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gods, god, luxor, Egypt, hawass, fresco, dolphins, dolphin, queen, nefertiti, nefertari, memphis, pyramids, gizeh,pyramids of gizeh, fun, games, books, book, about, egypte, description, information, travel, hotels, info, abu simbel, edfu, philae, island, sun, goddess, disc, water, nile, river, deity, money, links, link, hello kitty, map, map of egypt, map of ancient egypt, abydos, kv, valley of the kings, cairo, museum, dendera, temple, saqqara, tutanchamun, toetankhamon, akhenaten, peom, ramses 2, rammeses 2, ramses, farao, pharaoh, battle, war, hieroglyph, writings, insciptions, alphabet, music, readings, howard carter, carter, tomb, adventure, documentary, movie, movies, desciption de L'egypte, napoleon, giovanni, Belzoni, giovanni belzoni, reeves, nicholas, tutankhamun, royal, treasure, edwards, epigraphic survey, medinet habu, hatshepsut, female, wadi, Alexandrie, Africa, Rosetta, Karnak, Tell-el Armana, Armana, Aswan, cataract, nubia, Then" writes the poet Pentaur in exaltation of the glory of his lord, "extending his body to its full height, Pharaoh arrayed himself in the proud armour of the warrior. And whipping forward his chariot drawn by two horses, he flung himself into the fray. He was alone, completely alone, with no one beside him! His soldiers and his bodygaurd watched from a distance as he leaped to the attack and defended himself like a hero. Two thousand five hunderd chariots, each bearing three soldiers, surrounded him and crushed tight about him to cut him off. But he, undaunted, had with him neither princes nor generals nor soldiers!...". In this moment of supreme danger, Ramses then addresses this fervant prayer to the supreme god of the pharaohs: "O thou, divine Amon, Lord of eternity, creator and organiser of the world, God who provides all, Lord of all the kingdoms of the earth... see, I am alone!... Are you not my father and I your son?... My arm has always done thy will. Have I not rendered you homage with my offerings? Remember the thirty thousand oxen sacrificed in your name and the temples of enormous blocks of granite I have raised to thee! Count the obeliscs I have erected in your honour! O divine Amon, now that I am alone and abandoned by all, I extend to you my hands and prayer. Are you not stronger than a thousand archers, than thousands of heros?...". Amon responds at last to Ramses' prayer: "I am your father the sun, my right hand is with thee and, as you have said, I am alone worth more than millions of warriors! When I descend into the tumult of chariots which beseige you, you will see them fall and shatter like vases of Clay under your horse's hooves!... I will turn to ice the hearts of your countless enemies, I will take the strength from their limbs, I will make fall the lances and quivers from their hands and I will fling them into the waters like crocodiles!... They will kill each other and cut each other's throats, and he who has fallen shall never rise again!...". Then Ramses calls for help from the generals and horsemen who have not taken part in the battle: "Come forward", Pharaoh cries to them, "and tell me who among you has sacrified himself for his country more than I have done. While you sat tranquil in your camps, I went out alone against the enemy. Were it not for me, you would all be dead!...". Evening falls and the poet lets us witness the outcome of the battle. Ramses' entire army, which had retreated, turns to advance again. "They advanced over earth covered with corpses, all red with blood... Their feet found no place to rest, so many were the dead!..." When the battle is over, the generals acclaim Pharaoh and praise him for the victory: "O Ramses of the valiant heart, you have done alone more than a wole army could do. Before your victorious sword the land of the Hatti has bowed down!... Nothing can be compared to you when you fight for your people on the day of battle!... Impelled by the example of their leader, the Egyptian cavalary threw themselves into battle as the sparrow-hawk springs on its prey. The Pharaoh accomplished great of valour. All who approached him fell beneath his blows. Soon the bodies of the enemy cut to pieces formed a mountain of bloody corpses...". The role played by ramses in history comes to life in this epic pages. No wonder then that from Djebel Barkal to Narh el Keld, numerous stelea celebrate the deeds of this king to whom classic legend attributes victory similar to those of Thotmosis III, Seti I and Ramses III. 1
gs? Remember the thirty thousand oxen sacrificed in your name and the temples of enormous blocks of granite I have raised to thee! Count the obeliscs I have erected in your honour! O divine Amon, now that I am alone and abandoned by all, I extend to you my hands and prayer. Are you not stronger than a thousand archers, than thousands of heros?...". Amon responds at last to Ramses' prayer: "I am your father the sun, my right hand is with thee and, as you have said, I am alone worth more than millions of warriors! When I descend into the tumult of chariots which beseige you, you will see them fall and shatter like vases of Clay under your horse's hooves!... I will turn to ice the hearts of your countless enemies, I will take the strength from their limbs, I will make fall the lances and quivers from their hands and I will fling them into the waters like crocodiles!... They will kill each other and cut each other's throats, and he who has fallen shall never rise again!...". Then Ramses calls for help from the generals and horsemen who have not taken part in the battle: "Come forward", Pharaoh cries to them, "and tell me who among you has sacrified himself for his country more than I have done. While you sat tranquil in your camps, I went out alone against the enemy. Were it not for me, you would all be dead!...". Evening falls and the poet lets us witness the outcome of the battle. Ramses' entire army, which had retreated, turns to advance again. "They advanced over earth covered with corpses, all red with blood... Their feet found no place to rest, so many were the dead!..." When the battle is over, the generals acclaim Pharaoh and praise him for the victory: "O Ramses of the valiant heart, you have done alone more than a wole army could do. Before your victorious sword the land of the Hatti has bowed down!... Nothing can be compared to you when you fight for your people on the day of battle!... Impelled by the example of their leader, the Egyptian cavalary threw themselves into battle as the sparrow-hawk springs on its prey. The Pharaoh accomplished great of valour. All who approached him fell beneath his blows. Soon the bodies of the enemy cut to pieces formed a mountain of bloody corpses...". The role played by ramses in history comes to life in this epic pages. No wonder then that from Djebel Barkal to Narh el Keld, numerous stelea celebrate the deeds of this king to whom classic legend attributes victory similar to those of Thotmosis III, Seti I and Ramses III. 1 /noscript> 1