Cocoa-Rockledge Historical TrailCocoa-Rockledge Historical Trail

Instructions:

1....Print this file.

2....At its end, click on "rules" to see a copy of the trail rules, print it, and then click where indicated at the end of the 3-page rules and patch order form to get back to the list of Florida trails.

3....If you want a hand-drawn map showing the locations of all of the sites, send a self-addressed stamped envelope to Steve Rajtar, 1614 Bimini Dr., Orlando, FL 32806.

4....Hike the trail and order whatever patches you like (optional).

WARNING - This trail may pass through one or more neighborhoods which, although full of history, may now be unsafe for individuals on foot, or which may make you feel unsafe there. Hikers have been approached by individuals who have asked for handouts or who have inquired (not always in a friendly manner) why the hikers are in their neighborhood. Drugs and other inappropriate items have been found by hikers in some neighborhoods. It is suggested that you drive the hike routes first to see if you will feel comfortable walking them and, if you don't think it's a good place for you walk, you might want to consider (1) traveling with a large group, (2) doing the route on bicycles, or (3) choosing another hike route. The degree of comfort will vary with the individual and with the time and season of the hike, so you need to make the determination using your best judgment. If you hike the trail, you accept all risks involved.

Cocoa-Rockledge Historical Trail

Copyright 2000 by Steve Rajtar

(From Interstate 95, drive east on King St. (SR 520) past Fiske Blvd. to park on the south side of the street between Blake and Wilson Aves.)(0.0 miles so far)

Crossing King St., west of Cocoa

1....Site of Hernandez Trail

About a quarter-mile west of here passed the Hernandez Trail, used during the Seminole Wars to connect forts along the eastern part of Florida and Fort Brooke (Tampa). It was named after Brig. Gen. Joseph M. Hernandez, who captured Seminole Chief Osceola in 1837.

(Walk east on King St. to the intersection with US 1.)(0.3)

Intersection of King St. and US 1

2....Dixie Highway

This section of US 1 was a part of the Dixie Highway, which was the dream of Carl Fisher of Indianapolis. He had made his fortune in the new auto industry, and wanted to build a highway from Chicago to Miami. When news got out, many communities formed associations to lobby for inclusion on the route.

The Dixie Highway Association met in Chattanooga and chose a route passing through Tallahassee and Jacksonville, and proceeding south along the east coast. Frenzied lobbying also produced an inland route passing through Gainesville, Ocala, Winter Park, Orlando, Kissimmee, Bartow and Arcadia, rejoining the coastal route at Palm Beach.

In 1915, Fisher led an auto cavalcade from the Midwest to Miami, popularizing auto trips to Florida. The Dixie Highway was officially open for traffic in October of 1925 from the Canadian border at the northern tip of Michigan to Miami.

(Cross to the southeast corner and walk south on US 1 to the intersection with Stone St.)(0.3)

Intersection of US 1 and Stone St.

3....Stone Street

During the early years, black residents of Cocoa usually lived west of Florida Ave. and south on Willard St., with the focus of the black community being Magnolia St. It was renamed Stone St. to honor Richard E. Stone, a prominent black mortician. The section of the street between 121 and 304 Stone St. is known as the Richard E. Stone Historic District.

Richard Stone, the son of the owner of Melbourne's first grocery store and stable, established Brevard County's first black professional baseball team (the Cocoa Black Indians) and its first black funeral home. He also helped found the first civic organization, then known as Liberty League, Inc., and invented and patented an automobile directional signal light, and patented the trocar, a surgical instrument used in embalming.

(Walk east 325 feet on Stone St.)(0.4)

North side of Stone St., between US 1 and Glenn Ln. (300 Stone St.)

4....Mt. Moriah A.M.E. Church

Malissa Moore raised money to build a church on Florida Ave., the construction of which took place in 1886. In 1922, it burned down and Moore raised money for its replacement. Bricks used in the 1923 construction of this Gothic style sanctuary were manufactured on the site using sand donated by Richard E. Stone.

(Continue east 25 feet on Stone St.)(0.4)

South side of Stone St., between US 1 and Glenn Ln. (241 Stone St.)

5....Brown House

This house was the residence of Cocoa's first shoe shiner. This Bungalow was built in about 1924.

(Continue east 85 feet on Stone St.)(0.5)

South side of Stone St., between US 1 and Glenn Ln. (231 Stone St.)

6....Scurry House

This was the home of Cocoa's first black doctor, Dr. B.C. Scurry. This is a Frame Vernacular structure built in about 1920.

(Continue east 60 feet on Stone St.)(0.5)

South side of Stone St., between US 1 and Glenn Ln. (225 Stone St.)

7....Johnson House

This was one of the early grocery stores in Cocoa. It began in about 1924 as a private residence, and returned to that use after its time as a store.

(Continue east 85 feet on Stone St.)(0.5)

South side of Stone St., between US 1 and Glenn Ln. (221 Stone St.)

8....Site of Hall Store

John Henry Hall had one of the first grocery stores here, a Frame Vernacular structure built in about 1895.

(Continue east on Stone St. to the intersection with Glenn Ln.)(0.5)

Southwest corner of Stone St. and Glenn Ln. (215 Stone St.)

9....Moore House

Malissa Moore moved to Cocoa in 1884 and planned to build a church similar to ones she had attended in Atlanta and Monroe, Georgia. She raised money within two years and hired a Titusville carpenter to construct the Mt. Moriah A.M.E. Church. She lived here.

This Frame Vernacular structure was built in 1890 near the Indian River, then was moved here to become a restaurant and rooming house. At the time, it was the only one in Cocoa and was a favorite of Henry Flagler.

(Cross to the southeast corner.)(0.5)

Southeast corner of Stone St. and Glenn Ln. (213 Stone St.)

10....Greater St. Paul Baptist Church

This congregation was established in 1886 and had its original church building here. The windows from it were preserved when it was torn down, and were incorporated into the present sanctuary which was built in 1978.

(Continue east on Stone St. 150 feet past Hughlett Ave.)(0.6)

South side of Stone St., between Hughlett and Florida Aves. (121 Stone St.)

11....Edwards House

This residence of Grace Edwards was built by one of Cocoa's first black families.

(Continue east on Stone St., then walk south on Florida Ave. to the intersection with Travis St.)(0.9)

Southwest corner of Florida Ave. and Travis St. (823 Florida Ave.)

12....Residence

This is a Bungalow, built in about 1924. Bungalow is a term derived from a Bengali word meaning a low house with porches used as a wayside shelter by British travelers in India. In Cocoa, Bungalows are strongly horizontal in appearance, one to one and one-half stories with a shallow sloping roof. They are generally rectangular and asymmetrical in plan.

(Continue south on Florida Ave., then walk east on Rockledge Ave. and south on Seminole Dr. to the intersection with possibly unmarked Longwood Ave.)(2.3)

Northwest corner of Seminole Dr. and Longwood Ave.

13....Wuestoff Hospital

On these grounds, a golf course was built in 1921. During the 1930s, winter resident Eugene Wuestoff took ill and was treated by Dr. Tom Kenaston. When he recovered, he left $12,500 in his will for the construction of a hospital. After he died in 1940, the city donated the golf course for a hospital site.

Wuestoff Hospital, organized by Dr. Tom Kenaston and Rev. William Hargrave, opened on December 14, 1941, with eight rooms and ten beds. It was enlarged to 28 beds in 1952 at a cost of $125,000. It later grew to five stories on ten acres with 308 rooms.

(Continue south on Seminole Dr., then walk east 375 feet on Barton Ave.)

North side of Barton Ave., between Seminole and Shares Drs. (56 Barton Ave.)

14....St. Mary's Church

This church was built in 1907. During the space boom of the 1960s, a larger sanctuary was built to replace it for most functions.

(Continue east 400 feet on Barton Ave. and look south across the street.)(2.5)

South side of Barton Ave., between Seminole and Shares Drs. (39 Barton Ave.)

15....Residence

This home was built before 1900 and was one of the guest houses comprising the 40-room White's Cottage complex. It later was converted for use as a family residence.

(Continue east 135 feet on Barton Ave. and look south across the street.)(2.5)

South side of Barton Ave., between Seminole and Shares Drs. (35 Barton Ave.)

16....Residence

As are several of the homes on this early Rockledge street, this house was built in 1890.

(Continue east 75 feet on Barton Ave. and look south across the street.)(2.6)

South side of Barton Ave., between Seminole and Shares Drs. (31 Barton Ave.)

17....White's Cottage

This three-story building was built before 1900. With Singleton's Cottage along the Indian River, they were two of the most popular privately-run guesthouses of their era.

(Continue east 125 feet on Barton Ave.)(2.6)

North side of Barton Ave., between Seminole and Shares Drs. (24 Barton Ave.)

18....Former Town Hall

This was first used as the Rocklege Town Hall, and was replaced by a new government building in the early 1920s. This then became an apartment house.

Rockledge was first settled in about 1876. In the 1880s, Rockledge was Florida's southernmost winter resort city. It got its name from the home of Cephas Bailey Magruder on a rocky river bluff along Rockledge Dr., which he called his "Rockledge Home".

(Continue east 100 feet on Barton Ave.)(2.6)

North side of Barton Ave., between Seminole and Shares Drs.

19....Women's Exchange

This building, while it was located at another site, was the gift shop of Kate Eyer. It was bought by May Quimby and moved here to be the Women's Exchange, and later housed Stefurak's Antique Shop.

(Continue east on Barton Ave., then walk north on Rockledge Dr. to the intersection with Orange Ave.)(2.9)

Intersection of Rockledge Dr. and Orange Ave.

20....Site of Railroad Spur

Rockledge was served by a railroad spur track from the main line east to this point, which was between the 400-room Indian River and the 300-room Plaza Hotels.

Henry Flagler wanted to buy the Plaza Hotel in 1908, but its owners decided not to sell. In retaliation, during the middle of one night, Flagler's workers tore up the spur line and cut off a major access to the hotel.

(Cross to the northwest corner.)(2.9)

Northwest corner of Rockledge Dr. and Orange Ave.

21....Rocklege Presbyterian Church

Cornelia B. Magruder, the wife of Col. Cephas B. Magruder, moved to this area in 1870 and in 1877 raised funds for the construction of a church. The church organized in 1884 with five members. The first one-room cabin sanctuary was built at the present site of the city hall parking lot in 1885-87 with most of the labor being provided by Albert S., George and H.L. Magruder. The first service in it took place on April 24, 1887.

In 1909, Dr. Alfred S. Badger became the first permanent pastor. A second sanctuary was built by Albert H. Smith in 1909-11. The present sanctuary was built in 1952-53 at a cost of $100,000.

This was previously the site of the three-story, 300-room Plaza Hotel which was built during the 1880s.

(Continue north on Rockledge Dr. (which becomes Riverside Dr. as you leave Rockledge) 100 feet past Oak St.)(4.0)

East side of Riverside Dr., between Oak and Derby Sts. (112 Riverside Dr.)

22....Site of Brevard Hotel

A Moorish style stuccoed building built here in the mid-1920s contained 57 guest rooms. An early owner was Ralph Laycock, who reopened it in 1934 after it had closed for some years during the real estate bust of the late 1920s. It was acquired in 1961 by Tony and Georgia Ninos, who restored it to much of its earlier charm.

Next to the hotel was the Indian River Yacht Club, which had been formed during the 1880s.

(Continue north on Riverside Dr. 300 feet past Derby St.)(4.1)

West side of Riverside Dr., between Derby and Church St. (29 Riverside Dr.)

23....Hicks House

This house is an example of Carpenter Gothic, a style popularized in the U.S. by Andrew Jackson Downing, Alexander Jackson Davis and Richard Upjohn. Its most common feature is the use of sawn wood ornamentation of eaves and vergeboards. They generally also have steeply pitched roofs with cross gables, sometimes with windows extended into gables. This was the residence of J.N. Hicks.

(Continue north on Riverside Dr. to the intersection with Church St.)(4.2)

North side of Church St., across from Riverside Dr.

24....St. Mark's Episcopal Church

The center section of this church, the first in Cocoa, was built in 1886 of wood frame and clapboard. The site had been personally prepared by Bishop John Freeman Young in 1877. Its style is described as Florida Gothic, and was designed by local shipbuilder Gabriel Gingras. The altar windows are a memorial to Bishop Young.

The building was enlarged in 1926 and remodeled with a Spanish style. The land on which it sits was donated by Sarah Delannoy and Mrs. E.P. Porcher.

(Walk east on Church St. and north on Riveredge Dr. to the intersection with Harrison St., and look to the east.)(4.3)

East end of Harrison St.

25....Cocoa-Merritt Island Bridge

The first bridge connecting Cocoa and Merritt Island was built here in 1919 for $75,000, at the east end of the main business district in the 1920s.

(Continue north on Riveredge Dr. to the intersection with King St. and look to the east.)(4.4)

East end of King St.

26....City Dock

A railroad spur was built here by the Florida East Coast Railroad to conect with a large wharf for boats delivering and picking up freight.

(Walk west on King St. and north on Delannoy Ave. to the intersection with Willard St., and cross to the northwest corner.)(4.6)

Northwest corner of Delannoy Ave. and Willard St.

27....Site of Willard's Store

The Willard brothers, B.C. and C.A., built a store here in 1881 as the first commercial building in Scrub City. It was a trading post for settlers living along the river, reached by a 35-foot dock. The Willard brothers founded the community, once known as Oleander Point.

The store was acquired by J.M. Sanders in 1912. He tore it down and built the Bank of Cocoa on the site.

(Walk west 100 feet on Willard St. and look south across the street.)(4.6)

South side of Willard St., between Delannoy and Brevard Aves. (117 Willard St.)

28....Site of Second School

Cocoa's first school, located on the west side of town, was replaced in 1900 by a two-story six-room building at this location. Next door was the town hall, also built in 1900. The town hall building included the post office downstairs until 1920 and an opera house on the second floor. The school was replaced in 1917 by a larger building at another location.

(Continue west on Willard St., then walk north 225 feet on Brevard Ave. and Indian River Dr.)(4.7)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Brevard Ave. and Peachtree St. (7 Indian River Dr.)

29....Residence

This Frame Vernacular style home was built in about 1910.

(Continue north 60 feet on Indian River Dr.)(4.7)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Brevard Ave. and Peachtree St. (11 Indian River Dr.)

30....Residence

This is a Bungalow, built in about 1924.

(Continue north on Indian River Dr. 225 feet past Mulberry St.)(4.9)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Mulberry and Mitchell Sts. (219 Indian River Dr.)

31....Residence

This Masonry Vernacular style home was built in about 1930.

(Continue north on Indian River Dr. to the intersection with Mitchell St.)(5.0)

Southwest corner of Indian River Dr. and Mitchell St. (241 Indian River Dr.)

32....Residence

This is a Frame Vernacular style house built in about 1900.

(Cross to the northwest corner and continue north 75 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.0)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Mitchell and Parkway Sts. (307 Indian River Dr.)

33....Residence

Built in about 1895, this home is Frame Vernacular in style.

(Continue north 75 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.0)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Mitchell and Parkway Sts. (313 Indian River Dr.)

34....Residence

As do many of the Bungalows in Cocoa, this dates to about 1924.

(Continue north on Indian River Dr. to the intersection with Parkway St.)(5.0)

Southwest corner of Indian River Dr. and Parkway St. (317 Indian River Dr.)

35....Residence

This Frame Vernacular home was built in about 1919.

(Cross to the northwest corner.)(5.0)

Northwest corner of Indian River Dr. and Parkway St. (407 Indian River Dr.)

36....Residence

This Frame Vernacular home was built in about 1924.

(Continue north 150 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.1)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Parkway and Carmalt Sts. (413 Indian River Dr.)

37....Residence

This is another Frame Vernacular style home, built in about 1910.

(Continue north on Indian River Dr. to the intersection with Carmalt St., and cross to the northwest corner.)(5.1)

Northwest corner of Indian River Dr. and Carmalt St. (507 Indian River Dr.)

38....Residence

This is a Mediterranean Revival style home, built in about 1925.

(Continue north 100 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.1)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Carmalt and Olive Sts. (509 Indian River Dr.)

39....Residence

This Frame Vernacular style home was built in about 1924.

(Continue north 100 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.1)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Carmalt and Olive Sts. (517 Indian River Dr.)

40....Residence

This is an earlier Cocoa Bungalow, built in about 1919.

(Continue north on Indian River Dr. to the intersection with Olive St., and cross to the northwest corner.)(5.2)

Northwest corner of Indian River Dr. and Olive St. (601 Indian River Dr.)

41....Buckalew House

This 1924 Bungalow features a low-pitched gable roof, wide eaves supported by exposed beams, exposed rafter ends, a gable dormer, and a porch supported by a coquina knee wall.

(Continue north 75 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.2)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Olive and Highland Sts. (607 Indian River Dr.)

42....Residence

This Colonial Revival structure was built in about 1915 as a single residence, and later was converted into a boardinghouse.

(Continue north on Indian River Dr. 75 feet past Highland St.)(5.2)

Northwest corner of Indian River Dr. and Highland St. (703 Indian River Dr.)

43....Residence

This Colonial Revival house was built in about 1905.

(Continue north 75 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.2)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Highland and Sunrise Sts. (709 Indian River Dr.)

44....Residence

This Frame Vernacular style home was built in about 1938.

(Continue north 150 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.3)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Highland and Sunrise Sts. (713 Indian River Dr.)

45....Residence

This Colonial Revival style home was built in 1918.

(Continue north to the intersection with Sunrise St., and look west to the top of Sunrise St.)(5.3)

West end of Sunrise St., west of Indian River Dr. (12 Sunrise St.)

46....Residence

This Frame Vernacular style house was built in about 1905.

(Cross to the northwest corner.)(5.3)

Northwest corner of Indian River Dr. and Sunrise St. (803 Indian River Dr.)

47....Residence

This Bungalow dates to 1920.

(Continue north 150 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.4)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Sunrise St. and Dixon Blvd. (809 Indian River Dr.)

48....Residence

This is a Frame Vernacular style home built in about 1905.

(Continue north 375 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.4)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Sunrise St. and Dixon Blvd. (829 Indian River Dr.)

49....Residence

This Frame Vernacular style home was built in about 1923.

(Continue north 150 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.5)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Sunrise St. and Dixon Blvd. (837 Indian River Dr.)

50....Residence

This is also a Frame Vernacular style home, built in about 1910.

(Continue north 100 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.5)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Sunrise St. and Dixon Blvd. (841 Indian River Dr.)

51....Residence

This is a Monterey style house, built in 1939.

(Continue north 100 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.5)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Sunrise St. and Dixon Blvd. (843 Indian River Dr.)

52....Residence

This is a Colonial Revival style house, built in about 1900.

(Continue north 100 feet on Indian River Dr.)(5.5)

West side of Indian River Dr., between Sunrise St. and Dixon Blvd. (845 Indian River Dr.)

53....Residence

This Colonial Revival style home was built in about 1905.

(Walk south on Indian River Dr. and west 275 feet on the south side of Highland St., and look north across the street.)(5.9)

North side of Highland St., between Indian River Dr. and Forrest Ave. (30 Highland St.)

54....Residence

This Mediterranean Revival style house was built in about 1930.

(Continue west 25 feet on Highland St.)(5.9)

South side of Highland St., between Indian River Dr. and Forrest Ave. (29 Highland St.)

55....Residence

This Frame Vernacular home was built in about 1924.

(Continue west 25 feet on Highland St., and look north across the street.)(5.9)

North side of Highland St., between Indian River Dr. and Forrest Ave. (34 Highland St.)

56....Residence

This Mediterranean Revival style house dates to about 1930.

(Continue west 25 feet on Highland St.)(5.9)

South side of Highland St., between Indian River Dr. and Forrest Ave. (33 Highland St.)

57....Residence

This is a Colonial Revival home built in about 1924.

(Continue west on Highland St. to the intersection with Forrest Ave. and look across to the northeast corner.)(5.9)

Northeast corner of Highland St. and Forrest Ave. (36 Highland St.)

58....Residence

This Colonial Revival style house was built in about 1924.

(Look west across the street.)(5.9)

Southwest corner of Forrest Ave. and Highland St. (719 Forrest Ave.)

59....Apartment House

This building with a Mediterranean Revival style was built in about 1930.

(Walk south 100 feet on Forrest Ave. and look west across the street.)(6.0)

Northwest corner of Forrest Ave. and Olive St. (711 Forrest Ave.)

60....Apartment House

This Frame Vernacular apartment dwelling was built in about 1924.

(Continue south on Forrest Ave. to the intersection with Parkway St.)(6.1)

Northeast corner of Forrest Ave. and Parkway St. (54 Parkway St.)

61....Residence

This house was built in about 1919 with a Frame Vernacular style.

(Cross to the southeast corner.)(6.1)

Southeast corner of Forrest Ave. and Parkway St. (51 Parkway St.)

62....Residence

This is another Bungalow, built in about 1924.

(Continue south 100 feet on Forrest Ave.)(6.1)

East side of Forrest Ave., between Parkway and Mitchell Sts. (446 Forrest Ave.)

63....Residence

This Bungalow dates to about 1930.

(Continue south on Forrest Ave. 125 feet past Mitchell St.)(6.2)

East side of Forrest Ave., between Mitchell and Mulberry Sts. (346 Forrest Ave.)

64....Residence

This Frame Vernacular house was built in about 1924.

(Continue south on Forrest Ave. to the intersection with Main St.)(6.3)

East side of Forrest Ave., between Mulberry and Main Sts. (228 Forrest Ave.)

65....Commercial Building

This Bungalow was built in about 1924 to house a business.

(Look west across the street.)(6.3)

Northwest corner of Forrest Ave. and Main St. (229 Forrest Ave.)

66....Commercial Building

This Colonial Revival style structure was built in about 1940.

(Continue south 40 feet on Forrest Ave.)(6.3)

East side of Forrest Ave., between Main and Center Sts. (224 Forrest Ave.)

67....Commercial Building

This Bungalow was built for business use in about 1924.

(Continue south 125 feet on Forrest Ave.)(6.4)

East side of Forrest Ave., between Main and Center Sts. (214 Forrest Ave.)

68....Residence

This Bungalow was built as a residence in about 1924.

(Continue south 100 feet on Forrest Ave.)(6.4)

East side of Forrest Ave., between Main and Center Sts. (210 Forrest Ave.)

69....Residence

This Bungalow was built in about 1920.

(Continue south 50 feet on Forrest Ave.)(6.4)

East side of Forrest Ave., between Main and Center Sts. (208 Forrest Ave.)

70....Residence

This Bungalow was built in about 1915.

(Continue south on Forrest Ave. 70 feet past Center St.)(6.5)

East side of Forrest Ave., between Center and Willard Sts. (92 Forrest Ave.)

71....Commercial Building

This Masonry Vernacular structure was erected in about 1924.

(Continue south on Forrest Ave. to the intersection with Willard St.)(6.5)

Northeast corner of Forrest Ave. and Willard St. (90 Forrest Ave.)

72....Commercial Building

This building, erected in about 1930, has a Tudor Revival style.

(Continue south on Forrest Ave., then walk east on King St. to the intersection with Delannoy Ave., and look to the north.)(6.8)

West side of Delannoy Ave., between King and Willard Sts.

73....Site of Delmonico's Restaurant

Built in 1884 by William Jarvis, Delmonico's Restaurant was located on this site and was owned by English sisters Mrs. Jarvis and Mrs. L.T. Daniel. It initially had six sleeping rooms for guests. To accommodate steamer travelers, the Prospect Boarding House was later added to it at the south end. It was badly damaged by the fire which burned the center of town on September 2, 1890. By 1917, it was known as the Cocoa House Hotel. It was considered quite stylish.

(Cross to the southeast corner and walk south 50 feet on Delannoy Ave.)(6.8)

Southeast corner of Delannoy Ave. and King St. (300-02 Delannoy Ave.)

74....Travis Hardware

The S.F. Travis family opened a hardware store on this corner in 1885. The present Masonry Vernacular style building was added in 1907, and four additional buildings were added later. Cocoa commercial buildings of this style are characterized by flat parapet roofs, decorative brick work, belt courses, and name and date panels.

In 1926, the Travis Company extensively renovated the building, including the enlargement of display windows, removal of the transom which had run over the windows and door, and the addition of a stucco covering.

(Continue south on Delannoy Ave. to the intersection with Harrison St., and cross to the southeast corner.)(6.9)

Southeast corner of Delannoy Ave. and Harrison St.

75....Taylor Park

This was the homestead of Albert Armer Taylor in 1886, who had come here that year for his health. His large home burned down in the 1940s. Across the street was Brevard's first bank, founded by Taylor in 1889, as the only bank between here and Key West.

Delannoy Ave. is named for Judge John Delannoy, who developed areas south of Cocoa.

(Cross to the southwest corner, walk west 90 feet on Harrison Ave., and look north across the street.)(6.9)

North side of Harrison Ave., between Delannoy and Brevard Aves. (114 Harrison Ave.)

76....Brevard County State Bank

This building was erected in 1925 during the Florida land boom. Unlike nearby buildings, it has a Beaux Arts Classical style, emphasizing elaborate and lavish decorative detailing. The style expressed the American sentiment of prosperity and progress in 1885 to 1920. It was popularized by the World Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893.

(Walk east on Harrison St. and south 70 feet on Delannoy Ave.)(6.9)

West side of Delannoy Ave., between Harrison and Church Sts. (407 Delannoy Ave.)

77....Victor Theater

In the rear of this building, silent movies were shown until 1924. The front of the first story was a jewelry store, and the upstairs was a boarding house.

(Continue south 50 feet on Delannoy Ave.)(6.9)

West side of Delannoy Ave., beween Harrison and Church Sts. (415 Delannoy Ave.)

78....Miss Julia's Millinery Shop

Julia Roberts O'Brian lived here and ran a dressmaker and millinery business in this Florida Gothic building. She was known as the "dressmaker for the ladies of Cocoa". The building later became an art studio.

(Continue south 250 feet on Delannoy Ave. and look east across the street.)(7.0)

East side of Delannoy Ave., between Harrison and Church Sts. (434 Delannoy Ave.)

79....Porcher House

In 1883, the Porcher family started the Deerfield Citrus Groves on Merritt Island and brought the fruit across the river to a wharf and warehouse at this site. Coquina rock dug from the riverbed was used to construct this Classical Revival style home in 1916 for Edward Postel Porcher and his wife, Byrnina Mona Peck.

Porcher is reputed to have been the first to wash, inspect and grade citrus. He invented machines for washing citrus, stamping fruit and lifting heavy boxes. He was one of the founders of the Florida Citrus Commission.

This house has been used as a residence, a library, the police department headquarters, and beginning in 1945, the city hall. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.

(Continue south on Delannoy Ave. to the intersection with Church St.)(7.0)

Northwest corner of Delannoy Ave. and Church St.

80....Site of Orange Hall

Dr. W.L. Hughlett built a Victorian mansion here in 1890 and named it Orange Hall. Hughlett was a physician and civic leader, and his home was a gathering place for Cocoa's influential people. It was later torn down.

(Continue south on Delannoy Ave., then walk west on Maryland Ave. to the intersection with Brevard Ave.)(7.2)

West side of Brevard Ave., across from Maryland Ave.

81....City Hall

Cocoa incorporated as a city in 1895. The present city hall was constructed in 1969.

(Walk north on Brevard Ave. to the intersection with Church St. and cross to the northwest corner.)(7.2)

Northwest corner of Church St. and Brevard Ave.

82....Post Office

Cocoa's first post office was established on September 11, 1884, with William B. Smith as the first postmaster. He also edited the first newspaper, the Indian River Mirror. This building, a Public Works Administration project, was erected in 1939.

(Continue north 300 feet on Brevard Ave.)(7.3)

West side of Brevard Ave., between Church and Harrison Sts.

83....Site of Mrs. James' Cottage

Mrs. James had a simple cottage on this site in 1880 and provided meals for river travelers. She also handled the mail for local residents. Local legend says that she suggested naming the town after seeing the word "cocoa" on a package of Baker's chocolate powder.

(Continue north on Brevard Ave. to the intersection with Harrison St.)(7.3)

West side of Brevard Ave., across from Harrison St. (315 Brevard Ave.)

84....Masonic Temple

This three-story building was erected in 1919 to serve as a meeting place of the Masons, who had organized in Cocoa in 1889. It was designed by Richard W. Rummell and was built by the Brevard Construction Company. For a time, the post office and the Cocoa Bank and Trust were located on the first floor. This building was later known as the Village Tower.

(Continue north 150 feet on Brevard Ave. and look east across the street.)(7.4)

East side of Brevard Ave., across from Oleander St. (315 Brevard Ave.)

85....Cocoa Village Playhouse

Built in 1924 by contractor W.H. Bower as the Aladdin Theatre, this was one of the finest theaters in Florida when it was new. It shows an Italian Renaissance style more popular in the Miami area. It features three horizontal zones divided by belt courses, upper-story windows being smaller and more elaborate than those below, a low-pitched hipped roof covered with ceramic tile, arcaded window surrounds, small classical columns, and medallions.

(Continue north on Brevard Ave. 75 feet past Oleander St. and look east across the street.)(7.4)

East side of Brevard Ave., between Oleander and King Sts. (204-36 Brevard Ave.)

86....Bellair Arcade

This Spanish Mission style building was erected in 1925-26. The pineapple designs on the roof are symbols of hospitality in the South.

(Continue north on Brevard Ave., then walk west on King St. to the point of beginning.)(8.0)

Bibliography

African Americans in Florida, by Maxine D. Jones and Kevin M. McCarthy (Pineapple Press, Inc. 1993)

Black Florida, by Kevin M. McCarthy (Hippocrene Books 1995)

Brevard County, by Elaine Murray Stone (Windsor Publications, Inc. 1988)

Centennial History: First United Methodist Church, Cocoa, Florida, by Frank M. Childes (1985)

Florida Historical Markers & Sites, by Floyd E. Boone (Gulf Publishing Company 1988)

Florida: The Long Frontier, by Marjory Stoneman Douglas (Harper & Row 1967)

Florida's History Through Its Places: Properties in the National Register of Historic Places, by Morton D. Winsberg (Florida State University 1988)

Guide to Florida Historical Walking Tours, by Roberta Sandler (Pineapple Press, Inc. 1996)

Guide to the Small and Historic Lodgings of Florida, by Herbert L. Hiller (Pineapple Press, Inc. 1991)

Historic Homes of Florida, by Laura Stewart & Susanne Hupp (Pineapple Press, Inc. 1995)

Historic Properties Survey Within the City of Cocoa, Florida, by Historic Property Associates, Inc. (1991)

History of Brevard County (vols. 1 and 2), by Jerrell H. Shofner (Brevard County Historical Commission 1995)

History of the Rockledge Presbyterian Church 1877-1953, by Clara Edwards (1953)

Indian River, Florida's Treasure Coast, by Walter R. Hellier (Hurricane House 1965)

One Hundred Years of Rockledge, by Eric C. Caron (The City of Rockledge, Florida 1986)

Tales of Old Brevard, by Georgianna Kjerluff (The Kellersberger Fund of The South Brevard Historical Society, Inc. 1972)

Walking Tour of Historic Cocoa Village, (The Brevard Museum of History and Natural Science, Inc.)

Wish You Were Here: A Grand Tour of Early Florida Via Old Post Cards, by Hampton Dunn (Byron Kennedy and Company 1981)

Click here for a copy of the trail rules.