet, Ruhama James and Mary James. To wife Bathsheba, all my household goods and moveable estate. Executrix to sell homestead and house I now live in, when my son Benjamin comes to age of fourteen, and divide equally to my five youngest children, viz: William, Thomas, James, Greene and Benjamin Bentley, To wife Bathsheba, all income of whole estate, real and personal, to bring up my five youngest children.
Inventory #486, 15s., viz: apparel, spinning wheel, linen wheel, cow 2 sheep, &c.
[Children]
John, George, Caleb, Ezekiel, Elizabeth, Tabith, Ruhama, Mary, (2d wife) William May 29, 1735, Thomas, James June 6, 1739, Greene, March 23, 1741, Benjamin June 11, 1744." (1)
"Children of William and Sarah (..........) Bentley,
(All born probably in that part of the King's Towne, King's Province, Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, that is now in the eastern part of the township of Exeter, Washington County, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations):
William Bentley, born perhaps in 1677 or later and certainly by 1680 as, according to an item in "Probate Records, North Kingstown, 1692-1719" page 11, he was a "propietor" of land prior to -- day burned away-- January, 1698/9. He married perhaps about 1700 (1) Elizabeth, whose surname is unknown; and, at Westerly, to which town he had removed in 1715 and where his first wife, Elizabeth, died, date unknown, on August 1, 1734, Bathsheba Lewis." (2)
"5. WILLIAM JR.4 BENTLEY (WILLIAM SR.3, JOHN2, WILLIAM1) was born July 08, 1677 in Kingstown, RI, and died Abt. March 1760 in Westerly, RI. He married (1) ELIZABETH BENTLEY. He married (2) BATHSHEBA BENTLEY.

Notes for WILLIAM JR. BENTLEY:
William(2) Bentley of Kingstown and Westerly did NOT marry Mary Elliot.
A William Bently was married to a Mary Elliot by Rev. James Noyes in Stonington, Connecticut in 1703. In 1704 daughter, Mary, was baptized. On November 09, 1707 a son was baptized (there seems to be some disagreement as to whether he was named William - from a descendant of that family - or John from records of the Church of Christ at Stonington, we found in "Bentley Gleanings" by Lobdell). According to the same records, a son John was baptized on July 27, 1712. This William and Mary Bentley may have had a son George also. In 1912 a W.R. Cutter in referring to our William(2)'s son George said "George (William (2) William(1)) was born ca. 1705." Further, 'It is said he (George) married Jane Carson. He settled in Stonington and George Bentley married there March 04, 1723/4 Ruth Barber'. That would have George in his second marriage by or before he was eighteen years old! Given this and the gap in the dates of their first two children the Stonington Bentleys may have had a George born 1705 who married a Jane Carson, and who is referred to by Gen. Brinkerhoff and S.B. Bennett.
Our William(2)'s son George was probably born between 1699 and 1703 and married Ruth Barber March 04, 1723/4, the marriage recorded at Kingstown. William Bentley of Rhode Island first married an Elizabeth, surname unknown. She signed the Westerly Land Evidence on December 1723 when she and William deeded land to son George. Although the birth order of their children in uncertain, according to Austin (GDRI) William's will of August, 1748, proved August 12, 1760 (the initial petition occurred in May, 1760), calls John eldest son and Elizabeth eldest daughter.
William was a 'proprietor of land' prior to January, 1698/9.
In 1712 he was a freeman - presumably of Kingstown.
In 1715 he removed to Westerly, Washington county, Rhode Island, where his son William was born, then apparently to Richmond where his other children by Bathsheba were born, and there he spent the remainder of his life. Birth places according to records in "Bentley Gleanings"...
Children of WILLIAM BENTLEY and ELIZABETH BENTLEY are:
i. JOHN5 BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1699, Kingstown, RI; m. ELIZABETH GARDINER, May 30, 1727, prob. Kingstown, RI.
Notes for ELIZABETH GARDINER:
This lady is identified by Dr Beamon and his co-author in an article in the "Rhode Island Genealogical Register" on The Line of William Bently, as Elizabeth Gardiner, daughter of George (b 1675) and Elizabeth ___ Gardiner. Exactly which Source pertains to the parent's birth dates in unclear. However, this George is probably the son of George and Tabitha. We had estimated his birth year as about 1670. In any case this Elizabeth is possibly the granddaughter Elizabeth mentioned in the will of George (2). Unfortunately, the name of her father was worn or burned away and unreadable (per Austin in his GDRI).
ii. GEORGE BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1701, prob. Kingstown, RI; m. RUTH BARBER, March 04, 1723/24, Kingstown, RI.
iii. ELIZABETH BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1703, prob. Kingstown, RI; m. NATHANIEL POTTER, May 30, 1727, prob. Kingstown, RI.
iv. TABITHA BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1705, prob. Kingstown, RI; m. THOMAS SWEET, April 11, 1728, prob. Kingstown, RI.
v. CALEB BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1707, prob. Kingstown, RI; m. (1) DORCAS GOULD; m. (2) TABITHA GOULD.
vi. EZEKIEL BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1710.
vii. RUHAMMAH BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1713, prob. Kingstown, RI; m. JAMES JAMES.
viii. MARY BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1715, prob. Kingstown, RI; m. POSSIBLY EDWARD JAMES.

Children of WILLIAM BENTLEY and BATHSHEBA BENTLEY are:
ix. WILLIAM5 BENTLEYIII, b. May 29, 1735, prob. Westerly, RI; m. ABIGAIL MILLEMAN, April 21, 1754, poss. Richmond, RI.
x. THOMAS BENTLEY, b. April 09, 1737, prob. Richmond, RI.
xi. JAMES BENTLEY, b. June 06, 1739, prob. Richmond, RI.
9. xii. GREENE SR. BENTLEY, b. March 23, 1740/41, Richmond, RI; d. Bef. September 06, 1823, Veteran (now Millport) Tioga county, NY.
xiii. BENJAMIN BENTLEY, b. June 11, 1744, prob. Richmond, RI; d. June 18, 1822; m. DEBORAH BAKER. " (4)
1) The Bentley Family (see Greene) p. 20
2) Sarter, Emilie; One Branch of the Bentley Family of Rhode Island (Boston 1953) p. 22
3) Alvah Bentley, p. 396-7
4) A Bentley Family Tree William Bentley of Kingstown, RI - To rectify some old errors.
Elaine C Cowan
1712 Van Epps Dr
Carson City, NV 89701
United States
>

[NI3409] "[William Bentley married] at Westerly, to which town he had removed in 1715 and where his first wife, Elizabeth, died, date unknown, on August 1, 1734, Bathsheba (.....?) Lewis, widow of Israel Lewis, Jr. Bathsheba is believed to have been a daughter of George Greene, son of Edward and Mary (Tibbitts) Greene and grandson of John Greene of Kings Towne. There were three John Greenes in the Colony, fairly contemporaneously: John of Warwick, John of Newport and John of Kings Towne.
Bathsheba (?Greene?) (Lewis) Bentley married (3) at South Kingstown, March 29, 1761, John Bissell of North Kingstown." (1)
"LE11 iv. Bathsheba (Note: Beaman, RIGR, 1:93 says that she was the daughter of Geroge Greene b. 1665 and Mary Tibbets, b 1670), b ca 1705, m (1) Israel Lewis; m(2) 1 Aug 1734 in Westerly, William Bentley, son of William and Sarah Bentley, m(3) 29 March 1761 at North Kingstown, John Bissell of North Kingstown." (2)
"LE11 Israel Lewis (Israel, John) was born 22 June 1695 in Westerly; and he died in 1732 in Westerly. He married 30 June 1720 in Westerly, Bathsheba Noyes Greene, daughter of George and Mary Greene (see family #GR5).
On 19 March 1731/2, Israel Lewis made his will, which was proved 30 Apr 1732 in Westerly, naming his wife, Bathsheba, and children: Enoch, Israel, Ebenezer, Robert, Bathsheba, Elizabeth and Hannah. All the children were under age.
After the death of Israel Lewis, his widow, Bathsheba, married 1 Aug 1734 in Westerly, William Bentley. they had five children:
William, born in 1735;
Thomas who settled in Pennsylvania;
James, born 6 June 1738 in Richmond;
Greene M., born 23 Mar 1741 in Richmond; and
Benjamin Bentley (born 11 June 1744 in Richmond) who settled in Sharon Center, OH.
(Note: See will of William Bentley, Lucille Beaman, RIGR, 4:218. The will was dated 18 Aug 1748, proved 11 June 1760 before Governor and Council at Newport. Bathsheba Bentley had a bitter struggle with the Richmond Town Council regarding this will including the Council's order to the Sergeatn to take the Widow to South Kingstown to deliver her to the keeper of His Majestie's Gaol (Richmond TCP, 1:291). Hence the reason it was finally proved in Newport.)
In a deed dated 16 Feb 1735/6, Nathaniel Lewis of Westerly sold Amos Lewis, also of Westerly, 94 acres, bounded in part on the west by land in possession of Wm. Bently, which land had formerly gelonged to the widow of Israel Lewis, dec.
Bathsheba Bentley married third, John Bissell of North Kingstown. On 1 Jun 1772, Bershaba Bissel was cited to appear at the next council meeting in Richmond to give an account of the place of her last settlement and her right to reside in Richmond. The records of the next council meeting do not mention her name.
Children (with Israel Lewis):
i. Enoch, b 13 Oct 1720 in Westerly...
ii. Israel.
iii. Ebenezer.
iv. Robert.
v. Bathsheba.
vi. Elizabeth.
vii. Hannah." (3)
"Notes for BATHSHEBA BENTLEY:
Bathsheba Greene? - Maybe
Bathsheba has proved to be one of the most frustrating targets of our genealogical investigations. While she is often mentioned in official records and in articles by other researchers, the exact identity of her parents remains unproven. Virtually everybody who has written about her believes she was a Greene. The fact that a son of her second marriage, to William Bentley, was named Greene M. has most certainly given rise to that belief.
Many authors give her father as George Greene (some have given George's wife as Mary Tibbetts, who was actually the wife of Edward Greene, who is supposed to be the father of George and other, unnamed children, who were born while Edward and his brother Lt. John Greene were in New York). John Austin in his "Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island" list only one son for Capt. Edward Greene and that son is named Robert. Bathsheba had four sons by her first husband, Israel Lewis viz. Enoch, Israel, Ebenezer and Robert. Israel's known brothers were: Benjamin and Nathaniel. His father, also named Israel, had six known brothers: Jonathan, John, Daniel, James, David and Samuel. His mother, Jane Babcock, had one known brother: James. So the name Robert would appear to have come from Bathsheba's side of the family, not the Lewis side.
IF her father was in fact the Robert Greene attributed to Edward Greene, then we have:
Edward Greene b. estimated ca. 1643.
m. Mary Tibbetts (Tibbitts)
Daughter of Henry and Sarah Stanton Tibbetts
Children: (as given by Austin) Robert b. unknown
We could find only one reference to a Robert Greene in the " Colonial Records of Rhode Island" during the appropriate time period, ie. 1670/1690.
A Robert Greene was made a freeman in 1674.
Children (as given by other researchers who may be quoting Lara LaMance's book " The Green Family and Its Branches" . She states that she got much information from James Arnold but often does not give a source for the material)
George b. after 1680 (per LaMance)
Robert b. no date
John b. no date
William b. no date
Israel b. no date
The last three sons are given by authors Walter and Ella Green as residents of New York and/or Connecticut. They state that Edward and his brother John (called Lt. John) are recorded as being first in Connecticut, then in Suffolk county, NY in 1660. Later, in about 1665, they are said to have gone to Dutchess county, NY. According to the above authors, both Edward and John are mentioned in (unnamed) New York records in 1684. LaMance says that in a record of 1684, Lt. John Greene is referred to as 'of New York'.
In "Lists of Inhabitants of Colonial New York" complied by O'Callaghan there is a John Green in Huntington Twp. Long Island, NY in 1675 and 1683.
By 1687 Edward had returned to Rhode Island where he is listed as being taxed on September 06, 1687. In 1695 he was enrolled as a freeman of North Kingstown. In March of 1695 he sold land which he had inherited from his father "lately deceased". Edward is mentioned in records in 1697, 1700, 1702, 1710 and 1711.
In 1713 Henry Tibbetts left land to all his grandsons except the sons of Edward Greene who are 'provided for'. He does not name these sons, so we can only infer that as of 1713 Edward had at least two living sons.
These authors, as well as Ms. LaMance, mention Edward leaving land to his Grandson George Havens. However, in one of his series "The Rhode Island Genealogical Register", Dr Alden Beamon quotes the will of Edward THURSTON in which he leaves land to his grandson George Havens. We feel the attribution to Capt. Green of this grandson is in error. As far as we can determine Edward's will has never been found. LaMance says that his younger brother Benjamin bought land from his estate but she does not give a year. The records seem to show that Edward was alive in 1711, perhaps , but not necessarily, still living in 1713 at the time of Henry Tibbetts will. According to LaMance, Benjamin died in 1719, so we should be able to place Edwards death sometime between 1711 and 1719.
Genealogies of the Greene family often give three Johns: John of Warwick (also called Surgeon John), John of Quidnessett and John of Newport. However, many researchers feel the latter two are the same man - he was first in Newport and later acquired property at Quidnessett.
Austin (G D R I) gives three: Surgeon John who married first Joan Tattersall; married second Alice Daniels (widow) and married third Phillip (Phillipa?) ___.
His children are given as: (1) John b. 1620 m. Ann Almy, had son John b. November 06, 1651; (2) Peter b, 1622 m. Mary Gorton; (3) Richard b. 1623 died young; (4)James b. 1626 m. first Deliverence Potter - m. second Elizabeth Anthony - had son John b. February 01, 1671; (5) Thomas b. 1628 m. Elizabeth Barton; (6) Joan b. 1630; (7) Mary b. 1633.
Austin gives secondly: John (who is not designated in the GDRI as of Quidnessett) whose wife is Joan ____. Their children are given as: (1) John (called of Kingstown, East Greenwich and Warwick) b. June 06, 1651 m. Abigail (other sources give her last name as Wardell), they had: Thomas b. August 18, 1685; John b. April 09, 1688. There are listed eight other children whom we will omit here. Continuing the children of John and Joan: (2) James b. 1655 m. Elizabeth ___, m. second Ann ____, he had son John b. (no date given); (3) Daniel b. (no date given) m. Rebecca Barrow July 16, 1689; (4) Edward b. (no date given) m. Mary Tippitts (daughter of Henry Tippitts) had son Robert b. (no date given) ; (5) Benjamin b. (no date given) m. Humility Coggshall, they had a son John b. (no date given) and eleven other children.
Thirdly, Austin gives John called of Newport b. (no date given) m. Mary Jaffray b. March 20, 1642. They had son John b. (no date given) m. Sarah ____, had son John b. +/- 1690.
Miss LaMance in her history of the Greene family (going back to the Norman Conquest) gives the wife of John of Newport /Quidnessett as Joan Beggerly. She states this information came from Gov. Winthrop of Massachusetts who noted that 'John Green married the wife of Beggerly'. Unfortunately she does not give a date for this quote. In the "List of Freemen of Massachusetts 1630-1691" by Lucius Paige there appears a John Green taking the oath in 1642. If that is the John Green to whom Gov. Winthrop referred, then there are some problems equating this man with "our" John Greene.
In 1679 John Greene of Quidnessett/Newport testified before the Rhode Island General Court that he had been with Richard Smith in Narragansett 'forty years and more ago'. That would be about 1639. Louise Prosser Bates in an article on "John Greene of Newport and Narragansett" (reprinted in "Genealogies of Rhode Island Families" Vol I) puts the year when Richard Smith established his trading house in Narragansett as about 1637. She states that Smith and Greene made their headquarters in Newport before settling fully in Narragansett (or Quidnessett).
In January of 1642, John Greene was one of a group of men who purchased land from the 'Chefe sachim of the Nanheygansett (Narragansett?)" in Rhode Island.
A John Green took the oath of freeman in Massachusetts in May, 1642. Also in 1652 and 1668.
John Greene "of Newport" bought land in February, 1647, also in January and June, 1651. He was made of freeman of Newport 1655. John Greene was a commissioner from Newport in 1655, 56,57, 58 and 1660. Shortly thereafter John of Newport evidently removed to Quidnessett for, according to the above cited article by Ms. Bates, in 1663 Richard Smith speaks of his (Green's) house in Quidnessett. In 1664 John Greene was taken from this home to appear before a court in Newport to explain why he preferred the authority of Connecticut rather than Rhode Island over certain disputed territory. In 1671 John Greene and Henry and Daniel Greene all took an oath of loyalty to the government of Rhode Island. In 1672 John Greene was one of those engaged in the Fones Purchase. A letter concerning this venture was signed in 1679 by John Greene and John Greene Jr. The lots drawn by John Greene were those later sold (1695) by Edward Greene which he had received from his father "lately deceased".
That the wife of John Greene of Quidnessett/Newport was named Joan is clearly shown in a land evidence of 1681/2 wherein 'John Green of Aquidnessett' and his wife Joan Greene leased land to son James Greene, land bounded by land of John Greene and Daniel Greene. However, from the foregoing, it is hard to see how this John Greene who was so constantly engaged in Rhode Island, could be the same John Green with whom a governor of Massachusetts would concern himself.
We believe John Greene's wife remains Joan ____ Greene.
On September 25, 1685 Joseph Clark sold land, bounded by land formerly in the possession of 'John Greene Sr. of Narragansett, now deceased'.
Mrs Bates gives the children of John and Joan Greene as:
Lt. John Greene of Newport
Henry Greene of Quidnessett and 'New Gearsay' (New Jersey)
Daniel Greene of Quidnessett
James Greene of Quidnessett
Benjamin Greene of Quidnessett
Sarah Greene who married Ralph Flounders ca. 1688. After Flounder's execution for murder, Edward Greenman and John Greene of Newport had charge of his estate for Sarah and her child.
Oddly, Mrs Bates omits Edward Greene even though she refers in her article to "John's son Edward".
A deed in North Kingstown records dated 1695/6 is worth quoting in part: 'James Greene to George Wightman Sr. of Rochester....land....granted...to John Greene of Newport and by him to (line obliterated) and by him passed to Benjamin Greene his brother and from ...Benjamin to James Greene his brother...bounded in part...Edward Greene his brother'. This document certainly establishes a relationship among John (here called of Newport), Benjamin, James and Edward. We can only guess whether the name on that obliterated line would have been John Jr., Henry or Daniel.
The problem with all this information, plus much other material on the Greene family with their myriad Johns, is that NONE of it tells us who in fact were the parents of Bathsheba ____ Lewis/Bentley.
Researchers since the late 1800's on have tried and failed to make a documented connection from John of Newport/Quidnessett to Bathsheba.
It should be remembered that her first two marriages took place at WESTERLY. She was probably 15-16 years old when she married Israel Lewis (based on the fact that she was having children from 1720 to 1743/44). She was likely born and/ or raised in Westerly. So, instead of endlessly searching for a connection from her to some supposed son of Edward Greene, one might be better served to concentrate of records from Washington county, particularly Westerly, looking for a baptism of a Bathsheba from ca. 1698 to 1705, or a will naming a daughter Bathsheba as an heir.
The fact that she had a son named Robert and another named Greene M. may or may not be a clue to her father's identity. We can only hope that the solution to this mystery was not destroyed by the 1870 fire in Wickford wherein so many old records were burned.
Children of William and Bathsheba:
William (III) m. Abigail Milleman April 21, 1754
Thomas no info.
James d. possibly 1829
Benjamin m. Deborah Baker. He d. June 18, 1822 " (4)
1) Sarter, Emilie; One Branch of the Bentley Family of Rhode Island (Boston 1953) p. 23
2) Wright, William E.; Ancestors and Descendants of William Browning and Mary Hoxsie (Lewis) Greene (Gateway 1993) p. 123
3) Ibid., p. 370-1
4) A Bentley Family Tree William Bentley of Kingstown, RI - To rectify some old errors.
Elaine C Cowan
1712 Van Epps Dr
Carson City, NV 89701
United States
>

[NI3410] "128. William Bentley.
b. Baptised 13 September 1640, Parish Church of St. Andrew, Ampthill, Bedfordshire, England.
m. Sarah Eldred.
d. 1720, Kingstown, Rhode Island Colony.
William was the fifth son and sixth child of John Bentley and Mary Betts. He came from England in 1671. From New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 1848, Volume II, p. 407:
1671. A List of the Names of Passengers on board the Ship Arabella, Richard Sprague Master for New England, May ye 27th, 1671... William Bently... Gravesend May 27th : 1671. The Passengers above mentioned were all willing to goe to New England as Registered according to order" (11)
"From History of Washington and Kent Counties, Rhode Island by J. R. Cole, published by W.W. Preston and Company, NY, 1889, pp. 50-51:
During the Indian War, December 25th, 1675, it has been affirmed that every house in Narragansett was destroyed, and the inhabitants entirely driven out. In a petition, however, dated July 29, 1679, we find the following list who were inhabitants of Narragansett:
William Bentley, Benjamin Gardiner, Sam Wilson, Robert Spink, Henry Tibets [#1750], Lodwick Updike, Sam Eldred... Henry Gardiner, George Gardiner [#3344], James Greene,... William Gardner,... John Eldred,... John Greene [prob. #6932],... Daniel Greene,... Nicholas Gardiner, George Whitman [#1746], Daniel Eldred...
William Bentley and his wife Sarah Eldred were the parents of five children as follows:
i. William...
ii. James.
b. 26 may 1679, Kingstown, Rhode Island.
m. (1) Dorothy Albro.
(2) Hannah _____.
iii. Thomas
iv. Benjamin.
b. 27 March 1690, Exeter, Rhode Island.
m. Patience Rathbone.
v. Jane.
m. 6 January 1700 in Kingstown, Rhode Island, to John Wightman
b. 16 April 1674
d. 1750" (12)
"As early as 1679 we know that there was a William Bentley who resided in Kings Town, Rhode Island, for history shows that he with 41 others of Narrangansett, sent a petition to the King praying that "he would put an end to these differences about the government thereof, which hath been so fatal to the prosperity of the place; animosities still arrising in the people's minds, as they stand affected to this or that government."
William was a currier by trade, and his name appears upon the town record in various transactions. In 1687, Sept. 6, he was taxed 4s. 6 1/2d. In 1705 he had liberty granted by the town to set up a house, convenient for carrying on of his currying trade. In 1712, Jan. 20, he deeded to his son Thomas 11 acres recently bought of the widow Weathers and her son. In 1720 he died and his wife Sarah and son Benjamin were appointed executors under his will. There were bequests to his eldest son William, and also to sons James, and Thomas, and Benjamin, and to his daughter Jane Whitmore." (1)
"[Children]
William...
James b Kings Town, R.I. m. (1) Dorothy Albro dau. of Samuel & Isabel (Lawton) Albro m. (2) Hannah Freeman 1712.
Thomas b Kings Town, R.I. m Jan. 6, 1706 Elizabeth Chamberlin He was a cordwainer. Freeman 1712. March 1718 he had suit brought against him by Thomas Phillips, for trespass, & c., and answered that he rightly possesseth in the right of his father, William Bentley...
Benjamin b Exeter, R.I. d 1744 m. Unknown Rathbone dau of Thomas & Mary (Dickens) Rathbone
["John Wightman born 16 April 1674 in Quidnessett, situated in that part of King's Province (Kingstowne) which is now called North Kingstown... married first, in Kingstowne, 6 January 1700, Jane Bentley (No. Kings. rec.), daughter of William and Sarah Bentley; married second, June 1729... He was a Baptist, his name and that of Jane, his first wife, appearing in the membership of the rural Six-Principle Baptist Church, called Stony Lane Church, situated about five miles to the northeast in No. Kingstown"] (10)
He was a currier.
Sept. 1719 He and his father answered the suit of James and Daniel Updyke, in an action for trespass &c. damage #150.
Jane m. Jan. 6, 1700 John Wightman b. April 16, 1674 d. 1750 son of George & Elizabeth (Updyke) Wightman." (2)
"The William Bentley previously referred to, who came on the "Arbella," on whose list of passengers from Gravesend, England, dated May 27, 1671, his name appears with that of twenty-two others, has been accepted by many descendands as the progenitor of the Bentleys of Rhode Island but nothing has as yet been found to substantiate this claim.
On "The list of Soldiers Credited with Military Services under Capt. Daniel Henchman, August 20, 1675, in the NEHG Rigister (1882), Vol. 37, page 65, a William Bentley is mentioned as a soldier who on August 20, 1675 received two pounds, seven shillings, on account, for his services. [Henchman's troops took part in the Puritan attack on King Philip and the Pokanokets in and around Swansea and Rehoboth ending August 3, 1675.]" (3)
"William Bentley of Rhode Island was born, very probably, in England and died in "The King's Towne, King's Province, Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations" (now North Kingstown, Washington County, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations), shortly before July 9, 1720, the date of the Inventory of his Estate. (North Kingstown, R.I. Probabe Records, 6:11, Town Hall, Wickford.)" (4)
"William Bentley, according to the records, was a currier. He probably tanned as well as curried and dressed leather, most of which the colonists made into clothes. He lived in that part of the present State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations that is now Exeter but was in his day called the King's Towne in the Indian country of the Narragansett tribe." (5)
"On May 2, 1677, the General Assembly of the Rhode Island colony met at Newport and granted liberty to all former inhabitants of the Province to "resettle their aforesaid possessed rights and habitations" and gave ten thousand acres of land in the King's Province to be equally divided among a hundred men to be approved by the Assembly. The names of these men seem not to have been recorded and one can assume that most of them were former inhabitants or sons of former inhabitants or in some way connected with them.
Later, at the October Assembly, Rhode Island granted an additional five thousand acres for a settlement which came to be called East Greenwich.
When the surveys of these two grants were made, apparently in 1678, William Bentley was one of those who carried the "chains" and the record of payment for his services is the first public notice of him so far found.
"General Treasurer's Accounts, 1672-1711"
State Archives, Providenc, R.I.:
"To Generall Treasury Debitor
1678
Nov 9 To William Bently for Carrying ye Chains for surveying the lands of East Greenwich and other lands according to order
12 shillings"
How William Bentley came to the Narragansett counry and when will perhaps never be known. As later records (1709) show that the land he settled on after King Philip's War was part of a tract set to Joseph Reynolds and his sons Joseph and Robert Reynolds; and as the foregoing Treasurer's Accounts also show that James Reynolds, Senior and his son Jame Reynolds, Junior, were among those connected with the survey, one may logically surmise that William Bentley was in some way connected with the Reynolds family, perhaps as an apprentice or an employee. For any closer connection such as nephew or son-in-law of James Reynolds there is no evidence. The latter had no daughter, Sarah. The fact that William Bentley named one of his sons, James, can be construed to indicate some connection with the family. If he came into the Narragansett country with the Reynolds family it was most likely as a minor which would account for an absence of records.
Where William Bentley learned his currying trade can not be determined from the records examined. None of them shows what trade or trades if any besides that of farmer, James Reynolds and his sons followed.
In 1679, the inhabitants of the King's Province became so impatient with the continued bickering and impositions of the two colonies both of whom exercised of jurisdiction, that on July 29, they addressed a lengthy petition to his majesty, Charles II, reciting a history of their wrongs and beseeching him to settle the question of jurisdiction: whether they were to be under that of Connecticut; of Rhode Island, or under themselves, "The country being large and able to containe many families, may make an entire Province, if you Majestye see cause."
The Petition is dated "King's Province, in Narrangansett, July 29, 1679." The first of forty-two signatures is that of William Bentley, evidence that he was an inhabitant of the King's Province in 1679, was of age and was a land holder there, living onland that undoubtedly he himself had helped to survey." (6)
"One of the complaints enumerated in the Petition was that the government on the Island of Rhode Island had shown so little sympathy for the plight of the inhabitants of the Narrangansett in the aftermath of Philip's war, as to impose a tax on them in 1678. Four years later, at a meeting of the General Assembly at Newport, June 28, 1682, this tax was remitted by one half, the Assembly " having taken into their consideration, the assessment laid upon the inhabitants of Kings Towne in the year 1678, with their then present condition"' but, the inhabitants of Kings Towne flatly refused to pay any taxes at all, neither in money nor in provisions as assessed.
A few years later, England, under James II, determined to organize the norther colonies in America into a single royal domain to be called the Dominion of New England, first annulled the Massachusetts Bay's charter and provided for the later annulment of the charters of the Colony of Connecticut and of the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. The Narragansett country, already a King's province, was declared a separate government and automatically included in the Dominion. On June 23, 1686, a Court was held at King's Towne and that town was ordered to be henceforth called Rochester. The name of East Greenwich was changed to Dedford and that to Westerly to Haversham. In December of that same year, Sir Edmund Andros arrived from England as Royal Governor, with his headquarters at Boston...
Some forty-five French families sought refuge in Rhode Island and in the autumn of 1686 purchased a tract of land in the northern part of the newly-named town of Rochester and near to Dedford (East Greenwich) where they settled and where in the following spring they began to cultivate their acres. This spot is still known as Frenchtown and is a village in the township of East Greenwich.
In July 1687 certain of the English residents of East Greenwich "alias" Dedford, and Rochester, "alias" Kingstown, resenting the intrusion of the French upon their title to the meadow land given them nine years before by the Colony of Rhode Island, mowed the meadow and carted off the hay. The French complained to Andros who ordered the hay stacked pending an investigation as to the the rights of the English to mow the meadow and apporpriate the hay.
On August 5th, "upon hearing and examining of the matter in difference between the towns of Greenwich alias Dedford, Kingston alias Rochester and the French families lately settled in the Narrangansett country" Andros ordered the hay to equally divided between the French and English "until the right thereto can be determined and settled." He gave preference to those English who "live remote and are most wanting thereor." Among those who lived "remote" was William Bentley of "kingston."
Sir Edmond Andros in September 1687 authorized a tax to be assessed against the colonists. William Bentley's tax amounted to four shillings, six and a half pence. One shilling was his "poll" tax which gave him the right to vote for town officials only as all colonial charters had been revoked and there were no General Assemblies. The remainder, three shillings, six and a half pence, was property tax, further proof that he was in possession of land.
England in 1688 revolted against its Catholic king, James II. Risings in the colonies in America followed. Andros was overthrown and the colonial governments restored, leaving the Narraganset country or King's Province once more without a fixed government until December 1693 when the Rhode Island charter of 1663 was confirmed by William and Mary...
The first time, therefore, that we meet with William Bentley's name in the town records is in:
"List of all the ffreemen Belonging to the Towne of Kingstowne alias Rochester, in the Narrangansett Country this 21st of December 1696."...
The name "William Bentle" is seventy-fifth on the list. His son, Thomas's name appears as eighty-fifth and that of his son James, one hundred nineteenth. The name of his eldest son, William Bentley, Jr., does not appear on this list at all, due, perhaps to an oversight.
Although the three sons of William Bentley had long reached freeman age by 1712, they were not admitted as freeman of the Colony until May 6, 1712, when the General Assembly voted to admit forty-four inhabitants of Kingstown as freeman of the Colony.
The General Treasurer's Accounts for 1701 show that on September 4, William Bentley was paid ten shillings for killing a wolf, an award established by law to rid the colony of them.
In April, 1705, William Bentley, asked for and received of the town "liberty to sett up a house convenient for the carrying on of his currying trade on ... (burned away, but probably: country) Rhode near to Samuel Phillips his house and ... (faded or burned) sd Bently shall have conveniency of land fo... garding and place to dry his leather near to his house."
This land was bounded on the south by the Annaquatucket River and on the east by the "old Pequot Path" or "country Rhode." The house was familiarly known as the "tan" or "taun" house in the spelling and pronunciation of that period.
The land was a free gift of the town, as currying was a necessary trade, and William Bentley, at that time, was the only currier so far as known in that part of Kings Province. Later, it became necessary to buy the land from John Eldred to whom it was "laid out" as part of his tract in 1709...
It was on vacant land, less than five miles west of Wickford, that William Bentley had settled after the war, with apparently, the family of Joseph Reynolds."(7)
"In the list of sales is that of June 3, 1709, to:
Joseph Reynolds, Sr., Joseph Reynolds, Jr., Robert Reynolds and William Bently: of 727 acres "as platted, bounded North by the new road, South by Pettiquamscut line, East by road leading to East Greenwich and West by vacant lands."" (8)
"The "new road" called also "the new country road" and "the Ten Rod Road" is that which still runs from the village of Wickford west through the present township of Exeter, State Highway 102, on present day maps. Of this 727-acre tract, William Bentley's share was about 194 acres in the northeastern portion, bounded on the north by the Ten Rod road, on the east probably by what is now called the South County Trail or State Highway 2, placing a portion of his land today in the present North Kingstown and the remainder in the present Exeter...
Sometime between the date of William Bentley's purchase in the "vacant lands" and January 20, 1711/12, he and his wife, Sarah, deeded sixty-seven acres of this purchase to their eldest son William Bentley, Jr. The record of entry must have been one of the pages destroyed by fire for the only proof that such transaction took place is the subsequent record of sale by William Bentley, Jr., in 1713, when he was planning to remove to Westerly...
On January 20, 1711/12, William Bentley and his wife, Sarah, also deeded land to their son James Bentley...
Except for the town grant of 1705 on which he lived, William Bentley had now disposed of all his lands to two of his sons. On June 14, 1714, he purchased 11 1/2 acres from Priscilla Wethers, widow of Thomas, and their son John. This land on November 1, 1715, was deeded to Thomas Bentley.
A dispute as to rights to land, on the other side of the Pequot Path, arising between William Bentley and James Updike, whose land lay across that road, William Bentley brought suit for damages but judgment was rendered against him. He appealed therefrom without success on March 17, 1714/5.
When in 1705 the town granted him liberty to erect his tan house, the land alloted for the purpose was not apparently otherwise occupied. However, when the "vacant lands" were in 1709 "platted" and "laid out" and sold, this small tract proved to be on land "laid out" to Captain John Eldred from whom on December 16, 1716, William Bentley bought eight acres which included the tan house and "garding" and on which he continued to live until his death in 1720 when it fell to his youngest son Benjamin as his inheritance." (9)
"Generation No. 3

3. WILLIAM SR.3 BENTLEY (JOHN2, WILLIAM1) was born September 13, 1640 in Ampthill, Bedfordshire, Eng., and died July 1720 in Kingstown, RI. He married SARAH BENTLEY.

Notes for WILLIAM SR. BENTLEY:
There has been much confusion surrounding William Bentley of Kingstown, Rhode Island, due mainly to errors appearing first in turn of the century genealogies which are still being perpetuated today (1997).
Having discovered the existence of several William Bentleys in colonial records, early searchers tried to classify them as grandfather, father and son. However, closer examination of the data does not support this idea. In one instance the dates given would have made William nine years younger than his wife, and a precocious lad of about thirteen when his first child was born!
The usual sources cited by these early writers are: Utah Genealogical Society; a book "Persecutions of the Baptists by the Boston Church"; and 'Newgets' "Cavaliers and Pioneers of New Jersey".
Mr Cameron Stewart, in his monumental "Genealogical Classification by Family Group Coding for Descent from Common Ancestors" (Vol II copyright 1986 published by the author) notes that there is a book by an N.M. Nugent "Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of VIRGINIA Land Patents and Grants 1623 - 1800".
Much of our information on the earliest generations of Bentleys is either taken from or confirmed by Mr Stewart's book.
The date of William Bentley's arrival in the colonies is unknown.
Various records show:
-a William Bentley arriving in Virginia in 1624. He received land in Elizabeth City, Virginia the same year. ( Perhaps early searchers confused Elizabeth, New Jersey with Elizabeth City, Virginia ).
-a John Bentley to Virginia July, 1635 age 34 years
-a Mary Bentley to New England July, 1635 age 20 years
-a William Bentley to New England September, 1635 age 47 years
-a John Bentley same ship age 17 years
- Alice Bentley same ship age 15 years
-a William Bentley to New England May, 1671 no age given (Tepper's "Ships Passenger Lists")
-a William Bentley married Mary Houghten in Dorchester, MA, January 1675/76
A William Bentley received military pay for service in King Phillip's War, summer of 1675, which could be this latter William since Dorchester was one of the towns from which conscripts were taken.
Mr Cameron Stewart not only reviewed the work of numerous previous searchers, he also did a great deal of original research. One of the documents he viewed, at the suggestion of Mr Edwin Bentley of Seattle, Washington, was in the possession of the Rhode Island Historical Society. It is a very old manuscript which he believes is a compilation of information from "perhaps two or more Bible transcription-records"
This documents reads as follows:
"1) William Bently Born in Amphill in Bedfordshire
2) England and Departed this Life in Kingstown
3) 83 yrs and 11 days of His age and Sarah Bently She
4) the Wife of ye above William Departed this Life
5) December ye 28 1731
6) Mary Austen Born in ye year 1670
7) William Bently Son of William Born July ye 8 day __1677 (note-Mr Stewart says the month could be Jan or June)
8)James Bently Son of William Born May ye 26 dy ___ 1679
9) Thomas Bently Son of William Born June ye 19 dy ___1685
10) Benjamin Bently Son of William Born March ye 27 dy ___ 1690"
The above would yield a birth date for William of June/July 1637, a little over two years before the christening date given in the Ampthill records.
Records from Bedfordshire show:
' William Bently married May 18th or 20th (two records of the marriage with different days - otherwise the information is the same), 1601, Bedford, St Paul's to Mary Goodwin, buried July 01, 1632 (widow)'
Their seven children:
Margaret, Elizabeth, Thomas, JOHN, Rose, Emma and Mary.
John Bently was Christened November 05, 1608 at Elstow. He married October 03, 1630 Mary Betts at Ampthill. John was buried March 26, 1666 at Ampthill.
Children of John and Mary:
Robert bapt. March 25, 1631
Mary bp November 11, 1632
John bp July 20, 1634
Thomas bp April 10, 1636
James bp May 06, 1638
William bp September 13, 1640 at Ampthill, Bedfordshire
Mr Stewart does not believe the foregoing constitutes absolute proof that this John and William were our William's father and grandfather.
The two plus year discrepancy in the date of baptism and age as given at death could simply be a failing of memory, not uncommon as one grows older.
The document quoted above raises some unanswered (perhaps unanswerable) questions. Why does it not mention JANE Bentley - who is called 'daughter Jane' in William's will of 1720? Who is Mary Austen? Is Austen a middle or a last name? Is she a child of William or Sarah by previous marriage? - or a child born out of wedlock ? Could Jane be a nickname for Mary Austen? Why are the men called 'son of William' but there is no similar designation of this Mary as a daughter of William? Perhaps an answer lies undiscovered in some dusty archive in Rhode Island.

Some researchers feel there was a connection between William and the Reynolds family. In, or by, 1709 he had settled on land which was part of a tract allotted to Joseph (2) Reynolds and his sons Joseph (3) and Robert (3) Reynolds after King Phillips War.
The Narragansett was obviously sparsely settled at the time, 1675/76, and the inhabitants evidently departed their lands to seek safety in larger communities. After the war both Connecticut and Rhode Island claimed the area but both agreed to let the former residents return and reclaim their property. Rhode Island commissioned a survey of "Kings Province" and later added another 5000 acres which became East Greenwich. After both regions were surveyed in 1677, Treasurer's Account Books show that James Reynolds Sr. and Jr. and William Bently were paid for their services, in William's case for "carrying ye chains".
In 1679 William was one of 79 signers of a petition to the King to settle the disagreement between Connecticut and Rhode Island regarding these areas.
In 1687 William was listed as one of those taxed by Gov. Andros.
In 1696 he was a freeman.
In 1705 he was granted liberty to set up a house convenient for carrying on his trade as a currier.
Over the next fifteen years his name appeared in the records - deeding land to a son, buying land, being involved in a law suit and, in 1720, the proving of his will...
Children of WILLIAM BENTLEY and SARAH BENTLEY are:
4. i. JANE4 BENTLEY, b. Abt. 1675, prob. Kingstown, RI; d. Bef. June 1729, prob Kingstown, RI.
5. ii. WILLIAM JR. BENTLEY, b. July 08, 1677, Kingstown, RI; d. Abt. March 1760, Westerly, RI.
6. iii. JAMES BENTLEY, b. May 26, 1679, Kingstown, RI; d. prob. RI.
7. iv. THOMAS BENTLEY, b. June 19, 1685; d. Abt. 1778, RI.
8. v. BENJAMIN BENTLEY, b. March 27, 1690. " (13)
1) The Bentley Family (see Greene) p. 4
2) Ibid., p. 20
3) Sarter, Emilie; One Branch of the Bentley Family of Rhode Island (Boston 1953) p. XII
4) Ibid., p. 3
5) Ibid., p. 5
6) Ibid., p. 7-9
7) Ibid., p. 10-14
8) Ibid., p. 15
9) Ibid., p. 16-18
10) Wightman, Wade C.; The Wightman Ancestry (Bookcrafters Chelsea, MI 1994) p. 26-7
11) Clevenger, Anna Belle Bentley; Alvah Bentley and Zora Belle Dodson: Their Ancestors and Descendants (1984) (1625 N.W. 27th, Lawton, OK 73505) p. 393
12) Ibid. p.395-7
13) A Bentley Family Tree William Bentley of Kingstown, RI - To rectify some old errors.
Elaine C Cowan
1712 Van Epps Dr
Carson City, NV 89701
United States
>

[NI3411] "129. Sarah Eldred.
b. 1650 in Yarmouth, Massachusetts.
d. 28 December 1731.
From The Family of Clyde Mulford Eldridge, and Other Descendants of William Eldred of Yarmouth, by Luella Eldridge, published by Gateway Prss, Baltimore, Maryland, 1983: Sarah Eldred was the second daughter of William Eldred and Ann Lumpkin." (2)
"2. Sarah; b. 10/10/1650 [Yarmouth]" (3)
"From [William Bentley's] will and other records we learn that his wife's name was Sarah. She is believed by some descendants ot have been a Sarah Leithfield, and by others, Sarah Eldred, born at Yarmouth, Plymouth Colony, October 10, 1650, daughter of William and Anne (Lumpkin) Eldred of Yarmouth.
Leithfield is an unusual name. It may be, as was then so frequently the case, merely one of a number of spellings of the name "Litchfield." Austin's Genealogical Dictionary, page 19, in the Bentley Chart, does not give the surname of Sarah, wife of William Bentley, and it is not known how Leithfield came to be assigned to her unless she was related to Thomas Leachfield, another variation of Litchfield, of Massachusetts Bay Colony, whose daughter, Anne, married, December 29, 1702, Samuel Shippee of East Greenwich, Rhode Island Colony. Austin on page 179 spells the name "Anne Leithfield." "The Litchfield Family in America" (1901-06) makes no reference to Thomas nor to his daughter Anne, nor to a Sarah, wife of William Bentley. Another spelling is Leichfield.
Sarah Shippee, born about 1716, a daughter of Samuel and Anne (Leithfield or Leichfield) Shippee, married at East Greenwich about 1737, Benjamin Bentley (Thomas2, William1), grandson of William and Sarah (........) Bentley.
The variations in the spelling of the name Litchfield may easily account for the confusion. Neverthe less nothing has been found to prove that a Sarah Leithfield or Leichfield married William Bentley.
The evidence that Sarah Eldred of Yarmouth was the wife of William Bentley, seems to rest on the testimony she gave in King's Towne in 1718 that John Eldred (1659-1724), was then living on land which his father, Samuel Eldred had lived on fifty years previously; that is, in 1668. It would be logical to assume that Sarah Bentley, if her memory carried her back fifty years, must have been living there herself, perhaps with the Samuel Eldreds, in that part of the Narrangansett country, in 1668, and that her father, William Eldred of Yarmouth was a brother of Samuel Eldred of Kingstown.
The loss of records, by fire, at both Yarmouth and North Kingstown, makes it difficult to substantiate either contention. All we can be sure of is that at the time of his death, the wife of William Bentley was named Sarah.
The record of Sarah Bentley's death has not been found. She may have married again in 1721, as it was not unusual then, as now, for elderly widows and widowers to marry. North Kingstown records show that on March 16, 1721, a Sarah Bentley married some one whose name ended in "man," the first name and first part of the surname having been burned away.
There was at that time a widower, Henry Brightman, whose record tallies best with that of the widow of William Bentley. There was no other known Sarah Bentley in 1721, and if she married Henry Brightman she predeceased him, probably in Freetown, Massachusetts Bay Colony, where Brightman died in 1728." (1)
"His [William Bentley's] wife testified that Samuel Eldred, father of John, did dwell upon the land where John now dwells, fifty years ago." (4)
"Notes for SARAH BENTLEY:
Regarding the identity of Sarah Bentley's parents - those who propose Leithfield or Litchfield as her maiden name seem to use the book "Persecutions of the Baptists by the Boston Church" as their reference. What this book might contain to support their contention is unknown to us. However, the dates they give and the insistence on the three Williams as Grandfather, Father and Son theory, which is unsupportable, lead us to believe there is nothing in this book to prove Sarah's parentage.
Those who believe she was an Eldred point to the testimony given by Sarah in 1718 concerning Samuel Eldred dwelling on the land where his son John then lived fifty years ago (ie. about 1668). She even mentioned that the old road ran on the east side of the house (a fact supported by the testimony of Henry Knowles). It would appear that she was living in Rhode Island in or before 1668.
Since there is no known evidence to connect her to the family of Samuel Eldred (and apparently her testimony did not contain any language indicating a family connection with Samuel and John) some searchers have decided she is the daughter of William and Anne (Lumpkin) Eldred of Yarmouth, Massachusetts. She is said to be their 3rd (or 4th) child, born about 1650. At least one family researcher, Miss Eva Boone, had received from another family historian, a reference number for a marriage between Sarah and William Bentley. However, they had no marriage date and our inquiries to Yarmouth regarding this reference number produced no record. In addition, no connection between William Eldred of Yarmouth and Samuel Eldred of Kingstown has ever been proven - at least not as far as we are aware.
We can reasonably assume that Sarah was in Rhode Island as early as 1668 but what her family connections were remain a mystery. " (5)
1) Sarter, Emilie; One Branch of the Bentley Family of Rhode Island (Boston 1953) p. 3-5
2) Alvah Bentley, p. 393-4
3) Eldred, Orville Ward; The Eldred Family (1940) p. 11
4) Austin, Gen. Dict. of RI, p. 19
5) A Bentley Family Tree William Bentley of Kingstown, RI - To rectify some old errors.
Elaine C Cowan
1712 Van Epps Dr
Carson City, NV 89701
United States
>

[NI3415] "GR5 George Greene (Edward, John) was born before 1680. He married about 1702 Mary.
Children:
i. Anna, b in 1702.
ii. Sarah.
iii. George, b. in 1704, m. Ann.
LE11 iv. Bathsheba...
v. Henry, m. Hannah." (1)
1) Wright, p. 123

[NI3416] "Edward b. Kingstown, R.I.
d.
m.
Mary Tibbitts...
1687, Sep. 6. Taxed 3s. 10d.
1695, Mar. 8. He sold George Vaughan, 10 acres in East Greenwich, for #8, which land fell to me by will of my honored father, lately deceased.
1697, Sep. 4. He sold George Vaughan, 90 acres in East Greenwich, given by father.
1700, May 4. He was summoned with others by Assembly, to answer in court, the charge of being guilty of a riot.
1711, Apr. 6. He sold to Anthony Low, of Warwick, certain land in East Greenwich.
[Children]
Robert." (1)
"GR2 Edward Greene (John) was born about 1643; and he died before 1717. He married Mary Tibbetts, daughter of Henry and Sarah (Stanton) Tibbetts. Mary Green, wife of Edward Green, is mentioned in the will of his father-in-law, Henry Tibbetts, dated 1708 and recorded in North Kingstown. Edward Greene's father-in-law, Henry Tibbetts, left land to all of his grandsons, except the sons of Edward Greene "who are provided for."
He and his brother, John, left Rhode Island early and are recorded in Connecticut, then in 1660 in Suffolk Co., NY, then again in Dutchess Co., about 1665. Several of his children remained in Charlotte Precinct, Dutchess Co., after Edward returned to Rhode Island. He and his brother are both mentioned in the New York records in 1684. In 1687, he was back in Rhode Island where he inherited the land which his father had obtained as a Fones partner in 1679. He was made a freeman in North Kingstown in 1695.
On 8 March 1695, he sold to George Vaughan for eight pounds, ten acres of land in East Greenwich which he had received "by will of my honored father, lately deceased."
Children:
GR5 i. George, b bef 1680; m Mary
ii. Robert
iii. John
iv. daughter
v. William
vi. Israel" (2)
"Family Quarrel
Four writers mention the fact that sons of John Greene left Rhode Island, two of them connecting the exodus to a violent family quarrel, but with different versions.
Henry Lewis Greene, who was interested in the line of Edward, the eldest son of John of Quidnessett, wrote that he had "unimpeachable evidence" of a great family quarrel but unfortunately failed to print this evidence. As a result of this quarrel "old John disinherited his sons Edward, Robert and Henry. They all left Rhode Island, Edward going to New York, Henry to New Jersey, and Robert to Virginia. Edward returned to Rhode Island when his father was an old man, was reconciled, and was given his portion of land...
[Captain Edward and his brother Lt. John] settled in Charlotte Precinct, Dutchess County, New York, where several of the children remained after Edward returned to Rhode Island. Edward and John are both mentioned in the New York records in 1684.
Between 1684 and 1687 Edward returned to Rhode Island...
June 9, 1710, John Waterman and his wife sold to Edward Greene, yeoman of Kingstowne, his lands, divided and undivided, in the tract westward of East Greenwich. This deed was recorded in East Greenwich, January 20, 1720." (3)
1) R. I. Gen. Dict. p. 87
2) Wright, p. 120-1
3) Greene, Walter and Ela; A Greene Family History c. 1981 p. 51-3

[NI3417] "[Edward Greene] m. Mary Tibbitts, dau. of Henry & Sarah (Stanton) Tibbitts." (1)
1) R.I. Gen. Dict. p. 87

[NI3418] "John b.
d. abt 1695
m.
Joan b.
d. aft 1682
Kings Town, R.I.
1639+/- He came early to Narragansett, living in the family of Richard Smith, as his testimony shows.
1664, May 11. The Rhode Island authorities sent to his house and took him thence to Newport, where being called soon after before the court to answer for his adhering to government of Connecticut, he answered so as to give offence, but upon asking pardon for that and for adhering to Connecticut, the court passed his offence and he was promised the protection of Rhode Island, as a freeman of that colony.
1671, May 20. He gave oath of allegiance to colony of Rhode Island.
1672, Jan. 1. He and five others bought of Awashuwett, Chief Sachem of Quoheset, in Narragansett, certain land there.
1676, Aug. At a court martial at Newport, Awasawin, of Narraganset, denieth that he laid hands on John Greene, of Narragansett, occasioned about the death of a dumb boy.
[Children:
John b. June 6, 1651 Kings Town d. October 6, 1729 m. Abigail
James b. 1655 North Kingstown d. 1728 m. (1) Elizabeth (2) Ann
Daniel d. 1730 m. Rebecca Barrow
Edward...
Benjamin d. 1719 m. Humility Coggeshall" (1)
"GR1 John Greene is known as John Greene of Quidnesset to distinguish him from another contemporary John Greene...
John Greene died between 24 Mar 1681/2 and 25 Sep 1685. The latter date is the date of a deed from Joseph Clark of Newport to Francis Brinley which makes reference to land which was formerly in possesion of "John Greene, Sr. of Narragansett, now deceased."
The time of John Greene's settlement in Rhode Island can not be determined exactly. He testified in 1679 that "forty years and more" earlier he lived with Richard Smith (#6590) who first began "a settlement in Narragansett." A week later in a petition to the king, he stated that he and Richard Smith had settled in the Narragansett forty-two years earlier, where there were no English within twenty miles. These two statements would place the time of his settlement between one and three years after Roger Williams settlement at Providence in 1636. We know that John Greene was in Rhode Island by 1647 because he is named in deed dated 1647 from David and Edward Greenman...
Therefore, about 1639 John Greene worked for Richard Smith at an Indian trading post in the wilderness of Narragansett. This area was called Aquidnesset by the Indians...
John Greene was probably unmarried at the time he settled in Rhode Island since his oldest son was not born until about 1643. Nothing is known of the wife of John Greene, except that on March 24, 1682 Joan Greene joined her husband John in deeds transferring a hundred and twenty acres of land to their son, Daniel Greene, and sixty acres to their son James Greene...
John Greene participated in several major land purchases, including the purchase of Fone's Neck which became East Greenwich where he later moved and the island of Conanicut, now called Jamestown.
Children:
GR2 i. Edward...
ii. Daniel, b ca 1647; d in 1730 at North Kingstown; m 16 July 1689 at Newport, Rebecca Barrow.
iii. Henry, b bef 1650 in Newport, d ca 1694; m bef 20 Oct 1670, Sarah Greenman...
iv. John, Jr...
v. Robert, b. in 1653...
GR3 vi. James, b in 1655; prob m(1) Elizabeth Jenkins; m(2) Ann
GR4 vii. Benjamin, b ca 1665; m Humility Coggeshall.
viii. Sarah, m ca 1668, Thomas Founders" (2)
1) Austin, John Osborne; Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island (Gen Pub Co., Baltimore 1969) p. 86
2) Wright, p. 118-20

[NI3834] Elizabeth Judd is listed as the youngest child of Thomas Judd in Barbour: Early Hartford Families. I calculate that she was born abt 1650 because her son Nehemiah was born in 1670.

[NI3835] "David Burt was born before18 Oct 1629 in Haberton, Devon, England. He was baptized on 18 October 1629 in Haberton, Devon, England. He died on 9 Sept 1690 in Northhampton, Hampshire County, MA. He married Mary Holton on 18 Nov 1655 in Northampton, Hampshire Co., MA." (2)
"David Burt, the second son of Henry Burt, received a grant of land in Springfield, but he relinquished it to the town and went to Northampton in 1654 where he was not only one of the first settlers but was the first to marry. His wife was Mary Holton, daughter of Deacon William Holton, an early settler of both Hartford and Northampton. They were married November 18, 1655. He died September 9, 1690. His homelot was on what is now King Street. Besides attending to his own affairs, he acted as Town Measurer of land for many years, and when the division line between Springfield and Northampton was established, he served as one of the commissioners on the part of Northampton. Northampton, Hadley and Deerfield suffered from Indian depredations and David Burt had two of his sons captured at Deerfield by Indians, when the town was burned, and taken to Canada. Both were finally liberated, but the youngest of the two brothers was subsequently killed near Burlington by Indians when on a scouting expedition. A third was captured when the Indians burned Schenectady and was never heard from. His children were:
David, b. July 14, 1656, killed August 30, 1660, by being run over by a cart.
Jonathan, b. May 1, 1658, d. April 15, 1662.
Henry, b. August 20, 1660, m. December 12, 1684, Elizabeth, daughter of Alexander Alvord... he married Hannah, daughter of Henry Denslow... He died September 26, 1735.
Mary, b. March 18, 1663, d. November 3, 1666.
Sarah, b. May 2, 1665, m. May 21, 1688, Robert Potter, d. May 14, 1689.
Hannah, b. September 1667, d. May 3, 1689.
David, b. August 25, 1669, captured by the French and Indians February 8, 1690, on the burning of Schenectady and never heard from.
Jonathan, b. September 5, 1671, m. June 2, 1696, Mindwell Taylor, daughter of Capt. John Taylor. He died October 15, 1745...
Joseph, b. September 26, 1673, m. April 16, 1702, Sarah Cowles, daughter of John Cowles of Hatfield. Was one of the early settlers of Northfield; d. January 13, 1759...
Mary, baptised May 3, 1676, m. February 14, 1706 Dr. Thomas Hastings of Hatfield. He died July 23, 1712, and his widow m. May 7, 1713 Samuel Belding of Hatfield.
Ruth, b. April 1677, m. December 16, 1710, Nehemiah Allen of Northhampton. She died March 1746.
Benjamin...
John, b. April 29, 1682. Captured at the same time at Deerfield with his brother Benjamin and taken to Canada. In May, 1709, he accompanied his cousin, Capt. Benjamin Wright, on a scouting expedition in search of Indians and was killed on Onion River, near Burlington." (1)
1) Springfield (see Benjamin Burt) p. 540-1
2) Marge Gray; http://www.parsonstech.co...ray/d2672.htm#P10085

[NI3836] "David Burt...
His wife was Mary Holton, daughter of Deacon William Holton, an early settler of both Hartford and Northampton. They were married November 18, 1655." (1)
"Mary Holton was born in 1638 in Hartford, Hartford County, CT. She died between 16 Dec 1713 and 1718 in Northfield, Franklin County, MA." (2)
"3. Joseph Baker (1.Edward 1) b. ABT 1640, Lynn, Ma, m. 5 Feb 1663, in Hartford, Ct, Ruth Holton, b. __ ___ 1640, Hartford, Ct, (daughter of William Holton and Mary Winchell) d. Northampton, Ma. Joseph died 29 Oct 1675, Northampton, Ma. Killed by Indians with eldest son, Joseph, age 11, while working in the fields.
Children:
11. i Joseph Baker b. 20 Jan 1665, Poss Northampton, Ma, d. 29 Oct 1675, Northampton, Ma. Killed by Indians with father.
+ 12. ii Ruth b. 6 May 1668.
13. iii Mary Baker b. 5 Sep 1670, Northampton, Ma, m. 11 Sep 1693, Ambrose Fowler, b. 8 May 1658, Windsor, Ct, (son of Ambrose Fowler and Joanna Alford).
14. iv Samuel Baker b. 11 Sep 1672, Northampton, Ma.
15. v Joseph Baker b. 25 Jan 1676, Northampton, Ma." (3)
This Ruth Holton is undoubtedly a sister of Mary, whose mother is thus probably Mary Winchell.
1) First Century of Springfield (see Benjamin Burt) p. 540
2) Marge Gray; http//www.parsontech.co...ray/d2672.htm#P10085
3) Kathleen M. Baker, Descendants of Edward Baker

[NI3837] "William Holton died Aug 12, 1691 ae 80 (Northampton) mar Mary who died Nov 16, 1691. Early member 1 Ch. Name on Founders Monument. Moved to Northampton.
Children:
John m. Abigail
Samuel bp Nov 1, 1646 (HTR) m Mary (Gilbert) rossiter
William m Sarah Marshfield
Mary m/1 David Burt m/2 Joseph Root
Sarah m John King
Ruth m/1 Joseph Baker m/2 Thomas Lyman
Rachel m/1 Thomas Strong m/2 Nathan Bradley
Thomas
(Houghton, Holton). Came in the "Francis" from Ipswich 1634 aged 23. An original proprietor of Hartford; his home lot in 1639 was "on the road from George Steele's to the Great Swamp now Washington St." Removed to Northampton in 1654; was the first deacon there; member of first Board of Magistrates; deputy several years." (1)
1) Barbour; Hartford, p. 310

[NI3838] "Henry Burt, the ancestor of those who bear this family name, who have resided in Springfield and neighboring towns, as well as many who have gone to other states, came from England prior to 1638. His name appears that year in the records of the General Court, in reference to paying #8 to Roxbury on account of the burning of his house. In 1640 he appears here. Just what time he left Roxbury it is not known, probably on that or the prev